Online Art and Design Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its art and design courses to be successful designers, ad designers, advertising designers, commercial designers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 8,900 people employed as fine artists, including painters, sculptors, and illustrators alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $50,630. Electrical and electronics drafters make on average $54,800 per year and there are about 30,590 of them employed today.

Art and Design Organizations Art and Design Common Job Tasks
  • drawing pictures
  • modifying images
  • reading books
Popular Journals & Magazines
courses
 

Ranked by Excellence

Art and Design Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: BS in Business Administration - New Media / Internet Marketing
academic strategies for the business professional
Course Number CS 113
Credits 5.0

Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces the student to the purposes and processes of the university.An emphasis is placed on study, communication and thinking skills that support academic achievement.


Accounting For Nonaccounting Majors
Course Number AC 113
Credits 5.0

h is course emphasizes the use of accounting by managers in a business environment. Topics covered include accounting concepts, internal control, current assets, noncurrent assets, liabilities, and equity. h e course is specii cally designed for nonaccounting majors, and emphasis is placed on accounting areas affecting business owners and managers.


Macroeconomics
Course Number Bu 204

This course includes analysis and study of macroeconomic theory, principles and practice.


Microeconomics
Course Number BU 224

Global Business
Course Number MT 220
Credits 5.0

This course gives students an overview of global business. Students receive an introduction to the terminology and the cultural, economic, strategic, market, and production differences encountered in the global business environment. This course serves as an introduction to the factors involved in making business decisions regarding globalization. Case studies and real-world scenarios will illustrate the reality of doing business on this broad scale.


Business math
Course Number MM 255

Business math presents math skills and knowledge that students can apply to solve financial problems


Introduction To Management
Course Number MT 140
Credits 5.0

This course will give students an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to real-world management problems and scenarios.


Small Business Management
Course Number MT 209
Credits 5.0

In this course, students will create a business plan applying the principles of small business organization and management. Students will enhance problem-solving skills and develop a foundational understanding of entrepreneurial principles.


Finance
Course Number MT 217
Credits 5.0

Marketing
Course Number MT 219
Credits 5.0

Managerial Accounting for Business Professionals
Course Number AC 330
Credits 6.0

This course emphasizes how accounting information can be used to aid management in planning business activities, controlling operations, and making decisions that promote profitability and sustainability. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, budgeting, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, variance analysis, balanced scorecard, and relevant cost analysis in the decision-making process.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number MT 302
Credits 6.0

This course explores human behavior in organizations. Students examine individual behavior, attitudes, personality, values, perception, and emotions and how these affect organization outcomes. The course also looks at the theories, concepts, and application of motivation, as well as the importance of stress management and professional ethics and etiquette. Students gain an understanding and appreciation for communication processes, channels, and styles. They also gain a set of organizational design tools.



Marketing Research
Course Number MT 355
Credits 6.0

This course explores how an organization collects and interprets information about the marketplace to develop effective strategies. It covers the use of statistical and analytical techniques used to measure and predict consumer behavior, assist product and service developers, guide sales or service management decisions, and evaluate marketing initiatives. The use of the Internet in marketing research is an integral part of the course.


Operations Management
Course Number MT 435
Credits 6.0

This course combines theory with practical applications in developing and managing software applications that support business functions. Key issues such as risk management, technology transfer, control, modeling and quality assurance are covered.


Corporate Finance
Course Number MT 480
Credits 6.0

Corporate Finance is an upper-level finance course designed to provide a framework for understanding and analyzing investment and financial decisions of corporations. A basic understanding of how financial assets are priced is necessary to understand how to make a good decision for the corporation.


Management Policy and Strategy
Course Number MT 460
Credits 6.0

This course demonstrates how to create a strategic business plan. Students learn how to craft, communicate, implement, and monitor a strategic plan, reformulating it as the need arises.


Bachelor's Capstone in Management
Course Number MT499
Credits 6.0

Internet Marketing
Course Number IT 437
Credits 6.0

This course explores various Internet marketing strategies and the role marketing plays in building a successful website. Students learn how to use the Web to earn revenue and build recognition. Different marketing strategies are introduced to drive Internet traffic to a site as well as to keep audiences coming back.


Advertising in the Twenty-First Century
Course Number MT 359
Credits 6.0

This course looks at integrated marketing communications through a comprehensive plan that evaluates the strategic roles of general advertising, direct response, sales promotion, and public relations. It examines both established advertising media (print, radio, and television) and alternative and emerging medias (the Internet and beyond), focusing on how they influence communication strategies to manage demand and to sell products and services.


Marketing
Course Number MT 219
Credits 5.0

Internet Business Fundamentals
Course Number IT 337
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Marketing Management
Course Number MT 450

Program description: This course explores various internet marketing stratergies and role marketing plays in building a successful website. students learn how to use the web to earn revenue and build recognition. Different marketing stratergies are introduced to drive internet traffic to sitea as well as to keep audiences coming back.

Program Name: BS in Information Technology - New Media /Internet Marketing
Data Modeling For Health Informatics
Course Number IT 238
Credits 5.0

This course covers data modeling for health care systems. Students will be introduced to the following topics: entity-relationship modeling, normal forms, database creation, and data manipulation using SQL. Students will complete hands-on assignments and case studies related to the health care industry.


Academic Strategies For The It Professional
Course Number CS 114
Credits 5.0

Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces students to the purposes and processes of university education. An emphasis is placed on study, communication, and thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation. Choose either CS114 or CS121.


pathways to academic success
Course Number CS 121

Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces the student to the purposes and processes of the university.An emphasis is placed on study, communication and thinking skills that support academic achievement.


Introduction To Website Development
Course Number IT 117
Credits 5.0

Learning The Value Of Self-promotion Equips Students To Demonstrate Their Skills To An Audience. This Course Investigates The World Wide Web And The Internet. Students Learn The Basic Concepts Of Web Development And E-commerce Along With Basic Web Page Design. By Creating An Individual Online Portfolio Or Biography Using Html, Xhtml, And Css (cascading Style Sheets), Students Will Develop Skills For Today And Tomorrow.


Database Concepts Using Microsoft Access
Course Number IT 163
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to relational database management systems. Students will use a relational database management system to create and maintain a database. Students will create filters, sorts, queries, forms, and reports. Emphasis will be placed on the skills needed to meet user requirements.


Data Modeling For Health Informatics
Course Number IT 238
Credits 5.0

This course covers data modeling for health care systems. Students will be introduced to the following topics: entity-relationship modeling, normal forms, database creation, and data manipulation using SQL. Students will complete hands-on assignments and case studies related to the health care industry.


Foundations In Information Technology
Course Number IT 190
Credits 5.0

Students will explore the basic concepts of information technology including hardware, software, and networks. The student will gain a practical understanding of how computer hardware and operating systems work. Topics include personal computer configuration and maintenance, along with the fundamentals of system software installation and administration.


Foundations Of Programming Using Visual Basic
Course Number IT 193
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of programming using Visual Basic. Basic concepts and syntax used to write programs, including variables, input, output, looping, and program flow, are introduced. Students will design and develop simple, graphical user interface-based applications using the Visual Studio development environment.


Foundations Of Programming Using Java
Course Number IT 258
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming in Java, where students learn analysis and design techniques of software engineering. Projects and assignments cover numerous aspects of program development. Students successfully completing the course will have the necessary background to analyze, design, and implement basic software solutions in Java.


Networking Concepts
Course Number IT 273
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the concepts behind today's networks. It outlines current network design, explaining the OSI Model and the methods of carrying data over wired and wireless media. Other topics include fundamental network design components such as topologies and access methods, basic administration of network operating systems, and troubleshooting methods for data transmission and recovery.


Introduction To Management
Course Number MT 140
Credits 5.0

This course will give students an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to real-world management problems and scenarios.


Small Business Management
Course Number MT 209
Credits 5.0

In this course, students will create a business plan applying the principles of small business organization and management. Students will enhance problem-solving skills and develop a foundational understanding of entrepreneurial principles.


Global Business
Course Number MT 220
Credits 5.0

This course gives students an overview of global business. Students receive an introduction to the terminology and the cultural, economic, strategic, market, and production differences encountered in the global business environment. This course serves as an introduction to the factors involved in making business decisions regarding globalization. Case studies and real-world scenarios will illustrate the reality of doing business on this broad scale.


Project Managment I
Course Number IT 301
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Human Computer Interaction
Course Number IT 302
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Technology Infrastructure
Course Number IT 331
Credits 6.0

This course explores the concepts and purpose of information technology infrastructure. Emphasis is placed on expanding the student’s knowledge of computer networks and data transmissions and applying those concepts to an organization’s technology requirements.


Internet Business Fundamentals
Course Number IT 337
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Structured Query language
Course Number IT 350
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


IT Consulting Skills
Course Number IT 402
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


System Analysis and Design
Course Number IT 460
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Bachelor's Capstone in Information Technology
Course Number IT 499
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Website Development
Course Number IT 245
Credits 5.0

This course introduces activities related to website development. The concepts begin with the planning stages of interface design, site mapping, and storyboards. Elements such as tables, forms, rollover buttons, hyperlinks, text formatting and management, navigation systems, inserting multimedia, and implementing Cascading Style Sheets will be explored.


Fundamentals of Web Graphics
Course Number IT 247
Credits 5.0

Students will learn how to create appropriate Web graphics using popular image editing tools. Throughout the course, they will create a collection of custom graphics that will be displayed in an e-portfolio layout. Topics will include resizing, resolution, optimization, digital photo enhancement, custom banner and button creation, and more.


Marketing
Course Number MT 219
Credits 5.0

Internet Marketing
Course Number IT 437
Credits 6.0

This course explores various Internet marketing strategies and the role marketing plays in building a successful website. Students learn how to use the Web to earn revenue and build recognition. Different marketing strategies are introduced to drive Internet traffic to a site as well as to keep audiences coming back.


Advertising in the Twenty-First Century
Course Number MT 359
Credits 6.0

This course looks at integrated marketing communications through a comprehensive plan that evaluates the strategic roles of general advertising, direct response, sales promotion, and public relations. It examines both established advertising media (print, radio, and television) and alternative and emerging medias (the Internet and beyond), focusing on how they influence communication strategies to manage demand and to sell products and services.


Marketing Management
Course Number MT 450

Program description: Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a career focus area in/ New Media and Internet Marketing program have the opportunity to learn from courses in information technology, networking technology, and marketing. Learn more about the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a career focus area in New Media and Internet Marketing program at Kaplan University here.

Program Name: Cisco Certified Design Associate
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

n/a


Program description: If you are interested in designing routed and switched network infrastructures and services involving LAN, WAN, and broadband access for businesses and organizations, consider this program. The Cisco Certified Design Associate (CCDA) Certificate program demonstrates how Cisco network infrastructure can help businesses and organizations link with their employees, customers, and supply-chain partners. The program is designed to help students prepare for CCDA certification.* After the CCNA, the CCDA is the next step toward achieving Cisco Certified Design Professional (CCDP) certification.

Art and Design Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Bachelor's (BFA) - Digital Design
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Design Principles
Course Number VCDD 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a foundation class in principles relating to all areas of visual design. In this course, students can develop an awareness of the basic elements of visual language, aesthetics sensitivity, and the ability to think and act as a designer. Students explore methods for evoking intuitive responses through color, shape, texture, rhythm, line, and other compositional elements. The class consists of both practical studio-based assignments and contextual studies areas.


Fundamentals of Color
Course Number VCDD102
Credits 4.5

This is a theoretical and practical course examining the visual forces of color and color relationships in traditional and electronic media. This foundation-level class is essential to all design students. Students can develop knowledge of color principles and the ability to manipulate hue, value and chroma as well as sensitivity to aesthetic and psychological qualities.


Computer Design I
Course Number VCDD 201
Credits 4.5

Utilizing digital media and traditional visualization techniques in the production of graphic art for print and screen, this course will develop skills accrued during Intro to Mac; examining closely the potential of the Macintosh or PC as a creative and communication tool. All assignments are related to professional practice. Adobe CS (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Flash, Acrobat) is the default software set for this class.


Drawing Concepts
Course Number VCDD 202
Credits 4.5

The techniques of drawing basic forms and shapes are developed through exercises that are designed to develop perceptual skills. The student studies volume, tone, texture, perspective, and composition. The exercises are presented in sequence and are designed to develop the individual student's basic drawing methods and techniques. Subject matter can vary from still life to figure drawing.


Foundation Illustration
Course Number VCDD 203
Credits 4.5

This course explores concepts, methods and materials employed in contemporary illustration. Emphasis is placed upon development of ideas and the exploration of various media and techniques. This basic course encourages a creative and open approach to visual thinking and problem solving. It is an essential foundation for all further areas of design study.


Foundation Photography
Course Number VCDD 204
Credits 4.5

This course is an introduction to the aesthetics, concepts, and techniques of photography. Students apply this knowledge as they explore traditional or digital photography. This course is an essential foundation for all further areas of design study.


Creative Research & Development
Course Number VCDD 205
Credits 4.5

As a foundation in understanding the nature of creativity, the goal of this course is to encourage and enable students to become self-motivated, capable of overseeing, independently and collaboratively, all aspects of the creative process. Key skills, essential in all the creative disciplines, will be developed through a series of lively group projects and individual assignments. These include competences in visual and literary research; the generation and development of ideas; critical evaluation; contextual analysis; discursive and collaborative skills; competence in developing core concerns of the individual student.


Portfolio Development and Review
Course Number VCDD 300
Credits 4.5

Portfolio Presentation and Review is designed to begin the process of developing a professional presentation of lower level skills need to move forward to an in depth upper level study of Visual Communication. This course will also act as a lower level capstone to assure knowledge of lower level skills before moving forward to the upper division studies.


