Online Accounting Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its accounting courses to be successful accountants, finance accountants, forensic accountants, tax accountants, etc. and connect them to future employers. Financial analysts make on average $85,240 per year and there are about 235,240 of them employed today.

Accounting Organizations Accounting Common Job Tasks
  • approving and disbursing funds
  • developing guidelines to implement policies and procedures
  • reviewing journal vouchers
Popular Journals & Magazines
courses
 

Ranked by Excellence

Accounting Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Bachelor's (BBA) - Accounting and Finance
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN 105
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed, and controlled.



Principles of Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 205
Credits 4.5

"This course introduces students to financial accounting. Students can learn the fundamentals of the accounting cycle."


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON 220
Credits 4.5

"This course focuses on Economic theory of the firm, resource allocation and price determination, the free market supply/demand mechanism, and pure and imperfect competition models are analyzed."


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON 224
Credits 4.5

"Presents basic economic concepts emphasizing the part the United States plays in a global economy. Foundations of economic theory are presented, using topics from television news and mass media. Topics introduced are GDP, National Income Accounting, United States fiscal policy and economic growth."


Business Management and Leadership
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

"Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix."


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix.


Lower Division Capstone
Course Number BUSN 300
Credits 4.5

This course requires students completing their AABA degree to demonstrate knowledge learned throughout the program and apply the theories to real world issues. Students are expected to synthesize and integrate learning experiences acquired throughout their program and to evaluate research and current topics relative to their area of concentration.


Marketing Management
Course Number MKTG 305
Credits 4.5

This course explores the application of management principles to the marketing function. Emphasis is placed on the application of planning, implementation, controlling, and evaluation of marketing strategies as the means for achieving an organization's objectives.



Management Information Systems
Course Number MGMT 305
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on management of information systems. Topics include resources, information systems in an organization, social implications and use and evaluation of common microcomputer software packages.


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT 310
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the role of accounting information in support of decision making and planning throughout the organization. Students will learn accounting methods for planning and controlling operations through budgets, responsibility centers and cost management. Furthermore, students will learn various measures and analysis techniques to evaluate the performance of the business.


Quantitative Methods and Analysis
Course Number BUSN 311
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of probability, statistics, and their applications in business decision making.


Financial Management
Course Number FINA 310
Credits 4.5

This course examines the key components of financial decision making: valuation and risk management. Students will examine the implications of forecasting, capital budgeting, working capital management, and project risk management.


Global Operations Management
Course Number MGMT 415
Credits 4.5

This Course Explores Basic Operations Management In Modern Organizations Which Involves Design, Management And Improvement Of Productive Processes. Subjects Include Critical Path Methods (cpm), Pert Charts, Resource Allocations, Gantt Charts, Budgeted Cost Of Work Scheduled, Budgeted Cost Of Work Performed, Actual Cost Of Work Performed, And Projects Associated With Services And The Manufacture Of Products Including Fast Delivery To The Ultimate Consumer.


Advanced Entrepreneurship
Course Number MGMT 422
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will learn to effectively organize, develop, create, and manage a business. The main objective of the course is to experience the challenges of starting and financing a new company. The main focus will be in-depth exposure to the process of starting and scaling an enterprise from an idea and business plan into a company, examining and exploring the entrepreneurial process, and analyze business decisions that entrepreneurs face.


Program Capstone
Course Number ITCO 499
Credits 4.5

An internship or senior project that satisfies the concentration outcomes and meets the approval of the University Program Committee.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT 410
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on the underlying concepts, ethical, regulatory and business environment of financial reporting with an emphasis on measurement, valuation and presentation of typical asset-related items.


Cost Accounting
Course Number ACCT 420
Credits 4.5

An advanced study of the concepts and techniques used by management accountants to assist decision-makers within the organization. Areas covered include process accounting, job-order accounting, measuring quality costs activity-based costing, and evaluating performance.


Taxation
Course Number ACCT 430
Credits 4.5

This course will provide the students the fundamentals of individual income taxation. A background of accounting courses is not essential for this course. The course may be of special interest to non-business majors. Topics include exemptions, exclusions, and deductions available to the individual. These concepts will aid the student in the preparation of an individual tax return.


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number ACCT 440
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on the study of concepts and terminology of accounting information systems and their use in decision making in accounting and auditing. The course also covers Information Technology (IT) fundamentals, responsibilities and business implications.


Investment
Course Number FINA 405
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on securities and securities markets. Topics include analysis of various categories of corporate securities, public securities, and other investments, types of risks and taxes that affect investment policy timing, selection and investment values.


International Financial Management
Course Number FINA 410
Credits 4.5

This course discusses how multinational corporations make financial decisions. Topics include international cash management, hedging cash flows, international capital budgeting and international financing.


Commercial Bank Management
Course Number FINA 420
Credits 4.5

This course studies the changing banking environment in the US and the principles and practices used to effectively manage a commercial bank. It covers value creation in banking as well as capital funds, assets, and liability management. The course examines a typical bank’s loan portfolio and its management. Hedging and derivatives are also covered.


Financial Policy and Strategy
Course Number FINA 430
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on the theory of the firm, strategic options, the financing of corporate strategies, strategic positioning, and corporate governance. Theories are used to examine the forces and factors that influence the strategies pursued by corporations and the governance of those firms. Focus is placed on quantitative and qualitative analysis of financial policies based on readings and empirical research.


Program description: The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) with a concentration in Accounting and Finance degree program prepares students for career opportunities such as internal auditors, assistant controller, and personal financial advisers. This degree completion program provides a strong foundation for motivated professionals looking to advance in multiple financial career options as they complete courses in financial accounting, corporate investment analysis, and economics in our global environment to prepare them to enter this high demand field.

Program Name: MBA - Accounting & Finance
Economics for the Global Manager
Course Number BUS 610
Credits 6.0

In this course students will be expected to apply the theory and tools of micro- and macroeconomics and research to the formation of business decisions in the global environment.


Global Financial Management
Course Number FIN 630
Credits 6.0

Within the context of the multinational firm, this course examines the development of policy, financing options for international business, and the making of standard financial management decisions.


Business Research for Decision Making
Course Number MGT 600
Credits 6.0

In this course, the student will explore decision making from a managerial viewpoint and examine the role of decision making in dealing with employees, formulating strategy, and negotiating. This course requires students to understand, apply, and evaluate both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies as they apply to business studies and analyses.


Leadership and Ethics for Managers
Course Number MGT 615
Credits 6.0

In this course, the student will explore decision making from a managerial viewpoint and examine the role of decision making in dealing with employees, formulating strategy, and negotiating. This course requires students to understand, apply, and evaluate both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies as they apply to business studies and analyses.


Strategic Management
Course Number MGT 680
Credits 6.0

The development and implementation by the global enterprise of integrated business strategies and policies is the focus of this applied course. Course contents include the planning, implementation, management, and evaluation of the corporate resources, products, and assets. Advanced research is an integral component of this course.


A Managerial Approach to Marketing
Course Number MKT 640
Credits 6.0

This course focuses on the application of marketing concepts in a global organization. Students will examine international channel distribution as well as promotional, pricing, and product strategies.


Accounting for Managers
Course Number ACG 610
Credits 6.0

This course is designed to allow students to develop the ability to use cost and financial data in the planning, management, and controlling functions of an organization. Students focus on the budget process, utilization of internal and external data for control and performance analysis, and the allocation of resources to achieve corporate objectives.


Financial Statement Analysis
Course Number FIN 620
Credits 6.0

In this course, students can learn how to analyze financial statements and methods used to value companies.


Program description: This Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree program with a concentration in Accounting and Finance offers students the opportunity to understand the critical importance of smart decision making in the world of finance and accounting, particularly in today's tough economic climate. Coursework is structured to assist students in the development of their goals as they acquire the knowledge and skills common to accounting and finance professionals.The goal of the MBA with a concentration in Accounting and Finance is to help students acquire a global perspective concerning economics and financial management and the ability to approach management strategically, including developing plans to improve business operations.

Program Name: MBA - Accounting & Finance Part Time Option
Economics for the Global Manager
Course Number BUS 610
Credits 6.0

In this course students will be expected to apply the theory and tools of micro- and macroeconomics and research to the formation of business decisions in the global environment.


Global Financial Management
Course Number FIN 630
Credits 6.0

Within the context of the multinational firm, this course examines the development of policy, financing options for international business, and the making of standard financial management decisions.


Business Research for Decision Making
Course Number MGT 600
Credits 6.0

In this course, the student will explore decision making from a managerial viewpoint and examine the role of decision making in dealing with employees, formulating strategy, and negotiating. This course requires students to understand, apply, and evaluate both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies as they apply to business studies and analyses.


Leadership and Ethics for Managers
Course Number MGT 615
Credits 6.0

In this course, the student will explore decision making from a managerial viewpoint and examine the role of decision making in dealing with employees, formulating strategy, and negotiating. This course requires students to understand, apply, and evaluate both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies as they apply to business studies and analyses.


Strategic Management
Course Number MGT 680
Credits 6.0

The development and implementation by the global enterprise of integrated business strategies and policies is the focus of this applied course. Course contents include the planning, implementation, management, and evaluation of the corporate resources, products, and assets. Advanced research is an integral component of this course.


A Managerial Approach to Marketing
Course Number MKT 640
Credits 6.0

This course focuses on the application of marketing concepts in a global organization. Students will examine international channel distribution as well as promotional, pricing, and product strategies.


Accounting for Managers
Course Number ACG 610
Credits 6.0

This course is designed to allow students to develop the ability to use cost and financial data in the planning, management, and controlling functions of an organization. Students focus on the budget process, utilization of internal and external data for control and performance analysis, and the allocation of resources to achieve corporate objectives.


Financial Statement Analysis
Course Number FIN 620
Credits 6.0

In this course, students can learn how to analyze financial statements and methods used to value companies.


Program description: If you are seeking an MBA with a concentration in Accounting and Finance degree online, AIU Online can help you with your education needs.

For those looking for an MBA with a concentration in Accounting and Finance degree online, note that AIU created this MBA program to help prepare students interested in developing and advancing their career opportunities as Financial Analysts, Independent Accountants and other financial professions.

The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting and Finance degree online lends itself to change and allows us to prepare relevant, timely coursework for students that will benefit them in the real world upon graduation. This helps ensure that AIU graduates will be professionally up-to-date upon earning a timely, industry-current MBA.

A Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting and Finance degree online can be earned in a relatively short period of time. This accelerated, team-based program can be completed as little as 10 months.

Accounting Courses at Everest University

Program Name: Accounting (Associate's)
Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Internet Research
Course Number LIS 2004
Credits 2.0

Let’s Talk Business
Course Number MAN 2031
Credits 2.0

Business Communications
Course Number OST 2335
Credits 4.0

Business Math
Course Number MTB 1103
Credits 4.0

Applied Spreadsheets
Course Number CGS 2510C
Credits 4.0

Principles of Accounting I
Course Number APA 2111
Credits 4.0

Principles of Accounting II
Course Number APA 2121
Credits 4.0

Introductory Cost/Managerial Accounting
Course Number APA 2161
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Corporate Accounting
Course Number ACG 2021
Credits 4.0

Computerized Accounting
Course Number APA 2141
Credits 4.0

Payroll Accounting
Course Number ACO 1806
Credits 4.0

Non-Profit Accounting
Course Number ACG 2551
Credits 4.0

Tax Accounting
Course Number TAX 2000
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Business Enterprise
Course Number MAN 1030
Credits 4.0

Applied Business Law
Course Number BUL 2131
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Finance
Course Number FIN 1103
Credits 4.0

Financial Statement Analysis
Course Number ACG 2178
Credits 4.0

Principles of Management
Course Number MAN 2021
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

College Algebra
Course Number MAT 1033
Credits 4.0

General Psychology
Course Number PSY 2012
Credits 4.0

American National Government
Course Number POS 2041
Credits 4.0

Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Environmental Science
Course Number EVS 1001
Credits 4.0

Basic Critical Thinking
Course Number SLS 1505
Credits 2.0

Program description: Accounting is the language of business, and accounting procedures and records are the basic ingredients that provide students
with a broad and diverse background in professional accounting, making a variety of entry-level positions in business, industry, and
governmental accounting fields available to graduates of this program.
The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program prepares students to measure and communicate the financial position of an
enterprise and provide advice on taxation, management services, and the analysis of information systems.

