Online Adult Education Courses at Accredited Schools

Liberty University Online, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its adult education courses to be successful adult education teachers, economics professors, teachers, educators, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 56,880 people employed as education teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $62,160. Education administrators make on average $95,340 per year and there are about 105,900 of them employed today.

Adult Education Organizations Adult Education Common Job Tasks
  • promoting adult education initiatives
  • managing a small budget
  • identifying the needs of learners
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Ranked by Excellence

Adult Education Courses at Liberty University Online

Program Name: AA in Education
Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 301
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 212 This is an intensive course in accounting theory and practice. The course attempts to strike a balance between procedural explanations of currently applied accounting practices and the theoretical framework upon which those practices are based. Alternatives to current practice are also introduced


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number ACCT 332
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 301 This course provides a basic knowledge of how accounting information systems function in today’s business environment. It emphasizes the internal control feature necessary to produce accurate and reliable accounting data as it looks at how accounting information is recorded, summarized and reported in both manual and computerized systems. The following topics are covered in this course: systems concepts, tools, development processes, analysis; design; implementation and operation; computer software and configurations; data storage and processing methods; file processing; implementing data base management systems; internal control; information system control; data security and integrity; accounting transaction cycles; revenue cycle applications; and expenditure cycle applications.


Advanced Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 402
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 302 This is an intensive course in accounting theory and practice regarding partnerships, business combinations and consolidated financial statements. The course attempts to strike a balance between procedural explanations of currently applied accounting practices and the theoretical framework upon which those practices are based. Alternatives to current practice are also discussed


Advanced Accounting II
Course Number ACCT 403
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 402 Advanced problems involving government and non-profit organizations, estates and trusts, financially distressed entities, translation and consolidation of foreign entities and segment reporting.


Auditing
Course Number ACCT 404
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 302 A study of auditing standards and related auditing procedures. Topics include: evaluation of internal control and preparation of the audit program; examination of financial statements and preparation of working papers; and auditors’ reports and opinions


Taxation II
Course Number ACCT 412
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: Acct 401 The Second Course In A Two-course Sequence Dealing With Corporate Income Taxes, Taxes On Corporate Distributions, Other Corporate Tax Levies; Partnership Information, Operation And Special Issues; “s” Corporations, Gift And Estate Taxes; The Income Taxation Of Trusts And Estates; And Irs Administrative Procedures


Accounting Theory and Ethics
Course Number ACCT 441
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: Acct 404 This Is The Capstone Course For Accounting Majors. The Course Has Two Major Parts That Represent A Blend Of Theory, Practice, And Research. Topics Included In Part One: Theoretical, Ethical Decisionmaking Models For The Accounting Profession; The Nature Of Accounting Theory And Its Development; And Accounting Standardsetting And Its Chronological Development. Part Two Evaluates Contemporary Financial Reporting Issues As They Relate To The Fasb’s Conceptual Framework. It Specifically Examines Areas Of Contemporary Financial Reporting That Are Controversial. This Course Has A Major Research And Group Component


Internships
Course Number ACCT 499
Credits 1.0

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; required GPA. Directed applicable work experience under supervision of the Director of Business Internships and an accounting or business professional at the place of employment. Application procedures processed through the Career Center. Must apply semester prior to completing internship.


Principles of Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 211
Credits 3.0

A study of basic transactions, general ledger accounts, books of original entry, closing and adjusting entry processes, trial balances, financial statements, accounting for assets, liabilities, sole proprietorship, equity, revenues, and expenses


Principles of Accounting II
Course Number ACCT 212
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 211 A study of the fundamentals of accounting with a financial accounting emphasis on the corporate form of business including such topics as bonds, capital stock, retained earnings, statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis; and a managerial accounting perspective including topics related to global business, cost accounting measurement systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, managerial decision-making concepts, operational budgeting, standard cost systems and capital budgeting


Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACCT 302
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 301 This is an intensive course in accounting theory and practice dealing with liabilities, stockholders equity, and financial reporting issues. The course attempts to strike a balance between procedural explanations of currently applied accounting practices and the theoretical framework upon which those practices are based


Cost Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 311
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 212 A study of the principles and procedures used in the collection, recording and reporting of costs. Balance Sheet inventory valuation and the related Income Statement cost of goods sold valuation, determined using both job order costing and process costing, are emphasized. Activity-based costing is covered in depth. Traditional cost accounting is the main content of this course.


Taxation I
Course Number ACCT 401
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ACCT 212 A study of the legal and accounting aspects of federal taxation with an emphasis on individuals and unincorporated businesses.


Program description: Those who pursue this degree do so because they gain satisfaction in teaching and assisting children of all ages. While most states require a bachelor’s degree and teaching certificate to become a full-time teacher, those with an associate degree typically move on to work as paraprofessionals (teaching assistants), pre-school teachers or work for childcare institutions and facilities. As the need for quality education will continue to take priority at school districts, career prospects in this industry are expected to increase within the next couple of years, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, job opportunities for paraprofessionals alone will increase 10 percent, creating 134,900 new jobs in the next decade, the Bureau states. Paraprofessionals earned about $22,200 in May 2008, the most recent statistics available from the Bureau. Career opportunities for childcare workers are also expected to increase by 11 percent within the next decade, establishing 142,100 new jobs. While an associate degree is not necessary to become a childcare worker, the original salary is usually low and a degree will most definitely increase your pay. Those who worked as childcare workers in elementary and middle schools earned on average $10.53 an hour in 2008, according to the most recent statistics from the Bureau.

Adult Education Courses at Ashford University

Program Name: BA - Education Studies

Program description:

Adult Education Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Master of Education: Adult Education and Development Concentration
Adult Learning Theory
Course Number EDU 500
Credits 4.0

Reviews, analyzes, and evaluates contemporary educational theory and practice as they relate to the teaching and learning process. This is viewed from the different philosophical perspectives of human development, motivational theory, learning theory, and how they affect the educational enterprise as they are applied to varied learning situations.


Perspectives on Adult Education
Course Number EDU 525
Credits 4.0

This course will examine adult education from historical perspectives, including social, economic, regulatory, and technological, that have shaped adult education. Students examine distance education, online education, and other modes of adult education.


Diversity in Adult Education
Course Number EDU 526
Credits 4.0

Provides students with practical and theoretical approaches to foster understanding of and appreciation for diversity. Students will learn how to create inclusive learning environments for adults in educational and non-educational settings. Students will learn ways to incorporate cultural diversity and diversity of ideas into instructional content.


Curriculum Design and Development
Course Number EDU 550
Credits 4.0

Provides students with the tools to plan, design and implement curricula in educational settings. Approaches to, and models of, curriculum and program design will be explored, with a specific emphasis on developing curricula for adult learners. The internal and external influences on curriculum and program development will be evaluated.


Organizational Training and Development
Course Number EDU 535
Credits 4.0

Examines the elements of training and development in organizational and educational environments. Students learn how to incorporate adult learning theory into training and developmental programs. Topics include planning, facilitating, and assessing training and development of adults.


Training Strategies and Assessment
Course Number EDU 565
Credits 4.0

Examines the primary components of managing the training function within an organization. Effective strategies to be explored include program development, budgeting, team roles, internal consulting, training delivery methods, project management, course development for different media, marketing and learning management systems.