Foundation Graphic Design
Course Number VCDD 210
Credits 4.5

Graphic design is the translation of ideas and concepts into structural order and visual form. This course aims to familiarize students with a brief history of graphic design and with the fundamental knowledge necessary to become competent designers in commercial fields. Students can learn to understand visual meaning and association, arrangement of design elements, and various other topics to prepare for successive classes within the program.


Foundation of Web Design
Course Number VCDD 211
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to teach students how to apply graphic design techniques to develop effective, aesthetically pleasing, and useful websites. The class serves an introduction to the basic principles of web design. The course can teach students how to plan and develop well-designed websites, through the use of HTML, that combine effective navigation techniques with the creative use of graphics, sound, and typography. Students can learn the effects of browser and computing platform on their design choices and gain a critical eye for evaluating website design.


Time-based Media
Course Number VCDD 212
Credits 4.5

This course is designed for students to explore concepts and methods utilized in the various forms of time-based media. Students will be introduced to the exploration of time, narrative and motion development through the use of storyboarding, taking this work and developing it on a digital platform using industry standard software. This course encourages a creative and open approach to visua thinking and problem solving.


Typography Design I
Course Number VCDD 213
Credits 4.5

Developing sensitivity toward the use of varied lettering and typographic forms is an essential foundation for all visual communicators. This course encourages a broad, creative approach to the subject, as well as explaining the history and methodology of modern typography and lettering in practical terms. The course will look at how type is structured, the importance of hierarchy in typographic design, type-only design and the successful integration of type and image.


Art Direction
Course Number VCDD 310
Credits 4.5

An introduction to the disciplines and practice of advertising and marketing, and the creative's role within this industry. Areas of study include the marriage between marketing and communication, a guide to the agency structure, media planning, objectives and strategy and creative aspects of a campaign. This course aims to give the student understanding of the range of ways that an art director operates within the sphere of visual communication and the contemporary marketing culture. The course also aims to develop creative thinking skills within this context.


Design Development I
Course Number VCDD 311
Credits 4.5

This course takes a broader approach to creative design thinking, and encourages exploration of wider visual sources, media and methods of expression. Skills of visual judgment and critical assessment developed through projects and critiques instigate more complex and expansive frames of reference, both in terms of visual research and visual vocabulary. Emphasis is placed upon the use and development of research and visual vocabulary, as well as upon developing more expressive uses of typography, image and format, through the exploration and use of sequential and narrative devices, and an emphasis on the relationship and dialogue between communicator and audience.


Design Development II
Course Number VCDD 312
Credits 4.5

This course continues the approach to creative development established in Design Development I. Within closely supervised and defined project criteria, the student is encouraged to tackle more diverse and ambitious areas of visual communication and design. Reference to themes and issues from a wide range of design and other contemporary concerns help establish a context for personal progression. The distinctive style developed by individual students can be used to explore subject matter which combines personal interest with commercial potential. The student begins to establish a more personal direction. The importance of developing critical judgment criteria and analytical skills are emphasized.


Computer Design II
Course Number VCDD 313
Credits 4.5

Building on the skills acquired in Computer Design I, this class will primarily focus on digital image manipulation within the realm of visual communication. Attention will be paid to how these skills can be seamlessly integrated into the personal and professional direction of the student's work.


Business Practices in Visual Communication
Course Number VCDD 410
Credits 4.5

This course examines the professional environment of the visual communicator. It offers a framework for understanding the career structure, job responsibilities, and employment opportunities (including how to establish a freelance practice) within the working field. With the background knowledge gained through the series of explanatory lectures, advice from guest speakers from the industry, and visits to businesses, the student should be well prepared to make informed decisions about their future career plan. Included are workshops on constructing resumes, covering letters and self-promotional materials.


Senior Design Presentation I
Course Number VCDD 411
Credits 4.5

This course is designed for students to complete a comprehensive project which is designed to evaluate the student’s ability to perform on a professional level. It utilizes all the knowledge and conceptual skills the student has learned throughout the program and proper execution of the project determines if the student has the skills necessary to succeed in the industry. Part I is structured around research and development of concepts.


Senior Design Presentation II
Course Number VCDD 412
Credits 4.5

This course is designed for students to complete a comprehensive project which is designed to evaluate the student’s ability to perform on a professional level. It is a culmination of all the student has learned throughout the program and proper execution of the project determines if the student has the skills necessary to succeed in the industry. Part II is the synergy of research, independent critical analysis and creativity into mature design work.


Portfolio Presentation I
Course Number VCDD 413
Credits 4.5

Portfolio Presentation is a capstone class which is designed to develop a professional body of work in a creative, professional manner that will show a prospective employer what a student can offer them. Proper completion of the portfolio and collateral materials will determine if the student is ready to enter and compete in his or her chosen discipline. Part I emphasizes the need for independent thinking, research, analysis and assessment of own work which culminates in the development and/or tailoring of existing work and the creation of new projects.


Portfolio Presentation II
Course Number VCDD 490
Credits 4.5

Portfolio Presentation is a capstone class which is designed to teach the student how to present their artwork in a creative, professional manner that will show a prospective employer what a student can offer them. Proper completion of the portfolio and collateral materials will determine if the student is ready to enter and compete in his or her chosen discipline. In Part II the student will achieve final visualization and create a body of design work in a professional manner.


Experimental Digital Typography
Course Number VCDD 421
Credits 4.5

Within the framework of design thinking already explored, this course examines structure, formats, sequences, and unities within books, publications, packaging, and online and digital formats. Emphasis is upon expanding and developing ideas to their full potential, looking at options, and rigorously examining design decisions. Projects are of a more comprehensive and extended nature than in prerequisite courses.


Experimental Digital Illustration
Course Number VCDD 432
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to develop an understanding of structure and engineering of type within design, layout, form, line, paragraph, page spreads and digital media. The concern will be with compositional thinking through the examination of printed and digital media.


Experimental Animation
Course Number VCDD 443
Credits 4.0

In this course, students use their advance knowledge and creative skills in exploring and developing new multimedia/animation solution in the visual design field. Student will use the design process to explore new animation direction, methodology, application to express their intellectual and visual aesthetic knowledge. It is a comprehensive project where students further develop their skills in the area of digital Animation and Time-based image imaging by mixing traditional animation concepts with industry standard software.


Program description: This Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree program with a concentration in Digital Design gives students the opportunity to learn the principles, practical applications and methodologies used to complete competent and creative graphic solutions for specified design problems. Coursework is structured to assist students in the development of their goals as they acquire the knowledge and skills common to digital design professionals.
The goal of the BFA with a concentration in Digital Design is to teach students to utilize digital media and traditional visualization techniques in the production of graphic art for print and screen.

All required graphics software is included in the cost of course materials, providing students with training in industry-current design software necessary to help pursue a variety of opportunities upon completion of the degree program.

Program Name: Bachelor's (BFA) - Web Design
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Design Principles
Course Number VCDD 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a foundation class in principles relating to all areas of visual design. In this course, students can develop an awareness of the basic elements of visual language, aesthetics sensitivity, and the ability to think and act as a designer. Students explore methods for evoking intuitive responses through color, shape, texture, rhythm, line, and other compositional elements. The class consists of both practical studio-based assignments and contextual studies areas.


Fundamentals of Color
Course Number VCDD102
Credits 4.5

This is a theoretical and practical course examining the visual forces of color and color relationships in traditional and electronic media. This foundation-level class is essential to all design students. Students can develop knowledge of color principles and the ability to manipulate hue, value and chroma as well as sensitivity to aesthetic and psychological qualities.


Computer Design I
Course Number VCDD 201
Credits 4.5

Utilizing digital media and traditional visualization techniques in the production of graphic art for print and screen, this course will develop skills accrued during Intro to Mac; examining closely the potential of the Macintosh or PC as a creative and communication tool. All assignments are related to professional practice. Adobe CS (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Flash, Acrobat) is the default software set for this class.


Drawing Concepts
Course Number VCDD 202
Credits 4.5

The techniques of drawing basic forms and shapes are developed through exercises that are designed to develop perceptual skills. The student studies volume, tone, texture, perspective, and composition. The exercises are presented in sequence and are designed to develop the individual student's basic drawing methods and techniques. Subject matter can vary from still life to figure drawing.


Foundation Illustration
Course Number VCDD 203
Credits 4.5

This course explores concepts, methods and materials employed in contemporary illustration. Emphasis is placed upon development of ideas and the exploration of various media and techniques. This basic course encourages a creative and open approach to visual thinking and problem solving. It is an essential foundation for all further areas of design study.


Foundation Photography
Course Number VCDD 204
Credits 4.5

This course is an introduction to the aesthetics, concepts, and techniques of photography. Students apply this knowledge as they explore traditional or digital photography. This course is an essential foundation for all further areas of design study.


Creative Research & Development
Course Number VCDD 205
Credits 4.5

As a foundation in understanding the nature of creativity, the goal of this course is to encourage and enable students to become self-motivated, capable of overseeing, independently and collaboratively, all aspects of the creative process. Key skills, essential in all the creative disciplines, will be developed through a series of lively group projects and individual assignments. These include competences in visual and literary research; the generation and development of ideas; critical evaluation; contextual analysis; discursive and collaborative skills; competence in developing core concerns of the individual student.


Portfolio Development and Review
Course Number VCDD 300
Credits 4.5

Portfolio Presentation and Review is designed to begin the process of developing a professional presentation of lower level skills need to move forward to an in depth upper level study of Visual Communication. This course will also act as a lower level capstone to assure knowledge of lower level skills before moving forward to the upper division studies.


Foundation Graphic Design
Course Number VCDD 210
Credits 4.5

Graphic design is the translation of ideas and concepts into structural order and visual form. This course aims to familiarize students with a brief history of graphic design and with the fundamental knowledge necessary to become competent designers in commercial fields. Students can learn to understand visual meaning and association, arrangement of design elements, and various other topics to prepare for successive classes within the program.


Foundation of Web Design
Course Number VCDD 211
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to teach students how to apply graphic design techniques to develop effective, aesthetically pleasing, and useful websites. The class serves an introduction to the basic principles of web design. The course can teach students how to plan and develop well-designed websites, through the use of HTML, that combine effective navigation techniques with the creative use of graphics, sound, and typography. Students can learn the effects of browser and computing platform on their design choices and gain a critical eye for evaluating website design.


Time-based Media
Course Number VCDD 212
Credits 4.5

This course is designed for students to explore concepts and methods utilized in the various forms of time-based media. Students will be introduced to the exploration of time, narrative and motion development through the use of storyboarding, taking this work and developing it on a digital platform using industry standard software. This course encourages a creative and open approach to visua thinking and problem solving.


Typography Design I
Course Number VCDD 213
Credits 4.5

Developing sensitivity toward the use of varied lettering and typographic forms is an essential foundation for all visual communicators. This course encourages a broad, creative approach to the subject, as well as explaining the history and methodology of modern typography and lettering in practical terms. The course will look at how type is structured, the importance of hierarchy in typographic design, type-only design and the successful integration of type and image.


Art Direction
Course Number VCDD 310
Credits 4.5

An introduction to the disciplines and practice of advertising and marketing, and the creative's role within this industry. Areas of study include the marriage between marketing and communication, a guide to the agency structure, media planning, objectives and strategy and creative aspects of a campaign. This course aims to give the student understanding of the range of ways that an art director operates within the sphere of visual communication and the contemporary marketing culture. The course also aims to develop creative thinking skills within this context.


Design Development I
Course Number VCDD 311
Credits 4.5

This course takes a broader approach to creative design thinking, and encourages exploration of wider visual sources, media and methods of expression. Skills of visual judgment and critical assessment developed through projects and critiques instigate more complex and expansive frames of reference, both in terms of visual research and visual vocabulary. Emphasis is placed upon the use and development of research and visual vocabulary, as well as upon developing more expressive uses of typography, image and format, through the exploration and use of sequential and narrative devices, and an emphasis on the relationship and dialogue between communicator and audience.


Design Development II
Course Number VCDD 312
Credits 4.5

This course continues the approach to creative development established in Design Development I. Within closely supervised and defined project criteria, the student is encouraged to tackle more diverse and ambitious areas of visual communication and design. Reference to themes and issues from a wide range of design and other contemporary concerns help establish a context for personal progression. The distinctive style developed by individual students can be used to explore subject matter which combines personal interest with commercial potential. The student begins to establish a more personal direction. The importance of developing critical judgment criteria and analytical skills are emphasized.


Computer Design II
Course Number VCDD 313
Credits 4.5

Building on the skills acquired in Computer Design I, this class will primarily focus on digital image manipulation within the realm of visual communication. Attention will be paid to how these skills can be seamlessly integrated into the personal and professional direction of the student's work.


Business Practices in Visual Communication
Course Number VCDD 410
Credits 4.5

This course examines the professional environment of the visual communicator. It offers a framework for understanding the career structure, job responsibilities, and employment opportunities (including how to establish a freelance practice) within the working field. With the background knowledge gained through the series of explanatory lectures, advice from guest speakers from the industry, and visits to businesses, the student should be well prepared to make informed decisions about their future career plan. Included are workshops on constructing resumes, covering letters and self-promotional materials.


Senior Design Presentation I
Course Number VCDD 411
Credits 4.5

This course is designed for students to complete a comprehensive project which is designed to evaluate the student’s ability to perform on a professional level. It utilizes all the knowledge and conceptual skills the student has learned throughout the program and proper execution of the project determines if the student has the skills necessary to succeed in the industry. Part I is structured around research and development of concepts.


