Online Arts Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its arts courses to be successful artists, graphic designers, journalists, musicians, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 8,900 people employed as fine artists, including painters, sculptors, and illustrators alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $50,630. Craft artists make on average $33,070 per year and there are about 5,380 of them employed today.

Arts Organizations Arts Common Job Tasks
  • writing an article
  • editing an article
  • creating music
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Arts Courses at Walden University

Program Name: Teacher Preparation Program with a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)
Teacher as Lifelong Learner and Professional Educator
Course Number EDUC 6605
Credits 3.0

Lifelong learning and professionalism are key components of teaching. This course orients teacher candidates to the skills, understandings, strategies, and knowledge necessary to become a successful learner while establishing the foundations for becoming a professional educator, including knowledge of child development. Course instructors help candidates become comfortable in the online learning environment, enabling them to clarify program expectations, create support networks and learning communities with colleagues and instructors, and establish a personal professional philosophy to promote social change. Upon completion of this course, teacher candidates will demonstrate understanding of resources and expectations, initiate an electronic professional portfolio, and determine strategies for success as a professional educator.


Effective Practices: Assessment, Teaching, and Learning
Course Number EDUC 6607
Credits 3.0

To ensure high levels of learning and achievement for all students, today’s educators must be knowledgeable about learners and learning and well-versed in effective teaching and assessment practices. This course examines the interrelationships among assessment, teaching, and learning and examines effective practices for applying and thoughtfully integrating these critical components in the P–12 classroom. Students will gain a historical perspective on the standards and accountability movement and examine standards in their state or local setting. They will explore learning theory in the context of today’s challenging educational goals and standards. And they will learn and apply research-based practices in effective assessment, curriculum design, and instruction. Through both on-site work and Walden’s signature Virtual Field Experience, students will critically analyze as well as implement teaching and learning principles and practices that ensure responsiveness to the individual and collective needs of students.


Classroom Management
Course Number EDUC 6608
Credits 3.0

This course helps teachers create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character in order to optimize learning for all students. Teachers will learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among students. Age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and for teaching conflict resolution will be presented. The course also provides strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem-solving with parents and families.


Seminar: Professional, Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration: Early Childhood Education
Course Number EDUC 6611
Credits 1.0

This seminar, taken concurrently with EDUC 6687 Demonstration Teaching: Early Childhood Education, allows teacher candidates to fine-tune their skills, understandings, strategies, and knowledge. Teacher candidates complete the requirements for their ePortfolio and determine strategies for success as professional educators. The seminar allows for problem-solving among colleagues; group and individual reflective practice; and support and feedback for what is happening in demonstration teaching districts, schools, and classrooms. Seminar topics focus on promoting success for teacher candidates as they transition from the program of study into employment in the field as professional educators.


Early Childhood Education: Past, Present, and Future
Course Number EDUC 6681
Credits 3.0

This course examines the historical and philosophical foundations of early childhood care and education while exploring a variety of early childhood programs—from child care centers to preschools and primary-grade classrooms—in order to provide the teacher candidate with a range of professional insights and opportunities regarding effective practice. With an emphasis on establishing developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive learning environments and on maintaining effective partnerships with families, this course serves to continue the development of a reasoned, coherent philosophy of education as a basis for ethical and professional practice and decision-making in diverse settings. This in-depth course reviews early childhood learning and developmental theory, as well as the knowledge needed to support and enhance the development and learning of all children from birth through age 3.


Teaching Reading, P–3
Course Number EDUC 6682
Credits 3.0

This course presents research-based methods for developing literacy (reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing) in grades P–3. Teacher candidates will gain a historical perspective on teaching reading and explore various purposes and types of literacy assessments Strategies for creating an effective literacy environment and for working with parents and families will be addressed. Candidates will learn effective strategies for developing phonemic awareness, phonics skills, vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, and writing. Through field experiences, candidates will plan and implement assessment-driven, developmentally appropriate classroom lessons in each of these areas, addressing the diverse needs of individual children.


Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Infants and Toddlers
Course Number EDUC 6683
Credits 3.0

Offering an in-depth look at infant and toddler growth and development, this course focuses on developmentally appropriate practices that promote children’s total well-being and that guide development in each of the domains (physical, social, emotional, and cognitive/language). Special areas of focus include: health and safety; early mental health; brain development; creative development; and fostering respectful and responsive adult-child relationships and family involvement. In addition, teacher candidates learn to design and evaluate environments that enrich the development and learning of infants and toddlers.


Play and Learning for the Preschool Child
Course Number EDUC 6684
Credits 3.0

Offering an in-depth look at the development and learning of preschoolers, this course focuses on developmentally appropriate theory, practices, and environments that enhance children’s development and learning in each of the domains (physical, social, emotional, and cognitive/language). Special areas of focus include the integral roles of play and creativity in children’s learning; the role of observation as it relates to establishing a child-centered approach to planning curriculum and assessing young children; promoting pro-social, anti-bias learning communities; and being responsive to and inclusive of children’s family members.


Teaching Mathematics, P–3
Course Number EDUC 6685
Credits 3.0

Using the latest research on the most effective methods for teaching developmentally appropriate mathematics curriculum from preschool through Grade 3, this course explores instructional and assessment strategies to develop children’s conceptual understanding of mathematics, including the best use of materials and technology. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) content and process standards are embedded in this course with an emphasis on real-world problem-solving.