Directed Research Project OR Adult Education Capstone
Course Number EDU 590 OR EDU 599
Credits 4.0

Edu 590: Enables Student To Complete A Research Project In The Field Of Major Concentration. The Research Project Will Be Monitored By A Supervising Faculty Member And Must Be Defended By The Student In An Oral Examination. The Oral Defense May Be Conducted In A Conference-style Meeting Of Student, Instructor, And Second Reader Or Technical Advisor. A Second Type Of Defense Allows Students To Present A Synopsis Of Their Project During One Of The Last Two Scheduled Class Meetings. Students Are Encouraged To Discuss The Project With An Instructor Or Academic Officer Early In Their Program. Students May Not Fulfill The Directed Research Requirement By Completing Another Course. Edu 599: Enables Students To Complete A Capstone Project In Their Field Of Major Concentration. The Capstone Will Be Monitored By A Supervising Faculty Member And Involves Applying The Theoretical And Practical Knowledge Gained In Prior Courses To Formulate A Solution Or Improvement To A Current Challenge In Adult Education.


Research Methods
Course Number RES 531
Credits 4.0

This course covers research methodology and strategic communications in business and the professions. It discusses research planning and design including the research proposal, identification of appropriate measurement instruments, and evaluation of alternative methodologies and their validity. Students are required to complete a minimum of a 20-page research proposal consistent with standards of the University's Directed Research Project (DRP). Students also acquire oral and written communication skills necessary to perform effectively as managers. All phases of the communications process - interpersonal, group, and public speaking - are illuminated throughout the course as are current challenges presented by new technology, the global marketplace, and workforce diversity.


Theory and Practice of e-Learning
Course Number EDU 522
Credits 4.0

Focuses on the design, development, and implementation of e-Learning. Topics include learning platforms for educational and corporate environments, online learning communities, designing content for online delivery, and preparing learners for online learning. Students will learn how to use e-Learning as a teaching tool in a traditional classroom or training environment.


Methods of Teaching in Adult Education
Course Number EDU 528
Credits 4.0

Provides a thorough examination of theories and methods of teaching, learning, and motivation for adult learners in education and in the workplace. Students will analyze teaching and learning models, apply learning and motivation theories to instruction, develop learning solutions for adults, use specific analysis tools, and discuss various issues that will influence adult learning in the future.


Assessing Adult Learners
Course Number EDU 529
Credits 4.0

Examines current theory and practice in assessment. Prepares students to evaluate leading assessment trends, models, methods, and tools used in workplace and educational settings. Students will analyze essential variables that influence adult learning, evaluate the costs and benefits of assessment programs, and develop formative and summative assessment plans that include authentic assessment techniques.


Leadership and Organizational Behavior
Course Number BUS 520
Credits 4.0

Analyzes the interaction of individual, group, and organizational dynamics that influence human behavior in organizations and determines appropriate management approaches to foster a productive work environment. Examines a variety of theories, models, and strategies used to understand motivation and individual behavior, decision making, the dynamics of groups, work teams, communication, leadership, power and politics, conflict resolution, work design, organizational structure and culture, and managing change. Provides a conceptual base for managers to interpret, assess, and influence human behavior in an organization.


Program description: The Master of Education (M.Ed.) program provides teachers, training and development professionals, human resource staff managers, and others the knowledge and skills to pursue or advance their careers in education, human resource, training, curriculum development, instructional technology, or trade and education association management.

The M.Ed. program of study includes courses covering functional areas and critical knowledge in education as well as courses incorporating business skills and information technology tools. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be able to apply key concepts and techniques to educational problems and issues.

Students who have not earned degrees from appropriate fields of study may be required to take additional coursework as a prerequisite for completing the program.

Adult Education Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Adult Education and Training
Foundations of Adult Education and Training
Course Number AET505

This course focuses on the principles of adult learning and andragogical theory. It addresses the history of adult learning, the characteristics of adult learners, key adult learning theories, and learning processes and styles. Additionally, the course investigates factors that influence adult education and training environments such as motivation, critical thinking skills, and ethics. Topics and Objectives History of Adult Learning Explore the history of adult learning. Explain the impact of federal mandates on adult education and training. Compare and contrast andragogy and pedagogy. Examine adult learning in a contemporary society. Purposes and Principles of Adult Education and Training Analyze the purposes of adult education and training. Examine the fundamental principles of adult learning. Identify the providers of adult education and training. Explore subject-matter categories of adult learning. Adult Development and Learning Examine the biological and psychological development of adult learners. Analyze the influences of sociocultural and integrative perspectives on development. Explore cognitive development in adulthood. Examine the notion of intelligence in reference to adult learners. Learning Process Explain memory and cognition. Analyze the adult learning process and experience. Examine key theories of learning. Learning Transactions with Adults Identify characteristics of adult learners. Analyze the impact of learning styles on adult learning. Examine ways to utilize andragogical techniques. Compare and contrast traditional and non-traditional instructional models. Adult Learning Environment Describe the characteristics of formal and informal adult education and training settings. Apply ethics to adult learning environments. Explore the application of critical thinking in the adult learning environment. Examine the motivation of adults in the learning environment. Describe the most common challenges in an education or in a training environment.



Instructional Design
Course Number AET515

This course focuses on systematic approaches to instructional design. Learners create an instructional plan that outlines each of the five components of a systematic instructional design model (i.e., ADDIE: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation). The course identifies trends and issues in instructional design for adult learners. Topics and Objectives Instructional Design Models and Analysis Analyze systematic approaches to instructional design. Examine the components of a needs assessment. Identify performance gaps based on a needs assessment. Design Construct goals for an instructional plan. Create performance-based objectives that align with instructional goals. Describe a summative assessment to support learner outcomes. Analyze the impact of learner characteristics and learning context on instructional design. Development Determine delivery modality. Select instructional strategies. Implementation Create an implementation schedule for the instructional plan. Evaluate resources for instructional delivery. Analyze the purposes of formative evaluations. Evaluation Examine strategies for evaluating a systematic approach to instructional design. Identify criteria for determining that design goals, performance-based objectives, and learning outcomes were achieved. Analyze possible recommendations for future use. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design Describe issues and trends in various instructional settings. Analyze issues and trends in the use of various instructional modalities. Predict how current issues and trends will impact the future of instructional design.


Instructional Strategies in Adult Education and Training
Course Number AET520

This course builds upon the foundation provided in the instructional design course and focuses on development and implementation of instruction that facilitates adult learning. Learners examine and apply models, strategies, and methods for planning and for implementing instruction. Instructional approaches, engagement strategies, and management of the instructional environment are explored. Topics and Objectives Effective Communication and Instructional Techniques Describe effective communication for facilitators. Analyze the relationship between interpersonal skills and instruction. Examine information components of an instructional module/training plan. Instructional Planning Explain components in the development of an instructional module/training plan. Analyze components in the implementation of an instructional module/training plan. Examine planning and instructional variables. Engagement of Adult Learners Analyze methods of engaging the adult learner. Describe the essential components of collaborative learning. Describe compelling questioning techniques. Instructional Approaches Examine the roles of the facilitator and the learner in various instructional approaches. Examine teaching/training concepts. Explain the rationale for selected instructional approaches. Create an audience-appropriate instructional module/training plan. Critical Thinking and Problem-Based Learning for Adults Examine problem-based learning. Employ components of critical thinking to improve cognitive skills. Management of the Instructional Environment Identify elements of effective course syllabi/instructional agendas. Analyze proactive management strategies. Describe appropriate responses to challenging participant behavior.