Senior Design Presentation II
Course Number VCDD 412
Credits 4.5

This course is designed for students to complete a comprehensive project which is designed to evaluate the student’s ability to perform on a professional level. It is a culmination of all the student has learned throughout the program and proper execution of the project determines if the student has the skills necessary to succeed in the industry. Part II is the synergy of research, independent critical analysis and creativity into mature design work.


Portfolio Presentation I
Course Number VCDD 413
Credits 4.5

Portfolio Presentation is a capstone class which is designed to develop a professional body of work in a creative, professional manner that will show a prospective employer what a student can offer them. Proper completion of the portfolio and collateral materials will determine if the student is ready to enter and compete in his or her chosen discipline. Part I emphasizes the need for independent thinking, research, analysis and assessment of own work which culminates in the development and/or tailoring of existing work and the creation of new projects.


Portfolio Presentation II
Course Number VCDD 490
Credits 4.5

Portfolio Presentation is a capstone class which is designed to teach the student how to present their artwork in a creative, professional manner that will show a prospective employer what a student can offer them. Proper completion of the portfolio and collateral materials will determine if the student is ready to enter and compete in his or her chosen discipline. In Part II the student will achieve final visualization and create a body of design work in a professional manner.


Web Application
Course Number VCDD 471
Credits 4.5

In this course students will use their advance knowledge in web design. They will be focus on improving their navigation site performance. Students are also introduced to programming languages such as web development language/script in developing web sites.


Web-Base /Database Programming
Course Number VCDD 472
Credits 4.5

This course is for the non-programming student, where they are exposed to the principles of client-side and server-side applications and the role of databases in such application.


Web Application II
Course Number VCDD 473
Credits 4.5

This is course is the continuation of Web application. Students will focus the more programming/scripting topics needed to create interactive and dynamic web sites.


Advanced Web Application
Course Number VCDD 474
Credits 4.5

In this course students will use advance web design/ development skills and open sources to explore web development for e-commerce/e-business.


Program description: This Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree program with a concentration in Web Design and Development gives students the opportunity to understand the basic principles of web design and how to plan and develop well-designed websites that combine effective navigation techniques with the creative use of graphics, sound and typography. Coursework is structured to assist students in the development of their goals as they acquire the knowledge and skills common to professional web designers and developers.

Art and Design Courses at Penn Foster Career School

Program Name: Caterer
Instruction Set 1:Intrroduction to Catering

Catered events; levels of catering; assessing clients' needs; written agreements.


Instruction Set 2:Dynamics of Catering

Wine and beverages; table service; beverage service; importance of etiquette; fast cleanup.


Instruction Set 2:Food Styles of Catering

Garnishing techniques; food presentation styles and design techniques.


Instruction Set 2:Alcoholic Beverages

Marketing strategies to maximize profitability; efficient bar layout and operation; intoxication warning signs; legal concerns.


Instruction Set 3:The Gourmet Kitchen

Kitchen layout and design; buffet presentation; buffet design and setup; goals of presentation; simple garnishes; basic and advanced presentation.


Instruction Set 3:The Culinary Professional

French kitchen brigade; food-borne illnesses; balanced diets; developing a foundation of flavor; nutrition and food science; food and kitchen safety; measuring ingredients; converting recipe yields; calculating edible portion quantity and cost; identifying kitchen equipment and its uses. Textbook: The Professional Chef Video: Chef Skills Supplements: • Cooking Lab: Seared Beef • Cooking Lab: Caramelized Onion Frittata


Instruction Set 4:Stocks, Sauces, and Soups

Identification and uses of bouquet garni, sachet d'épices, mirepoix, and clarified butter; preparation of stocks and sauces; soup ingredients and preparation.


Instruction Set 4:Fruits, Vegetables, and Herbs

Identifying fruits, vegetables, and herbs; basic vegetable preparation; decorative techniques; cooking methods for vegetables; effects of herbs in recipes. Supplement: Cooking Lab: Stir-Fried Beans Video: Stir-Fried Beans


Instruction Set 5:Meat

Mise en place for beef; elements of beef fabrication; basic beef cuts and cooking methods; basic veal cuts and cooking methods; cuts of lamb and pork; cooking methods for lamb and pork; elements of lamb fabrication; braising; principles of curing pork. Supplements: • Cooking Lab: Chateaubriand • Cooking Lab: Rack of Lamb Video: Filet with Red Wine Mushrooms


Instruction Set 6:Poultry and Game

Poultry cuts; poultry fabrication and trussing; roasting, deep poaching, and sautéing poultry; identifying types of game. Supplement: Cooking Lab: Stuffed Chicken Breast Video: Stuffed Chicken Breasts


Instruction Set 7:Fish and Shellfish

Identifying fresh and saltwater fish and shellfish; cleaning and preparing fish and shellfish; cooking methods. Supplement: Cooking Lab: Striped Sea Bass Video: Seared Tuna


Instruction Set 8:Grains, Legumes, and Pasta

Identifying grains and legumes; cooking, simmering, and sorting grains; using dried and fresh legumes; cooking pasta; making fresh pasta. Supplement: Cooking Lab: Sesame Shiitake Noodles


Instruction Set 9:Baking and Pastry

Functions of baking ingredients; cooking sugar; whipping egg whites; yeast breads and quick breads; dessert sauces and creams; preparing pastry doughs and cookies. Supplement: Cooking Lab: Phyllo Pear Tart


Instruction Set 10:Breakfast, Garde Manger, and World Cuisines

Dairy products and eggs; cooking methods for eggs; omelets, souffles, and quiche; primary elements of garde-manger; creating charcuterie; culinary traditions of the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Supplement: Cooking Lab: Preparation of an Entire Meal


Program description: Learn the skills you need to succeed as a Caterer — at home, at your own pace, with Penn Foster Career School.

Develop your natural talent with the Penn Foster Career School Caterer program. Your family, friends – and customers -- will admire your skills and the exquisite meals you prepare and serve.

Train effectively and conveniently with our online program. Your courses include:

* Food Styles
* The Gourmet Kitchen
* The Culinary Professional
* Poultry and Game
* Fish and Shellfish
* Baking and Pastry
* Breakfast, Garde Manger, and World Cuisines
* ... and so much more.

And you'll learn it all at home — no classroom needed! You'll get valuable information about basic and advanced presentations.

Program Name: Drafting with AutoCAD
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies The advantages of learning at home, types of study materials, types of examinations, accessing and using the features of our website, determining what kind of learner you are, establishing a study schedule, using study tips, preparing for and taking examinations. The Drafter's World Language Basic techniques used in sketching; occupations that use the drafter's world language


Instruction Set 2

Size And Shape Description Orthographic Projection; Points Of View And Shape Descriptions. Introduction To Computer-aided Design And Drafting (cadd) Use Of Basic Cadd Equipment; Coordinate Systems And Various Software Features Used With Cadd Programs. Project Booklet - Spatial Relationship Learning Aids: • Appendices And Glossary • How To Use Your Architect Scale • How To Use Your Mechanical Drafting Scale • How To Use Your Civil Engineer Scale • How To Use Your Metric Scale Equipment: Drafting Kit #1 • Drafting Pencil • Leads • Template • Other Common Drafting Items


Instruction Set 3

Sketching, Lettering, and Lines Properly sketching lines, circles, arcs and multiviews; sketching techniques. Basic Drafting Math Basic math ground rules; signs of operation and how they are represented in drafting. Equipment: Drafting Kit #2 • Compass • Divider • Triangle


Instruction Set 4

Drafting Equipment, Media, and Reproduction Methods Equipment and supplies used in the industry; scales; scales and drafting machine verniers; drafting media. Orthographic Projection (Sketching) Size and shape description; the three regular views of drafting; the six principal views of orthographic projection. Geometric Construction Drawing parallel and perpendicular lines; constructing bisectors; drawing polygons, tangencies, and ellipses. Project Booklet - Applied Geometry Learning Aid: Orthographic Sketching Workbook Equipment: Drafting Kit #3 • Triangle • Lettering Guide • Drafting Pencil • Leads


Instruction Set 5

Multiviews and Auxiliary Views Drawing single-view and multiview drawings; first- and third-angle projection. Dimensioning Dimensioning systems; correct tolerancing techniques. Sections, Revolutions, and Conventional Breaks Making sectional views; modifying standard sectioning techniques.


Instruction Set 6

Geometric Tolerancing Establishing basic dimensions; identifying proper feature control frames; determining the virtual condition of features. Working Drawings Complete sets of working drawings; preparing engineering changes. Pictoral Drawings Drawing three-dimensional objects using 3-D coordinates; isometric, dimetric, or trimetric drawings; one-, two-, or three-point perspective.


Instruction Set 7

Introduction To Windows® The Windows® Operating System; Creating Files And Folders. Using Windows® Start-up; Using Windows® Accessories; Using Desktop Commands; Using Windows® Explorer. Harnessing Autocad®, Part 1 Getting Started With Autocad®; Fundamentals. Harnessing Autocad®, Part 2 Fundamentals Of Autocad® Operations. Project Booklet - Autocad® Basic Commands Learning Aid: Autocad® Student Portfolio Software Textbooks: Harnessing Autocad®


Instruction Set 8

Harnessing Autocad®, Part 3 Dimensioning; Plotting/printing; Hatching And Boundries; Block References. Harnessing Autocad®, Part 4 External References; Designcenter; Utility Commands; The Internet. Harnessing Autocad®, Part 5 3d; Rendering Tablet And Digitizing; Customizing; Visual Lisp. Project Booklet - Autocad Commands: Blocks And Layers


Instruction Set 9

Structural Drafting With Basic Architectural Applications Preparing A Complete Set Of Structural Drawings; Drawing A Site Plan. Project Booklet - Structural Drafting With Autocad® Civil Drafting Drawing Transit Lines For Roadway Layouts; Drawing Plans And Profiles From Survey Information. Project Booklet - Civil Drafting With Autocad®


Instruction Set 10

Heating, Ventilating, And Air Conditioning Function Of Hvac Systems; Preparing Complete Hvac Drawings. Project Booklet - Hvac/sheet Metal Drafting With Autocad® Electrical And Electronic Schematic Drafting Drawing Electrical Diagrams And Cable Assemblies; Making A Set Of Electrical Power System Substation Plans; Drawing An Industrial Electrical Schematic; Drawing Electronic Block And Schematic Diagrams. Project Booklet - Electrical And Electronic Schematic Drafting With Autocad® Project Booklet - Drafting With Autocad® Elective Project Textbook: Autocad® Quick Reference


Program description: Receive AutoCAD® training at home. You'll get the support you need while learning at your own pace, with the Penn Foster Career School Drafting with AutoCAD Program.

Learn the skills you need to begin a career in drafting by completing the Drafting with AutoCAD® training program at home. It's convenient, affordable, and accredited.

You'll get hands-on AutoCAD® training in:
Use of basic CAD equipment; coordinate systems and software used with CAD programs
Use of drafting equipment, media, and reproduction methods
Dimensioning, geometric construction, and geometric tolerancing
AutoCAD® commands.
Electrical and electronic schematic Drafting with AutoCAD®

Software and Supplies Included!
The Penn Foster Drafting with AutoCAD® training program provides you with a broad range of tools and supplies, including AutoCAD® Student Portfolio software, to provide you with hands-on training.

Respected and Accredited
You'll earn your Drafting with AutoCAD® Career Diploma from Regionally and Nationally Accredited Penn Foster Career School. Over 13 million students have enrolled in our training programs, making Penn Foster one of the world's largest and most respected distance learning institutions.

Contact Penn Foster Today
We’ll send you FREE information – with absolutely no obligation! Find out more about AutoCAD® training which includes:
All the books, lessons, equipment, and learning aids you need
Drafting tools
AutoCAD® Student Portfolio software
Access to student services by website, phone, and mail

Program Name: Dressmaking & Design
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies The advantages of learning at home; types of study materials; types of examinations; accessing and using the features of our website; determining what kind of learner you are; establishing a study schedule; using study tips; preparing for and taking examinations. Introduction to Sewing The art of sewing; introduction to tools and equipment; temporary and permanent stitches; creating the most common seams; taking measurements; purchasing and preparing patterns; making simple pattern alterations. Learning Aid: Binder


Instruction Set 2

The Sewing Machine Types of sewing machines and machine attachments; threading machines; making stitches; setting machine timing and tension; sewing machine care; cleaning and lubrication; removing burrs; troubleshooting. Practical Exercise 1


Instruction Set 3

Fibers and Fabrics Identifying fibers and fabrics; choosing the right fabric; working and handling fabrics; properly caring for fabrics and treating stains. Basic Dressmaking Processes Selecting materials for a garment; marking and cutting fabric; tacking for proper fit; shaping, interfacing, binding, seams, and hems. Practical Exercise 2


Instruction Set 4

Decorative Features Introduction to common decorative features; preparing neckline, skirt and sleeve openings; installing zippers; constructing and attaching cuffs and collars; attaching fasteners. Advanced Dressmaking Techniques Finishing corners, points, and curved edges; forming pleats; making coats, jackets, trousers; working with linings, shoulder pads, and boning. Practical Exercise 3 Learning Aid: Pattern


Instruction Set 5

Line and Design in Fashion Line, color, texture, and detail; types of line; principles of design: balance, proportion and scale, rhythm, emphasis, and unit; creating optical illusions. Miscellaneous Garments Construction of non-standard garments: maternity wear, infants and children, nightwear, underwear; working with lace trim. Practical Exercise 4 Supplement: Always in Style


Instruction Set 6

Embroidery Embroidery tools and materials; handworking embroidery stitches; machine embroidery; smocking and quilting. Garment Decoration Applying garment-decorating techniques: ruffles, fringe, tassels, beading, sequins; belts and belt loops; custom fasteners. Pattern Alteration Making major pattern alterations for shoulders, armholes, bust size, sleeves, skirts, and pants. Practical Exercise 5 Equipment: Patterns Special Shipment: Brother® Sewing Machine (90% of total program price must be paid prior to shipment of Brother® Sewing Machine.)