Program Name: Accounting (Bachelor's)
Workplace Relationships
Course Number SLS 1392
Credits 2.0

Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACG 3103
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACG 3113
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Accounting III
Course Number ACG 3123
Credits 4.0

Cost Accounting I
Course Number ACG 3341
Credits 4.0

Cost Accounting II
Course Number ACG 3351
Credits 4.0

Consolidation Accounting
Course Number ACG 4201
Credits 4.0

Auditing I
Course Number ACG 4632
Credits 4.0

Federal Taxation I
Course Number TAX 4001
Credits 4.0

Federal Taxation II
Course Number TAX 4011
Credits 4.0

Workplace Continuity & Contingency Planning
Course Number MAN 3554
Credits 4.0

Principles of Accounting I
Course Number APA 2111
Credits 4.0

Principles of Accounting II
Course Number APA 2121
Credits 4.0

Introductory Cost/Managerial Accounting
Course Number APA 2161
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Corporate Accounting
Course Number ACG 2021
Credits 4.0

Computerized Accounting
Course Number APA 2141
Credits 4.0

Payroll Accounting
Course Number ACO 1806
Credits 4.0

Non-Profit Accounting
Course Number ACG 2551
Credits 4.0

Tax Accounting
Course Number TAX 2000
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Business Enterprise
Course Number MAN 1030
Credits 4.0

Applied Business Law
Course Number BUL 2131
Credits 4.0

Program description: Accounting is the language of business, and accounting procedures and records are the basic ingredients that provide students
with a broad and diverse background in professional accounting, making a variety of entry-level positions in business, industry, and
governmental accounting fields available to graduates of this program.
The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program prepares students to measure and communicate the financial position of an
enterprise and provide advice on taxation, management services, and the analysis of information systems.

Accounting Courses at Capella University

Program Name: BS - Accounting
Statistical Reasoning
Course Number MAT2001
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners study the fundamental concepts of elementary statistics, including descriptive statistics, methods of counting, probability distributions, approximations, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Learners then use these concepts to gain an understanding of the application and interpretation of statistical results.


Developing a Business Perspective
Course Number BUS3004
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners build and strengthen the skills needed to succeed in their program and the workplace. Learners engage in interactive activities that help them develop a business perspective and expand their organizational, research, critical-thinking, and problem-solving skills. Learners also participate in building a learning community, share talents and resources with courseroom peers, and prepare professional written communications. Other topics include teamwork, ethics, and project creation.


Fundamentals of E-Business
Course Number BUS3020
Credits 6.0

This course presents fundamentals of e-business, acquisition of hands-on experience with e-business technology, evaluation of primary management considerations in the development process of commercial e-business systems, and assessment of the implications of an e-business initiative. Learners also study the development of an e-business technological and management plan for an enterprise.


Fundamentals of Marketing and Sales
Course Number BUS3030
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners examine the fundamentals of marketing and sales: market research and planning, product differentiation and positioning, marketing communications, differences between consumer and business markets, and relational marketing and sales strategy. Learners prepare a marketing and sales plan, and a corresponding marketing and sales strategy for a simple product offering.


Fundamentals of Human Resource Management
Course Number BUS3040
Credits 6.0

This course helps learners develop an understanding of the fundamentals of human resource management, explore the human capital perspective of employees as the principal economic asset of the enterprise, examine human capital development, and study how the HRM function is evolving in different types of organizations. The implications for human resource professionals are underscored in each of these functions. Learners are assigned a case study in which they work to identify and understand the evolving talents, motivations, and needs of employees of different generations, backgrounds, and personalities.


Fundamentals of Finance and Accounting
Course Number BUS3060
Credits 6.0

This course enables learners to gain knowledge of the fundamentals of finance and accounting, to understand and create the standard financial statements of a simple enterprise, and to evaluate the financial condition of this simple enterprise from the different perspectives of various financial institutions using typical financial ratios and metrics. Learners practice reading and understanding annual reports of more complex publicly traded enterprises to interpret explanatory footnotes and to relate financial statements to the business performance of the enterprise.


Financial Accounting Principles
Course Number BUS4060
Credits 6.0

Learners in this course examine financial accounting principles and the ways accounting information is used to assess an organization’s financial performance. Learners study the relationship between business events and accounting systems and analyze an organization’s financial structure.


Managerial Accounting Principles
Course Number BUS4061
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners focus on the role of accounting in the management of an organization. Learners analyze accounting systems and financial statements and apply sound budgeting and time value of money principles from a managerial perspective.




Cost Accounting for Planning and Control
Course Number BUS4064
Credits 6.0

This course emphasizes the role of cost and managerial accounting in the planning, control, and performance evaluation of business, government, and nonprofit organizations. Learners examine the theory and practice of business control and give particular attention to strategic aspects within business decision cycles.


Income Tax Concepts and Strategies
Course Number BUS4065
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners study fundamental concepts of individual, partnership, and corporate income taxation and tax-related transactions. Learners examine events that affect tax decisions, apply tax guidelines, and analyze tax forms.


Contemporary Auditing: An Ethical Perspective
Course Number BUS4066
Credits 6.0

This course presents the nature and economic purpose of auditing by emphasizing the philosophy and current environment of the auditing profession. Learners study the stages and issues involved in planning and conducting a financial audit on various transaction cycles. Learners also examine the code of professional ethics as defined by the American Institute Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and its influence on the auditing process.


Foundations in Finance
Course Number BUS4070
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners evaluate the principles of financial decision making. Learners examine the ways global economic conditions affect financial theory and decision-making processes. Learners also apply financial tools to evaluate finance principles.


Business Capstone Project
Course Number BUS4993
Credits 6.0

The capstone project is the culmination of the bachelor’s degree program in Business and is intended to demonstrate the technical and applied business knowledge and the critical-thinking and communication skills learners gain during their program. Learners formulate ideas for a new business product or service, create a vision, and develop a strategic plan that describes how to implement their concept.


Fundamentals of Management and Leadership
Course Number BUS3010
Credits 6.0

This course is an introduction to management and leadership. Learners explore the relationship between organizational management and leadership within a changing business climate. The course focuses on the individual’s role in aligning management practices with leadership-driven mission, vision, and goals.


Fundamentals of Organizational Communication
Course Number BUS3050
Credits 6.0

This course helps learners develop an understanding of the fundamentals of organizational communication; explore the interrelationship of organizational communication, symbols, culture, and performance; learn effective communication practices in relationships internal and external to the enterprise; and realize how they contribute to successful organizational performance. Through participation in a case study, learners examine the ways organizational communication factors are interrelated and function in an enterprise.


Elective Courses BA39
Credits 39.0

Choose 39 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


Program description: Accounting professionals design, examine, and manage accurate financial recording and reporting procedures for financial and business transactions. Undergraduate learners in the Accounting specialization acquire and apply various methods of ethically maintaining accurate and up-to-date records. The specialization provides learners with an understanding of a wide array of accounting-related services, including budget analysis, financial and investment planning, and financial statement and internal control auditing. These skills prepare graduates for a profession in financial, managerial, or government accounting. In addition to accounting expertise, learners in this specialization demonstrate the interpersonal and communication skills required to present information to both internal and external clients, influencing organizational effectiveness at all levels of their organization. This specialization is not designed to prepare learners for a CPA exam

Program Name: MBA - Accounting
Professional Effectiveness: Stretch, Impact, Reposition
Course Number MBA6010
Credits 3.0

This Course Is The First Component Of The Mba Experience And Employs The Grow Coaching Model That Provides Learners With Guidance As They Navigate The Mba Academic Environment. Learners Identify And Prioritize Their Professional Development Goals And Strategize Ways To Effectively Manage Their Mba Experience So That They Can Stretch Themselves, Have A Positive Impact On Their Career, And Reposition Themselves For Greater Responsibility And Influence Within Their Organization. Learners Also Explore Assessment Tools To Use In Identifying Their Management Skills And Clarifying Their Purpose, Vision, And Values. This Course Prepares Learners To Begin The Professional Effectiveness Coachingsm Process. Mba6010 Must Be Taken By Mba Learners In Their First Quarter. Mba6010 And Mba6020 Must Be Taken In Sequence. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer Or Petition.


Leading for Results
Course Number MBA6020
Credits 3.0

This Course Focuses On Leadership Effectiveness Practices And Behaviors And Provides The Foundation For The Remaining Mba Program Course Work. Learners Analyze The Different Leadership Styles Present Within Their Organization And The Ways They Are Used To Mobilize Others To Accomplish Organizational Goals. Learners Also Analyze Their Own Personal Leadership Styles, Evaluate Their Leadership Skills In Terms Of Strengths And Areas Of Improvement, And Develop Measurable Goals For Applying New Leaders Hip Practices And Behaviors In The Context Of A “personal Best Project” Within Their Organization. Mba6010 And Mba6020 Must Be Taken In Sequence. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer Or Petition.


Marketing and Brand Management
Course Number MBA6110
Credits 3.0

This course presents learners with a comprehensive approach to marketing and brand management. Topics include marketing strategy and competitive differentiation; segmentation and targeting; the positioning levers of product, price, promotion, and distribution; and creation and management of brand. Learners analyze the major decisions that marketers must make in their efforts to effectively use company resources to meet marketplace needs and use commonly accepted criteria to evaluate those decisions.


Operations and Process Management
Course Number MBA6130
Credits 3.0

This course presents tools and techniques for effective process and supply chain selection, design, planning, and control. This course helps learners apply the principles and techniques of process-based management as a foundation for continuous improvement. Learners explore ways to design, develop, and manage effective operations management tools required to detect and fix problems quickly. Learners identify, discuss, and practice applying measures of operational performance that support organizational growth, innovation, and market leadership. As a result, learners are better prepared to respond to changes in market demand.


Applied Managerial Statistics
Course Number MBA6140
Credits 3.0

Analyzing and interpreting quantitative information is a primary component of effective business administration. In this course, learners become familiar with performing analysis and evaluation using statistics and mathematical modeling to support effective decision making in management practice. Course activities include case analysis, discussions of business-related statistical problems, and readings focused on state-of-the-art statistical methods for business decision-making.


Accounting
Course Number MBA6150
Credits 3.0

This course provides a survey of financial and managerial accounting concepts and practices. Topics include the accounting cycle, financial reporting, financial statements analysis, cost accounting, management control, differential analysis, and ethical aspects of accounting and financial reporting.


Financial Management
Course Number MBA6160
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides Basic Theories And Techniques Related To Acquisition Of, Accounting For, And Allocation Of An Organization’s Financial Resources. Along With A Comprehensive Overview Of These Processes, Learners Identify And Apply Basic Financial Management Theories And Techniques That Support Effective Acquisition And Allocation Of Their Organization’s Financial Resources And Apply Their Knowledge Of Finance Management Practices To Real-world Business Concerns And Issues Within Their Work Environment. Prerequisite(s): Mba6140, Mba6150.


Managing Information Assets and Technology
Course Number MBA6180
Credits 3.0

This course addresses the use of information, knowledge, and technology as strategic assets. Learners develop the ability to proactively manage information as a strategic asset, recognize how to use appropriate technologies by applying new skills and knowledge, and understand the importance of monitoring and adjusting their organization’s communication processes and principles. This course focuses on leveraging available information technology and communication assets in order to realize an organization’s business goals.


Strategy
Course Number MBA6190
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners examine tools and techniques for competitive analysis, strategic planning, and strategy implementation. Learners gain knowledge of the tools and concepts needed to develop a business strategy including macro environmental scanning, industry and competitive analysis, value chain analysis, SWOT analysis, identification of critical success factors and driving forces, and development of strategic alternatives and recommendations. Throughout the course, learners apply these tools and concepts as they develop a strategic profile for a company that is described in a detailed case study.