Facilitating Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners
Course Number AET525

This course focuses on facilitation strategies for meeting the needs of diverse adult learners. It examines differences among adult learners in language, literacy skills, and learning styles. It also utilizes previous learning experiences and provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to provide differentiated instruction to address different needs. In addition, this course covers the challenges and the opportunities that diversity and multiculturalism present in facilitating adult education and training. Topics and Objectives Connecting with the Adult Learner Review characteristics of adult learners. Identify learning styles of diverse adult learners. Describe the diverse adult learner population. Analyze characteristics of effective facilitators for diverse learners. Challenges and Opportunities of Diversity and Multiculturalism in Adult Learning Examine demographic profiles influencing adult learning. Examine the psychographic factors influencing adult learning. Identify categories of special needs learners. Explore challenges and opportunities of diversity and multiculturalism in adult education and training. Implications for the Facilitation of Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners Analyze types of regulations and policies that impact facilitation of instruction for diverse adult learners. Examine the facilitation implications for multicultural adult learners. Examine the implications of multicultural facilitators on adult learners. Strategies for Effective Facilitation of Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners Examine how to establish a foundation for working with adult learners. Explore effective learning environments for diverse learners. Analyze differentiated instruction as an effective means of facilitating learning. Supportive Strategies for Diverse Adult Learners Examine strategies for engaging diverse adults in their learning. Examine classroom communication strategies that support diverse adult learners. Identify support services for diverse adult learners. Explore language and literacy challenges that impact facilitation of instruction for diverse adult learners. Effective Diverse Curriculum Explore continuous improvement techniques to monitor and to adjust facilitation methods. Examine best practices to monitor diverse adult learners’ achievement of outcomes. Demonstrate modification strategies for assignments, instruction, and assessments for diverse learners


Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Learning
Course Number AET535

This course focuses on developing the skills necessary to become effective assessors of adult learners in postsecondary and training environments. It provides the fundamentals of varied classroom assessments and training evaluation models, such as formative and summative tests and authentic assessments. Learners develop assessments and analyze how assessment data is used to improve instruction and learning. Additionally, the purposes, the methods, and the reporting of evaluation for trainers are explored. Topics and Objectives Overview of Assessment Identify what assessment is and how it is used in learning environments Differentiate between assessment, evaluation, measurement, and testing Compare and contrast formative and summative assessment Assessment in Adult Education Explore the purposes of assessment in adult education Analyze the types of summative assessment Analyze ethical standards for assessments Using Assessment to Improve Instruction Describe effective assessment techniques Analyze the use of assessment to improve instruction and learning Evaluation Principles and Purposes Examine the guiding principles of evaluation Explore the purposes of evaluation in training Examine decision-making in evaluation Describe effective evaluation models Evaluation for Trainers Identify data sources for evaluation Explore data analysis for evaluation Examine the purpose and process of evaluation reporting


Coaching and Mentoring
Course Number EDL531

This course provides an exploration into how mentoring and coaching improves teaching and learning. This course examines mentoring and coaching competencies, including ethical guidelines, creating collegial relationships, building learning communities, effective communication, problem-solving and conflict resolution, and facilitating learning and accountability. Candidates will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to integrate and apply these competencies in real life and instructional leadership situations. Topics and Objectives Foundations of Coaching and Mentoring Identify characteristics of coaching. Identify characteristics of mentoring. Compare and contrast coaching and mentoring. Identify the dispositions necessary to be an effective coach and mentor. Explore the International Coach Federation Code of Ethics. Collegial Relationships Identify the role and responsibilities of a coach and of a mentor. Examine the elements of cognitive coaching. Analyze the 16 Habits of Mind. Demonstrate effective collaboration skills. Effective Communications Describe factors that impact communication. Describe effective communication processes. Illustrate strategies for promoting dialogue, resolving conflict, and problem solving. Mentors as Instructional Coaches Examine topics for instructional coaching. Analyze opportunities to cultivate learning focused relationships. Facilitating Results Explain the stages of mentoring. Identify ways to create awareness. Establish realistic goals and objectives. Design an action plan. Analyze effective modeling and motivation strategies. Develop a process to monitor progress and accountability. Coaches as Leaders of Change Develop an understanding of the effects of change on school culture. Identify ways to create and communicate support. Examine ways to manage change effectively. Explore mentoring and coaching as elements of professional growth.


E-Learning Design Technologies
Course Number AET545

This Course Provides Adult Learners The Opportunity To Design A Web-based E-learning Tutorial. The Focus Is On The Importance Of Planning, Principles Of Good Web-page Design, Storyboarding, And Elements Of Multimedia. Web-based Design Standards, As Well As Appropriate Use Of Web Pages And Multimedia, Are Analyzed. It Reviews E-learning Software, Computer-mediated Delivery Platforms, And Learning Management Systems. Topics And Objectives Analysis Phase And Introduction To Multimedia Review The Addie Instructional Design Process. Perform A Needs Assessment To Address A Training Need That Will Be Solved By A Web-based Tutorial. Identify Performance Gaps Based On The Needs Assessment. Identify Different Types Of Multimedia That Can Be Integrated Into E-learning. Design Phase And Storyboarding Write Instructional Goals And Performance Objectives Based On The Needs Analysis (gap Analysis). Apply Storyboard Principles For Creating A Web-based Tutorial. Select Appropriate Web-based Platforms For E-learning. Identify Different Strategies That Increase Adult Learner Engagement. Development Phase And Introduction To Web Design Analyze Effective E-learning Instructional Strategies And Delivery Modalities. Examine Html Development Techniques For An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Review Effective Web Design Techniques. Creation Of A Web-based Tutorial Create An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Analyze Page Layout Techniques. Compare And Contrast Multimedia Elements. Determine A Summative Assessment For A Web-based Tutorial. Implementation Of E-learning Publish An E-learning Tutorial To The Web. Analyze The Preparedness Of Learners For E-learning. Review E-learning Standards. Evaluation Of A Web-based Tutorial Examine E-assessment Tools. Evaluate The Instructional Effectiveness Of A Web-based Tutorial.