Instruction Set 7

Alterations and Fitting Altering and fitting necklines, including altering necklines, armholes, and sleeves; raising or lowering a waistline; eliminating wrinkles and bulges. Drafting Patterns from Basic Patterns Constructing the basic pattern; designing the bodice, neckline, collar, sleeve, and skirt. Designing by Draping Principles of draping; using and customizing a dress form; creating original clothing designs. Practical Exercise 6 Final Project Supplements: • Dressmaking Glossary • Sewing as a Home Business • Quick to Make • Sew Basics


Program description: Develop your natural talent for Dressmaking
and Design with the Penn Foster Career School Dressmaking and Design distance learning program. Your customers, neighbors, and friends will respect your skills and admire the clothes you create.

Learn how to:

Identify fibers and fabrics and care for them
Select the right material for a project
Mark, cut, and tack fabric for a proper fit
Finish garments and alter patterns
And you’ll learn it all at home – no classroom needed! You’ll get valuable information about alterations and fitting, drafting patterns, and designing by draping.

Art and Design Courses at Capella University

Program Name: MS - Instructional Design for Online Learning
Foundations of Theory and Practice in Master’s Studies
Course Number ED5002
Credits 4.0

This is a foundational course for learners in higher education and training specializations. Learners are introduced to discipline-specific topics and begin to put into practice the academic developmental and behavioral competencies they are expected to master during their degree program. Learners engage in scholarly inquiry, research, critical thinking, and communication within the context of their specialization. ED5002 must be taken by master’s learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Survey of Research Methodology
Course Number COUN5006
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of Graduate-level Approaches To Research Methodology. Learners Study Major Research Methodologies And Quantitative And Qualitative Approaches To Needs Assessment, Program Evaluation, And Program Design. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5006 Or Cst5006 Or Hs5006 Or Shb5006.


Principles of Instructional Design
Course Number ED5802
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners gain an understanding of the instructional design process and associated instructional design principles and strategies. Learners focus on the decisions that instructional designers make, the principles and concepts that drive those decisions, and the ways the decisions are interrelated. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Processes of Instructional Design
Course Number ED5803
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the process of instructional design and provides learners the opportunity to apply the instructional design principles studied in ED5802 in the design, development, and evaluation of instructional materials. Learners examine the systematic and iterative process of addressing the needs of the student, structuring the content, and applying principles of learning and instruction to create effective instructional solutions. Prerequisite(s): ED5802. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Design of Instructional Media
Course Number ED5807
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine instructional design, budgeting, communication, project management, and legal and ethical issues. Learners apply evidence-based practice to instructional design and development and focus on developing the skills needed to make decisions about the design of instructional components using various forms of instructional media and technologies.


Project Management for e-Learning Development
Course Number ED5810
Credits 4.0

This course presents project management topics and techniques specific to e-learning development. Learners examine the tools, methods, and processes used to effectively budget, implement, and manage e-learning development projects.


Application of Learning Theories to Instructional Design
Course Number ED7484
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners explore the theories and principles that provide the foundation for designing instructional interventions. Learners distinguish among learning theories, instructional theories, and instructional design theories and explore the rationale for using theories to inform instructional design decisions. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803.


Evaluation and Assessment of Instructional Design
Course Number ED7505
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the guidelines used to evaluate and assess learning. Learners analyze tools and methods for assessing learning outcomes and evaluating instructional effectiveness, and practice designing new assessment and evaluation tools. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803.


Instructional Design for Online Learning Internship
Course Number ED6895
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with the opportunity to gain experience in the instructional design for online learning field and may serve as the capstone course for the master’s Instructional Design for Online Learning specialization. Learners engage in a supervised internship during which they apply the instructional design competencies gained during the program and document their experience by completing a final project that includes an action plan, field notes, and other written documentation. For PhD and MS Instructional Design for Online Learning learners only. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Instructional Design for Online Learning Capstone
Course Number ED5992
Credits 4.0

The capstone course is taken after completing all required and elective course work. Learners demonstrate proficiency in integrating learning from required and elective courses by completing a final project. For MS Instructional Design for Online Learning learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


The Delivery of Distance Education
Course Number ED5804
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners gain an understanding of current distance education delivery systems, including print, recorded audio and video, and Internet technologies. Learners also examine the ways delivery technologies inform and constrain design decisions.


Instructional Media Tools
Course Number ED7503
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine software tools that developers and instructional designers use to create innovative e-learning experiences. Learners also apply theories and principles of cognitive learning to instructional media design.


Interface Design
Course Number ED7814
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine current interface design practices and the research informing the effective interface design of various learning applications and environments. Learners also explore ways to design interfaces applicable to a diverse range of communication devices. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803.


Strategies for Building Online Learning Communities
Course Number ED5312
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners develop the facilitation strategies and tactics that nurture interaction and collaboration and guide the development of effective personal learning strategies. Learners benefit from interacting with one another in a virtual classroom.


Theory and Methods of Educating Adults
Course Number ED7311
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study adult learning theory and learning styles and preferences to gain an understanding of the roles of instructor and student in adult education. Learners examine the ways race, ethnicity, class, gender, ability, and other forms of diversity impact the theory and practice of adult education. Learners further develop their skills in selecting and applying appropriate materials, methods, and techniques used to achieve particular learning objectives. This course incorporates adult learning from both theoretical and personal perspectives.


Research and Writing for Graduate Learners
Course Number ED7006
Credits 4.0

This course prepares graduate learners for the rigors of academic writing, which requires a series of related critical thinking and writing skills, including understanding the nature of academic research; developing strong arguments based on primary and secondary research; evaluating, summarizing, paraphrasing, and citing sources; drafting, revising, and editing multiple drafts of major projects; and producing clear, accurate, and error-free prose. Since this is a writing course, learners should expect to write a lot: the course includes weekly writing assignments, several short writing projects, and a research plan for a longer project. Learners submit a final portfolio at the end of the course.


Needs Assessment: Models and Procedures
Course Number ED7641
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of the needs assessment models and procedures used to diagnose the causes of workplace performance problems. Learners design and develop needs assessment instruments and collect and diagnose data to differentiate workplace performance issues that require training solutions from those that require non-training interventions.


Program description: The master’s specialization in Instructional Design for Online Learning is designed to provide professionals working in a variety of traditional and online settings in educational institutions, corporations, health care and government agencies, and the military with the instructional design and development competence needed to advance their careers and serve their organizations. The curriculum focuses on preparing instructional design practitioners to design and develop educational interventions based on theory and practice in the field.

Program Name: PhD - Instructional Design for Online Learning
Foundations of Theory and Practice in Doctoral Studies
Course Number ED8002
Credits 4.0

This is a foundational course for learners in higher education and training specializations. Learners are introduced to discipline-specific topics and begin to put into practice the academic developmental and behavioral competencies they are expected to master during their degree program. Learners engage in scholarly inquiry, research, critical thinking, and communication within the context of their specialization. ED8002 must be taken by PhD learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Theories of Learning and Instruction
Course Number ED7624
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore various theories and research associated with learning and instruction, from behaviorist to constructivist. In particular, learners focus on the theories that attempt to explain how and why people learn and the ways those theories inform instruction design. Prerequisite(s): ED5802.


Theoretical Basis of Instructional Design
Course Number ED7620
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an understanding of the theories that form the foundation of instructional design and development. Learners examine the fundamental instructional design theories and models associated with training and education and apply these theories to create an instructional design model that meets the current or projected needs of an organization. Learners also formulate a rationale that supports their design model. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803, ED7624.


Ethics and Social Responsibility in Distance Education
Course Number ED8810
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the influence of law and ethics on course ownership, privacy, intellectual property, freedom of speech, and social responsibility. Through an examination of ethical assumptions, attitudes, and values, learners develop a foundation for understanding and supporting distance education from an ethical perspective. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803, ED7624, ED7620.


Advanced Instructional Design
Course Number ED7496
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on practical applications of instructional design in various work settings. Learners explore and evaluate current and emerging instructional interventions and identify ways to apply these approaches in education and industry settings. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803, ED7624, ED7620.


Leadership for Instructional Design
Course Number ED7504
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course gain an understanding of the leadership and management skills necessary for the effective design and delivery of Web-based instruction. Learners develop a professional portfolio that demonstrates competencies in collaborative team planning, decision making, problem solving, and change management. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803, ED7624, ED7620.


Research in Instructional Design and Development
Course Number ED8829
Credits 4.0

This course builds upon previous research courses and encourages learners to begin thinking like scholars engaging in instructional design and development research. Learners explore the fundamental elements of research in instructional design and development, generate potential dissertation research topics relevant to the Instructional Design and Development specialization, and discuss their potential to contribute to the body of instructional design and development knowledge.


Theoretical Constructs for Evaluation and Assessment of Instructional Design
Course Number ED8831
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course engage in an in-depth exploration of theories and principles of instructional design evaluation and assessment. Learners reflect on evaluation and assessment practices associated with individuals, organizations, and society to gain an understanding of the ways they inform overall evidence-based practice. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803.


Leading Instructional Design Initiatives
Course Number ED8841
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners integrate the competencies of the Instructional Design and Development specialization with the leadership, innovative thinking, and communication skills needed to become leaders within their organizations. Learners practice applying these skills and focus on extending their ability to advance the performance goals and vision of their organization. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803.


Developing an Academic Writing Process
Course Number ED7086
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Focus On Developing A Process For Enhancing And Improving Their Academic Writing. Learners Assess Their Individual Writing Strengths And Needs And Receive Feedback On Their Writing From Courseroom Instructors. Using The Feedback And Appropriate Information Literacy Skills, Learners Develop And Implement A Plan For The Research, Writing, And Revision Of A Specific Piece Of Academic Writing. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Om7086 Or Ed7086 Or Psl7086 Or Psy7086 Or Shb7086. Prerequisite(s): Psychology Learners Must Take Psy7086 Concurrently With Psy7087.


Applying Research in an Academic Writing Process
Course Number ED7088
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Develop And Practice The Writing And Research Skills Exemplary Of An Academic Scholar. Learners Apply Their Skills In The Academic Writing Process And Write A Paper That Incorporates The Necessary Research Elements. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Om7088 Or Ed7088 Or Psl7088 Or Psy7088 Or Shb7088. Prerequisite(s): Om7086 Or Ed7086 Or Psl7086 Or Psy7086 Or Shb7086. Psychology Learners Must Have Also Completed Psy7087 And Must Take Psy7088 Concurrently With Psy7089.


Administration and Leadership of Distance Education Programs
Course Number ED7212
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course gain an overview of the skills and competencies needed to administer, manage, and lead distance education programs. Topics include the management of existing distance education programs, the design and implementation of new distance education programs, and the transformation of existing distance education programs for more efficient and effective delivery.


Special Topics in Instructional Design for Online Learning
Course Number ED8895
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with the opportunity to explore a specific area of interest within the Instructional Design for Online Learning specialization. Learners propose, develop, and study topics that supplement their specialization course work. For PhD in Education learners only. Directed study; special permission is required for enrollment. Prerequisite(s): ED5802. ED5803.


Educational Research Methods
Course Number ED8112
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the quantitative and qualitative research methodologies often used in educational research. Learners analyze and evaluate the characteristics, strengths, and weaknesses of specific quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and designs and examine strategies for designing specific, appropriate, and feasible research questions.


Statistics for Educational Research I
Course Number ED8122
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course apply statistical analyses appropriate to different research contexts using SPSS, a statistical software package. Learners examine statistical concepts, including descriptive statistics, normal distribution, sampling probability, and sampling distribution and demonstrate different hypothesis testing techniques.


Principles of Instructional Design
Course Number ED5802
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners gain an understanding of the instructional design process and associated instructional design principles and strategies. Learners focus on the decisions that instructional designers make, the principles and concepts that drive those decisions, and the ways the decisions are interrelated. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Processes of Instructional Design
Course Number ED5803
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the process of instructional design and provides learners the opportunity to apply the instructional design principles studied in ED5802 in the design, development, and evaluation of instructional materials. Learners examine the systematic and iterative process of addressing the needs of the student, structuring the content, and applying principles of learning and instruction to create effective instructional solutions. Prerequisite(s): ED5802. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number ED9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number ED9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number ED9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number ED9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Strategies for Building Online Learning Communities
Course Number ED5312
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners develop the facilitation strategies and tactics that nurture interaction and collaboration and guide the development of effective personal learning strategies. Learners benefit from interacting with one another in a virtual classroom.


Instructional Design for Online Learning Internship
Course Number ED6895
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with the opportunity to gain experience in the instructional design for online learning field and may serve as the capstone course for the master’s Instructional Design for Online Learning specialization. Learners engage in a supervised internship during which they apply the instructional design competencies gained during the program and document their experience by completing a final project that includes an action plan, field notes, and other written documentation. For PhD and MS Instructional Design for Online Learning learners only. Prerequisite(s): ED5802, ED5803. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.