Advanced Accounting
Course Number MBA6152
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners examine accounting applications with respect to the nature and scope of business operations. Topics include parent and subsidiary accounting in multinational operations, partnership accounting, accounting for mergers and acquisitions, and accounting for branches and agencies of business entities. Prerequisite(s): MBA6150.


Budget Planning and Control
Course Number MBA6154
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners cultivate their ability to apply a system approach to planning and controlling organizational budgets. Learners become familiar with preparing budgets, accounting, and performance reports. Other topics include analyzing the impact of budgets on an organization, the function of budgetary systems in organizational planning, and control. Prerequisite(s): MBA6152.


Audit and Control of Accounting Information Systems
Course Number MBA6156
Credits 3.0

This course teaches learners to audit and evaluate the control of computerized accounting information systems. Learners analyze auditing and evaluation standards and the effects of auditing on information technology in business operations. The course also covers statistical analyses of accounting control systems. Prerequisite(s): MBA6152.


Accounting Information for Decision Making
Course Number MBA6158
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners gain knowledge of the nature and function of accounting information in the decision-making process. They examine strategies for integrating accounting systems with financial information from managers and other professionals in order to make better decisions. Learners also explore the uses of accounting information in functional areas such as finance, management, and marketing. Prerequisite(s): MBA6152.


Accounting Capstone: Judgment, Planning, and Action
Course Number MBA6350
Credits 3.0

This Is An Integrative Course For Learners Completing The Mba Accounting Specialization. The Outcome Is For Learners To Synthesize And Integrate The Learning Experiences Acquired In Accounting And To Evaluate The Research And Current Topics Relative To This Specialization. This Course Focuses On The Implementation Of A Project That Incorporates The Skills Necessary For Analyzing Issues, Thinking Creatively And Strategically, Using Sound Judgment, And Establishing Plans. Prerequisite(s): Completion Of All Required Mba Course Work. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer Or Petition.


Sales and Customer Relationship Management
Course Number MBA6120
Credits 3.0

This course covers the theory and practice of strategic consultative selling, including relationship selling, solution selling, and strategic account management. Learners explore topics in sales force management, including alignment of the field organization, the use of resellers, and compensation. The course is structured according to the five steps of consultative selling, which are presented in detail: development of a personal selling philosophy and the subsequent creation of a strategy for the relationship, product, customer and sales presentation. Learners also explore customer relationship management software applications and topics. Learners investigate roles in the selling process such as buyer, sales manager, and salesperson.


Building Relationships
Course Number MBA6210
Credits 3.0

This course presents tools and techniques to help learners influence others, build relationships, inspire trust, and manage conflict. By building positive relationships, leaders develop and sustain strategic alignments within the organization. In this course, learners examine various tools and techniques to motivate and inspire others and ways to recognize and use important interpersonal skills to expand their circle of influence and manage conflict.


Developing and Coaching Others
Course Number MBA6220
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners evaluate various coaching methods and apply coaching as a tool to enable and engage leadership action in others. Learners create a personal coaching and development action plan and examine ways to use coaching and development skills that focus on both individual and organizational results.


Leading Teams
Course Number MBA6230
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners explore techniques and models for building and leading effective teams. Learners develop a conceptual grounding in team dynamics theory and application and examine what makes teams effective at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include the development of team collaboration skills, synthesis of team theory, assessment of an organization’s use of teams, and the overall effectiveness of team support systems. Learners research and recommend strategies and best practices to better align a critical team organizational support system and practice problem-solving, decision-making, project management, and conflict management in a virtual environment.


Facilitating Change
Course Number MBA6240
Credits 3.0

This course presents theories and models for leading and facilitating organizational change. Learners explore ways to recognize and translate theory into practice by identifying and applying effective change management techniques. Learners develop collaborative processes that support forward movement within their work environment, thus helping themselves and their employees make transitions more effective for the organization.


Leveraging Workplace Diversity
Course Number MBA6250
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners explore the models and tools for creating an effective and respectful work environment. This course emphasizes the importance of encouraging the expression of diverse people and their ideas. Learners explore ways to use models and tools to promote ethical and respectful interpersonal relationships that support the free flow of ideas. Learners develop practical skills and hands-on techniques to effectively support and manage diversity, recognize the importance of organizational diversity and why it is inextricably linked to business success, and establish a framework to promote an ongoing and respectful exchange of information.


Negotiating for Results
Course Number MBA6260
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners explore ways to create effective negotiations with employees, customers, and partners. The course offers learners a practical exploration of the major concepts and theories of bargaining and negotiation and a forum for examining the dynamics of interpersonal and inter-group conflict and its resolution. The course is designed to be relevant to the broad spectrum of problems faced by managers and professionals. Learners explore their own negotiating preferences and the consequences of the choices they make. In addition, learners are asked to accept and offer feedback on the negotiation behavior that they demonstrate, observe and formulate their own perspectives about negotiation, and extract insights from their own experiences to guide them in future negotiations.


Regulatory and Ethical Environment of Business
Course Number MBA6270
Credits 3.0

In this course, learners examine the key components of the business environment and ethical choices with regard to corporate decisions. The emphasis in this course is on current regulatory environments and their impact on organizational directions. Learners analyze and discuss how current trends in business ethics can help them make socially responsible and strategically sound decisions.


Program description: The MBA Accounting specialization emphasizes accounting applications with respect to the nature and scope of business operations. The specialization cultivates learners’ abilities to plan and control organizational budgeting. Learners gain knowledge and skills in the audit and evaluation of controls and computerized information systems of accounting. Learners examine the nature and function of accounting information in the decision-making process. Learners also study the conceptual framework of accounting theory and practice, focusing on processes of identification, measurement, documentation, and financial reporting. This specialization is not designed to lead to professional licensure in accounting.

Program Name: PhD - Accounting
Theory and Practice in Business
Course Number PHB8004
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore business theories, research, and practice. In particular, learners study the challenges of conducting scholarly research and the practice of leading and managing a business enterprise. Learners explore the depth and breadth of business research, the research methodologies used to conduct it, and potential business research topic areas. Learners also focus on strengthening their critical-thinking and scholarly writing skills


Marketing Strategy and Practice
Course Number OM7020
Credits 4.0

. This course presents learners with a systematic analysis of the factors that influence marketing strategy and uses marketing theory to evaluate opportunities, identify market segments, and to formulate appropriate strategies. While this course has a theoretical focus, the development of good marketing practices also receives attention


Ethics and Social Responsibility
Course Number DPA8408
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Study The Ways In Which Creating And Maintaining Public Value And Mission-specific Leadership Provides The Foundations For Ethical Behavior. Learners Analyze Case Studies That Illustrate Ethical Dilemmas In Order To Develop Intelligence, Planning, Operations, Command, Interagency Coordination, Communication, And Technology Solutions Applicable To A Variety Of Public Agencies And Situations. Prerequisite(s): Completion Of Or Concurrent Enrollment In Dpa8100. May Be Taken Concurrently With Dpa8412. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Applied Enterprise Economics
Course Number PHB7045
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine microeconomic, macroeconomic, and trade theory; evaluate the operation of markets in the allocation of scarce resources; and explore current literature in applying economic theory to financial decision making at the individual and firm level. Learners also examine topics and concepts of economics education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


organizational Systems and leadership
Course Number PHB7075
Credits 4.0

This course presents the theoretical foundations, research, and practices of organizational systems and leadership. Learners analyze organizations as systems and evaluate the ways they are affected by their structure and the external environment. Learners also examine the practice of leadership using a systems approach and synthesize organizational systems and leadership theory.


Strategy, Planning, and operations in Business
Course Number PHB8012
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine theories of and approaches to effective strategy formulation, integration, and implementation across the various functional areas of business operations. Learners focus on the skills needed to become strategic thinkers and leaders in today’s complex global business environment and practice using them to solve contemporary issues in business strategy, planning, and operations. Learners also examine business goals and objectives within the context of internal and external influences and strategic management methodologies


Quantitative Research Techniques
Course Number OM8020
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore fundamental concepts needed to conduct graduate-level quantitative research. Learners examine the foundations, methods, and applications of quantitative research; dependencies among research design, measurement, and analysis; variable types and levels of measurement; sampling; and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and hypothesis testing.


Management Theory Creation
Course Number OM8021
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the scientific, philosophical, and methodological approaches underlying organization and management research and theory. Course topics include the scholar-practitioner as social and behavioral scientist and purveyor of evidencebased management and ways of working with the extant literature. Learners analyze and report on the elements of a scientific study and evaluate the ontological, axiological, and epistemological assumptions underlying qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies. Learners also identify the strengths and limitations of various methodological approaches and provide recommendations for future research based on author-identified limitations and a review of the seminal works and recent research.


Survey of Applied Research Methods
Course Number OM8022
Credits 4.0

. This course focuses on research designs for qualitative, quantitative, mixedmethods, and applied research in organization and management. Learners move beyond conducting reviews of literature at the methodological level, focusing on research design in order to evaluate specific design features related to reliability and threats to validity, and to craft their own research prospectus. Learners explore the meaning of content and process gaps, problems, and opportunities uncovered through a review of the literature. They also examine issues related to management science research ethics and the role of the Institutional Review Board (IRB)


Advanced Research: Mixed-Methods Research Designs
Course Number PHB8024
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using mixed-methods research designs in applied business and organizational research. Learners examine the philosophic foundations and practical implications of merging numerical and non-numerical data to gain a comprehensive perspective of complex business and organizational phenomena than that gained by using either quantitative or qualitative methods alone. Learners also focus on using evidencebased practice to create actionable knowledge in local contexts; connect theory with practice to address core performance and quality metrics; and develop a comprehensive mixed-methods research prospectus


Teaching Practice Seminar
Course Number OM8910
Credits 4.0

Learners in this seminar examine the practice fundamentals necessary for a teaching career in management education. Syllabus and course development, online and classroom instruction, as well as the fundamentals of human development in the classroom are explored


leadership Practice Seminar
Course Number OM8920
Credits 4.0

. Learners in this seminar examine the practice fundamentals needed to prepare themselves for an executive leadership role. Learners review theories and models of leadership from a scholar-practitioner perspective and gain an understanding of the leadership responsibilities required by today’s complex and diverse organizations


Consulting Practice Seminar
Course Number OM8930
Credits 4.0

Learners in this seminar examine the fundamentals necessary for building and establishing a management consulting business or preparing themselves for possible careers in consulting or management. Learners review the various roles of the consultant and assess their own consulting experience, skills, and abilities. Learners also evaluate and apply marketing principles to a consulting business, examine the legal aspects of establishing their own consulting business, and explore the role of ethics in being a successful consultant


Survey in Financial Accounting
Course Number PHB8410
Credits 4.0

. Learners in this course study financial accounting standards and practices and associated legal, regulatory, and reporting issues. Learners focus on the relationship between financial accounting research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of financial accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


Survey in Managerial Accounting
Course Number PHB8415
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study managerial accounting and its association with managerial practice and decision making. Learners focus on the relationship between managerial accounting research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of managerial accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number PHB8420
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study accounting information systems and their influence on internal and external financial reporting, managerial decision making, audit, and control. Learners explore emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications of accounting information systems and examine topics and concepts of accounting information systems education. Learners also strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Auditing
Course Number PHB8422
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study audit program design, planning, and implementation and associated regulatory topics, including the SarbanesOxley Act. Learners explore emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications of auditing and examine topics and concepts of auditingeducation. Learners also strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


International Accounting
Course Number PHB8424
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study international accounting standards and the evolving process of harmonization and compare U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with those of other countries. Learners focus on the relationship between international accounting and finance research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of international accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research project