Teaching Across the Content Areas, P–3
Course Number EDUC 6686
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on standards-based, data-driven, developmentally appropriate teaching, learning, and assessment within and across content areas in preschool through Grade 3. The course focuses primarily on the content areas of science, social studies, and the arts, and emphasizes the importance of integrating literacy and mathematics in meaningful and relevant ways. Teachers will examine standards in various content areas, apply effective methods and strategies—including approaches to meeting diverse needs—to plan instruction in specific content areas and the arts, and develop ideas for integrating multiple content areas.


Demonstration Teaching: Early Childhood Education
Course Number EDUC 6687
Credits 6.0

Demonstration Teaching Is The Culminating Experience In The Teacher Preparation Program And Is An Opportunity To Apply Knowledge And Skills And To Demonstrate Required Competencies. Demonstration Teaching Takes Place In Two Different Classroom Settings During The Semester. During Demonstration Teaching, Candidates Will Gradually Assume Complete Teaching Responsibility Of The Classroom, Gaining Real-world Experience And The Opportunity To Translate Theory Into Practice And To Learn From Doing. Teacher Candidates Will Work Closely With, And Are Evaluated By, Their University Supervisor And Classroom Cooperating Teacher. The First 5 Weeks Of Demonstration Teaching Run Concurrently With Educ 6686 Teaching Across The Content Areas, P–3. The Remainder Of Demonstration Teaching Runs Concurrently With Educ 6611 Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, And Collaboration: Early Childhood Education.


Educational Research: Foundations
Course Number EDUC 6621
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide post-baccalaureate teacher licensure candidates with an introduction to the fundamentals of research. Contemporary educational research is examined with the underlying assumption that research can improve classroom practice. Course participants will be expected to develop knowledge and skills in the use of theoretical frameworks; quantitative, qualitative, and action research methodologies; development of research questions; and compliance with ethical responsibilities of the researcher. Candidates will also complete an initial review of literature relevant to an identified research question.


Educational Research: Practical Applications
Course Number EDUC 6622
Credits 3.0

This course is an applied research course designed to expand post-baccalaureate teacher licensure candidates’ knowledge and skills by requiring them to utilize use the tools and information gained in EDUC 6621, Educational Research: Foundations, to design a timely and useful educational research project. Specific activities in this course include developing and refining research questions or needs assessments; determining appropriate research methodologies and instrumentation; collecting and analyzing data, if possible; evaluating validity; and presenting analysis and implications. In addition, candidates will link their research proposal with the social change mission of the university.


Program description: Turn your passion for learning into a fulfilling career as a first-time teacher by enrolling in Walden’s Teacher Preparation Program with a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.). Choose from three specializations focusing on special education or early childhood education. Designed for the independent learner, this program combines virtual and school-based field experience to prepare you to make a positive impact in your classroom, school, and community.

Specializations

  • Early Childhood Education (Birth–Grade 3)
  • Special Education, Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (K–12)
  • Special Education, Learning Disabilities (K–12)


Note to all Pennsylvania residents: Walden University’s teacher preparation program and special education endorsement programs are approved by the Minnesota Board of Teaching as leading to licensure and endorsement, respectively. Because these programs are not reviewed by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, candidates are instructed to apply for Pennsylvania certification as out-of-state graduates of a teacher preparation program.

Arts Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in English
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

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Program description: The Bachelor of Arts degree with a language requirement and primary major in English is designed to provide students with substantive academic content in a liberal arts discipline of their choice. The program prepares students for teaching opportunities in elementary and secondary education after completion of additional methodology courses required for teacher certification in all states. The degree also provides an academic foundation for students interested in pursuing further graduate education necessary for postsecondary teaching positions in liberal arts at most colleges and universities. Focused studies are designed to provide an interdisciplinary component that will increase the student’s breadth of learning. The program will provide workers in business and government, as well as education, with learning that promotes critical thinking, information utilization, collaboration, communication, and analytical skills essential to effective and efficient work productivity.

The major in English is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of rhetoric, literature, and writing. Students will choose from topics in American and English literature, writing essentials, linguistics and poetry, literary masterpieces, and technical writing.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Administration and Supervision
Leadership and Collaborative Processes
Course Number EDA518

This course provides students with an overview of educational leadership and with an understanding of the issues in educational leadership positions. Students analyze the various styles of leadership and explore how leadership enhances an educational environment. Students examine information on collaborative processes and on how educational leaders can create high performing teams.


Family, Community, and Media Relations
Course Number EDA575

This course focuses on the role of the school principal as a catalyst for developing and for maintaining collaborations with families, business and community groups, and the media to support a school’s vision and programs. Candidates analyze the research on school and community relations and its implications for their particular school. They also examine ways of learning about the nature of community resources, interests, and needs; establishing reciprocal relationships; the use of conflict resolution and decision making tools; and ethical issues when working with families, business, community, and media groups. In addition, candidates plan a social action project that involves school, families, community, and the media.


Equity, Diversity, and Access in Education
Course Number EDA570

This course provides candidates the opportunity to examine and to reflect upon equity, diversity, and access in education. In particular, the course focuses on the potential for contributions of students, families, teachers, and staff through equitable participation in school practices, programs, and curriculum. Candidates examine their personal beliefs, as well as issues regarding equity, diversity, and access, in the context of leadership.


Supervision of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
Course Number EDA524

This course examines principals’ responsibilities related to supervision of curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Principal candidates study the relationships among supervision, curriculum design, national and state standards, and effective instructional practice for diverse learners. Candidates also review the types of assessments that school leaders must be familiar with, the use of assessments to measure and support student achievement, the continuous school improvement model, and the development of school improvement plans. In addition, candidates participate in field experiences related to curriculum, instruction, and assessment.