Introduction to Training and Performance Systems
Course Number ED7631
Credits 4.0

This course is an overview of the history of training and human performance improvement (HPI) and its associated theories, principles, and processes. Learners develop a systems view of developing people and organizations by completing a performance improvement project in which they perform business, performance, gap, and root cause analyses; select appropriate interventions; and develop implementation, change, and evaluation plans.


Needs Assessment: Models and Procedures
Course Number ED7641
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of the needs assessment models and procedures used to diagnose the causes of workplace performance problems. Learners design and develop needs assessment instruments and collect and diagnose data to differentiate workplace performance issues that require training solutions from those that require non-training interventions.


Delivery Systems for Training and Performance Improvement
Course Number ED7672
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an in-depth, application-based overview of facilitation skills and e-learning initiatives for training and performance improvement and the tools and strategies used to address these critical issues.


Coaching for High Performance
Course Number ED7830
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study theories and practices used to coach individuals to improved learning, decision making, and performance. Learners explore theoretical coaching approaches and models; client needs assessment; the coaching knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for supporting clients through personal and professional change; and the role of coaching in organizational performance systems. Learners focus on becoming confident and effective mediators of people seeking to improve the quality of their personal and professional lives.


Statistics for Educational Research II
Course Number ED8123
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Apply Statistical Analyses Appropriate To Different Research Contexts Using Spss, A Statistical Software Package. Learners Examine Statistical Concepts Including Analysis Of Variance (anova), Analysis Of Covariance (ancova), Correlation, Regression, Chi Square, Factor Analysis, And Post Hoc And Demonstrate Different Hypothesis Testing Techniques.


Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Course Number HS8112
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate qualitative research methods and designs. Learners focus on developing the skills used to synthesize information related to qualitative research methodology and examine ethical issues associated with the qualitative research process


Program description: The doctoral specialization in Instructional Design for Online Learning is designed to prepare professionals to lead and manage instructional design challenges in a variety of traditional and online settings in educational institutions, corporations, health care and government agencies, and the military. The curriculum emphasizes research and leadership in the instructional design, development, and implementation of educational interventions. Successful graduates of this specialization are prepared to pursue leadership roles in producing and applying research in instructional design and development.

Art and Design Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Associate in Web Graphic Design
Visual Design Fundamentals
Course Number WGD-201
Credits 3.0

In this course students examine the foundation of visual design. Topics include the design process; elements of design, such as line, color, form, function and space; and combining elements for enhanced visual design. Students explore these topics through various projects and by applying concepts using appropriate software. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 3-3


Advanced Design and Rapid Visualization
Course Number WGD-205
Credits 4.0

Students in this course develop skills in creating graphic media. Students explore design and use of type, the process of using rapid visualization for design concept and idea formulation, as well as create media that enhance user understanding. Prerequisite: WGD-201 / 4-4


Digital Imaging Fundamentals
Course Number WGD-210
Credits 4.0

Students in this course learn concepts of digital imaging, including editing, optimizing and preparing images for webbased delivery. Topics such as color, special effects and compression formats are examined. Prerequisite: WGD-201 / 4-4


Information Design
Course Number WGD-229
Credits 4.0

This course addresses principles of analyzing, explaining and communicating instructions, ideas and information used in integrated text and graphics. Using a collaborative approach, students use real-world examples to explore user-centered design. Prerequisite: WGD-205 / 4-4


Web Design
Course Number WGD-232
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Fundamentals Of Web Design Principles And Web Content Management. Topics Include The User Interface, Web Page Conceptualization, Page Structure, Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (xhtml), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Wysiwyg Editors, Scripting And Web Accessibility Standards. Prerequisite: Wgd-229 / 4-4


Web Animation
Course Number WGD-235;
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on design and production of animation within the constraints of web applications. Topics include filesize optimization, timing, formatting requirements and scripting. Automated animation techniques as well as user-mediated animation are addressed. Prerequisite: WGD-229 / 4-4


Advanced Web Design
Course Number WGD-242
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Students Work In Teams To Develop A Web Design For A Fictitious Company. Students Research The Company’s Industry, Evaluate Competitors’ Web Designs And Explore Emerging Web Development Tools That Enhance Production Capabilities. Prerequisites: Wgd-232 And Wgd-235 / 4-4


Instructional Design for Multimedia
Course Number WGD-250
Credits 3.0

Students in this course examine theory and practice of designing instructional materials, as well as systems used for interactive training and education. Practical development of online learning materials is emphasized. Prerequisite: WGD-242 / 3-3


Project
Course Number WGD-260
Credits 3.0

Media Portfolio This capstone course culminates in a professional portfolio that showcases students’ web graphic products, including component examples and web designs. Prerequisite: WGD-250


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 3-3


Public Speaking
Course Number SPCH-275
Credits 4.0

This course teaches basic elements of effective public speaking. Topics include audience analysis, organization, language, delivery and nonverbal communication. Practical application is provided through a series of individual and group presentations in a variety of rhetorical modes. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-3


Interpersonal Communication
Course Number SPCH-277
Credits 4.0

This course explores ways in which people interact verbally and nonverbally, and teaches basic principles of interpersonal communication including perception, self-concept, persuasive communication, nonverbal communication, semantics, roles and norms, and communication barriers. Activities include participation in groups, pairs and interactive communication situations. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Debate and Critical Thinking
Course Number SPCH-279
Credits 4.0

This introductory debate course helps students develop clear, logical and ethical arguments using critical thinking strategies. Classroom activities include cross-examination debate and argumentation speeches. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-3


Small Group Communication
Course Number SPCH-282
Credits 4.0

This course examines theories of, and tools needed for, effective communication in small groups. Emphasis is placed on leadership and individual roles in a group, performance and motivation, conflict management, decision-making and avoiding groupthink. Coursework addresses the role small groups – formed in personal and professional relationships – play in individuals’ lives as well as the role individuals play in a small group. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-3



Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Cross-Cultural Communications
Course Number SOCS-187
Credits 3.0

This course promotes cultural sensitivity through readings, discussions, research and informal forums with guest speakers of other cultures. Students learn the importance of effective communication among diverse ethnic groups and gain knowledge of principles that govern social interactions in a multicultural milieu. / 3-3


Cultural Anthropology
Course Number SOCS-190
Credits 3.0

This course provides a comparative study of human cultures throughout the world. Students learn to think critically about human behavior as they develop an understanding of the role culture plays at the interface between the natural environment and human needs. By examining diverse behaviors, customs and traditions from different countries, students learn to recognize and value both differences and similarities among cultures, and develop tolerance and respect for other societies. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Basic Algebra
Course Number MATH-102
Credits 4.0

This Course First Addresses Polynomials, Then Moves To Factoring Skills And Applying Technology To Solve Various Types Of Mathematical Problems. Coursework Also Introduces Graphing, Number Bases And Elementary Statistical Techniques. Students Apply Their Skills To A Variety Of Application Problems. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results Or Successful Completion Of Math-032. / 4-4 Note: Students In Selected Programs Take Basic Algebra Under This Course Number For Graduation Credit. In Other Programs The Course Is Taken As A Prerequisite Skills Course, Math-092, And Does Not Carry Graduation Credit.


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Program description: In this course students examine the foundation of visual design.
Topics include the design process; elements of design, such as
line, color, form, function and space; and combining elements for
enhanced visual design. Students explore these topics through
various projects and by applying concepts using appropriate
software. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 3-3

Program Name: Bachelor's in Business Administration - Hospitality Management
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190



Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Marketing
Course Number BUSN-319
Credits 3.0

In This Course Students Apply Principles And Strategies For Marketing Products And Services To Industrial, Commercial And Governmental Entities. Topics Include Ways In Which Market Information And Product Life Cycle Affect Product And Production Design; Forecasting Techniques; Interdependencies Between Marketing And Operations Functions; And Selling Skills. Prerequisites: Busn-115 And Math-114


Finance
Course Number BUSN-379
Credits 3.0

This course introduces corporate financial structure and covers basic capital budgeting techniques, including discounted cash flow analysis. Funds sources and financial resource allocation are analyzed. Spreadsheet software packages are used to analyze data and solve case-based problems. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGMT-303
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental management theories and traditional managerial responsibilities in formal and informal organizational structures. Planning, organizing, directing, controlling and staffing are explored. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Fundamentals of E-Commerce
Course Number ECOM-210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth overview of the issues, technology and environment of electronic commerce. Knowledge gained facilitates more comprehensive and contemporary exploration of future coursework in marketing, operations, finance, business law, and database and website management. Challenges and opportunities of electronic business are discussed. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Federal Tax Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-424
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the special tax issues of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, gift taxes, estates and trusts. Tax forms, tax software, the Internet, spreadsheets and word processing programs are used to research, solve and analyze tax problems relating to corporate and partnership income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT-324


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Data Analysis with Spreadsheets with Lab
Course Number BIS-155
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing business situations using current spreadsheet software. Using data derived from real-world business situations, students learn to use appropriate spreadsheet software features to organize, analyze and present data, as well as to make business decisions. Through personal database technology such as Access, the course also introduces basic database concepts. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 4-3


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Database Essentials for Business with Lab
Course Number BIS-245
Credits 5.0

Students in this course learn to design relational databases and to build database applications, including tables, queries, forms, reports and macros. Also addressed is implementation of basic database security, backup and recovery procedures. Generating reports and meeting business requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIS-155 / 5-4


Introduction to Hospitality Management
Course Number HMT-310
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major fields within the hospitality industry: lodging, meetings/events, restaurants, casinos and tourism. Operations and management are covered in the context of history, society and leadership.


Foundations of Hotel Management
Course Number HMT-320
Credits 4.0

This course examines the lodging industry – from its traditional roots to contemporary structures – and addresses management, economics and measurement of hotel operations. Reservation systems, staffing, housekeeping, security and facility maintenance operations are examined and related to management responsibilities.


Meetings and Events Management
Course Number HMT-330
Credits 4.0

This course introduces event, meeting and convention management – one of the fastest growing segments of the hospitality industry. Coursework addresses the diverse demands of multiple stakeholders who plan, organize, lead and control organized functions. Models of events are introduced, enabling students to explore issues related to sponsorship, venues, staffing, finance, exhibit coordination, contracted services, legal implications, marketing and convention bureaus.


Restaurant Management
Course Number HMT-410
Credits 4.0

This course introduces operational and management practices of both startup and established restaurants. Concepts related to mission, marketing strategy and menu are addressed. Financial management of restaurants is examined, including pricing, budgets, cost control, payroll, fixed assets, leasing, and cash and revenue control, as are service and customer relations challenges.


Food Safety and Sanitation
Course Number HMT-420
Credits 4.0

This course covers fundamental aspects of food safety, sanitation and food service operations. Coursework is based on the 2001 FDA Food Code and focuses on management of sanitation, factors contributing to unsafe food, food-borne illnesses, food production flow, the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system, accident and crisis management, employee training, food safety regulations, and facilities and equipment cleaning and sanitation.


Tourism Management
Course Number HMT-450
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the many interdisciplinary aspects of the growing tourism industry, with emphasis on managerial challenges and responsibilities. The structure and function of major tourism delivery systems are covered, as are social and behavioral aspects of tourism. Additionally, supply and demand for products and services are analyzed, and forecasting demand, revenue and yield management approaches are explored.


Casino Management
Course Number HMT-440
Credits 4.0

This course introduces operating conditions and management responsibilities in casinos, and related properties and services. Gaming history and regulations are covered, as are modern gaming laws, controls, taxes, accounting, reporting, marketing, and the mathematics and statistics of games and casinos.


Program description: Qualified graduates of approved international three-year
business-related programs may select this option, which
provides a direct path to earning a recognized bachelor’s
degree. International credentials considered for approval –
from China, India, Singapore and the United Kingdom,
among others – include higher national diplomas, three-year bachelor’s degrees and the equivalent

Program Name: Bachelor's in Game and Simulation Programming
Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL-227
Credits 4.0

This course extends composition principles to writing in a career context. Through a process-oriented approach, students learn to create effective reports and correspondence. Major emphasis is given to the principles of professional writing in common applications. Studies include electronic communication and oral reporting. Students may also learn to create web pages for communication purposes. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Studies in Literature
Course Number HUMN-421
Credits 3.0

This course introduces literature in social, historical and cultural contexts. Through readings from various historical periods and cultures, students learn genres, forms and elements of literature. In discussions and assignments, they use analysis and critical thinking to reveal the complexity and richness of language, the diversity and commonality of human experience and the ethical dimensions of literary works. Literature’s relevance to society and culture emerges from its connections to nonliterary texts. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Post-1945 History
Course Number HUMN-412
Credits 3.0

This course explores major political and historical trends worldwide, from conditions leading to World War II to the present. Major themes include the Cold War, the demise of European colonialism, the struggle for independence and stability in the Third World, the economic emergence of the Pacific Rim, the collapse of the Soviet empire and the impact of technological development. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Social Movements
Course Number POLI-410
Credits 3.0

This course examines how political drama changes when new players enter the political arena. Through case studies of several modern social movements such as temperance, populism, civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, fundamentalism and nationalism, this course examines causes of movements as well as their tactics, obstacles and successes. Students gain a clearer understanding of the prospects, methods and limits of social change from below.