Fraud Examination
Course Number PHB8426
Credits 4.0

This course provides an examination of the nature and causes of fraud and presents various approaches to prevent, detect, investigate, and regulate fraudulent activity, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Learners explore emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications of fraud and examine topics and concepts of fraud education. Learners also strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Forensic Accounting
Course Number PHB8428
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study the requirements, processes, and techniques used to present accounting and financial information in the legal environment. Learners focus on the relationship between forensic accounting research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of forensic accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Taxation
Course Number PHB8430
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of various taxation systems. Learners evaluate the influence of taxation on society and economic decision making and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of taxation education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Dissertation Research 1 Dissertation Research 30
Course Number PHB9921–PHB9950
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication for a total of 30 credits.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Program description: The doctoral specialization in Accounting is designed for accounting faculty, accounting professionals such as certified public accountants and certified and chartered management accountants, or those with a Master of Accountancy or equivalent degree. The specialization provides learners the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of accounting research, practice, and education and strengthen the skills needed to think critically about and formulate appropriate solutions to accounting problems. Throughout the specialization, learners evaluate advanced theoretical constructs, standards, and techniques of accounting practice; analyze strategic implications of various accounting issues; and conduct scholarly research that contributes to the field of accounting. Upon successful completion of this specialization, learners are prepared to pursue advancement in accounting research, practice

Accounting Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Associate in Accounting
Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 3-3


Public Speaking
Course Number SPCH-275
Credits 4.0

This course teaches basic elements of effective public speaking. Topics include audience analysis, organization, language, delivery and nonverbal communication. Practical application is provided through a series of individual and group presentations in a variety of rhetorical modes. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-3


Interpersonal Communication
Course Number SPCH-277
Credits 4.0

This course explores ways in which people interact verbally and nonverbally, and teaches basic principles of interpersonal communication including perception, self-concept, persuasive communication, nonverbal communication, semantics, roles and norms, and communication barriers. Activities include participation in groups, pairs and interactive communication situations. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Debate and Critical Thinking
Course Number SPCH-279
Credits 4.0

This introductory debate course helps students develop clear, logical and ethical arguments using critical thinking strategies. Classroom activities include cross-examination debate and argumentation speeches. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-3


Small Group Communication
Course Number SPCH-282
Credits 4.0

This course examines theories of, and tools needed for, effective communication in small groups. Emphasis is placed on leadership and individual roles in a group, performance and motivation, conflict management, decision-making and avoiding groupthink. Coursework addresses the role small groups – formed in personal and professional relationships – play in individuals’ lives as well as the role individuals play in a small group. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-3



Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Cross-Cultural Communications
Course Number SOCS-187
Credits 3.0

This course promotes cultural sensitivity through readings, discussions, research and informal forums with guest speakers of other cultures. Students learn the importance of effective communication among diverse ethnic groups and gain knowledge of principles that govern social interactions in a multicultural milieu. / 3-3


Cultural Anthropology
Course Number SOCS-190
Credits 3.0

This course provides a comparative study of human cultures throughout the world. Students learn to think critically about human behavior as they develop an understanding of the role culture plays at the interface between the natural environment and human needs. By examining diverse behaviors, customs and traditions from different countries, students learn to recognize and value both differences and similarities among cultures, and develop tolerance and respect for other societies. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Introduction to General, Organic and Biological Chemistry with Lab
Course Number BIOS-120
Credits 4.0

This Introduction To General, Organic And Biological Chemistry Includes Topics Such As Chemical Nomenclature, Structures, Equations, Calculations And Solutions. In Addition, The Chemical Structure And Function Of Biological Macromolecules Are Surveyed. Lab Exercises Relate To Topics Discussed. Corequisite: Math-114 Or Math-190 / 5-4


Foundations in Biology and Chemistry with Lab
Course Number BIOS-135
Credits 4.0

This course introduces biology and chemistry, stressing the relatedness and interdependence between biological concepts and their associated chemical features. Genetics, cell communication, immune responses, evolution, organic chemistry and biological macromolecules are introduced. Lab exercises focus on inquiry and discovery and support topics presented. Prerequisite: MATH-114 or the equivalent / 5-4


Biology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-140
Credits 4.0

This general biology course covers animal and plant cells, as well as organelle structure and function, and also addresses cell growth and division. Additional topics include tissue structure, organ structure and function, and an introduction to genetics and the immune response. Lab exercises support topics discussed. / 5-4


Physics with Lab
Course Number PHYS-216
Credits 4.0

This Course Examines Fundamental Principles Of Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Optics, And Electricity And Magnetism, As Well As Aspects Of Modern Physics. Lab Activities Complement Classroom Discussion And Include Experiments That Concisely Illustrate Main Theoretical Topics Presented. Prerequisite: Math-102, Math-114 Or Math-190 / 5-4


Environmental Science with Lab
Course Number SCI-204
Credits 4.0

This interdisciplinary science course integrates natural and social science concepts to explore the interrelatedness of living things. Coursework focuses on environmental issues, problems and possible solutions. Topics include sustainability, ecosystems, biodiversity, population dynamics, natural resources, waste management, energy efficiency and pollution control, as well as associated ethics and politics. Through lab exercises, students apply general principles using a variety of methods and explore a broad range of topics. Prerequisite: MATH-114 / 5-4


Integrated Science with Lab
Course Number SCI-214
Credits 4.0

This interdisciplinary science course draws on basic principles and insights from physics, chemistry, biology, geology, astronomy and information technology, which are linked within four fundamental principles of science: Newton’s laws of force and motion, laws of thermodynamics, laws of electromagnetic force and the atomic structure of all matter. The course provides an understanding of science while clarifying the role of technology and strengthening decision-making. Lab exercises help students further explore theories through observation and application using a variety of methods. Prerequisite: MATH-114 / 5-4


Astronomy with Lab
Course Number SCI-224
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the science of astronomy, including exploration of the night sky, astronomical instrumentation and techniques, and historical background. Starting with our own earth, moon, sun and Milky Way, the course explores solar systems as well as the properties, classes and life cycles of stars and galaxies. The universe as a whole is then considered through major competing theories on its origin, evolution and ultimate fate. The lab component blends practical outdoor observation, computer simulation and research studies. Prerequisite: MATH-114 / 5-4


Nutrition, Health and Wellness with Lab
Course Number SCI-228
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of basic nutrients the body requires for health and life, and dispels common nutrition myths. The role of nutrition in various biological phases of the human life cycle, as well as psychological and sociological implications of food, are discussed. Students also learn how the scientific method of inquiry is used in the nutritional science and health fields. In the lab, students collect observational data, employ computer simulations, and prepare and sample various foods. / 5-4


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Accounting Theory and Applications
Course Number ACCT-216
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Apply Knowledge Of The Financial Accounting Process In Accordance With Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (gaap) To Develop Skills Preparing Them For Real-world Applications. Students Identify And Correct Errors, Determine And Develop Adjusting Entries To Ensure Correct Financial Reports, And Demonstrate Understanding And Application Of Computational Skills To Determine Correct Payroll, Inventory Valuation And Depreciation Expense. Prerequisite: Acct-212 / 3-3


Principles of Ethics and Fraud
Course Number ACCT-217
Credits 3.0

In this course students explore ethical issues facing business and the accounting profession. Topics include ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence, core values, ethical behavior and ethical decision-making. In addition, students review internal controls, fraud recognition, responses to fraud and professional issues in the field. Students apply concepts and theories to relevant case studies. Prerequisite: ACCT-216 / 3-3


Introduction to Individual Income Taxation
Course Number ACCT-224
Credits 3.0

This course covers federal income tax concepts, laws and filing requirements applied to preparation of individual and sole proprietorship returns. Topics include factors that influence income tax laws, individual tax formula, employee/employer compensation arrangements, investment and rental activities, wealth transfer, personal activities, business income or loss, and property transactions. Prerequisite: ACCT-212 / 3-3


Introduction to Cost Accounting
Course Number ACCT-244
Credits 3.0

This course addresses product-cost determination and cost-control elements as applied to basic job order, process and standard cost systems. Manufacturing costs and using relevant accounting data to improve decision-making are also emphasized. Topics prepare students for presenting information to management as part of the decision-making process. Activity-based costing, pricing strategies and profitability are addressed. Prerequisite: ACCT-216 / 3-3


Introduction to Accounting Information Systems
Course Number ACCT-251
Credits 3.0

Students in this course examine use of an accounting information system. The general ledger, appropriate subsidiary ledgers and each transaction process cycle are discussed and reviewed in detail. Students apply their accounting knowledge and use accounting software to generate financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT-216 / 3-3


Data Analysis with Spreadsheets with Lab
Course Number BIS-155
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing business situations using current spreadsheet software. Using data derived from real-world business situations, students learn to use appropriate spreadsheet software features to organize, analyze and present data, as well as to make business decisions. Through personal database technology such as Access, the course also introduces basic database concepts. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 4-3


Database Essentials for Business with Lab
Course Number BIS-245
Credits 5.0

Students in this course learn to design relational databases and to build database applications, including tables, queries, forms, reports and macros. Also addressed is implementation of basic database security, backup and recovery procedures. Generating reports and meeting business requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIS-155 / 5-4


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Budgeting and Forecasting
Course Number BUSN-278
Credits 4.0

In this course students design and implement a departmental budget encompassing the various processes that account for resource expenditures. Students develop a long-range budget forecast and then assess its impact on departmental planning. Prerequisite: ACCT-212 / 4-4


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Program description: DeVry’s Accounting program equips students with the knowledge,
skills and abilities needed to function as entry-level accounting
professionals in public accounting, industry, nonprofit organizations and government. Coursework – taught from the practitioner’s perspective – focuses on applying accounting and financial
management concepts and skills to real-world applications while
providing students with a solid base in accounting theory.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Business Administration - Accounting
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190



Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Marketing
Course Number BUSN-319
Credits 3.0

In This Course Students Apply Principles And Strategies For Marketing Products And Services To Industrial, Commercial And Governmental Entities. Topics Include Ways In Which Market Information And Product Life Cycle Affect Product And Production Design; Forecasting Techniques; Interdependencies Between Marketing And Operations Functions; And Selling Skills. Prerequisites: Busn-115 And Math-114


Finance
Course Number BUSN-379
Credits 3.0

This course introduces corporate financial structure and covers basic capital budgeting techniques, including discounted cash flow analysis. Funds sources and financial resource allocation are analyzed. Spreadsheet software packages are used to analyze data and solve case-based problems. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGMT-303
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental management theories and traditional managerial responsibilities in formal and informal organizational structures. Planning, organizing, directing, controlling and staffing are explored. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Fundamentals of E-Commerce
Course Number ECOM-210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth overview of the issues, technology and environment of electronic commerce. Knowledge gained facilitates more comprehensive and contemporary exploration of future coursework in marketing, operations, finance, business law, and database and website management. Challenges and opportunities of electronic business are discussed. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Federal Tax Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-424
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the special tax issues of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, gift taxes, estates and trusts. Tax forms, tax software, the Internet, spreadsheets and word processing programs are used to research, solve and analyze tax problems relating to corporate and partnership income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT-324


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Data Analysis with Spreadsheets with Lab
Course Number BIS-155
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing business situations using current spreadsheet software. Using data derived from real-world business situations, students learn to use appropriate spreadsheet software features to organize, analyze and present data, as well as to make business decisions. Through personal database technology such as Access, the course also introduces basic database concepts. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 4-3


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Database Essentials for Business with Lab
Course Number BIS-245
Credits 5.0

Students in this course learn to design relational databases and to build database applications, including tables, queries, forms, reports and macros. Also addressed is implementation of basic database security, backup and recovery procedures. Generating reports and meeting business requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIS-155 / 5-4


Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACCT-304
Credits 4.0

This Course Expands On Topics Covered In Acct-212 And Presents Them Within A Conceptual Framework Determined By Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Financial Accounting Functions And Theory, And Recognition And Measurement Of Assets, Are Covered. Prerequisite: Acct-212 / 4-4


Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-305
Credits 4.0

This second course in intermediate accounting addresses financial accounting, with an emphasis on external reporting to the investing public in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include property; plant and equipment;intangible assets; investments; current, long-term and contingent liabilities; and leases. Prerequisite: ACCT-304 / 4-4