Performance Improvement and Management
Course Number AET550

This Course Provides Learners With An Overview Of Performance Improvement Principles. Learners Identify And Analyze Organizational Performance Gaps, Create Learning Interventions To Diminish Those Gaps, And Evaluate Training Using Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels. Topics And Objectives Human Performance Technology Define Performance Improvement Describe The Human Performance Technology (hpt) Process Demonstrate That Performance Improvement Is Systems-based Compare And Contrast The Components Of Performance Improvement And Of Instructional Design Relate The Performance Improvement Process To The Addie Model Human Performance Management Define Performance Management Examine The Key Features Of Ideal Performance Management Analyze Learning Theories And Their Impact On The Performance Management Process Performance Gaps Determine The Nature Of A Performance Gap Based On Motivation (affective Domain), Declarative Knowledge (cognitive Domain), And Procedural Knowledge (psychomotor Domain) Examine The Role Of The Performance Model In Identifying Performance Gaps Inspect The Causes Of Performance Gaps Performance Interventions Define Performance Interventions And The Role They Play In The Hpt Process Examine The Types Of Performance Interventions Inspect The Factors That Influence The Selection Of Performance Interventions Determine The Risks In Selecting An Inappropriate Intervention Performance Evaluations Examine The Four Levels Of Kirkpatrick’s Evaluation Model Examine The Types Of Performance Evaluations To Measure Results Of An Intervention Analyze The Factors That Influence The Evaluation Of Performance Justify The Success Of The Performance Intervention Becoming A Practitioner In Performance Management Inspect Roles Of Successful Practitioners In The Field Of Performance Management Review Opportunities In Performance Management Outline A Career Development Plan That Includes Certification, Continuing Education, And Job Outlook Examine Ethical Standards In Performance Management


Overview of the Community College
Course Number AET555

This course provides an overview of the community college. It examines global, national, and local perspectives of the community college. The course also examines the history and development, mission and purpose, functions, governance and organization, and trends and issues of community colleges. Topics and Objectives Historical Perspectives, Philosophies, and Missions Examine the history of community colleges Describe the historical and current functions of community colleges Explore the general mission of community colleges Governance and Organizational Structure Compare community college governance models Explore national and local governance issues Investigate community college organizational structures and their effects Examine the purpose of accreditation Investigate measurements of accountability Funding and Finances Identify sources of community college funding Analyze the relationship among funding, services, course and program offerings, and local and national economic issues Student Populations and Student Services Describe community college student populations Explore admission, enrollment, and registration policies Examine services offered to community college students Evaluate essential and non-essential services Explore retention issues Examine the role of articulation and its relationship to community college students Curriculum Explore community college curricula Examine curriculum development processes Identify types of degrees and certificates awarded by community colleges Instruction Examine instructional methodologies and delivery modalities Explore developmental education and its role in student success Describe services that support student learning Identify methods and challenges of assessment Roles and Challenges for Faculty Identify faculty roles Analyze faculty challenges and their effects on the institutional environment Examine faculty qualification and certification processes Explore the role and challenges of technology in the educational environment The Future of Community Colleges Describe research in and about community colleges Analyze trends and challenges related to the community college Investigate how community colleges respond to local social, political, and economic influences


Action Research and Evaluation
Course Number EDD581

This course examines action research and its role in decision-making and in educational practices. Students are introduced to various types of action research and to the elements of the action research process, including identifying a problem, determining a problem statement and a purpose, conducting a literature review, planning for the collection and the analysis of data, and creating a plan of action. Methods for collecting, evaluating, and analyzing data are discussed. Students identify ethical issues related to research as well, including a professional code of ethics, confidentiality, and research using human subjects. In addition, they synthesize and apply the content of the course by writing a proposal for an action research study. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Action Research Define action research. Distinguish between types of action research. Identify the components of action research. Review examples of action research. Explain how action research can be utilized to effect school improvement and change. Examine opportunities to conduct action research collaboratively. Introduction to the Action Research Process Examine the role of reflection on practice in generating ideas for a research focus. Determine appropriate topics for an action research study. Identify the elements of an effective research question. Determine varied sources relevant to a research problem. Explain the importance of the literature review. Compare qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Collecting Data Explain processes for selecting research participants. Describe varied types of data that can be collected to answer research questions. Examine qualitative research designs, methods, and issues in collecting data. Initial Steps in Developing an Action Research Study Examine quantitative research designs and methods, and issues in collecting data. Explain ways of ensuring validity in action research. Develop a plan for collecting data. Analyzing and Interpreting Data Explain the purpose of interim data analysis and its importance in action research. Describe ways to analyze and report results for qualitative data. Describe ways to analyze and report results for quantitative data. Draw conclusions from data. Ethical Issues Related to Educational Research Outline guidelines for conducting research using human subjects. Analyze the impact of technology on the ethical issue of confidentiality in educational research. Discuss the ethical use of data in educational decision-making. Assess ethical considerations when publishing reports of a research study. Develop a process for following ethical guidelines throughout an action research study. Creating a Proposal for an Action Research Study Produce a proposal for an action research study. Prepare an overview of the proposal for presentation.


E-Learning
Course Number AET541

Course Description This course focuses on e-learning for adult learners. Students apply instructional design techniques, learning theory, and technical tools for e-learning activities. The course also addresses the challenges associated with the e-learning environment. Topics and Objectives Foundations of E-Learning Identify the characteristics of e-learning. Summarize the evolution of e-learning. Analyze the purposes, benefits, and challenges of e-learning. Describe the instructional methods of an e-learning environment. Designing E-Learning Summarize the principles for designing effective e-learning instruction. Analyze the effect of personalization on e-learning. Evaluate the benefits of segmentation and pretraining. Explain methods for incorporating worked examples in e-learning environments. Instructional Considerations: Text and Graphics Summarize the principles for effective use of text in e-learning. Summarize the principles for integrating graphics in e-learning. Evaluate the use of text and graphics in instruction. Integrate text and graphics for effective instruction. Instructional Considerations: Text and Audio Identify the various technologies for audio in e-learning. Determine appropriate uses of audio in e-learning. Integrate text and audio for effective instruction. Analyze the application of audio in e-learning environments. Effective E-Learning Practices Describe the principles behind the effective use of practice in e-learning. Determine the effectiveness of feedback in practice exercises. Apply multimedia principles in practice exercises. Justify collaboration in e-learning. Evaluate the level of learner control in e-learning. Applications of E-Learning Guidelines Summarize e-learning principles that promote thinking skills. Analyze the role of simulations and games in e-learning. Prioritize guidelines for developing e-learning courseware.


Technology for the Adult Learner
Course Number AET531

This course explores a variety of ways in which technology can support and facilitate instruction for adult learners, including the use of web resources and multimedia.It also addresses the facilitator’s role in researching, selecting, integrating, and managing technology in an adult learning and training environment. The course focuses on technologies, software applications, and the evaluation of technology. Additionally, the course analyzes the effects of 21st century technology tools on intellectual property and other legal matters. Topics and Objectives Transformation of Online Learning Analyze how the delivery of adult education has changed over the past 50 years. Analyze the effect of modern technologies on adult education. Identify technology skills required by instructors. Facilitating Online Instruction Compare technology-based learning tools that enhance student learning. Analyze the importance of collaboration for student learning. Identify assessment strategies for the online environment. Synchronous Learning Identify the advantages and disadvantages of synchronous learning. Explain how technology tools can enhance synchronous learning. Identify strategies for facilitating synchronous online learning. Synchronous Versus Asynchronous Learning Identify the advantages and disadvantages of asynchronous learning. Identify strategies for facilitating asynchronous online learning. Compare synchronous learning to asynchronous learning. Administration of Technologies Identify challenges associated with managing the use of technologies. Evaluate an organization’s capacity for integrating technology to aid instruction. Analyze the functionality and purpose of various communication tools. Legal Matters Analyze the effect of modern technology tools on legal and ethical issues. Identify the key components of an acceptable use policy.


Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


Program description: Our Adult Education and Training degree program gives you the tools you need to enhance adult learning.