Math Programming for Games
Course Number GSP-221
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces 2d Geometry And The Application Of Linear Algebra As Used In Video Games And Interactive Simulation Design. Students Learn Mathematical Principles Such As Parametric And Implicit Linear Equations, The Derivative And Integral, Implementation And Application Of Linear Algebra Using A Vector Class, And Collision Detection Between A Particle/ball And Straight Boundaries. Prerequisites: Gsp-125 And Phys-216


Programming Game Physics
Course Number GSP-321
Credits 4.0

This course covers 3D geometry, math and physics as applied to video games and interactive simulation design. Topics include 2D and 3D transformations, matrix representation of transformations, matrix-matrix and matrix-vector multiplication, perspective projection, rotational physics and calculation of mass properties. Prerequisite: PHYS-216


Discrete Mathematics
Course Number MATH-233
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Discrete Mathematics As Applied To Game And Simulation Programming Problems. Topics Include Logic, Sets, Boolean Algebra, Data Representation, Counting, Probability, Randomness, Algorithm Efficiency, Recursion, Recurrence Relations, Markov Chains, Graphs And Trees. Mathematical Reasoning Is Emphasized Throughout. Computer Software Is Used In Problem Modeling And Solutions. Prerequisites: Gsp-125 And Math-190


Introduction to Game and Simulation Programming
Course Number GSP-111
Credits 4.0

This course provides a broad overview of the game industry, as well as of the game development and design process. An introduction to programming logic and design is also included. Prerequisite: Admission to the GSP program


Practical Game Design with Lab
Course Number GSP-240
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on basic elements used to systematically transform a designer’s vision into a working game or simulation. Topics include spatial and task design; design integration; control schemes; game balancing; game play mechanics and player interaction; tuning; and types and methods of testing and analysis. Prerequisite: GSP-111


Introduction to Computer Graphics Modeling and Programming with Lab
Course Number GSP-261
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Principles Of 3d Computer Graphics Modeling From The Perspectives Of The Technical Modeler And The Programmer Responsible For Creating 3d Environments For Games And Simulations. Students Explore Methods For 3d Modeling, Environmental Programming And Model Interaction. Prerequisites: Gsp-125 And Gsp-240


Simulation Design and Programming with Lab
Course Number GSP-281
Credits 5.0

This course explores mathematical theories, models and principles fundamental to design and development of computer simulations for study and interpretation of real phenomena; for learning and evaluation tools; and for instructional simulations and in-game simulation event development. Prerequisite: GSP-295


Modification and Level Design with Lab
Course Number GSP-340
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Tools And Concepts Used To Create Levels For Games, Including Level Design, Architecture Theory, Critical Path And Flow, Game Balancing, Play-testing And Storytelling. Working As A Team, Students Create An Original Modification (mod) Based On A Current Game Engine, Creating Original Levels, Characters And Content For Real-time Multi-player And First-person Games. Prerequisite: Gsp-261


Software Engineering for Game Programming with Lab
Course Number GSP-410
Credits 5.0

This course introduces principles and methodologies of software engineering for game and simulation software development. Processes and tools covered ensure that software products are developed to meet requirements, are tested for reliability, can be effectively maintained, and are delivered on time and within budget. An iterative and incremental development process is introduced as a team approach across the software development life cycle. Prerequisite: GSP-362


Introduction to Programming in C++ with Lab
Course Number GSP-115
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basics Of Designing And Coding Programs – Including Use Of An Integrated Development Environment (ide) – Language Syntax, As Well As Debugger Tools And Techniques. Students Learn To Develop Programs That Manipulate Simple Data Structures, Such As Arrays, As Well As Different Types Of Files. Prerequisite: Gsp-111


Intermediate Programming in C++/OOP with Lab
Course Number GSP-125
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Students design, code, test and document programs. Prerequisite: GSP-115


Computer Systems for Programmers with Lab
Course Number GSP-215
Credits 5.0

This course covers hardware and software aspects of computer systems – knowledge of which is essential for designing highperforming game engines – that affect game software performance. Prerequisite: GSP-125


Data Structures with Lab
Course Number GSP-295
Credits 5.0

This course examines abstract data structures – including linked lists, stacks, queues, tables, trees and graphs – their uses and programming algorithms required to implement them. Prerequisite: GSP-125


Artificial Intelligence for Games and Simulations with Lab
Course Number GSP-315
Credits 5.0

This course covers artificial intelligence methods and techniques related to game and simulation programming. Topics explored include autonomous movement, path finding, decision-making, genre considerations and learning with dynamic programming. Prerequisite: GSP-295


Computer Graphics Programming I with Lab
Course Number GSP-381
Credits 5.0

This course introduces computer graphics programming. Topics include 2D and 3D rendering, 3D animation, and programming for sound and input/output devices. Prerequisite: GSP-321


Computer Graphics Programming II with Lab
Course Number GSP-390
Credits 5.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Gsp-381, Students Explore Scene Management, Terrains, Particle Effects And Advanced Techniques In Programming Computer Graphics. Prerequisite: Gsp-381


Game Engine Design and Integration with Lab
Course Number GSP-420
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the logic and function of game engines, as well as the software core of computer games. Addressed are systems (graphics, input, sound and clock); virtual consoles; 3D graphics renderers; game engine function interfaces; and tools and data as aspects of game engines that facilitate reuse of assets such as graphics, characters, animated machines and levels. Prerequisite: GSP-410


Multiplayer Online Game Programming with Lab
Course Number GSP-470
Credits 5.0

This course introduces player behavior and programming topics unique to online multiplayer game environments for role play, casual and virtual world games. Topics include synchronous and asynchronous game design, player interaction, network performance and game system management. Prerequisite: Senior status


Applied Development Project I
Course Number GSP-361
Credits 4.0

Students in this course work individually to apply knowledge and mastered skills to develop small game or simulation programs, or modifications to game or simulation programs. Prerequisite: GSP-315


Applied Development Project II
Course Number GSP-362
Credits 4.0

Students in this course work as team members to apply knowledge and mastered skills to design and develop small game or simulation programs, or modifications to game or simulation programs. Prerequisite: GSP-361


Senior Project I
Course Number GSP-494
Credits 2.0

Students in this course apply knowledge and mastered skills to develop at least one complete level of a 3D game or simulation. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: GSP-420


Senior Project II
Course Number GSP-497
Credits 2.0

In This Course, A Continuation Of Gsp-494, Students Further Apply Knowledge And Mastered Skills To Develop At Least One Complete Level Of A 3d Game Or Simulation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisite: Gsp-494


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Interpersonal Communication
Course Number SPCH-277
Credits 4.0

This course explores ways in which people interact verbally and nonverbally, and teaches basic principles of interpersonal communication including perception, self-concept, persuasive communication, nonverbal communication, semantics, roles and norms, and communication barriers. Activities include participation in groups, pairs and interactive communication situations. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Cross-Cultural Communications
Course Number SOCS-187
Credits 3.0

This course promotes cultural sensitivity through readings, discussions, research and informal forums with guest speakers of other cultures. Students learn the importance of effective communication among diverse ethnic groups and gain knowledge of principles that govern social interactions in a multicultural milieu. / 3-3


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Pre-Calculus
Course Number MATH-190
Credits 4.0

This Course Emphasizes Topics That Form The Foundation For Study Of Electronics, Engineering Technology, Game And Simulation Programming, And Calculus. Topics Include Analyzing And Graphing Quadratic, Polynomial, Rational, Exponential,logarithmic And Trigonometric Functions; And Developing Complex Solutions To Problems In Rectangular, Trigonometric And Euler Form. Students Use Computer Software And Technology To Assist In Problem Solving And Analysis. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-104 Or Math-114. / 4-4


Physics with Lab
Course Number PHYS-216
Credits 4.0

This Course Examines Fundamental Principles Of Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Optics, And Electricity And Magnetism, As Well As Aspects Of Modern Physics. Lab Activities Complement Classroom Discussion And Include Experiments That Concisely Illustrate Main Theoretical Topics Presented. Prerequisite: Math-102, Math-114 Or Math-190 / 5-4


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Program description: DeVry University's bachelor's degree program in Game and Simulation Programming (GSP) prepares graduates to make an impact in the private and public video game and simulation software industry. Master the coding languages, visual design principles, and software methods used in the development of video games, crime scene reconstruction, corporate training software, and more. DeVry University partners with industry-leading companies like Vivendi/Universal to offer students experiential learning opportunities and networking contacts to potential employers around the world. With the gaming industry charting revenues in excess of $21 billion1, and the U.S. Army alone investing millions in simulation training, exciting new jobs in gaming and simulation programming are created every day.

Your Game and Simulation Programming degree from DeVry University will prepare you for success. Watch two of our students describe their own DeVry University success story.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Multimedia Design & Development
Multimedia Standards
Course Number MDD-310
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on generally accepted usability and accessibility standards that are global, industry wide, or legal for web and other media. In addition, students apply these standards to develop practices, policies and standards for effective management of multimedia projects and assets. Prerequisite: WGD-235 / 4-4


Business of Graphics
Course Number MDD-340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on issues critical to leading successful multimedia projects and businesses. Topics include scoping work for clients, legal considerations and financial aspects. In addition, the course introduces management principles applied to creative production. Students develop a pro forma media project plan that uses multiple resources. Prerequisite: WGD-235 / 4-4


Emerging Multimedia Technologies
Course Number MDD-410
Credits 4.0

This course explores emerging and advanced topics in multimedia. Students explore advances in technology and their implications for design and development of multimedia. Prerequisite: WGD-235 / 4-4


Interactive Web Page Scripting with Lab
Course Number WBG-310
Credits 4.0

Students in this course learn to program dynamic, interactive web pages and web-based games. Topics include basic programming fundamentals and object handling techniques. Fundamentals of game design are also introduced. Students use a scripting language to build basic interactive web page components and examples of web-based games. Prerequisite: MDD-310 / 5-4


Programming Multimedia for the Web with Lab
Course Number WBG-340
Credits 4.0

Students In This Course Use Multimedia Authoring Tools And Techniques To Create Web-based Games And Dynamic Web Pages. Integrating And Controlling Multimedia Assets Such As Movie Clips, Sound Effects, Images And Animations Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-363a Or The Equivalent, Or Mdd-310 / 5-4


Game Development with Lab
Course Number WBG-370
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basics Of Game Design And Development. Using An Object-oriented Game Engine With Libraries, Students Apply Game Design Principles To Develop Example Games. Technical Considerations And Industry Best Practices Are Also Covered. Prerequisite: Cis-363a Or The Equivalent, Or Wbg-340 / 5-4


Dynamic Website Development and Database Integration with Lab
Course Number WBG-410
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Advanced Techniques To Design And Develop Dynamic Websites Through Use Of Cascading Style Sheets (css), Integration Of Databases, Server-side Scripting And Large Site Management. Prerequisite: Wbg-340 / 5-4


Multiplayer Online Game Development with Lab
Course Number WBG-450
Credits 4.0

This Course Surveys Design, Development And Play Characteristics Of Multiplayer Online Games. Students Install, Configure And Maintain Game Server Software; Deploy A Simple Multimedia Game Using The Server; And Manage And Audit The Server. Actionscript Is Used To Configure Server Functionality. Prerequisites: Wbg-340 And Wbg-370 / 5-4


Web Video Fundamentals with Lab
Course Number GMD-311
Credits 4.0

Students in this course learn to enhance web presentations through video and audio integration. Technical aspects such as linking files, streaming media and embedded video are covered. Prerequisite: MDD-310 / 5-4


Advanced Imaging with Lab
Course Number GMD-341
Credits 4.0

This Course Explores Advanced Techniques For Achieving Sophisticated Visual Designs And Imagery. Students Learn To Actualize Designs And Maximize Creative Capabilities Through Use Of Software Such As Adobe Creative Suite. Students Also Learn Techniques To Streamline Workflow In Large Projects. Prerequisites: Mdd-310 And Wgd-210 / 5-4


Advanced Illustration with Lab
Course Number GMD-371
Credits 4.0

Students in this project-based course learn advanced drawing and line art techniques, including advanced vector-based illustration. Blending tools, gradients, transparency and various effects are explored. Web illustrations and animations are developed using vector art and common multimedia tools in an integrated development environment. Prerequisite: MDD-310 / 5-4


Visual Design Fundamentals
Course Number WGD-201
Credits 3.0

In this course students examine the foundation of visual design. Topics include the design process; elements of design, such as line, color, form, function and space; and combining elements for enhanced visual design. Students explore these topics through various projects and by applying concepts using appropriate software. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 3-3


Advanced Design and Rapid Visualization
Course Number WGD-205
Credits 4.0

Students in this course develop skills in creating graphic media. Students explore design and use of type, the process of using rapid visualization for design concept and idea formulation, as well as create media that enhance user understanding. Prerequisite: WGD-201 / 4-4


Digital Imaging Fundamentals
Course Number WGD-210
Credits 4.0

Students in this course learn concepts of digital imaging, including editing, optimizing and preparing images for webbased delivery. Topics such as color, special effects and compression formats are examined. Prerequisite: WGD-201 / 4-4


Information Design
Course Number WGD-229
Credits 4.0

This course addresses principles of analyzing, explaining and communicating instructions, ideas and information used in integrated text and graphics. Using a collaborative approach, students use real-world examples to explore user-centered design. Prerequisite: WGD-205 / 4-4


Web Design
Course Number WGD-232
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Fundamentals Of Web Design Principles And Web Content Management. Topics Include The User Interface, Web Page Conceptualization, Page Structure, Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (xhtml), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Wysiwyg Editors, Scripting And Web Accessibility Standards. Prerequisite: Wgd-229 / 4-4


Web Animation
Course Number WGD-235;
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on design and production of animation within the constraints of web applications. Topics include filesize optimization, timing, formatting requirements and scripting. Automated animation techniques as well as user-mediated animation are addressed. Prerequisite: WGD-229 / 4-4