Intermediate Accounting III
Course Number ACCT-312
Credits 4.0

This Course Continues Topics Covered In Acct-305 And Addresses Accounting For Income Taxes, Pensions And Other Post Retirement Benefits; Shareholders’ Equity; Share-based Compensation And Earnings Per Share; Accounting Changes And Error Correction; And Statement Of Cash Flows. Prerequisite: Acct-305 / 4-4


Auditing
Course Number ACCT-444
Credits 4.0

This course covers accepted principles, practices and procedures used by public accountants for certifying corporate financial statements. It also introduces audit reports, the corporate internal auditor’s function, and interaction between outside auditors and a client company’s accounting staff. In addition, the course fosters students’ analytical skills. Hands-on experience is gained with computerized accounting systems. Prerequisite: ACCT-312 / 4-4


Federal Tax Accounting I
Course Number ACCT-324
Credits 4.0

This course covers federal income tax concepts and their effect on individuals. Topics include the history and background of taxes, gross income, exclusions, allowable deductions, and the basis for gain and loss on the disposition of property. Prerequisite:Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ACCT-212 / 4-4


Federal Income Taxation
Course Number ACCT-429
Credits 4.0

This course examines basic concepts of federal income taxation of individuals and businesses, including sole proprietorships, S corporations and limited partnerships. Topics include income inclusions and exclusions, property transactions, capital gains and losses, and tax credits. Students develop basic tax planning skills, and use tax planning and preparation software packages. Prerequisite: ACCT-212 / 4-4


Business Information Systems with Lab
Course Number ACCT-352
Credits 4.0

Students in this course analyze current practices and technologies used to design and manage an integrated accounting system. A general ledger and subsidiary ledgers are used. In addition,controls and security requirements of an accounting information system are examined. Prerequisite: ACCT-312 / 5-4


Accounting Information Systems with Lab
Course Number ACCT-451
Credits 4.0

This course analyzes current practices and technologies used to design, install, operate and manage an integrated, automated accounting system. The general ledger, appropriate subsidiary ledgers and each transaction process cycle are discussed. In addition, application controls, information security requirements and integration with other business information systems are examined. Prerequisite: ACCT-312 / 5-4


Advanced Accounting
Course Number ACCT-405
Credits 4.0

This course addresses financial accounting practice and theory in relation to consolidations, pushdown accounting, foreign currency transactions, financial statement remeasurement and translation,and partnership accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT-312 / 4-4


Program description: Students in DeVry’s Business Administration program develop
competency in applying technology to business strategy, management and decision-making through case studies, team projects,
Internet use and web page development, as well as computer
applications and systems integration. The program offers majors
(concentrations in Illinois, New York and Pennsylvania) as shown in
the following program outline, as well as general business options,
which students may take in lieu of a specific major/concentration

Program Name: Graduate Certificate in Accounting
Federal Taxes and Management Decisions
Course Number AC553

This course deals with the need to recognize important tax consequences of common business transactions and how substantially different tax liabilities can result from nearly identical economic events. The course emphasizes practical results rather than technical compliance requirements to achieve those results. Prerequisite: AC505


External Auditing
Course Number AC555

External Auditing deals with accepted principles, practices and procedures used by public accountants for certification of financial statements. The major focus is on external audit services; auditor and management responsibilities; professional standards of external auditors; evidence and procedures used by external auditors; and audit reports. Prerequisite: AC551


Advanced Financial Accounting and Reporting Issues
Course Number AC559

This course covers financial accounting practice and theory in relation to consolidations; foreign currency transactions and financial statement translations; and partnership accounting, including formation, maintenance, reorganizations and liquidations. Prerequisite: AC557


Accounting and Finance: Managerial Use and Analysis
Course Number FI504

This course introduces students to core concepts and tools of accounting and finance needed by managers. Topics are presented from a user perspective and include transaction analysis; financial statement analysis and interpretation; financial ratio analysis; job-order costing; cost-volume-profit analysis; and operational, cash and capital budgeting. No prerequisite


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACCT-304
Credits 4.0

This Course Expands On Topics Covered In Acct-212 And Presents Them Within A Conceptual Framework Determined By Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Financial Accounting Functions And Theory, And Recognition And Measurement Of Assets, Are Covered. Prerequisite: Acct-212 / 4-4


Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-305
Credits 4.0

This second course in intermediate accounting addresses financial accounting, with an emphasis on external reporting to the investing public in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include property; plant and equipment;intangible assets; investments; current, long-term and contingent liabilities; and leases. Prerequisite: ACCT-304 / 4-4


Intermediate Accounting III
Course Number ACCT-312
Credits 4.0

This Course Continues Topics Covered In Acct-305 And Addresses Accounting For Income Taxes, Pensions And Other Post Retirement Benefits; Shareholders’ Equity; Share-based Compensation And Earnings Per Share; Accounting Changes And Error Correction; And Statement Of Cash Flows. Prerequisite: Acct-305 / 4-4


Program description: DeVry’s Accounting program equips students with the knowledge,
skills and abilities needed to function as entry-level accounting
professionals in public accounting, industry, nonprofit organizations and government. Coursework – taught from the practitioner’s perspective – focuses on applying accounting and financial
management concepts and skills to real-world applications while
providing students with a solid base in accounting theory.
Coursework builds students’ knowledge and skills in key
functional areas including financial accounting and reporting,
managerial accounting, personal taxation and accounting
technology. The program also addresses key principles of
business administration and provides students with a solid
base in general education.

Program Name: Master of Accounting and Financial Management
Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACCT-304
Credits 4.0

This Course Expands On Topics Covered In Acct-212 And Presents Them Within A Conceptual Framework Determined By Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Financial Accounting Functions And Theory, And Recognition And Measurement Of Assets, Are Covered. Prerequisite: Acct-212 / 4-4


Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-305
Credits 4.0

This second course in intermediate accounting addresses financial accounting, with an emphasis on external reporting to the investing public in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include property; plant and equipment;intangible assets; investments; current, long-term and contingent liabilities; and leases. Prerequisite: ACCT-304 / 4-4


Federal Taxes and Management Decisions
Course Number AC553

This course deals with the need to recognize important tax consequences of common business transactions and how substantially different tax liabilities can result from nearly identical economic events. The course emphasizes practical results rather than technical compliance requirements to achieve those results. Prerequisite: AC505


Intermediate Accounting III
Course Number ACCT-312
Credits 4.0

This Course Continues Topics Covered In Acct-305 And Addresses Accounting For Income Taxes, Pensions And Other Post Retirement Benefits; Shareholders’ Equity; Share-based Compensation And Earnings Per Share; Accounting Changes And Error Correction; And Statement Of Cash Flows. Prerequisite: Acct-305 / 4-4


Accounting and Finance: Managerial Use and Analysis
Course Number FI504

This course introduces students to core concepts and tools of accounting and finance needed by managers. Topics are presented from a user perspective and include transaction analysis; financial statement analysis and interpretation; financial ratio analysis; job-order costing; cost-volume-profit analysis; and operational, cash and capital budgeting. No prerequisite


Financial Management Capstone: The Role of the Chief Financial Officer
Course Number AC600

The Role of the Chief Financial Officer (AC600) Drawing upon multi-disciplinary knowledge gained throughout your Keller program, real-world capstone projects provide the unique opportunity for you to demonstrate relevant business judgment and analytical models in the context of current and emerging opportunities. As a required part of your Keller program, the capstone course provides a unique opportunity to hone your professional skills while you complete your graduate degree.


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number AC571

This course addresses computerized accounting information systems, focusing on reporting objectives, management needs, transaction trails, documentation, security, internal controls, and integration of accounting systems in software evaluation and selection. Systems analysis techniques are discussed. Coursework also prepares students interested in pursuing the Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE) credential. Prerequisite: FI504


Accounting Fraud Criminology and Ethics
Course Number AC573

This course examines the nature of occupational fraud and how it is committed, and introduces actions taken to detect such fraud and procedures that can be implemented to deter it. The course also covers how allegations of fraud should be investigated to meet requirements of civil and/or criminal court procedures. Coursework prepares students interested in earning the Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE) credential, examining tools and techniques for gathering evidence and information during fraud examinations. Prerequisite: FI504


Global and Domestic Security Management
Course Number GM594

This survey course provides an overview of key concepts and skills needed to identify international and domestic threats, analyze their impact, formulate appropriate strategies and implement applicable action plans to achieve corporate and public management goals. The course helps students understand today's global and domestic security environment, as well as examines homeland security, international terrorism, security risk management, domestic rural resources security and environmental security issues. No prerequisite


Information Security Law and Ethics
Course Number SE575

This course, geared toward non-attorney managers and executives, provides a broad survey of federal and state laws and judicial systems governing and/or affecting information security. Coursework addresses the effects of cyber business regulation on information security, conducting business on the Internet, privacy laws, taxation, protection of intellectual property, electronic privacy, wiretapping and cyber squatting. In addition, students examine ethical issues, forensics and evidence of cyber crime. No prerequisite


Program description: DeVry’s Accounting program equips students with the knowledge,
skills and abilities needed to function as entry-level accounting
professionals in public accounting, industry, nonprofit organiza-tions
and government. Coursework – taught from the practitioner’s
perspective – focuses on applying accounting and financial
management concepts and skills to real-world applications while
providing students with a solid base in accounting theory.


Coursework builds students’ knowledge and skills in key
functional areas including financial accounting and reporting,
managerial accounting, personal taxation and accounting
technology. The program also addresses key principles of
business administration and provides students with a solid
base in general education.

Accounting Courses at Benedictine University

Program Name: Accelerated MBA in Accounting
Financial Accounting
Course Number MBA 500
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=657

Concentrates on the preparation, interpretation, and analysis of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Emphasizes the rationale for and implications of important accounting concepts, the selection of alternatively acceptable accounting methods and their varying affects of valuation and net income determination and reporting. Provides student with an opportunity to understand the complex accounting data they will receive as operational managers. Required.


Economics
Course Number MBA 510
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=669

Fundamental concepts of macroeconomics, including supply and demand, measurements of and determination of economic performance, such as GDP, inflation, and unemployment, are studied. Other topics include the causes of instability in the economy and corrective measures such as fiscal and monetary policy, money and banking, and the Federal Reserve System. Required.


Leadership and Ethics in a Global Environment
Course Number MBA 520
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=689

Reviews paradigms of leadership in global environment. Introduces and applies principles for ethical decision-making in business situations. Assesses student's leadership capacities and responsibilities in challenging situations. Required.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number MBA 530
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=707

A course focusing on the effects of organizational variables on individual and group behavior. This course addresses the theory and practice of organization behavior as it relates to the individual, effective team building, conflict management, and resolution, and the negotiation of legal and psychological contracts. The course also takes a look at the broader aspect of organizational culture and its impact on today s manager. Students learn how to use concepts in the traditional workplace as well as the virtual workplace. Required.


International Business
Course Number MBA 539
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=721

Selected readings in international business will be covered. Topics include culture, geography, politics, foreign direct investment, supply chain management, monetary systems, foreign exchange markets, and political risk management. Current topics in international business will be covered. Required.


Analytical Tools for Management Decisions
Course Number MBA 541
Credits 4.0

The goal for this course is to prepare students to be more effective users of quantitative information, as well as to avoid the many potential pitfalls from the misuse of statistical methods. The emphasis is on understanding what a previously obtained data set implies and, if appropriate, to develop meaningful forecasts with a reasonable sense of confidence. Specific topics include data analysis and statistical description, sampling and statistical inference, time series, and regression analysis. Required.


Managerial Accounting
Course Number MBA 601
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=829

This course introduces the measurement, communication, and interpretation of cost data for management decision-making, planning, control, and evaluation of results. Students are shown how to use accounting information as an effective management tool for coordinating managerial activities. Course material is explored in the context of the extensive changes being implemented in the area of manufacturing, service delivery technologies, and control systems. This course uses case studies to emphasize the application of concepts. Required. Prerequisite: MBA 500.


Managerial Economics
Course Number MBA 611
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=850

Applies microeconomic tools to business decision making. Topics include optimization, consumer behavior, elasticity of demand, the use of regression analysis to estimate demand (revenues) and costs, marginal analysis and market structure. Required.