Administration of Special Programs
Course Number EDA528

This course provides an overview of various federal, state, non-profit, and private funding programs and grants. Candidates study the components and requirements of these programs, practice grant-writing skills, and participate in field experiences related to special programs administration.


Human Relations and Organizational Behavior in Education
Course Number EDA532

This course examines human relations and organizational behavior concepts, strategies, and theories from the public, business, and educational sectors and applies them to the educational realm. The key processes of conflict resolution and organizational change are explored, along with how they influence educational organizations in the areas of leadership, communication, decision making, problem solving, diversity issues and educational change.


Business and Facilities Management
Course Number EDA535

In this course, candidates study the processes for managing business functions and school facilities. Principal candidates study school budgeting and accounting procedures and examine issues regarding facilities management. Principal candidates also participate in field experiences related to business and facilities management.


Education Finance and Budgeting
Course Number EDA538

This course examines the concepts and theories that form the foundation of public school finance in America such as taxation, revenue sources, legislative issues, risk management, and other associated school finance considerations. The practical application of these concepts and theories will be experienced in the development of district/school budget planning and development.


School Law for Educators
Course Number EDA545

This course allows students to examine legal theory and practice in the context of the educational setting. The constitutional framework, court systems, legal issues, and their subsequent impact on schools are discussed, analyzed, and applied to current educational practices.


Human Resources Management in Education
Course Number EDA550

This course is designed to provide a practical overview of human resources management from a district and school perspective. The role of the human resources department and its influence on individual schools is discussed. Current practices of recruitment, selection, retention, collective bargaining, staff development, and evaluation of personnel and their legal implications are emphasized.


Instructional Program Management and Evaluation
Course Number EDA554

This course is designed to examine instructional supervision, organizational techniques, and other skills needed to manage and evaluate the instructional program. The course focuses on methods of staff supervision, curriculum development, data-driven instructional improvement, assessment, evaluation of instructional standards, and staff development. Students are expected to demonstrate that they can engage staff and community as they develop student standards and assessments, help staff evaluate learning, coach effective instruction, and promote a school climate for learning.


School Policy and Law for Principals
Course Number EDA555

This course examines legal theory and practice in the context of the educational setting. The United States Constitution, federal and state court systems, legal issues, and their impact on schools are discussed, analyzed, and applied to current educational practices.


Human Resources Leadership and Management
Course Number EDA560

This course focuses on the responsibilities involved in human resources administration in education. Methods of recruitment, selection, induction, development, compensation, and appraisal are examined. In addition, the course analyzes strategic planning, employment continuity, employment justice including laws, policies and procedures, and unionism.


The Role and Functions of the Principal
Course Number EDA564

This course examines the roles and functions of the principalship and explores educational leadership. Research, theory, and systemic change are studied and integrated to develop principals who are collaborative instructional leaders for schools of the 21st century.


School Improvement Processes
Course Number EDA565

This course focuses on the use of assessments in K-12 education and in developing school improvement plans from a principal perspective. Candidates review the types of assessments that a school leader needs to be familiar with, and how a school leader can use assessment data to measure student achievement. Additionally, the model and processes of continuous school improvement are explored.


Program description: The courses in our MAED/Administration and Supervision degree program provide a foundation in education finance, school law, principal roles and responsibilities, community relations, and personnel supervision. The knowledge and skills developed from these courses is essential to helping you become a successful and ethical administrator.

To give you an even better idea of the responsibilities you'll face as a school principal, you'll participate in a required internship that incorporates fiscal operations and community relations, as well as curriculum, instruction and assessment.

Elevate your leadership and make an impact in your educational community

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Adult Education and Training
Foundations of Adult Education and Training
Course Number AET505

This course focuses on the principles of adult learning and andragogical theory. It addresses the history of adult learning, the characteristics of adult learners, key adult learning theories, and learning processes and styles. Additionally, the course investigates factors that influence adult education and training environments such as motivation, critical thinking skills, and ethics. Topics and Objectives History of Adult Learning Explore the history of adult learning. Explain the impact of federal mandates on adult education and training. Compare and contrast andragogy and pedagogy. Examine adult learning in a contemporary society. Purposes and Principles of Adult Education and Training Analyze the purposes of adult education and training. Examine the fundamental principles of adult learning. Identify the providers of adult education and training. Explore subject-matter categories of adult learning. Adult Development and Learning Examine the biological and psychological development of adult learners. Analyze the influences of sociocultural and integrative perspectives on development. Explore cognitive development in adulthood. Examine the notion of intelligence in reference to adult learners. Learning Process Explain memory and cognition. Analyze the adult learning process and experience. Examine key theories of learning. Learning Transactions with Adults Identify characteristics of adult learners. Analyze the impact of learning styles on adult learning. Examine ways to utilize andragogical techniques. Compare and contrast traditional and non-traditional instructional models. Adult Learning Environment Describe the characteristics of formal and informal adult education and training settings. Apply ethics to adult learning environments. Explore the application of critical thinking in the adult learning environment. Examine the motivation of adults in the learning environment. Describe the most common challenges in an education or in a training environment.