Advanced Web Design
Course Number WGD-242
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Students Work In Teams To Develop A Web Design For A Fictitious Company. Students Research The Company’s Industry, Evaluate Competitors’ Web Designs And Explore Emerging Web Development Tools That Enhance Production Capabilities. Prerequisites: Wgd-232 And Wgd-235 / 4-4


Instructional Design for Multimedia
Course Number WGD-250
Credits 3.0

Students in this course examine theory and practice of designing instructional materials, as well as systems used for interactive training and education. Practical development of online learning materials is emphasized. Prerequisite: WGD-242 / 3-3


Project
Course Number WGD-260
Credits 3.0

Media Portfolio This capstone course culminates in a professional portfolio that showcases students’ web graphic products, including component examples and web designs. Prerequisite: WGD-250


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model.prerequisite: Cis-321 Or Wbg-310 / 5-4


Marketing
Course Number BUSN-319
Credits 3.0

In This Course Students Apply Principles And Strategies For Marketing Products And Services To Industrial, Commercial And Governmental Entities. Topics Include Ways In Which Market Information And Product Life Cycle Affect Product And Production Design; Forecasting Techniques; Interdependencies Between Marketing And Operations Functions; And Selling Skills. Prerequisites: Busn-115 And Math-114


Internet Marketing
Course Number ECOM-340
Credits 4.0

This course provides a review of traditional marketing strategies and demonstrates their use in building a viable online business. Emphasis is placed on coordinating Internet marketing activities with existing traditional marketing. Steps to develop a company’s Internet presence are also discussed. Prerequisite: BUSN-319 / 4-4


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Advertising and Public Relations
Course Number MKTG-410
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the field of advertising and public relations. Topics include media relations; media buying; determining appropriate media; promotions; public relations and publicity development tools; methods for improving customer satisfaction; relationship-building strategies; and ethics in advertising and public relations. Prerequisite: BUSN-319 / 4-4


Program description: Through 20161, employment of graphic designers is expected to grow. And individuals with a bachelor's degree and knowledge of multimedia design software, web site design, and graphics animation experience will have the best opportunities. With a bachelor's degree in Multimedia Design and Development (MDD) from DeVry University, you'll learn how to design, illustrate, manage, and produce visual communications by mastering key software applications, fundamental design principles, web content management, and graphics animation.

In this multimedia design and development bachelor's degree program, you can specialize in one of four areas of study (see "Specializations" below) and complete coursework required for the entire Web Graphic Design associate degree program. You'll gain the skills needed to create Internet content, web pages, marketing collateral, advertising, instructional material, and multimedia projects. Upon graduation, you'll have created a wide array of digital media to build a full professional portfolio.

Art and Design Courses at Herzing University

Program Name: Associate of Science in Graphic Design
Graphic Design Fundamentals
Course Number GA 101

This course is a basic introduction to the design software programs and will be an overview of layout, typography, raster and vector graphics, and simple print production techniques


Introduction to Digital Design Applications
Course Number GA 102
Credits 3.0

This survey course provides an introduction to the current software used in digital design and layout, web design, and photo archiving. The course will emphasize vector- and raster-based programs. There will be hands-on experience with the Adobe Creative Suite including Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat, and Bridge.


Illustration Fundamentals
Course Number GA 104
Credits 3.0

Students will develop their basic hand-drawing skills. Topics include the use of pencil, marker, charcoal, ink, and other mixed media to render original works of still life and commercial product sketches.


Digital Photography—Introduction
Course Number GA 105
Credits 3.0

This hands-on course teaches you to make the most of your digital photographs by utilizing latest software. Learn techniques for brightening a picture, bringing out colors, cropping, and simple photographic manipulations.


Color Theory in Design
Course Number GA 201
Credits 3.0

In This Course, The Students Will Examine The Nature Of Color As It Relates To Various Media While Implementing The Full Range Of Software Tools Available. Students Will Be Exposed To The Principles Of Color Space: Additive, Subtractive Color, And Color Model Theory Including Rgb, Cmyk, And The Pantone Color System.


Diagrammatic Design
Course Number GA 205
Credits 3.0

This vector-based graphics course teaches students to create dynamic visual communications. They will learn skills required to take advantage of powerful software tools to create illustrations, type effects, charts, graphs, and diagrams. Students work with colors, gradients, layers, fonts, and photos to create eye-catching illustrations and text effects.


Introduction to Typography
Course Number GA 212
Credits 3.0

In this course, the student will be introduced to and examine the principles of typography. History of type, classifications of fonts, physical components of letters, and legibility will be studied. Typographic vocabulary and terminology will be studied and used to explain design projects. Students will study applications of digital typography in print, web, and multi-media. Knowing that typefaces can portray emotion, emphasis will be placed on quality of information and communication through the selection of the proper typeface


Web Design Fundamentals
Course Number GA 215
Credits 3.0

An introduction to basic coding and design fundamentals in advanced design for web. Topics covered will be solid design foundations in layout, typography, color, and usability. Studying existing websites shows real-life scenarios on how concepts are put to work. Application architecture and multiple platform use will be covered.


Information Literacy and Research Writing
Course Number En 106
Credits 1.0

This course introduces the principles and practices of information literacy by using reflective critical thinking in the research and writing processes. Topics include understanding the research process; evaluating resources; using research techniques; outlining; providing in-text citations; understanding APA style; and using appropriate voice in writing formal research papers. 1.0 credit hour. Prerequisite: none.


Corporate Identity Design
Course Number GA 235
Credits 3.0

In this course students will begin to develop a full-scale campaign including corporate identity, corporate branding materials, direct mail advertising, and web design. Students will prepare for business success through strategic marketing and design


Web in Motion
Course Number GA 245
Credits 3.0

Students will learn to create graphics for websites with vector and pixel images. They will develop sophisticated user-face interactive elements including rollovers, navigations bars and dropdown menus. This course will teach professional techniques including layering, text formatting, dynamic graphics, hyperlinks, templates, tables, frames, style sheets, and forms in order to develop a well-organized, state-of-the-art website.


English Composition I
Course Number En 104
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the principles and practices of developing effective communications by using reflective critical thinking in the writing and reading processes. Topics include understanding the writing process; applying essay development patterns; using research techniques; and writing essays, summaries, and reports. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Speech
Course Number En 116
Credits 3.0

The course is designed to provide the student the opportunity to develop speaking and presentation skills in a variety of situations. Topics include the elements and structure of speeches, researching topics and developing presentation materials, analyzing and responding to audience characteristics, learning effective speech techniques, and delivering different types of speeches. Microsoft PowerPoint is used as a presentation tool. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Sophomore Portfolio Assessment
Course Number GA 285
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and practices associated with the preparation of portfolio creation and its importance in gaining employment in the design field. During this course, students have the opportunity to enhance their design skills by developing a visual identity and brand. They will also review and rework projects from previous classes and create a student portfolio. Emphasis in this course is placed on not only the content of the portfolio, but also on the preparation and presentations of the portfolio so that it meets professional standards. Student portfolios and presentation will undergo single-faculty review. Graduating ASGRD students will use this course to enhance their presentation and interview skills. Students who continue their studies in the bachelor’s degree programs will build upon these topics in their junior- and senior-level courses.


Computers and Application Software
Course Number IS 102
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to operating systems and browsers as well as word processing, presentation, spreadsheets, and e-mail applications used in office productivity software. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


College Algebra
Course Number MA 107
Credits 3.0

This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, inequalities, systems of equations in two variables, polynominal functions, quadratic equations, and rational and radical equations. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Psychology
Course Number PS 101
Credits 3.0

This course introduces psychology with a focus on understanding human behavior. Topics include: the scope of psychology; biological foundations and the brain; the concepts of sensation, perception, conditioning, and learning; the nature of memory; motivation and emotion; states of consciousness; personality theories; social psychology; dealing with health and stress; and developing coping strategies. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Social Issues and Technology
Course Number SS 350
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the impact of technology on society through economic, political, and environmental analyses. Topics include: energy technologies and environmental preservation; the impact of technologies on the ecosystem; the intensity of population growth; the role of technology in warfare; the challenges of social responsibility; the ethical issues of medical technology; the global village challenges; and the challenge of creating the future. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Critical Thinking
Course Number HU 101
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of thinking critically about the world through discussion, analysis, and the evaluation of information across all disciplines. Topics may include decision-making, argumentation and debate, ethics, value analysis, fairness, an effective use of language, and cultural awareness. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


General Microbiology
Course Number SC 165
Credits 2.0

This course provides an introduction to the study of microorganisms in our world. It covers normal flora and pathogenic microbial structure and function, metabolism, genetics, growth, and the relationship to humans and the environment. This course examines human infectious diseases including transmission, host defense mechanisms, and processes used to control the growth and spread of infectious agents. 2.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none. Corequisite: SC 165L General Microbiology Lab.


General Microbiology Lab
Course Number SC 165L
Credits 1.0

This course provides an introduction to the methods used to study microorganisms in our world by introducing standard techniques and procedures used in the microbiology laboratory. 1.0 credit hour. Corequisite: SC 165 General Microbiology.


General Education Electives
Credits 3.0

This requirement may be satisfed by choosing any course not already taken from the following course areas.  EC Economics  En English  HU Humanities  MA Mathematics  PS Psychology  SC natural Science  SS Social Science


Introduction to Management
Course Number BU 106
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the environment of American business with an overview of various topics that serve as a foundation for further study of business. Topics include the environments in which businesses operate, the organizational structures of businesses, management functions in an enterprise, and the challenges of managing marketing, operations, information technology, finance, and human resources. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none


Program description: This associate’s degree in graphic design employs an integrated and coherent approach that prepares students with the necessary academic
knowledge and technical competencies required for an entry-level position in graphic design. The curriculum is focused on designing and
producing work for print, interactive web, and exhibitions.

Art and Design Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Master of Business Administration - Mediation and Dispute Resolution
Applied Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT614
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using available accounting information to help managers of the firm make relevant decisions. Examines how the financial information developed for external users forms the basis for the managerial accounting system. Explores costing systems, cost behavior analysis, responsibility accounting and volume-profit relationships.


Applied Managerial Economics
Course Number ECON616
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the practical aspects of both micro- and macroeconomics and how they are applied to the managerial environment. The students investigate the role of economic principles in management analysis and decision making: the study of demand, cost, and supply concepts from a business viewpoint; and the application of national income measures to strategic planning and the future.


Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments
Course Number EMBA690
Credits 4.0

Students will master analytical and integrative tools to perform in-depth analyses of industries, firms, and competitors. Course material includes methods to predict competitive behavior and develop and implement strategic plans to achieve and sustain a competitive profile in the emerging global marketplace.


Applied Managerial Finance
Course Number FINC615
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes management decision making utilizing accounting and finance concepts. The following subjects are addressed in the course: financial reports and metrics, financial analysis and planning, financial forecasting, financial markets, financial leverage, working capital management, capital budgeting processes, cost of capital and long term financing. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a financial strategy report and accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of financial analysis from either the academic or professional literature.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Applied Managerial Decision-Making
Course Number MGMT600
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the practical application of descriptive and inferential statistics to decisions made in a managerial role. The following subjects are addressed in the course: data summarization and presentation, data analysis, test of hypotheses, discrete and continuous distributions, estimation theory, simple and multiple correlation and regression, analysis of variance, multivariate statistics and non parametric methods. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a data aggregation and reduction exercise report and by accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of applied statistics from either the academic or professional literature.


Graduate Research Methods
Course Number MGMT605
Credits 4.0

This course will provide a working knowledge of quantitative, qualitative, mixed, and action research approaches. It covers the entire research process for each of these methods to include: formulating research questions; developing research proposals; performing a literature search and analysis; sampling and measurement; research design; data analysis; and writing and presenting the research report will be analyzed.


Applied Managerial Marketing
Course Number MKTG630
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the application of marketing concepts, tools and decision-making processes middle managers use in developing marketing plans, programs and strategies. Within the marketing strategy framework, it also examines market analysis and measurement, profitability and productivity analysis, product development, promotion and pricing strategies, the logistics systems approach and the marketing plan. The student will apply the knowledge learned by structuring and presenting to the class a practical strategic marketing plan.


Program description: The MBA in Mediation and Dispute Resolution Degree concentration is designed for mediation professionals that have earned the Advanced Practitioner of Mediation (APM) designation of the Institute for Advanced Dispute Resolution (IADR). The field of mediation has become increasingly significant in modern business environments as it can prevent costly litigation, worker strikes and other disruptions. The degree program was designed with the direction of leaders in management to help you learn and develop mediation process skills and conflict resolution procedures for use in the workplace.

Employment of labor relations staff, including arbitrators and mediators, should grow by as much as 16 percent through the year 2016 as firms become more involved in labor relations and attempt to resolve potentially costly labor-management disputes out of court.*

Art and Design Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BA in Communications: Digital Film Production
History and Aesthetics
Course Number DFP 101
Credits 4.0

This course covers multiple eras and movements throughout the age of film.


Digital Video Production I
Course Number DFP 111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the technical and aesthetic aspects of small format digital production as well as the basic principles of motion picture production. Students learn the language of film/digital video and how its manipulation can express one’s individual message or purpose.


Film Financing, Budgeting, and Distribution
Course Number DFP 113
Credits 4.0

This course is an intense overview of the entire process beyond the creation of a production. Students review film financing, contracting, budgeting, insurance, etc.


Acting for the Camera
Course Number DFP 115
Credits 4.0

This introductory course helps digital film production students to develop skills and gain experience in acting and directing for the camera. Students participate on both sides of the camera. Course sessions include lecture, practical exercises, and preparation for analyzing and blocking a scene and working on a set. Students screen selected film clips to evaluate performances, explore methods to prepare for an audition, discuss the actor/director relationship, and examine the professional requirements of relating to a crew.