Operations Management
Course Number MBA 630
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=885

This course focuses on the strategic role of operations and developing an appreciation for operations activities and how to improve them. Issues include continuous quality improvement, the critical importance of the customer and consideration of selected quantitative techniques. Required.


Financial Management
Course Number MBA 651
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=917

Develops an understanding of financial theory and its application through case analysis. Topics include capital management, operating and financial leverage, costs of capital, investment, and financing decisions. Techniques for the evaluation of investment alternatives using net present value and internal rate of return concepts are covered including the identification of cash flows relevant for capital budgeting. Emphasis is placed on the application of these concepts to the valuation of a going concern. Extensive use of proforma modeling of financial statements is made throughout the course.


Marketing Management
Course Number MBA 661

This course introduces students to both the theory and practice of marketing. It analyzes all marketing issues from the perspective of the marketing manager. Students will explore how consumer behavior, market research, environmental trend analysis, new product development, pricing and distribution decisions, and promotional considerations must interact to create a successful marketing program. Case analysis, contemporary issues in marketing, and the practical application of marketing concepts to the students employment experiences are also features of this course.


Project Management
Course Number MBA 683
Credits 4.0

The class is an examination of the art and science of project management as applied to a variety of business and technology settings. Students will study how to initiate, plan, execute, control and close projects within budget and on schedule. Advanced topics may include critical chains, adaptive and agile project management and portfolio management. A project planning software tool is used, usually MS Project. This course is appropriate for technology and non-technology managers alike.


Strategic Management
Course Number MBA 671
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=957

This course requires students to use and integrate the disciplines and techniques learned in previous required courses. Strategy formulation and implementation concepts are discussed using theory and cases. This course should be taken within two courses of completion of the required courses. Required. Prerequisites


Cost Analysis, Profit Planning and Control
Course Number MBA 603
Credits 4.0

This course covers profit planning, strategy, and the behavioral aspects of accounting information. It is useful for those pursuing careers in professional accounting or finance as well as for managers requiring a sophisticated knowledge of financial statements as a result of bottom-line responsibility.


Theory and Practice of Financial Reporting
Course Number MBA 604
Credits 4.0

Students will learn about the theory and practice behind the preparation and use of financial statements, including the balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows, as well as their the significance and limitations. The impact of decisions made by corporate executives with regard to the financial statements and their presentation will be discussed.


Tax Influences on Decision-Making
Course Number MBA 605

This course presents the impact of federal income taxation on various business decisions. Areas such as choice of business organization, capital gains, timing of income, depreciation, investments and employee benefits are emphasized.


Program description: Two 16 credit hour Certificates are offered in Accounting for those advancing toward Certified Public Accounting (CPA) status. These courses may be counted toward fulfillment of the Illinois CPA Society 150 Hour Rule, and provide a concentrated sequence in accounting courses. They may also be applied toward the Accounting Concentration for degree-seeking M.B.A. students.

Program Name: Master of Business Administration - Accounting
Financial Accounting
Course Number MBA 500
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=657

Concentrates on the preparation, interpretation, and analysis of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Emphasizes the rationale for and implications of important accounting concepts, the selection of alternatively acceptable accounting methods and their varying affects of valuation and net income determination and reporting. Provides student with an opportunity to understand the complex accounting data they will receive as operational managers. Required.


Economics
Course Number MBA 510
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=669

Fundamental concepts of macroeconomics, including supply and demand, measurements of and determination of economic performance, such as GDP, inflation, and unemployment, are studied. Other topics include the causes of instability in the economy and corrective measures such as fiscal and monetary policy, money and banking, and the Federal Reserve System. Required.


Leadership and Ethics in a Global Environment
Course Number MBA 520
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=689

Reviews paradigms of leadership in global environment. Introduces and applies principles for ethical decision-making in business situations. Assesses student's leadership capacities and responsibilities in challenging situations. Required.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number MBA 530
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=707

A course focusing on the effects of organizational variables on individual and group behavior. This course addresses the theory and practice of organization behavior as it relates to the individual, effective team building, conflict management, and resolution, and the negotiation of legal and psychological contracts. The course also takes a look at the broader aspect of organizational culture and its impact on today s manager. Students learn how to use concepts in the traditional workplace as well as the virtual workplace. Required.


International Business
Course Number MBA 539
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=721

Selected readings in international business will be covered. Topics include culture, geography, politics, foreign direct investment, supply chain management, monetary systems, foreign exchange markets, and political risk management. Current topics in international business will be covered. Required.


Analytical Tools for Management Decisions
Course Number MBA 541
Credits 4.0

The goal for this course is to prepare students to be more effective users of quantitative information, as well as to avoid the many potential pitfalls from the misuse of statistical methods. The emphasis is on understanding what a previously obtained data set implies and, if appropriate, to develop meaningful forecasts with a reasonable sense of confidence. Specific topics include data analysis and statistical description, sampling and statistical inference, time series, and regression analysis. Required.


Managerial Accounting
Course Number MBA 601
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=829

This course introduces the measurement, communication, and interpretation of cost data for management decision-making, planning, control, and evaluation of results. Students are shown how to use accounting information as an effective management tool for coordinating managerial activities. Course material is explored in the context of the extensive changes being implemented in the area of manufacturing, service delivery technologies, and control systems. This course uses case studies to emphasize the application of concepts. Required. Prerequisite: MBA 500.


Managerial Economics
Course Number MBA 611
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=850

Applies microeconomic tools to business decision making. Topics include optimization, consumer behavior, elasticity of demand, the use of regression analysis to estimate demand (revenues) and costs, marginal analysis and market structure. Required.


Operations Management
Course Number MBA 630
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=885

This course focuses on the strategic role of operations and developing an appreciation for operations activities and how to improve them. Issues include continuous quality improvement, the critical importance of the customer and consideration of selected quantitative techniques. Required.


Financial Management
Course Number MBA 651
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=917

Develops an understanding of financial theory and its application through case analysis. Topics include capital management, operating and financial leverage, costs of capital, investment, and financing decisions. Techniques for the evaluation of investment alternatives using net present value and internal rate of return concepts are covered including the identification of cash flows relevant for capital budgeting. Emphasis is placed on the application of these concepts to the valuation of a going concern. Extensive use of proforma modeling of financial statements is made throughout the course.


Marketing Management
Course Number MBA 661

This course introduces students to both the theory and practice of marketing. It analyzes all marketing issues from the perspective of the marketing manager. Students will explore how consumer behavior, market research, environmental trend analysis, new product development, pricing and distribution decisions, and promotional considerations must interact to create a successful marketing program. Case analysis, contemporary issues in marketing, and the practical application of marketing concepts to the students employment experiences are also features of this course.


Project Management
Course Number MBA 683
Credits 4.0

The class is an examination of the art and science of project management as applied to a variety of business and technology settings. Students will study how to initiate, plan, execute, control and close projects within budget and on schedule. Advanced topics may include critical chains, adaptive and agile project management and portfolio management. A project planning software tool is used, usually MS Project. This course is appropriate for technology and non-technology managers alike.


Strategic Management
Course Number MBA 671
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=957

This course requires students to use and integrate the disciplines and techniques learned in previous required courses. Strategy formulation and implementation concepts are discussed using theory and cases. This course should be taken within two courses of completion of the required courses. Required. Prerequisites


Cost Analysis, Profit Planning and Control
Course Number MBA 603
Credits 4.0

This course covers profit planning, strategy, and the behavioral aspects of accounting information. It is useful for those pursuing careers in professional accounting or finance as well as for managers requiring a sophisticated knowledge of financial statements as a result of bottom-line responsibility.


Theory and Practice of Financial Reporting
Course Number MBA 604
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=836

Focuses on the theory and practice behind the preparation and use of financial statements, including the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the significance and limitations of financial statements. The impact of decisions made by corporate executives with regard to the financial statements and their presentation will be discussed. Useful for those pursuing careers in professional accounting and managers requiring a sophisticated knowledge of financial statements as a result of bottom-line responsibility. Elective. Prerequisite: MBA 601.


Tax Influences on Decision Making
Course Number MBA 605
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=839

This course presents the impact of federal income taxation on various business decisions. Emphasis is placed on areas such as choice of business organization, capital gains, timing of income, depreciation, investments, and employee benefits. Elective. Prerequisite: MBA 601.


Program description: Benedictine University's online MBA Accounting concentration will help you and your organization thrive in a business environment that is subject to greater financial scrutiny and oversight.

The online MBA with a concentration in Accounting is designed for professionals interested in accounting roles at various types of organizations, such as privately-held companies, large corporations, non-profits and consulting firms.

Accounting Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Associate's (ASACC) - Accounting
English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Creating Academic and Professional Success
Course Number INTD111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for academic, professional, and life related success. The course helps students acquire, develop, and utilize basic learning tools. The course also teaches critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation methods and practices which will allow them to formulate reasonable alternatives, hypotheses, and/or premises for academic, social, and professional use. A clear, precise, fair, and unbiased approach to analysis, evaluation, problem-solving, and decision-making activities is emphasized and promoted.


Introduction to IT
Course Number IT190
Credits 4.0

Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON202
Credits 4.0

An introductory course in the tools of economics as they apply to the operation of market economy. Includes supply and demand analysis, consumer behavior, economic nature of production and costs, behavior of firms in both competitive and


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSYC100
Credits 4.0

Taking this course will enable the student to have a better understanding of the basic principles of human behavior. The course also includes a foundation in the background of the field of Psychology, the workings of the human mind and senses, the disciplines and modes of treatment, and the way that Psychology affects our everyday lives. Additional emphasis will be in areas of perception, emotion, learning, motivation, and development.


Business Courses
Course Number BUS
Credits 4.0

Accounting I
Course Number ACCT101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces fundamental accounting concepts and explores the accounting environment. It covers the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and introduces the concept of internal accounting controls.


Accounting II
Course Number ACCT202
Credits 4.0

This course covers accounting for balance sheet items for partnerships and corporate entities. In addition, students will be exposed to accounting for the capital structure, inventory, long-term liabilities, payroll, investments and international operations of a firm.


Accounting III
Course Number ACCT203
Credits 4.0

This course completes the fundamentals of financial accounting and includes managerial cost accounting through job costing and process costing applications. Topics covered include the financial analysis of financial statement information, the contribution margin approach to decision-making, and the budgeting process.


Computerized Accounting
Course Number ACCT210
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Taxation
Course Number ACCT215
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.



Financial Statement Analysis
Course Number FINC225
Credits 4.0

This course is a basic introduction to the concepts of finance. An overview of financial statements and financial statement analysis are presented. Specific topics include ration analysis, trend analysis, ethics, and financial proformas.


Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Program description: Professional education in accounting can help students develop the capabilities needed to assume positions of leadership and responsibility in accounting-related fields. Accounting processes are found in every business and industry, including government, education, health care, not-for-profit, and military organizations. Entry-level accountants are key players in the financial information arena of all organizations. They provide much of the information used by these organizations to make decisions that will help them attain their goals. Beyond the fundamental tasks of the occupation-preparing, analyzing and verifying financial documents in order to provide information to clients-many accountants now are required to possess a wide range of knowledge and skills.

The ASACC degree program is designed to equip students with a variety of basic accounting skills that are useful in entry-level accounting positions. Students can develop a base of practical, real-world skills from instructors who are accounting professionals. Building on a foundation of communication, interpersonal and math skills, they can learn all aspects of the accounting cycle, including analyzing and interpreting various financial statements. Courses in business and managerial accounting give students the tools for making basic decisions in organizations.