Instructional Design
Course Number AET515

This course focuses on systematic approaches to instructional design. Learners create an instructional plan that outlines each of the five components of a systematic instructional design model (i.e., ADDIE: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation). The course identifies trends and issues in instructional design for adult learners. Topics and Objectives Instructional Design Models and Analysis Analyze systematic approaches to instructional design. Examine the components of a needs assessment. Identify performance gaps based on a needs assessment. Design Construct goals for an instructional plan. Create performance-based objectives that align with instructional goals. Describe a summative assessment to support learner outcomes. Analyze the impact of learner characteristics and learning context on instructional design. Development Determine delivery modality. Select instructional strategies. Implementation Create an implementation schedule for the instructional plan. Evaluate resources for instructional delivery. Analyze the purposes of formative evaluations. Evaluation Examine strategies for evaluating a systematic approach to instructional design. Identify criteria for determining that design goals, performance-based objectives, and learning outcomes were achieved. Analyze possible recommendations for future use. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design Describe issues and trends in various instructional settings. Analyze issues and trends in the use of various instructional modalities. Predict how current issues and trends will impact the future of instructional design.


Instructional Strategies in Adult Education and Training
Course Number AET520

This course builds upon the foundation provided in the instructional design course and focuses on development and implementation of instruction that facilitates adult learning. Learners examine and apply models, strategies, and methods for planning and for implementing instruction. Instructional approaches, engagement strategies, and management of the instructional environment are explored. Topics and Objectives Effective Communication and Instructional Techniques Describe effective communication for facilitators. Analyze the relationship between interpersonal skills and instruction. Examine information components of an instructional module/training plan. Instructional Planning Explain components in the development of an instructional module/training plan. Analyze components in the implementation of an instructional module/training plan. Examine planning and instructional variables. Engagement of Adult Learners Analyze methods of engaging the adult learner. Describe the essential components of collaborative learning. Describe compelling questioning techniques. Instructional Approaches Examine the roles of the facilitator and the learner in various instructional approaches. Examine teaching/training concepts. Explain the rationale for selected instructional approaches. Create an audience-appropriate instructional module/training plan. Critical Thinking and Problem-Based Learning for Adults Examine problem-based learning. Employ components of critical thinking to improve cognitive skills. Management of the Instructional Environment Identify elements of effective course syllabi/instructional agendas. Analyze proactive management strategies. Describe appropriate responses to challenging participant behavior.


Facilitating Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners
Course Number AET525

This course focuses on facilitation strategies for meeting the needs of diverse adult learners. It examines differences among adult learners in language, literacy skills, and learning styles. It also utilizes previous learning experiences and provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to provide differentiated instruction to address different needs. In addition, this course covers the challenges and the opportunities that diversity and multiculturalism present in facilitating adult education and training. Topics and Objectives Connecting with the Adult Learner Review characteristics of adult learners. Identify learning styles of diverse adult learners. Describe the diverse adult learner population. Analyze characteristics of effective facilitators for diverse learners. Challenges and Opportunities of Diversity and Multiculturalism in Adult Learning Examine demographic profiles influencing adult learning. Examine the psychographic factors influencing adult learning. Identify categories of special needs learners. Explore challenges and opportunities of diversity and multiculturalism in adult education and training. Implications for the Facilitation of Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners Analyze types of regulations and policies that impact facilitation of instruction for diverse adult learners. Examine the facilitation implications for multicultural adult learners. Examine the implications of multicultural facilitators on adult learners. Strategies for Effective Facilitation of Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners Examine how to establish a foundation for working with adult learners. Explore effective learning environments for diverse learners. Analyze differentiated instruction as an effective means of facilitating learning. Supportive Strategies for Diverse Adult Learners Examine strategies for engaging diverse adults in their learning. Examine classroom communication strategies that support diverse adult learners. Identify support services for diverse adult learners. Explore language and literacy challenges that impact facilitation of instruction for diverse adult learners. Effective Diverse Curriculum Explore continuous improvement techniques to monitor and to adjust facilitation methods. Examine best practices to monitor diverse adult learners’ achievement of outcomes. Demonstrate modification strategies for assignments, instruction, and assessments for diverse learners


Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Learning
Course Number AET535

This course focuses on developing the skills necessary to become effective assessors of adult learners in postsecondary and training environments. It provides the fundamentals of varied classroom assessments and training evaluation models, such as formative and summative tests and authentic assessments. Learners develop assessments and analyze how assessment data is used to improve instruction and learning. Additionally, the purposes, the methods, and the reporting of evaluation for trainers are explored. Topics and Objectives Overview of Assessment Identify what assessment is and how it is used in learning environments Differentiate between assessment, evaluation, measurement, and testing Compare and contrast formative and summative assessment Assessment in Adult Education Explore the purposes of assessment in adult education Analyze the types of summative assessment Analyze ethical standards for assessments Using Assessment to Improve Instruction Describe effective assessment techniques Analyze the use of assessment to improve instruction and learning Evaluation Principles and Purposes Examine the guiding principles of evaluation Explore the purposes of evaluation in training Examine decision-making in evaluation Describe effective evaluation models Evaluation for Trainers Identify data sources for evaluation Explore data analysis for evaluation Examine the purpose and process of evaluation reporting