You'll focus on methods and techniques for engaging adult learners in a corporate training or community college setting, or any other academic or recreational instructional environment.

The course work emphasizes adult learning theory, the needs of diverse learners, critical issues and trends in adult education and training, instructional design and strategies, the use of technologies as well as assessment and learning. You'll also focus on coaching and mentoring, e-learning and instructional web design technologies.

Be a part of a lifetime of learning for today's adult learners. Enroll today in our Master of Arts in Education/Adult Education and Training degree program.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Adult Education Courses at Capella University

Program Name: MS - Post-secondary and Adult Education
Foundations of Theory and Practice in Master’s Studies
Course Number ED5002
Credits 4.0

This is a foundational course for learners in higher education and training specializations. Learners are introduced to discipline-specific topics and begin to put into practice the academic developmental and behavioral competencies they are expected to master during their degree program. Learners engage in scholarly inquiry, research, critical thinking, and communication within the context of their specialization. ED5002 must be taken by master’s learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Survey of Research Methodology
Course Number COUN5006
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of Graduate-level Approaches To Research Methodology. Learners Study Major Research Methodologies And Quantitative And Qualitative Approaches To Needs Assessment, Program Evaluation, And Program Design. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5006 Or Cst5006 Or Hs5006 Or Shb5006.


Adult Development and Learning
Course Number ED5315
Credits 4.0

This course presents theories and research related to adult development. Learners examine the changes that occur during the early, middle, and advanced stages of adulthood and analyze their effects on adult learning. Learners also consider the impact of gender, culture, and personal experience on adult learning and evaluate their related instruction implications. This course emphasizes critically reflective, transformational teaching and learning.


The Collaborative Nature of Adult Education
Course Number ED5311
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore the various approaches to collaborating in adult education. Learners examine the ways race, ethnicity, class, gender, and ability impact collaboration processes and identify the challenges of collaborating in a changing global environment. Learners also analyze best practices of designing collaborative processes and assessing collaborative learning and develop a collaboration action plan that combines


Theory and Methods of Educating Adults
Course Number ED7311
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study adult learning theory and learning styles and preferences to gain an understanding of the roles of instructor and student in adult education. Learners examine the ways race, ethnicity, class, gender, ability, and other forms of diversity impact the theory and practice of adult education. Learners further develop their skills in selecting and applying appropriate materials, methods, and techniques used to achieve particular learning objectives. This course incorporates adult learning from both theoretical and personal perspectives.


Critical Thinking in Adult Education
Course Number ED7590
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with a framework for critical inquiry and reflection. Learners examine models and best practices of thinking, reading, and acting critically in adult education. Learners also explore ways to evaluate and resolve conflicts and negotiate and facilitate conflict solutions.


International and Multicultural Perspectives in Postsecondary and Adult Education
Course Number ED7314
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze systems of power, privilege, and inequality in postsecondary and adult education and examine the importance of the presence of cultural differences in the classroom. Learners develop strategies for incorporating the multicultural perspectives into the classroom needed to address the needs of diverse learners and foster intercultural collaborative learning. Learners also explore international trends and issues and their role as educational leaders within their culturally diverse local and global communities.


Teaching Adults
Course Number ED7312
Credits 4.0

This course presents best practices of higher education teaching. Learners evaluate multiple teaching models and strategies and their underlying theoretical and research bases. Learners also examine cultural influences on teaching and learning; identify ways to incorporate technology into the teaching-learning process; and assess their teaching dispositions and educational philosophy.


Classroom Assessment in Education
Course Number ED7712
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore evidence-based classroom assessment and evaluation practices and apply a variety of tools and strategies to assess and evaluate learning. Learners also develop appropriate formative and summative classroom assessment techniques that address intended learning outcomes and promote learning in a global society.


Higher Education Curriculum Development and Teaching Strategies
Course Number ED8444
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is on curriculum development in higher education. Learners review the evolution of curriculum design and examine the impact of various design models on instructional frameworks and strategies. Learners analyze curricula that use face-to-face, online, and hybrid instructional platforms and develop curricula that meet diverse individual and cultural needs.


Postsecondary and Adult Education Capstone
Course Number ED5996
Credits 4.0

The capstone course is required for learners in the master’s Postsecondary and Adult Education specialization and is taken after completing all required and elective course work. Learners demonstrate proficiency in integrating learning from required and elective courses by completing a final project. For MS Postsecondary and Adult Education learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Program description: Postsecondary and Adult Education
The master’s Postsecondary and Adult Education specialization is designed to prepare learners to meet the challenges of changing global trends in education and contribute to the enrichment of the broader learning community. The curriculum helps learners develop and improve teaching skills by emphasizing reflective practice within adult education settings and integrating current theory with best practice in adult learning and teaching. Learners focus on the learning styles of individuals from various backgrounds, collaborative learning, and curriculum development for the adult learner. Learners who successfully complete this specialization are prepared to pursue careers as postsecondary educators in community college, distance education, college, university, corporate, or other adult education settings.

Program Name: PhD - Post-secondary and Adult Education
Foundations of Theory and Practice in Master’s Studies
Course Number ED5002
Credits 4.0

This is a foundational course for learners in higher education and training specializations. Learners are introduced to discipline-specific topics and begin to put into practice the academic developmental and behavioral competencies they are expected to master during their degree program. Learners engage in scholarly inquiry, research, critical thinking, and communication within the context of their specialization. ED5002 must be taken by master’s learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Adult Development and Learning
Course Number ED5315
Credits 4.0

This course presents theories and research related to adult development. Learners examine the changes that occur during the early, middle, and advanced stages of adulthood and analyze their effects on adult learning. Learners also consider the impact of gender, culture, and personal experience on adult learning and evaluate their related instruction implications. This course emphasizes critically reflective, transformational teaching and learning.


The Collaborative Nature of Adult Education
Course Number ED5311
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore the various approaches to collaborating in adult education. Learners examine the ways race, ethnicity, class, gender, and ability impact collaboration processes and identify the challenges of collaborating in a changing global environment. Learners also analyze best practices of designing collaborative processes and assessing collaborative learning and develop a collaboration action plan that combines


Theory and Methods of Educating Adults
Course Number ED7311
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study adult learning theory and learning styles and preferences to gain an understanding of the roles of instructor and student in adult education. Learners examine the ways race, ethnicity, class, gender, ability, and other forms of diversity impact the theory and practice of adult education. Learners further develop their skills in selecting and applying appropriate materials, methods, and techniques used to achieve particular learning objectives. This course incorporates adult learning from both theoretical and personal perspectives.


Critical Thinking in Adult Education
Course Number ED7590
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with a framework for critical inquiry and reflection. Learners examine models and best practices of thinking, reading, and acting critically in adult education. Learners also explore ways to evaluate and resolve conflicts and negotiate and facilitate conflict solutions.


International and Multicultural Perspectives in Postsecondary and Adult Education
Course Number ED7314
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze systems of power, privilege, and inequality in postsecondary and adult education and examine the importance of the presence of cultural differences in the classroom. Learners develop strategies for incorporating the multicultural perspectives into the classroom needed to address the needs of diverse learners and foster intercultural collaborative learning. Learners also explore international trends and issues and their role as educational leaders within their culturally diverse local and global communities.