ASACC Degree Program Objectives
Students who successfully complete the ASACC degree program should be able to:
• Describe the various forms of businesses and the environment
in which businesses operate.
• Apply professional communication skills.
• Develop personal financial goals and a personal budget.
• Explain the basic accounting concepts.
• Discuss the roles of managers and leaders in organizations.
• Describe the accounting concepts underlying the financial
reporting model.
• Prepare financial statements for various business needs.
• Use the tools of economics for decision making for the firm
operating in the market economy.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Accounting
English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


Professional Speaking
Course Number ENGL210
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations


World History Since 1500 or World History and Culture I
Course Number HIST150 or HIST210
Credits 4.0

World History Since 1500 This course introduces the student to most significant events, personalities, trends and issues associated with the historical development of world civilization in the five centuries since the Middle-Ages, beginning with an overview of the Renaissance and Reformation and concluding with an assessment of the contemporary legacy of the Cold War. It explores the rise of capitalism and the modern nation state, the expansion of Western Europe, advances in science and technology, the impact of industrialization, and the global conflicts of the 20th Century. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls World History and Culture I HIST210 covers major cultures and civilizations of the world from ancient times to the birth of western imperialism in the 16th Century. Topics include cultures and historical experiences representative of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and pre-Columbian America. Of particular interest is the evolution of world religions or philosophies that prevail and are still critical in the modern world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference for the historical events which shaped the modern world outside Indo-European civilization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls


Creating Academic and Professional Success
Course Number INTD111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for academic, professional, and life related success. The course helps students acquire, develop, and utilize basic learning tools. The course also teaches critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation methods and practices which will allow them to formulate reasonable alternatives, hypotheses, and/or premises for academic, social, and professional use. A clear, precise, fair, and unbiased approach to analysis, evaluation, problem-solving, and decision-making activities is emphasized and promoted.


Introduction to IT
Course Number IT190
Credits 4.0

Introduction to IT Introduction to IT provides an overview of issues and opportunities presented by the fast-paced world of information technology. Students receive an overview of computer-based systems and learn about the development, operation, and management of these systems. The course includes basic hardware and software principles and current information systems. Topics include databases and networking and their critical organizational importance, IT systems development, the impact of the Internet on organizations, and emerging technologies and trends for the future. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT080 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL310
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an understanding of ethical expectations and prepares the student to make decisions that are ethically correct and legal. The study of ethics includes the development of ethical standards, prima facie obligations, responsibilities, societal aims and professional codes of conduct. The course will follow the aims of normative ethics. The students should expect to participate and become involved in case studies, hypothetical situations and discussions to develop an attitude that is ethically acceptable, as well as to practice the concepts learned to aid in decision making.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSYC100
Credits 4.0

Taking this course will enable the student to have a better understanding of the basic principles of human behavior. The course also includes a foundation in the background of the field of Psychology, the workings of the human mind and senses, the disciplines and modes of treatment, and the way that Psychology affects our everyday lives. Additional emphasis will be in areas of perception, emotion, learning, motivation, and development.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Accounting I
Course Number ACCT101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces fundamental accounting concepts and explores the accounting environment. It covers the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and introduces the concept of internal accounting controls.


Accounting II
Course Number ACCT202
Credits 4.0

This course covers accounting for balance sheet items for partnerships and corporate entities. In addition, students will be exposed to accounting for the capital structure, inventory, long-term liabilities, payroll, investments and international operations of a firm.


Accounting III
Course Number ACCT203
Credits 4.0

This course completes the fundamentals of financial accounting and includes managerial cost accounting through job costing and process costing applications. Topics covered include the financial analysis of financial statement information, the contribution margin approach to decision-making, and the budgeting process.


Computerized Accounting
Course Number ACCT210
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACCT342
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACCT342
Credits 4.0

Cost Accounting
Course Number ACCT351
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on accounting for costs in a manufacturing environment. Various techniques for estimating and accounting for costs are employed. Students will be involved in the budgeting and cost allocation processes.


Tax Accounting I
Course Number ACCT361
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the principles of individual income tax based on the U.S. Internal Revenue Code and supporting authority. Students will acquire a theoretical as well as practical understanding of the tax law as applied to individual U.S. taxpayers.


Tax Accounting II
Course Number ACCT362
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the principles of taxation for various business entities based on the U.S. Internal Revenue Code and supporting authority. Students will acquire a theoretical as well as practical understanding of the tax law as applied to U.S. business entities.


Advanced Accounting
Course Number ACCT421
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of special accounting problems related to the preparation of combined and consolidated financial statements for business entities with branch offices and subsidiaries, both domestic and foreign. Accounting for partnerships, governmental, and non-profit organizations are also covered.


Auditing
Course Number ACCT441
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the primary work of the certified public accountant. It covers examination of financial statements for the purpose of rendering an opinion on the fairness with which they present an entity’s financial position and the result of its operations.


Auditing Lab
Course Number ACCT443
Credits 1.0

This lab represents a simulation of audit planning and implementation. Students will plan for and then audit various balance sheet and income statement accounts. The lab will conclude with the preparation of audited financial statements including audit opinion and appropriate footnotes.


Accounting Capstone
Course Number ACCT460
Credits 4.0

This is an integrative and interactive capstone course in which the student uses the functional skills acquired from previous courses to formulate decisions within a business entity and analyze the financial implications of those decisions. Individual and team participation are imperative for this course.


Contemporary Accounting Issues
Course Number ACCT480
Credits 4.0

This course addresses issues of current interest in accounting. Course content will vary as determined by the evolution of the discipline.



Organizational Behavior
Course Number BADM305
Credits 4.0

This course addresses some tools and insights necessary to understand and analyze the characteristics of human beings and organizational situations. It further explores both organization structure and human variables within that structure to contribute to the long-term survival of an enterprise and include team building.


International Business
Course Number BADM350
Credits 4.0

During this course the student studies the international business environment as it relates to global competitiveness. This course explores strategy, organizations, operations, finance, marketing, and coping with different economic systems. Differences between foreign and domestic environments and the impact of these differences on managing in an international business setting are examined.


Operations Management
Course Number BADM360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on solving the problems associated with the planning and control of production/manufacturing and service operations. The following concepts are explored: forecasting, planning products, processes, technologies and facilities, demand and inventory in the production systems, control for productivity, quality and reliability.


Business Law I
Course Number BADM410
Credits 4.0

This course provides an understanding of the principles underlying the legal environment of business. It examines the current legal rules and regulations affecting businesses and discusses the new developments and trends that will greatly affect future transactions. It also outlines the legal aspects of intellectual property especially as it relates to e-business.


Research Design Methods and Applications
Course Number BADM440
Credits 4.0

This course provides the basic of research needed to successfully complete their business capstone courses. It covers the full cycle of research starting with a qualitative examination of an organizational phenomenon and then addressing how to measure it via survey, experiments, or other designs. It concludes with issues of verification and implementation based on the outcome of the quantitative phase. It also includes the topic of scale development, reliability, validity, confirmatory factor analysis, and issues of survey development and implementation.


Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship
Course Number BADM475
Credits 4.0

During this course, the student will explore the fundamentals of business organization, operation and management. The course deals with the characteristics and activities of the business executive, managerial relationships, accountability and the entrepreneur. It requires the student to conduct application and synthesis of other material in order to create a business plan.


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON202
Credits 4.0

An introductory course in the tools of economics as they apply to the operation of market economy. Includes supply and demand analysis, consumer behavior, economic nature of production and costs, behavior of firms in both competitive and


Financial Statement Analysis
Course Number FINC225
Credits 4.0

This course is a basic introduction to the concepts of finance. An overview of financial statements and financial statement analysis are presented. Specific topics include ration analysis, trend analysis, ethics, and financial proformas.


Financial Management
Course Number FINC400
Credits 4.0

This course examines the process of budgeting. Students will examine the components of and develop budgets. Students will also utilize capital budgeting tools to evaluate investment opportunities.


World Cultures and Values or World History and Culture II
Course Number HIST250 or HIST310
Credits 4.0

World Cultures And Values This Course Helps The Student To Develop The Global Viewpoint Appropriate For The Business And Technology Leaders Of The 21st Century. It Develops An Appreciation For The Variations In Culture Across The World’s Regions And People. Additionally, It Helps The Student To Develop A Framework For Understanding The Elements And Expressions Of Culture, And How Culture Shapes And Is Shaped By Historical Trends, Events, Situations, Climate, Geography, Beliefs And Values. Emphasis Is Placed On Driving Political, Intellectual And Technological Forces As Shapers Of Culture And Values, Especially Those That Have Influenced The Development Of The Global Marketplace. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Engl112, Hist150 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls World History And Culture Ii This Course Presents An Examination Of World History From The 16th Century To The Present. These Topics Include The Birth Of Western Imperialism, The Fall Of The Islamic Empires, The African Kingdoms And The Slave Trade, And The Collapse Of Traditional China. Other Topics Include The Rise Of Japan In The New Imperialism And Industrialization Of The 19th Century, The Decolonization Process, The Cold War, Latin American Revolutions, Conflicts In The Middle East And Other Contemporary Issues. Driving Political, Intellectual And Technological Forces Are Also Explored As Shapers Of Culture And Values, Especially Those That Have Influenced The Development Of The Global Marketplace. Western Civilization Is Used As A Timeline And A Reference To The Impact Of Non-western Cultures On Indo-european Civilization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls


Introduction to Human Resource Management
Course Number HRMT210
Credits 4.0

This course examines the role and function of the Human Resource Department in the organization. It is an overview of human resource activities including job analysis, performance appraisals, recruiting, selection, compensation, and career development. Additionally, employee diversity, labor relations, organization development and equal employment opportunity will be discussed.


Training and Employee Development
Course Number HRMT410
Credits 4.0

The course emphasizes the role of training and employee development as a strategic aspect of organizational performance. The course also provides students with the opportunity to develop training designs from needs assessment to evaluation, including return on investment. These skills are essential for contemporary managers. Topics covered include linking training and employee development to organizational strategy, conducting needs assessment, designing and evaluating training and development programs, traditional and contemporary instructional methods, including distance learning, and using information technology to track and implement training and development programs.


Quantitative Decision Making
Course Number MATH476
Credits 4.0

This course introduces methods to formulate various mathematical models of problems that seek optimal solutions. Software and hand calculations are used to perform algorithms that can find optimal values that help managers make decisions. Some algorithms are performed on graphical models of complex systems. Attention is paid to the sensitivity of the solution to changes in the model. The objective: guide decision-makers to find optimal ways to implement solutions, but to satisfy many constraints.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOCL101
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the organization of social behavior and the relationship of society and social conditions. Emphasis will be placed on culture, norm, stratification, systems, structure, social institutions and social change in different cultures.


Program description: If you are looking for a career that can open the door to almost any business or organization, accounting is it. This program can help you develop critical problem-solving skills in accounting and management and will teach you to prepare, comprehend and interpret the required financial statements according to generally accepted accounting principles. It's designed to help you acquire an understanding of corporate accounting, taxation, government and not-for-profit accounting and auditing to prepare for a wide range of professional opportunities.

Program Name: Master of Business Administration - Accounting
Taxation and Business Decisions
Course Number ACCT618
Credits 4.0

The course covers the relationship between managerial decision-making and taxes. Students will explore the taxation of different types of business entities and the individuals involved with the entities. Emphasizes the impact of tax considerations in business decisions such as compensation, mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures


Financial Reporting
Course Number ACCT628
Credits 4.0

This class focuses on a comprehensive examination of financial statements and accounting reporting standards. Students will gain an understanding of the information provided in corporate annual reports and how to evaluate the financial performance of an entity.


Management Control and Auditing
Course Number ACCT644
Credits 4.0

This course covers advanced auditing procedures and standards, as well as management control systems. Audit objectives, cycles, review, documentation, theory, and professional code of practice are covered. Other topics include risk assessment techniques, management control systems, and organization for control.


Applied Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT614
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using available accounting information to help managers of the firm make relevant decisions. Examines how the financial information developed for external users forms the basis for the managerial accounting system. Explores costing systems, cost behavior analysis, responsibility accounting and volume-profit relationships.


Applied Managerial Economics
Course Number ECON616
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the practical aspects of both micro- and macroeconomics and how they are applied to the managerial environment. The students investigate the role of economic principles in management analysis and decision making: the study of demand, cost, and supply concepts from a business viewpoint; and the application of national income measures to strategic planning and the future.


Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments
Course Number EMBA690
Credits 4.0

Students will master analytical and integrative tools to perform in-depth analyses of industries, firms, and competitors. Course material includes methods to predict competitive behavior and develop and implement strategic plans to achieve and sustain a competitive profile in the emerging global marketplace.