Coaching and Mentoring
Course Number EDL531

This course provides an exploration into how mentoring and coaching improves teaching and learning. This course examines mentoring and coaching competencies, including ethical guidelines, creating collegial relationships, building learning communities, effective communication, problem-solving and conflict resolution, and facilitating learning and accountability. Candidates will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to integrate and apply these competencies in real life and instructional leadership situations. Topics and Objectives Foundations of Coaching and Mentoring Identify characteristics of coaching. Identify characteristics of mentoring. Compare and contrast coaching and mentoring. Identify the dispositions necessary to be an effective coach and mentor. Explore the International Coach Federation Code of Ethics. Collegial Relationships Identify the role and responsibilities of a coach and of a mentor. Examine the elements of cognitive coaching. Analyze the 16 Habits of Mind. Demonstrate effective collaboration skills. Effective Communications Describe factors that impact communication. Describe effective communication processes. Illustrate strategies for promoting dialogue, resolving conflict, and problem solving. Mentors as Instructional Coaches Examine topics for instructional coaching. Analyze opportunities to cultivate learning focused relationships. Facilitating Results Explain the stages of mentoring. Identify ways to create awareness. Establish realistic goals and objectives. Design an action plan. Analyze effective modeling and motivation strategies. Develop a process to monitor progress and accountability. Coaches as Leaders of Change Develop an understanding of the effects of change on school culture. Identify ways to create and communicate support. Examine ways to manage change effectively. Explore mentoring and coaching as elements of professional growth.


E-Learning Design Technologies
Course Number AET545

This Course Provides Adult Learners The Opportunity To Design A Web-based E-learning Tutorial. The Focus Is On The Importance Of Planning, Principles Of Good Web-page Design, Storyboarding, And Elements Of Multimedia. Web-based Design Standards, As Well As Appropriate Use Of Web Pages And Multimedia, Are Analyzed. It Reviews E-learning Software, Computer-mediated Delivery Platforms, And Learning Management Systems. Topics And Objectives Analysis Phase And Introduction To Multimedia Review The Addie Instructional Design Process. Perform A Needs Assessment To Address A Training Need That Will Be Solved By A Web-based Tutorial. Identify Performance Gaps Based On The Needs Assessment. Identify Different Types Of Multimedia That Can Be Integrated Into E-learning. Design Phase And Storyboarding Write Instructional Goals And Performance Objectives Based On The Needs Analysis (gap Analysis). Apply Storyboard Principles For Creating A Web-based Tutorial. Select Appropriate Web-based Platforms For E-learning. Identify Different Strategies That Increase Adult Learner Engagement. Development Phase And Introduction To Web Design Analyze Effective E-learning Instructional Strategies And Delivery Modalities. Examine Html Development Techniques For An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Review Effective Web Design Techniques. Creation Of A Web-based Tutorial Create An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Analyze Page Layout Techniques. Compare And Contrast Multimedia Elements. Determine A Summative Assessment For A Web-based Tutorial. Implementation Of E-learning Publish An E-learning Tutorial To The Web. Analyze The Preparedness Of Learners For E-learning. Review E-learning Standards. Evaluation Of A Web-based Tutorial Examine E-assessment Tools. Evaluate The Instructional Effectiveness Of A Web-based Tutorial.


Performance Improvement and Management
Course Number AET550

This Course Provides Learners With An Overview Of Performance Improvement Principles. Learners Identify And Analyze Organizational Performance Gaps, Create Learning Interventions To Diminish Those Gaps, And Evaluate Training Using Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels. Topics And Objectives Human Performance Technology Define Performance Improvement Describe The Human Performance Technology (hpt) Process Demonstrate That Performance Improvement Is Systems-based Compare And Contrast The Components Of Performance Improvement And Of Instructional Design Relate The Performance Improvement Process To The Addie Model Human Performance Management Define Performance Management Examine The Key Features Of Ideal Performance Management Analyze Learning Theories And Their Impact On The Performance Management Process Performance Gaps Determine The Nature Of A Performance Gap Based On Motivation (affective Domain), Declarative Knowledge (cognitive Domain), And Procedural Knowledge (psychomotor Domain) Examine The Role Of The Performance Model In Identifying Performance Gaps Inspect The Causes Of Performance Gaps Performance Interventions Define Performance Interventions And The Role They Play In The Hpt Process Examine The Types Of Performance Interventions Inspect The Factors That Influence The Selection Of Performance Interventions Determine The Risks In Selecting An Inappropriate Intervention Performance Evaluations Examine The Four Levels Of Kirkpatrick’s Evaluation Model Examine The Types Of Performance Evaluations To Measure Results Of An Intervention Analyze The Factors That Influence The Evaluation Of Performance Justify The Success Of The Performance Intervention Becoming A Practitioner In Performance Management Inspect Roles Of Successful Practitioners In The Field Of Performance Management Review Opportunities In Performance Management Outline A Career Development Plan That Includes Certification, Continuing Education, And Job Outlook Examine Ethical Standards In Performance Management


Overview of the Community College
Course Number AET555

This course provides an overview of the community college. It examines global, national, and local perspectives of the community college. The course also examines the history and development, mission and purpose, functions, governance and organization, and trends and issues of community colleges. Topics and Objectives Historical Perspectives, Philosophies, and Missions Examine the history of community colleges Describe the historical and current functions of community colleges Explore the general mission of community colleges Governance and Organizational Structure Compare community college governance models Explore national and local governance issues Investigate community college organizational structures and their effects Examine the purpose of accreditation Investigate measurements of accountability Funding and Finances Identify sources of community college funding Analyze the relationship among funding, services, course and program offerings, and local and national economic issues Student Populations and Student Services Describe community college student populations Explore admission, enrollment, and registration policies Examine services offered to community college students Evaluate essential and non-essential services Explore retention issues Examine the role of articulation and its relationship to community college students Curriculum Explore community college curricula Examine curriculum development processes Identify types of degrees and certificates awarded by community colleges Instruction Examine instructional methodologies and delivery modalities Explore developmental education and its role in student success Describe services that support student learning Identify methods and challenges of assessment Roles and Challenges for Faculty Identify faculty roles Analyze faculty challenges and their effects on the institutional environment Examine faculty qualification and certification processes Explore the role and challenges of technology in the educational environment The Future of Community Colleges Describe research in and about community colleges Analyze trends and challenges related to the community college Investigate how community colleges respond to local social, political, and economic influences