Teaching Adults
Course Number ED7312
Credits 4.0

This course presents best practices of higher education teaching. Learners evaluate multiple teaching models and strategies and their underlying theoretical and research bases. Learners also examine cultural influences on teaching and learning; identify ways to incorporate technology into the teaching-learning process; and assess their teaching dispositions and educational philosophy.


Classroom Assessment in Education
Course Number ED7712
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore evidence-based classroom assessment and evaluation practices and apply a variety of tools and strategies to assess and evaluate learning. Learners also develop appropriate formative and summative classroom assessment techniques that address intended learning outcomes and promote learning in a global society.


Higher Education Curriculum Development and Teaching Strategies
Course Number ED8444
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is on curriculum development in higher education. Learners review the evolution of curriculum design and examine the impact of various design models on instructional frameworks and strategies. Learners analyze curricula that use face-to-face, online, and hybrid instructional platforms and develop curricula that meet diverse individual and cultural needs.


Postsecondary and Adult Education Capstone
Course Number ED5996
Credits 4.0

The capstone course is required for learners in the master’s Postsecondary and Adult Education specialization and is taken after completing all required and elective course work. Learners demonstrate proficiency in integrating learning from required and elective courses by completing a final project. For MS Postsecondary and Adult Education learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Survey of Research Methodology_
Course Number ED5006
Credits 4.0

Program description: The doctoral Postsecondary and Adult Education specialization is designed to prepare learners to meet the challenges of changing global trends in education and help them develop and improve effective teaching and leadership skills. The curriculum emphasizes major theories of adult learning, the needs of the multicultural adult learner, the development of effective learning communities and environments, critical analysis, program and curricular evaluation, and best practices in postsecondary instruction. Learners who successfully complete this specialization are prepared to pursue instructional leadership positions in a variety of postsecondary education settings, including adult education, distance education, continuing higher education, health care education, community development, and military education.

Adult Education Courses at Jones International University

Program Name: MEd in Adult Education
Research Methods: Improving Learning Organizations
Course Number EDU522
Credits 3.0

This course teaches students how to apply fundamental research skills in developing and delivering adult education programs, with an emphasis on short term, applied research applications as opposed to theoretical research. In adult education, the educator is often called upon to justify the development or continuation of an educational program based on research into the usefulness of that program to achieve desired results. This course provides a means to that end. The course project, Applied Research Report: Designing, Implementing, and Publishing Research in a Learning Organization, prepares adult educators to evaluate the results of a program in order to justify curricula and/or instructional practices. The student works with a sponsor within an organization to develop and evaluate an applied research project. Prerequisites: Admission or application for admission to the degree program is required to enroll in this course.


Strategic Planning for Educators
Course Number EDU542
Credits 3.0

This course establishes the requisite knowledge and skills needed to assist an educational organization in planning more effectively for a constantly changing internal and external environment. The course covers basic components of strategic planning processes that can be adapted to specific educational environments. In the course project, students develop a strategic plan that incorporates/facilitates the development of a vision and mission, and a positive school or organizational culture. For students in the MEd in Adult Education programs, the course project is called Strategic Plan: Improving Organizations and Culture. For students in the MEd in Education Leadership and Administration (K-12) programs, the course project is called Strategic Plan: Improving School Programs and Culture; it is a key assessment designed to demonstrate mastery of the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) professional standards. In addition, students in the K-12 programs will be assessed on their ability to develop a strategic plan that incorporates/facilitates evidence-based practices when implementing effective instructional programs and: (1) respond to the diverse needs of families and communities, and (2) mobilize community resources.


EDU544 Business Management for Learning Organizations
Course Number EDU544
Credits 3.0

This course establishes a working knowledge of business planning to achieve organizational objectives by introducing considerations related to: Finance Principles of management Applications of information technology and systems Human resource management Operational management In the course project, Business Proposal: Integrating Business Decision Making into Educational Organizations, students develop either a business case or a grant proposal for a real-world organization of their choosing. The purpose of the proposal is to convince a person (or persons) in authority to commit money, people, and/or resources (existing assets) to the proposal.


Needs Assessment for Learning Environments
Course Number EDU630
Credits 3.0

This course introduces approaches and techniques for planning a training needs assessment so that the needs of an organization are not only met, but also anticipated. Assessment is a decision-making tool that helps an organization measure where it is, compared to where it wants to be. The course project, Needs Assessment: Planning for Learning Environments, demonstrates how analysis and assessment grow in importance as organizations become more concerned with competitive advantage and employee expertise. Applying analysis, theory, and skills to real problems, students create instruments, gather data, and consider how to counter objections and influence decision makers.


Assessment Strategies to Improve Adult Learning
Course Number EDU653
Credits 3.0

This course provides adult educators with the necessary knowledge and skills to develop valid, reliable, and fair evaluation plans, tests, and assessments for adult education and organizational learning. The course is intended for adult educators who will develop and implement adult education programs. Many of the principles and practices, however, can also be applied to workplace performance assessment and program evaluation. In the course project, Assessment Plan: Evaluation in Adult Education, students will design valid, reliable, and fair tests and scoring rubrics as well as provide evaluation and reporting results and cost-benefit analysis. Additionally, they will write clear, concise, and complete learning objectives and employ them in formative and summative assessment elements


Adult Learning Theory
Course Number EDU681
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to adult education theories and practices. Teaching and learning strategies for adult learners, including case studies, problem-solving strategies, collaborative learning, and distance learning techniques are discussed and modeled throughout the course. The course project, Adult Learning Program: Applying Theories and Strategies to a Real-world Adult Learning Environment, focuses students on developing a unit of instruction or program for adult learners. By analyzing the adult learning environment and selecting strategies for instruction and assessment, this project moves the student from studying educational theories into creating personally useful and insightful applications.


Capstone: The Professional Adult Educator
Course Number EDU669
Credits 3.0

This course represents the culmination of the master’s program. It is designed to give students a chance to synthesize their learning by producing a capstone project that exemplifies their newly acquired knowledge and expertise. Working alone or with a partner or team, they will select something from their educational portfolio and develop it further as proof of readiness to receive a master’s degree. In the course project, Capstone: Designing the Professional Portfolio, candidates apply knowledge and skills they have acquired during their tenure at JIU to a real educational issue or opportunity. The project may take any form, as long as it meets the specific educational objectives defined for the course. Project examples include: A grant proposal An environmental research scan A program development and/or implementation An appraisal of an existing program An internship A website Prerequisites: Academic advisor permission required for registration.


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


BBA or BC course, level 300 - 499

Program description: JIU’s MEd in Adult Education will provide you the practical skills, techniques, and confidence to excel in this growing industry. Our project-based degree program is comprehensive – you will address not only theory, organizational development strategies and assessments of adult learning, but apply this new knowledge to real-world situations.


Adult Education Courses at Walden University

Program Name: Ph.D. in Education
Development of the Scholar-Practitioner
Course Number EDUC 8110
Credits 4.0

Building on the Carnegie Foundation’s metaphor of “stewards of the discipline”, students explore the role of scholar-practitioner and the expectations and responsibilities inherent in obtaining a Ph.D. in Education. Based on this understanding, students develop a Professional Development Plan to guide their progress through the program. Strategies for success and orientations to the University and online learning are also provided.