Applied Managerial Finance
Course Number FINC615
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes management decision making utilizing accounting and finance concepts. The following subjects are addressed in the course: financial reports and metrics, financial analysis and planning, financial forecasting, financial markets, financial leverage, working capital management, capital budgeting processes, cost of capital and long term financing. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a financial strategy report and accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of financial analysis from either the academic or professional literature.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Applied Managerial Decision-Making
Course Number MGMT600
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the practical application of descriptive and inferential statistics to decisions made in a managerial role. The following subjects are addressed in the course: data summarization and presentation, data analysis, test of hypotheses, discrete and continuous distributions, estimation theory, simple and multiple correlation and regression, analysis of variance, multivariate statistics and non parametric methods. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a data aggregation and reduction exercise report and by accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of applied statistics from either the academic or professional literature.


Graduate Research Methods
Course Number MGMT605
Credits 4.0

This course will provide a working knowledge of quantitative, qualitative, mixed, and action research approaches. It covers the entire research process for each of these methods to include: formulating research questions; developing research proposals; performing a literature search and analysis; sampling and measurement; research design; data analysis; and writing and presenting the research report will be analyzed.


Applied Managerial Marketing
Course Number MKTG630
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the application of marketing concepts, tools and decision-making processes middle managers use in developing marketing plans, programs and strategies. Within the marketing strategy framework, it also examines market analysis and measurement, profitability and productivity analysis, product development, promotion and pricing strategies, the logistics systems approach and the marketing plan. The student will apply the knowledge learned by structuring and presenting to the class a practical strategic marketing plan.


Program description: If you are seeking a managerial position in finance, this program can provide the foundation you need to work with changing financial laws and regulations and increased scrutiny of corporate finances. It covers advanced topics such as taxation, financial reporting, auditing and cost accounting, accounting information systems, and managerial decision making to prepare you for issues facing today's businesses, The need for financial managers – especially with a Master's degree -- is expected to grow by 13%* during the next seven years

Accounting Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BS in Accounting
Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACC 370
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An In-depth Study Of Accounting Objectives, Principles, Theory, And Practice As Related To The Balance Sheet And Income Statement. Students Will Explore Accounting For Assets, Liabilities, And Equity Items, The Specific Rules For Accounting For Pensions, Postretirement Benefits, Leases, And Accounting Changes, And Other Items Frequently Addressed On The Uniform Certified Public Accounting Examination (uniform Cpa Exam). Prerequisite: Acc 350


Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACC 371
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An In-depth Study Of Accounting Objectives, Principles, Theory, And Practice As Related To The Balance Sheet And Income Statement. Students Explore Liabilities And Equity Items; The Specific Rules For Accounting For Pensions; Postretirement Benefits, Leases, And Accounting Changes; And Other Items Frequently Addressed On The Uniform Certified Public Accounting Examination (uniform Cpa Exam). This Course Also Includes An Analysis And Interpretation Of A Firm’s Three Principal Financial Statements And Their Uses From A Managerial Perspective. Prerequisites: Acc 370 And Fin 350


Cost Accounting
Course Number ACC 360
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of principles of internal accounting, including job order systems, process costing, activity-based costing, and budgeting. Prerequisite: ACC 350.


Taxation
Course Number ACC 460
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of the theory and practices of accounting for income taxes of corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, and individuals. Other taxes covered include payroll and sales taxes. Prerequisite: ACC 250.


Advanced Accounting
Course Number ACC 485
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides A Study Of Accounting Theory As It Applies To Partnerships And Business Combinations, International Accounting, And Governmental Accounting. Prerequisites: One Of The Following: 1) Acc 355, Or 2) Acc 370 And 371.


Auditing
Course Number ACC 491
Credits 4.0

Auditing Is An Examination Of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards, Procedures Involved In The Auditing Process, And Ethical Issues Faced By The Auditor. Through Class Discussions, Practical Applications And Case Studies, Students Learn The Responsibilities Of The Independent Public Auditor In The Expression Of Opinion Within The Guidelines Set By The Aicpa’s Code Of Professional Ethics. Topics Include The Nature And Types Of Audits, Auditor Responsibilities And Legal Liabilities, Audit Reports, Auditing Procedures, Ethical Issues, Contemporary Issues In Auditing, And The Sarbanes-oxley Act Of 2002. Prerequisite: Acc 350.


Introduction to Economics
Course Number ECN 220
Credits 4.0

The course covers microeconomic topics, macroeconomic topics, and international economics topics. Microeconomic topics include the nature and method of economics, supply and demand, utility, and supply and demand elasticities. Macroeconomic topics include the measurement of national output, factors that impact output, other means of measuring national wealth and economic well-being, unemployment, inflation, GDP accounting, and business cycles. While the focus of this course is primarily on the U.S. economy, some comparative economic analysis will be covered. In addition, select topics related to international trade and finance are introduced.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC 250
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An Introduction To The Accounting Cycle And The Construction Of Financial Statements. Students Explore The Fundamental Principles And Practices Of Financial Accounting As Outlined By Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (gaap); The Steps In The Accounting Cycle From Journalizing Transactions Through The Preparation Of Financial Statements; And The Use And Interpretation Of The Balance Sheet, Income Statement, And Statement Of Cash Flows. Prerequisite: Mat 134 Or Equivalent College Algebra Course.


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKT 245
Credits 4.0

This course surveys the marketing mix and marketing concept; markets and buyer behavior; product, service, and relationship marketing for global competition; creating and keeping customers in an e-commerce world; branding and positioning; distribution strategies, integrated marketing communications, and pricing strategies.



Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACC 350
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An Introduction To The Use Of Managerial Accounting Data In The Decision-making Process. Topics Include The Use Of Cost-volume-profit (cvp) Analysis And Relevant Costs In Decision Making, Using Budgets And The Balanced Scorecard To Evaluate Performance, Methods For Setting Prices Of Products And Services, And Analyzing Capital Investment Opportunities. Prerequisite: Acc 250.


Organizational Behavior and Management
Course Number MGT 420
Credits 4.0

Drawing upon real-world management situations, this course is a study of individual and group behavior in organizations through detailed coverage of the functions of management, individual differences/diversity, leadership, motivation, decision making, organizational design, and organizational change and development. Emphasis is placed on how an understanding of organizational behavior leads to effective management practice. Also PSC 420.


Business Statistics
Course Number BUS 352
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the practical application of descriptive and inferential statistics in business. Topics include probability, probability distributions, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Prerequisite: MAT 134 or equivalent college algebra course.


Fundamentals of Business Finance
Course Number FIN 350
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A General Survey Of Financial Institutions, The Federal Reserve System, The Qualities Of A Sound Monetary System, The Theory And Value Of Money, Deposit Insurance, And Foreign Exchange. Prerequisites: Ecn 220, Acc 250, And Mat 134 Or Equivalent College Algebra Course.


Production/ Operations Management
Course Number MGT 455
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to designing, planning, operating, and controlling production systems. Emphasis is on managerial concepts and strategies relating to the management of operations in both manufacturing and service environments. Quantitative and qualitative methods and tools are introduced and applied. Prerequisite: BUS 352.


Strategic Management
Course Number BUS 485
Credits 4.0

This Is A Capstone Course In Business And Management That Includes The Gradual Development Of A Comprehensive And Integrative Business Plan. This Course Is Designed To Assist Students In Their Development As Managers, Servant Leaders, And Successful Strategic Thinkers. Management, Marketing, Accounting, Finance, Economics, Global Perspectives, Law, And Political Issues Are Covered During This Course. It Is A Writing-intensive Course That Will Help Students Develop Competencies Such As Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, Leadership, And Global Awareness. Prerequisites: Fin 350, Mgt 420, Mkt 245, And Senior Status


Program description: Grand Canyon University's Bachelor of Science in Accounting prepares students for careers in the accounting field. After completing the program, students may be eligible to take the exams for the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and the Certified Management Accountant (CMA). Read more about Grand Canyon University's Bachelor of Science in Accounting here.

Program Name: M.S. in Accounting
Financial Research and Business Modeling
Course Number BUS 611
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with applied knowledge in using electronic databases to find accounting information and financial reports. Students develop the skills needed to access accounting, auditing, and taxation rules and regulations; company financial statements; and related industry data used for analyzing financial statements.


Advanced Managerial and Cost Accounting
Course Number ACC 653
Credits 4.0

This course is focused on key managerial and cost accounting concepts and methods. Students examine why, when, and how cost information is used to make effective decisions that lead a firm to success


Compliance in Financial Reporting
Course Number ACC 655
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Building An Understanding Of The U.s. And International Regulatory Framework Of Financial Reporting. Students Learn To Apply Gaap, Iass, And Ifrss To Practical Situations And Train To Prepare Financial Statements In Accordance With Gaap, Iass, Ifrss, And Pronouncements Of The Standing Interpretation Committee


Internal Auditing
Course Number ACC 651
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the principles involved in auditing. Topics include financial statement audits, the responsibilities of the external auditor, internal controls, the responsibilities and authority of the internal audit function, the types of audits and other attestation engagements, and accounting ethics. The effects of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 are also covered.


Business Law and Ethics for Accounting
Course Number ACC 623
Credits 4.0

This course gives students a robust legal and ethical framework that is crucial for accountants and managers under SarbanesOxley. Using case studies that incorporate the principles of business law, the AICPA code, and other systems of ethics, students learn how a commitment to ethics can enable accounting professionals to meet their ethical obligations to all stakeholders.


Advanced Accounting and Mergers and Acquisitions
Course Number ACC 662
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of advanced topics in financial accounting and reporting, including governmental, nonprofits, partnerships, and the preparation of consolidated financial statements affected by mergers and acquisitions. The financial and economic aspects of merger and acquisition activities are examined in both a domestic and international context.


Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination
Course Number ACC 664
Credits 4.0

This course is focused on fraudulent financial reporting and the prevention and detection of irregularities. Students become familiar with fraudulent reporting practices and the misappropriation of assets.


Tax Planning and Business Strategy
Course Number ACC 665
Credits 4.0

This course provides the practical and theoretical framework for recognizing tax planning opportunities and applying basic principles of tax strategy in various contexts, including investments, capital expenditures, organizational form, compensation, regulation, financial instruments, and family wealth planning.


Accounting Practices
Course Number ACC 501
Credits 3.0

This course is designed for students who have not had accounting in their undergraduate work or for those who desire a refresher in accounting. Topics covered include the accounting cycle, the presentation and valuation of accounts shown on the Balance Sheet and Income Statement, the Statement of Cash Flows, cost behavior, and budgeting.


Finance Principles
Course Number FIN 504
Credits 4.0

This course is designed for individuals who are preparing for more advanced course work in accounting and is designed for students who have not had finance in undergraduate work. Topics covered include financial analysis, financial planning, asset evaluation, capital structure, and working capital management.


Taxation
Course Number ACC 460
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of the theory and practices of accounting for income taxes of corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, and individuals. Other taxes covered include payroll and sales taxes. Prerequisite: ACC 250.


Managerial Finance
Course Number FIN 650
Credits 4.0

This course discusses elements of business financial decisions, including financial forecasting and development of proformas, management of working capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, and raising funds in capital markets. Prerequisite: FIN 504.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Master of Science in Accounting program is designed to enhance theoretical and
practical accounting skills for practitioners, researchers, and educators. The program will prepare students to sit
for the CPA exam and will provide opportunities for current CPAs and accountants to advance their skills in
theory, practice, and research. The coursework focuses on advanced accounting, auditing, and taxation practices
in accordance with current rules and regulations.

Accounting Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Accounting Schools (campus and online)

University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Boston College
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 94
Rank in USA 29th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
Texas A & M University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 135
Rank in USA 36th
University of Georgia
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 156
Rank in USA 38th
College of William and Mary
Total Programs 59
Number of Subjects 71
Rank in USA 39th
Carnegie Mellon University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 115
Rank in USA 44th
Michigan State University
Total Programs 220
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 45th
Washington and Lee University
Total Programs 61
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 47th