Action Research and Evaluation
Course Number EDD581

This course examines action research and its role in decision-making and in educational practices. Students are introduced to various types of action research and to the elements of the action research process, including identifying a problem, determining a problem statement and a purpose, conducting a literature review, planning for the collection and the analysis of data, and creating a plan of action. Methods for collecting, evaluating, and analyzing data are discussed. Students identify ethical issues related to research as well, including a professional code of ethics, confidentiality, and research using human subjects. In addition, they synthesize and apply the content of the course by writing a proposal for an action research study. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Action Research Define action research. Distinguish between types of action research. Identify the components of action research. Review examples of action research. Explain how action research can be utilized to effect school improvement and change. Examine opportunities to conduct action research collaboratively. Introduction to the Action Research Process Examine the role of reflection on practice in generating ideas for a research focus. Determine appropriate topics for an action research study. Identify the elements of an effective research question. Determine varied sources relevant to a research problem. Explain the importance of the literature review. Compare qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Collecting Data Explain processes for selecting research participants. Describe varied types of data that can be collected to answer research questions. Examine qualitative research designs, methods, and issues in collecting data. Initial Steps in Developing an Action Research Study Examine quantitative research designs and methods, and issues in collecting data. Explain ways of ensuring validity in action research. Develop a plan for collecting data. Analyzing and Interpreting Data Explain the purpose of interim data analysis and its importance in action research. Describe ways to analyze and report results for qualitative data. Describe ways to analyze and report results for quantitative data. Draw conclusions from data. Ethical Issues Related to Educational Research Outline guidelines for conducting research using human subjects. Analyze the impact of technology on the ethical issue of confidentiality in educational research. Discuss the ethical use of data in educational decision-making. Assess ethical considerations when publishing reports of a research study. Develop a process for following ethical guidelines throughout an action research study. Creating a Proposal for an Action Research Study Produce a proposal for an action research study. Prepare an overview of the proposal for presentation.


E-Learning
Course Number AET541

Course Description This course focuses on e-learning for adult learners. Students apply instructional design techniques, learning theory, and technical tools for e-learning activities. The course also addresses the challenges associated with the e-learning environment. Topics and Objectives Foundations of E-Learning Identify the characteristics of e-learning. Summarize the evolution of e-learning. Analyze the purposes, benefits, and challenges of e-learning. Describe the instructional methods of an e-learning environment. Designing E-Learning Summarize the principles for designing effective e-learning instruction. Analyze the effect of personalization on e-learning. Evaluate the benefits of segmentation and pretraining. Explain methods for incorporating worked examples in e-learning environments. Instructional Considerations: Text and Graphics Summarize the principles for effective use of text in e-learning. Summarize the principles for integrating graphics in e-learning. Evaluate the use of text and graphics in instruction. Integrate text and graphics for effective instruction. Instructional Considerations: Text and Audio Identify the various technologies for audio in e-learning. Determine appropriate uses of audio in e-learning. Integrate text and audio for effective instruction. Analyze the application of audio in e-learning environments. Effective E-Learning Practices Describe the principles behind the effective use of practice in e-learning. Determine the effectiveness of feedback in practice exercises. Apply multimedia principles in practice exercises. Justify collaboration in e-learning. Evaluate the level of learner control in e-learning. Applications of E-Learning Guidelines Summarize e-learning principles that promote thinking skills. Analyze the role of simulations and games in e-learning. Prioritize guidelines for developing e-learning courseware.


Technology for the Adult Learner
Course Number AET531

This course explores a variety of ways in which technology can support and facilitate instruction for adult learners, including the use of web resources and multimedia.It also addresses the facilitator’s role in researching, selecting, integrating, and managing technology in an adult learning and training environment. The course focuses on technologies, software applications, and the evaluation of technology. Additionally, the course analyzes the effects of 21st century technology tools on intellectual property and other legal matters. Topics and Objectives Transformation of Online Learning Analyze how the delivery of adult education has changed over the past 50 years. Analyze the effect of modern technologies on adult education. Identify technology skills required by instructors. Facilitating Online Instruction Compare technology-based learning tools that enhance student learning. Analyze the importance of collaboration for student learning. Identify assessment strategies for the online environment. Synchronous Learning Identify the advantages and disadvantages of synchronous learning. Explain how technology tools can enhance synchronous learning. Identify strategies for facilitating synchronous online learning. Synchronous Versus Asynchronous Learning Identify the advantages and disadvantages of asynchronous learning. Identify strategies for facilitating asynchronous online learning. Compare synchronous learning to asynchronous learning. Administration of Technologies Identify challenges associated with managing the use of technologies. Evaluate an organization’s capacity for integrating technology to aid instruction. Analyze the functionality and purpose of various communication tools. Legal Matters Analyze the effect of modern technology tools on legal and ethical issues. Identify the key components of an acceptable use policy.


Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


Program description: Our Adult Education and Training degree program gives you the tools you need to enhance adult learning.

You'll focus on methods and techniques for engaging adult learners in a corporate training or community college setting, or any other academic or recreational instructional environment.