Principles of Social Change
Course Number EDUC 8111
Credits 4.0

Consistent with the mission of Walden University, this course “sets the stage” for the remainder of the program, by providing students with a framework for their work as scholars, and as agents of positive social change in education. Students examine foundational theories of education, while looking toward their future role in the discipline. Students also begin developing their skills as scholarly writers. (Taken concurrently with Development of the Scholar-Practitioner).


Social Change in Education
Course Number EDUC 8112
Credits 4.0

The choice to affect positive social change in education demands that scholar-practitioners have the requisite skills and abilities to take responsibility for generating new knowledge, conserving the values of education, and communicating that information to others. In this second course on social change, students examine these key principles of disciplinary stewardship, while building strategies to engage the scholarship in education. (Prerequisite: Foundational Courses 1 and 2. Taken concurrently with RSCH 8100).


Breadth: Theories of Human Development
Course Number SBSF 8210
Credits 4.0

Most Specializations In The Ph.d. In Education Program Require Completion Of Knowledge Area Modules (kams).the Kam Allows You To Focus Directly On Your Area Of Interest, From Initial Inquiry To The Final Dissertation. Six Kams Set The Framework For Your Faculty-guided Study, Each Comprising Three Components: •breadth: You Investigate A Range Of Theories And Concepts From Available Scholarly Literature. Kam Ii: Principles Of Human Development (12 Cr.) In Kam Ii, Students Explore Human Development From A Variety Of Perspectives, Including Those Defined By Biology, Anthropology, And Psychology. They Examine How Culture (e.g., Race, Nationality, Ethnicity, Social Class, Sex, Sexual Orientation, And Disability) Influences Human Development, And They Come To Know The Individual As Part Of A Larger Context In A Multicultural Society.


Depth: Current Research on Social Systems and Adult Education
Course Number EDUC 8224
Credits 4.0

Most Specializations In The Ph.d. In Education Program Require Completion Of Knowledge Area Modules (kams).the Kam Allows You To Focus Directly On Your Area Of Interest, From Initial Inquiry To The Final Dissertation. Six Kams Set The Framework For Your Faculty-guided Study, Each Comprising Three Components: •depth: You Thoroughly Research A Specific Concept Or Issue That Is Important To You Kam Iii: Principles Of Organizational And Social Systems (14 Cr.) In Kam Iii, Students Apply Social Systems Theory To Examine How Different Parts Of A System Interact, In Order To Better Analyze And Understand Education In The Context Of The Larger Society. The Primary Models Of Structured System Theories Are Presented As A Background And Theoretical Framework For Other Knowledge Areas. Specialized Kams Are Also Required For Particular Specializations. For A Detailed List Of Requirements, See Each Specialization.


Application: Professional Practice, Social Systems, and Adult Education
Course Number EDUC 8234
Credits 4.0

Most Specializations In The Ph.d. In Education Program Require Completion Of Knowledge Area Modules (kams).the Kam Allows You To Focus Directly On Your Area Of Interest, From Initial Inquiry To The Final Dissertation. Six Kams Set The Framework For Your Faculty-guided Study, Each Comprising Three Components: •application: You Draw On Theories And Research Emerging From The Breadth And Depth Components And Apply This Knowledge To A Real-world Situation


Breadth: Theories of Organizational and Social Systems
Course Number SBSF 8310
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Research Theory, Design and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100D
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans. (Prerequisite a Foundations course or first course in a program)


Quantitative Reasoning
Course Number RSCH 8200D
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis and applying statistical concepts. Students explore classical quantitative research designs and common statistical tests, the importance of quality assurance, and ethical and social change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. This course approaches statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting appropriate statistical tests for a research design. Students use statistical software to calculate statistics and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a quantitative research plan. (Prerequisite: RSCH 810.0)


Breadth: Principles for Adult Education Leaders
Course Number EDUC 8514
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Depth: Current Research in Adult Education and Learning
Course Number EDUC 8524
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Application: Professional Practice in Adult Learning
Course Number EDUC 8534
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Depth: Current Research in Program Planning and Delivery
Course Number EDUC 8624
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Application: Professional Practice for Adult Education Leaders
Course Number EDUC 8634
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8250C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis, and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding multivariate data analysis and applying more advanced statistical concepts. Students explore comprehensive quantitative research designs and suitable statistical tests, the importance of quality assurance, and ethical considerations and social social-change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. This course approaches statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting the appropriate research design and statistical tests for more complex research questions or problems. Students use statistical software to perform analyses and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a quantitative research plan.


Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8350C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Advanced Mixed Methods Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8450C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. The course emphasizes integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practice in data analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a truly mixed mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Program description: Walden’s Ph.D. in Education program offers educators and administrators the opportunity to grow as scholars and innovators in higher education. Gain access to distinguished faculty members, ongoing support, and three learning formats, depending on your chosen specialization. Conduct original research in your area of interest, deepen your research skills, and prepare to contribute as an education leader, administrator, faculty member, or policymaker.

Specializations (in addition to the General Program)

  • Adult Education Leadership
  • Assessment, Evaluation, and Accountability
  • Community College Leadership
  • Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Educational Technology
  • Global and Comparative Education
  • Higher Education
  • K–12 Educational Leadership
  • Leadership, Policy, and Change
  • Learning, Instruction, and Innovation
  • Self-Designed
  • Special Education


Walden offers both state-approved educator licensure programs as well as programs and courses that do not lead to licensure or endorsements. Prospective students must review their state licensure requirements prior to enrolling.

Prospective Alabama students: Contact the Teacher Education and Certification Division of the Alabama State Department of Education at 1-334-242-9935 to verify that these programs qualify for teacher certification, endorsement, and/or salary benefits.

Prospective Washington state students are advised to contact the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction at 1-360-725-6275 to determine whether Walden’s programs in the field of education are approved for teacher certification or endorsements in Washington state. Additionally, teachers are advised to contact their individual school district as to whether this program may qualify for salary advancement.

Program Name: B.S. in Instructional Design and Technology
Communication Skills For Career Development
Course Number COMM 1000
Credits 1.0

This course is designed to provide students with a practical application of the contemporary communication skills necessary for career development and career success. Topics include investigation of career fields and the communication and technology skills that are essential to those careers. Examples include technology-supported written, oral, private, and public communication. Students will be able to assess and analyze their personal communication and technology skills and strategize ways to apply them as part of their professional development goals. Note about required first courses: Students should review the program description section of this Walden University Catalog carefully to determine which first course is required.


Understanding Today’s Instructional Environments
Course Number EDUC 1014
Credits 5.0

In today’s world, learning can take place anytime, anywhere. This course provides an overview of the various settings in which teaching and learning occur. Students explore the dynamics of traditional face-to-face, hybrid, and online instructional environments found in such areas as corporate training, higher education, K–12 education, government, healthcare, and nonprofit organizations.


How People Learn
Course Number EDUC 1015
Credits 5.0

This foundational course provides a broad examination of the major theories of how humans learn, including behaviorism, constructivism, and emerging theories based on brain research. Students also explore the concepts of multiple intelligences and learning styles as well as the influences that emotion, culture, and motivation have on the learning process.