Cinematography
Course Number DFP 223
Credits 4.0

This course will be an intensive exploration of the craft, technologies, and aesthetic principles of cinematography, lighting, and set design techniques. Lectures and in-class demonstrations cover video formats, cameras, exposure, lenses and optics, lighting units, lighting placement, lighting control, camera support, and camera movement


Nonlinear Editing
Course Number DFP 225
Credits 4.0

This course follows the general chronology of editing from capture and logging, through editing and effects, to final output of a finished program. The first half of the course is devoted entirely to a mastery of the editing software. The second half of the course is devoted to examining how and why editing is important. Different editing theories are explored, including montage, fast cut, long take, jump cut, and others. Lab fee required.


Audio Production and Design
Course Number DFP 227

This course is an interactive exploration and implementation of audio production for cinema, including multimodal and theoretical approaches.


Cinema Directing
Course Number DFP 311
Credits 4.0

This course utilizes techniques of directing, sound editing, lighting, and advanced editing programs. Several practical and written exercises lead to a short digital production. Students spend time working with actors in front of the camera as well as composing shots to convey a story visually.


Entertainment Union and Guilds
Course Number DFP 345
Credits 4.0

Students learn the impact, use, and history of entertainment guilds and unions. The course also covers value, membership requirements, and alternative opportunities outside of the union system.


Music Video/Documentary Production
Course Number DFP 361

This course is a survey of music video and documentary productions. Students study, analyze, and implement techniques in both types of productions. Prerequisite: DFP 311.


Digital Production II
Course Number DFP 451
Credits 4.0

This course exposes students to every aspect of media production. Students also learn how to work well in a team environment and to adhere to deadlines, time constraints, and medium limitations. Prerequisite: DFP 111.


Advanced Digital Post-Production
Course Number DFP 455
Credits 4.0

This class is about developing students’ understanding of the art of cinematic storytelling and montage and exposing them to the cueing, performing, and editing of Foley and Automated Dialogue Replacement. Students work on more advanced projects is integrated into the class as a means of mastering advanced editing tools and techniques. Prerequisite: DFP 225.


Screenwriting II
Course Number DFP 457Δ
Credits 4.0

implement advanced techniques in creating cinema screenplays. This course emphasizes the use of traditional storytelling and classic mythology, and how these devices apply to contemporary screenplays. Prerequisite: COM 221


Adapting Media to Screenplays
Course Number DFP 463
Credits 4.0

Students learn to adapt various forms of media to screenplays. Prerequisite: DFP 457.


Screenwriting Capstone
Course Number DFP 470
Credits 4.0

Students Participate In Individually Writing A Full-length Feature Film. They Also Explore All Aspects Of Structure, Character, Settings, Theme, Obstacle, And Expressive Writing Storytelling. Prerequisites: Dfp 457 And Dfp 463.


Digital Production Practicum
Course Number DFP 480
Credits 4.0

This practicum provides students with the foundation and practice in digital production. Students learn how to use different media forms to express creativity and ideas. The course goal is to teach students to analyze a script by identifying character objectives, through-lines, key facts, circumstances, and emotional events while transferring that to an on-set production experience. Thecourse focuses on the process and completion of a short production piece. Prerequisite: DFP 451.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Digital Film program develops leaders in the fields of narrative
film and video production. The program is built on developing a strong foundation in narrative storytelling,
creativity, technical skills, and hands on experience necessary to design and deliver poignant messages.

Program Name: BA in Communications: Graphic Design
Introduction to 3D Animation
Course Number DGN 205
Credits 3.0

This is an introductory course on the creation of elements for 3D animation using industry standard Maya software. Students will be introduced to the entire production pipeline of 3D animation


Graphic Design I
Course Number DGN 220
Credits 4.0

This is an introductory course in the study of the primary elements and principles of design, type, and imagery, and their application to graphic design problems


Advertising Design
Course Number DGN 223
Credits 3.0

An overview of skills needed to develop successful advertising campaigns. Coursework is a combination of lecture and lab work.


Web Design
Course Number DGN 230
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development of students’ ability to plan a Web site and develop multiple design solutions for the needs of this media.


Graphic Design II
Course Number DGN 333
Credits 3.0

Intensified study of typography and its use as a communications design tool. Continued study of the use of images, color and texture.


3D Modeling: Theory and Practice
Course Number DGN 360
Credits 9.0

Studying the tools to convert 2D hand drawings, photos and other references into 3 dimensional elements


Computer Graphics
Course Number DGN 365:
Credits 3.0

A study of the evolution of computer generated imagery from film, television and photography.


Graphic Design III
Course Number DGN 433:
Credits 3.0

A highly aesthetic and technical class where students bring all design skills together, including typography, illustration, photography, graphics and production planning


Graphic Design IV
Course Number DGN 434
Credits 3.0

Students plan and complete their professional portfolio and produce self-promotional pieces including resume, cover letter, and Web site


3D Animation
Course Number DGN 455:
Credits 3.0

Students will learn the 12 principles of animation and apply it to specific animation assignments


3D Animation for Film
Course Number DGN 465
Credits 3.0

A highly aesthetic and technical class in which students bring all design skills together, including preproduction, graphic design, modeling, animation, texturing and rendering.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Communications program develops leaders in the fields of
human communication and media. The program is built on a values-based liberal arts foundation. Students
develop the knowledge, creativity, and intermodal communication skills necessary to design and deliver
compelling messages.

Art and Design Courses at Liberty University Online

Program Name: MA Worship-Ethnomusicology
Biblical Foundations of Worship
Course Number WRSP 510
Credits 3.0

A study of the principles of worship as found in the Old and New Testaments. Includes study of the Tabernacle as a model of worship, worship in the lives of biblical characters, and the biblical roots of worship practices developed by the early church.


Building a Theology of Worship
Course Number WRSP 635
Credits 3.0

This course is a comprehensive study of the purpose and practice of a theology of worship in the local church. The study is divided into two parts: Cognitive theology that includes the understanding and discovery of a biblical theology of worship and music; and, practical application of theology which includes developing a strategy for teaching theology as a worship leader. The class is guided by a series of projects whereby students build a personal theology for private and public worship.


Systematic Theology
Course Number THEO 530
Credits 3.0

A course completing the study of systematic theology with special attention given to the doctrines of the person and work of Christ, the Holy Spirit, salvation, the church, and last things. Such issues as nature and extent of salvation, the origin, nature and future of the church, and the eternal state are explored.


New Testament Introduction
Course Number NBST 525
Credits 3.0

General introduction to the New Testament including the New Testament world, canonicity, textural criticism, inspiration, archaeological insights, and special introduction of the New Testament, including the synoptic problem.


Old Testament Introduction
Course Number OBST 590
Credits 3.0

Deals with the two major subdivisions of OTI: (1) general introduction which involves the matters of text, canon, and the particular question of the date and authorship of the Pentateuch; and (2) special introduction relating to the treatment of the individual books of the Old Testament one-by-one, giving an account of authorship, date, purpose, and integrity. The goal of the course is to provide a basis for an introduction to the tools used in the Old Testament materials in their historical and theological context. (Offered in online format only.)


Psalms
Course Number OBST 610
Credits 3.0

An in-depth study of representative types of psalmic materials. Attention is given to questions of historical setting and literary form as they relate to major religious ideas and teachings.


Poetry of the Old Testament
Course Number OBST 620
Credits 3.0

A survey of the historical background, nature, and purpose of divine revelation in the poetic literature of the Old Testament. An analysis of the form and content of the poetic books of the Old Testament: Job through Song of Solomon, and Lamentations.


Dynamics of Corporate Worship
Course Number WRSP 501
Credits 3.0

This course involves a study of the dynamic influences of personal, biblical, historical, professional, and practical worship to the corporate ministry of the local church. Application is made to the presentation and influence of singing, praying, preaching, evangelism, and the great modern revival movements on corporate worship in the church today. Graduate students complete a personal assessment that relates honest, genuine, unhindered, and biblical worship to their own responsibility to music, prayer, evangelism, preaching, and corporate ministry.


Current Issues in Worship Ministry
Course Number WRSP 540
Credits 3.0

A study of the current trends and issues related to contemporary worship. Consideration is given to various worship models, worship evangelism, cross-cultural issues, and church worship in transition.


Building a Balanced Worship Ministry
Course Number WRSP 551
Credits 3.0

This is a course that looks at the various roles the worship leader holds within the mandates of the overall church mission. Consideration is given to the worship leader’s relationship to the local church education and discipleship programs, missions and evangelism outreach ministries, preaching and teaching ministries, women’s and men’s ministries, children, youth and young adult ministries, and creative arts ministries.


Global Worship
Course Number WRSP 545
Credits 3.0

This course investigates the biblical mandate for world missions as applied to principles for worship leading to various cultures and ethnic regions. Application is made to the role and responsibility worship leaders have in developing partnerships between local churches and missionary endeavors through worship. Special attention is given to the relationship between worship, the glory of God, and the Great Commission.


American Christianity
Course Number CHHI 692
Credits 3.0

A study of the beginnings of Christianity in America to the present. Includes the European background, colonial Christianity, the first Great Awakening, the rise of the United States, the separation of church and state, the second Great Awakening, the development of religious diversity, the impact of the Civil War on religion, denominational development, the impact of immigration and industrialization, and the modern period.


Introduction to Ethnomusicology
Course Number ETHM 511
Credits 3.0

The study of traditions, belief systems and practices of world cultures as approached through the comparative study and analysis of the music cultures of contrasting ethnic groups. Specific cultures studied may vary each term.


Field of Ethnomusicology
Course Number ETHM 512
Credits 3.0

The study of various philosophical approaches in the practice of ethnomusicology. Primary emphasis is given to research of the history of the discipline, comparative analysis, and readings of some major contributors in the field of ethnomusicology


Anthropology of Music
Course Number ETHM 513
Credits 3.0

Explore the anthropological side of ethnomusicology by examining a wide variety of theoretical and ethnographic approaches to music culture analysis.


Organology
Course Number ETHM 514
Credits 3.0

The study of sound instrument classifications and characteristics, their use in Western and non-Western cultures, and the variety of contexts in which instruments are found. Emphasis is also given to recent approaches and uses in the field of organology


Applied Ethnomusicology
Course Number ETHM 613
Credits 3.0

The practice of ethnomusicology including: 1) a summary of technology and audio/video recording practices; 2) development of professional and intercultural relationships; 3) contextualization of music in worship, discipleship, and evangelism; 4) promoting the creation of indigenous Christian songs; 5) promoting the distribution of such songs through appropriate media; and, 6) introduction to other areas of “applied ethnomusicology.


New Testament Orientation I
Course Number NBST 521
Credits 3.0

A general introduction to the New Testament Gospels, General Epistles, and Revelation, emphasizing matters of text, canon, authorship, date, authorial purpose, and theme development. Also a special introduction, involving current issues of criticism and interpretation, such as the synoptic problem. The general principles of interpretation (hermeneutics) will be introduced as well as the special principles concerning parables, symbols and types, and prophecy.


New Testament Orientation II
Course Number NBST 522
Credits 3.0

A continuation of NBST 521 with a general and special introduction of Acts and the Pauline Epistles. The study of hermeneutics will continue with emphasis upon word meaning, figures of speech, and other linguistic matters


Old Testament Orientation II
Course Number OBST 592
Credits 3.0

An examination of the current status of research in studies relative to the poetic and prophetic books. Special attention will be given to biblical introduction, hermeneutics, and the acquiring of a strategic grasp of the historical setting, literary genres, and structure of each book, as well as areas of particular critical concern.


History of Baptists
Course Number CHHI 694
Credits 3.0

A survey of the background and rise of English Baptists, including their progress from the seventeenth century in England until the present day. Includes a survey of the rise of Baptists in America in the seventeenth century and their progress to the present. Includes various Baptist groups, large and small, of differing theological persuasions, denominational and independent


Church Growth II: Evangelism and Church Growth
Course Number EVAN 510
Credits 3.0

An introductory study in evangelism and church growth principles, stressing the biblical and theological basis of evangelism as reflected in and through the local church.


Program description: Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary's Master of Arts in Worship Studies with a concentration in Ethnomusicology prepares musicians and worship leaders to become missionaries–or musical ambassadors–in various cultural settings. Studying the biblical and theological foundations of worship, you will develop a strong Christian worldview and explore the role of music and art within various cultures. The program includes training in biblical leadership techniques, pastoral–staff relations, the varying roles of the worship leader and the ongoing relationship to global worship.
You will study qualitative and quantitative research methods applicable to a variety of worship cultures and contexts within the evangelical community. Courses are taught by today's top Christian leaders in worship music, song writing and arranging, including Al Denson (worship leader/CCM artist/songwriter), Rick Muchow (worship pastor, Saddleback Community Church), Todd Bell (worship pastor/producer, Prestonwood Baptist Church) and Mark Harris (worship leader/song writer/band member of 4Him).


Potential Career Options
Musician
Worship Pastor
Music Ministry

Key points:

Ranked among the top 10 online colleges in the nation for three years in a row
Rated as one of the Best Distance Learning Graduate Schools by Get Educated.com
Nationally renowned Seminary and Professional Studies program offered from a sound moral and biblical perspective
Most cost–effective, accredited online Seminary program offered by a national educational institution
Nationally acclaimed Seminary faculty teaching online courses

Art and Design Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Art and Design Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Princeton University
Total Programs 56
Number of Subjects 59
Rank in USA 8th
Brown University
Total Programs 135
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 9th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th