The course work emphasizes adult learning theory, the needs of diverse learners, critical issues and trends in adult education and training, instructional design and strategies, the use of technologies as well as assessment and learning. You'll also focus on coaching and mentoring, e-learning and instructional web design technologies.

Be a part of a lifetime of learning for today's adult learners. Enroll today in our Master of Arts in Education/Adult Education and Training degree program.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Curriculum and Instruction
Orientation to the Curriculum and Instruction Reading Program
Course Number RDG501

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the primary components of the Curriculum and Instruction-Reading program. Candidates are introduced to the program's progression and degree completion requirements. Field experience, the practicum, the teacher work sample, and completion of an e-portfolio are discussed.


Theories and Best Practices of Curriculum and Instruction
Course Number CUR506

This course focuses on applying curricular theory to best practices in the 21st century classroom. Candidates explore the social and political foundations of curriculum and instruction and current research in this area. They analyze curriculum philosophy and planning as well as practical applications and innovations in curriculum design. Special attention is given to the use of technology in the development of effective curriculum and to learning environments in the 21st century classroom.


Social, Political, and Cultural Contexts of Schools
Course Number CUR507

This course explores historical, political, social, and cultural constructs of contemporary education and investigates how these contexts influence national, state, and local educational settings. Additionally, the course examines how policies influence school decision making and the practice of teaching. Candidates apply an inquiry-based process to identify individual, social, and cultural contexts in education. They analyze contemporary trends and issues, and develop an understanding of education in a global community in order to evaluate and determine their individual role in taking action in their local setting.


Teachers as Leaders
Course Number CUR510

In this course, teachers define, clarify, and reflect on their leadership roles. They explore leadership processes that utilize collaboration, coaching, mentoring, and inclusion. Additionally, they examine broad educational issues, as well as school-based issues and determine possibilities for initiating, sustaining, and building upon systemic change.


Reading and Writing Instructional Strategies for Adolescents
Course Number RDG533

This course focuses on the most current research for teaching reading and writing to students at the middle and secondary levels. Various comprehension strategies, technology lessons, and assessment techniques are addressed. The connection between reading and writing is analyzed. Critical issues in reading and writing instruction for adolescents are researched and examined.


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Course Number RDG504

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Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


Action Research and Evaluation
Course Number EDD581

This course examines action research and its role in decision-making and in educational practices. Students are introduced to various types of action research and to the elements of the action research process, including identifying a problem, determining a problem statement and a purpose, conducting a literature review, planning for the collection and the analysis of data, and creating a plan of action. Methods for collecting, evaluating, and analyzing data are discussed. Students identify ethical issues related to research as well, including a professional code of ethics, confidentiality, and research using human subjects. In addition, they synthesize and apply the content of the course by writing a proposal for an action research study. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Action Research Define action research. Distinguish between types of action research. Identify the components of action research. Review examples of action research. Explain how action research can be utilized to effect school improvement and change. Examine opportunities to conduct action research collaboratively. Introduction to the Action Research Process Examine the role of reflection on practice in generating ideas for a research focus. Determine appropriate topics for an action research study. Identify the elements of an effective research question. Determine varied sources relevant to a research problem. Explain the importance of the literature review. Compare qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Collecting Data Explain processes for selecting research participants. Describe varied types of data that can be collected to answer research questions. Examine qualitative research designs, methods, and issues in collecting data. Initial Steps in Developing an Action Research Study Examine quantitative research designs and methods, and issues in collecting data. Explain ways of ensuring validity in action research. Develop a plan for collecting data. Analyzing and Interpreting Data Explain the purpose of interim data analysis and its importance in action research. Describe ways to analyze and report results for qualitative data. Describe ways to analyze and report results for quantitative data. Draw conclusions from data. Ethical Issues Related to Educational Research Outline guidelines for conducting research using human subjects. Analyze the impact of technology on the ethical issue of confidentiality in educational research. Discuss the ethical use of data in educational decision-making. Assess ethical considerations when publishing reports of a research study. Develop a process for following ethical guidelines throughout an action research study. Creating a Proposal for an Action Research Study Produce a proposal for an action research study. Prepare an overview of the proposal for presentation.


Program description: The Master of Arts program in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Reading is intended for P-12 teachers who would like to expand and deepen their theoretical knowledge, instructional expertise, and use of effective digital and print resources for diverse populations in the teaching and learning of reading and literacy. The International Reading Association standards and the College of Education’s Conceptual Framework form the foundation for the focus of this program, which is to support reading professionals in learning and teaching new, research-based methodologies and in becoming advocates for collaborative, positive change in literacy education in their school, their district, and the community.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Early Childhood Education (Certification)
Orientation to Teacher Education
Course Number MTE 507
Credits 0.0

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the primary components of the Teacher Education Program. Students will be introduced to the program’s progression and degree completion requirements. Field Experience, Electronic Resources, E-Portfolio, Student Teaching, and Teacher Work Sample will be discussed


Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


Introduction to Early Childhood Education
Course Number ECH 506
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of Early Childhood Education For Children, Birth Through Age Eight. Topics Include Theories And History Of Early Childhood Education, Play Theories, Program Types And Models, And Public Policy Trends. The Course Examines The Significance Of Developmentally Effective Learning Experiences Throughout Early Childhood Programs. Prerequisites: Com 516 And Mte 507.