Human Development
Course Number EDUC 2003
Credits 5.0

In order to fully appreciate and understand ourselves and others, we must have a basic understanding of human cognitive, emotional, and social development. In this course, students examine the basic developmental stages that all humans undergo throughout their lifespan, from infancy to adulthood. These topics are presented and explored with consideration given to issues of gender, ethnicity, social class, and culture.


Literacy in the 21st Century
Course Number EDUC 2004
Credits 5.0

The technology- and information-rich world in which we live and work requires an expanded definition of what it means to be literate. Students examine the skills and strategies necessary for success in a digital information society and explore multimedia and Internet technologies that enhance learning by facilitating collaboration, communication, and problem-solving. (Prerequisite: EDUC 1014 Understanding Today’s Instructional Environments.)


Curriculum Design
Course Number EDUC 3004
Credits 5.0

This course provides the fundamental skills needed for planning, designing, and delivering engaging learning experiences. Students examine the elements of effective curriculum design, learn how to write measurable learning objectives, and explore tools, technologies, and resources for developing curriculum. (Prerequisite: EDUC 1014 Understanding Today’s Instructional Environments.)


Evaluation and Assessment
Course Number EDUC 3005
Credits 5.0

Evaluation of programs and the assessment of learners are fundamental to the process of designing effective learning experiences. In this course, students investigate major concepts, principles, and methodologies related to evaluation and assessment. Topics include selection of assessment tools, measurement of learning outcomes, and performance evaluation. Students learn how to use information gained from assessments as a tool for improving learning. (Prerequisite: EDUC 1015 How People Learn.)


Technology and Learning
Course Number EIDT 2001
Credits 5.0

Technology today facilitates and supports learning in ways never before possible. In this course, students learn how computers, multimedia tools, and other educational technologies can be used to differentiate the learning experience, provide access, and meet the needs of diverse learners. Students examine current trends and gain an understanding of the appropriate integration of technology and instruction. (Prerequisite: EDUC 1014 Understanding Today's Instructional Environments.)


Web Design I
Course Number EIDT 2002
Credits 5.0

This course presents the fundamental techniques and principles of effective Web design. Students learn the basics of building Web sites that incorporate good functionality and design elements in order to meet the needs of a diverse audience. Topics include introductory hypertext markup language (HTML), common graphic and Web publishing standards, Web publication protocols, and basic principles of Web site layout and design.


Ethical and Fair Use of Instructional Materials
Course Number EIDT 3003
Credits 5.0

Instructional designers are faced with the challenge of finding and using materials from various resources. In this course, students examine the issues related to the use of licensed and copyrighted content in the development of instructional materials. Students explore the legal and ethical implications of copyright, fair use, and Creative Commons licenses when designing materials for both nonprofit and for-profit entities.


Introduction to Distance Education
Course Number EIDT 2003
Credits 5.0

While distance learning is not a new concept, advances in technology and the Internet have been a catalyst for the rapid expansion of distance education to meet a variety of learning needs. This course provides a comprehensive overview of distance education. Students examine the field to gain both a historical perspective and an understanding of current trends. Students also gain the basic concepts, models, and technologies of distance learning. (Prerequisite: EDUC 1014 Understanding Today’s Instructional Environments.)


Instructional Design I
Course Number EIDT 2004
Credits 5.0

The instructional designer plays a key role in developing education and training programs in both the public and private sectors. In this course, students are introduced to the field of instructional design. They gain an understanding of the role an instructional designer plays in constructing the learning experience and explore the essential job functions and career paths available in this field.


Multimedia Tools
Course Number EIDT 3002
Credits 5.0

Multimedia tools allow instructional designers to be creative and develop innovative learning environments. This course provides an introduction to the design, production, and evaluation of multimedia for instructional purposes. Students experiment with tools commonly used for the creation of multimedia elements and learn how to create basic multimedia components incorporating audio, video, and visual graphics.


Instructional Design II
Course Number EIDT 3004
Credits 5.0

This Course Is A Continuance Of The Principles Learned In Instructional Design I. Students Explore The Basic Elements Of Commonly Used Instructional Design Theories And Models And Compare The Processes And Procedures Of These Models. They Gain A Working Knowledge Of The Instructional Design Process, Including How To Identify Learning And Performance Gaps And How To Design And Implement Instructional Solutions. (prerequisites: Eidt 2004 Instructional Design I And Educ 3004 Curriculum Design.)


Instructional Design II
Course Number EIDT 4004
Credits 5.0

In This Course, Students Apply The Principles Of Instructional Design To A Learning Situation. They Also Apply Their Knowledge Of The Instructional Design Process In Order To Define Learning Goals And Outcomes, As Well As To Create Instructional Materials, And Evaluate The Effectiveness Of Those Materials. (prerequisites: Eidt 3004 Instructional Design Ii And Cmis 4201 Human Factors.)


Web Design II
Course Number EIDT 4002
Credits 5.0

This Is A Project-based Course In Which Students Build On Their Basic Knowledge Of Web Design To Learn More Advanced Design And Development Skills. Students Apply Their Knowledge Of Web Design, Multimedia Tools, And Principles Of Visual Literacy To The Creation Of A Web Site. Emphasis Is Placed On The Development Of Web Sites That Incorporate Multimedia Elements For Education And Training. (prerequisites: Eidt 2002 Web Design I, Eidt 3002 Multimedia Tools, And Cmis 2001 Internet Computing.)


Instructional Design and Technology Capstone
Course Number EIDT 4001
Credits 5.0

This capstone course provides students with the opportunity to showcase their skills and creativity by applying their knowledge of instructional design, learning environments, and multimedia tools to an authentic task. Students work with a client or explore a case study to identify an instructional need and construct an appropriate solution.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSI 1001
Credits 5.0

Microsoft Windows 95 - Service and Support: Managing Disks

Ethical Leadership
Course Number BUSI 3002
Credits 5.0

This online leadership course helps prepare students to assume a leadership role in the modern organization. The basic principles of leadership, motivational theory, the importance of communication, and current and future trends are introduced. Students assess, discuss, and learn how to apply their own styles of leadership in the workplace and the community. Emphasis is on ethical leadership through personal and interpersonal effectiveness and organizational development. Students also learn the importance of followership and the similarities between the roles of follower and leader at all levels of the organization. (Prerequisite: BUSI 1001 Introduction to Business.)


Dynamics of Change
Course Number BUSI 3003
Credits 5.0

Students examine change as it impacts people, processes, and products. They learn to employ tools for dealing with and managing change. They learn methods for coping with change as an individual, a member of a group, and a member of an organization. (Prerequisite: Introduction to Management and Leadership)


Electives
Credits 35.0

7 courses


Program description: As technology transforms the way we learn in school and at work, instructional design professionals are in growing demand. Walden’s B.S. in Instructional Design and Technology prepares you to design training programs and leverage technology to improve individual and organizational performance. Gain the skills you need to succeed in corporate training, education, healthcare, military, or other sectors as you learn to identify training needs, apply learning theory, and design instruction. Learn cutting-edge instructional techniques from a recognized leader in online learning.

Concentrations

  • Business and Organizational Change
  • General Program
  • Human Factors and Interface Design

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