Models, Theories and Instructional Strategies
Course Number MTE508

This course focuses on the theoretical models that underlie teaching and learning. Students examine methods for teaching all students, explore lesson plan designs, analyze the most effective teaching strategies to promote student learning, and develop a lesson plan. Topics and Objectives Lesson Planning Describe the components of a lesson plan. Compare and contrast different approaches to lesson planning. Explain the role of standards in planning and instruction. Learning Goals and Objectives Analyze the difference between goals and objectives. Relate Bloom's Taxonomy to writing goals and objectives. Learning Goals and Objectives continued Write developmentally appropriate objectives. Develop a task analysis based on your lesson plan objective. Theoretical Models and Lesson Plan Designs Examine the three domains (affective, psychomotor, and cognitive)of learning. Examine educational theories. Analyze how the domains affect planning and instruction. Identify different theoretical models. Identify a variety of lesson plan designs. Apply the principles of theoretical models to planning and instruction. Instructional Strategies Compare and contrast different instructional strategies, such as direct instruction, individual study, indirect instruction, experiential instruction, and collaborative learning. Explain how different questioning strategies contribute to learning. Examine graphic organizers, concept mapping, and how they can enhance lesson planning and instruction. Examine how technology can be used to support instruction. Promoting Student Learning and Development Describe how students' critical thinking can be promoted through effective objectives, questioning, and activities. Demonstrate how to use various instructional strategies to promote student-centered learning. Describe how addressing student diversity in lesson planning can promote student learning. Evaluation Evaluate a lesson plan. Evaluate your personal disposition toward the teaching profession. Examine basic management skills that foster a positive, productive learning climate. Describe how assessment and evaluation of student learning can be used in lesson planning. All topics and objectives apply All topics and objectives apply.


Maintaining an Effective Learning Climate
Course Number ECH 521
Credits 3.0

This course examines developmentally effective strategies used in managing a positive learning environment within the framework of today’s diverse early childhood population. Topics include models of discipline, establishing expectations and procedures, motivating children, family communication, managing disruptive children, technology integration, and materials management and record keeping. Students will develop an individual classroom management plan for an early childhood setting.


Growth and Development in Early Childhood
Course Number ECH 513
Credits 3.0

This course examines the theories, concepts, and trends related to early childhood growth and development from prenatal development through the early school years. It examines the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language and literacy development of children from birth through age eight. The course discusses both typical and atypical development of young children of diverse cultural backgrounds. It includes observation and activities to guide teachers and caregivers in providing opportunities that support the physical, social, emotional, language, and cognitive development of children from birth through age eight. Prerequisite: COM 516.


Early Childhood Assessment Strategies
Course Number ECH 548
Credits 3.0

This course provides exposure to a variety of assessment techniques in early childhood education, including children with special needs. There is a focus on structured observations, use of behavioral rating scales, psycho-educational screening tests, and assessment of parent-child interactions. Formal and informal parent contacts, interviewing techniques, the use of technology in the assessment process, and referrals to school and community resources are also explored. Emphasis is placed on developmental and differentiated assessment strategies for children birth through age eight. Prerequisite: MTE 508.


Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Language and Literacy
Course Number ECH 532
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on children’s language and literacy development from birth to age eight. Students examine theories of language development, including theories of second language acquisition and the needs of English Language Learners. They also explore strategies for engaging children in integrated listening, speaking, reading, and writing experiences. Integration of content area standards and development of hands-on learning experiences are emphasized. Additionally, developmentally effective assessments are discussed as a means of informing instruction. Prerequisite: ECH 548.


Survey of Special Populations
Course Number ECH 514
Credits 2.0

This course provides an overview of special populations in early childhood education. The course focuses on developmentally effective methods and techniques used for the identification, assessment, and instruction of children with special needs from birth to age eight. Legal structures, public policy, and information related to current practices serving special populations in early childhood are also examined.


Structured English Immersion
Course Number SEI 500
Credits 3.0

This Course Will Introduce Students To The Concept Of And Methods For Instructing In A Structured English Immersion (sei) Environment. Students Will Learn About Assessment Of K-12 Students, State Standards, Research-based Instructional Activities, And Lesson Planning And Implementation Models. Students Will Study How A Learner-centered Approach To Teaching Can Provide English Language Learners (ell), As Well As Native English Speakers, With A Greater Opportunity To Interact Meaningfully With Educational Materials As They Learn Subject Matter And El Learners Acquire English.


Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: The Arts
Course Number ECH 527
Credits 2.0

This course focuses on understanding and using developmentally effective practices to teach and to integrate music, creative movement, dance, drama, and art in early childhood education. Curricular content, modifications, development of hands-on learning experiences, and integration of content area standards are explored. A foundation in effective teaching and assessment methodologies in the early childhood setting is provided. Prerequisite: ECH 548.


Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Mathematics and Science
Course Number ECH 529
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on understanding and using developmentally effective practices to teach and to integrate mathematics and science concepts and skills in early childhood education (birth through age eight). Developing meaningful curricular content, modifications, hands-on learning experiences, and integration of early childhood content area standards are explored. A foundation in developmentally effective teaching and assessment of the content area is provided. Prerequisite: ECH 548.


Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Social Studies
Course Number ECH 534
Credits 2.0

This course provides a foundation in content and methodology for the teaching of social studies in early childhood education (birth through age eight). Developing meaningful curricular content, hands-on learning experiences, integration of early childhood content area standards, and the impact of technology are explored. A foundation in developmentally effective teaching and assessment of the content area is provided. Prerequisite: ECH 548.


Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Physical Education
Course Number ECH 526
Credits 2.0

This course provides a foundation in content and methodology for the teaching of physical education, including movement and health, for children birth through age eight. It focuses on understanding and using developmentally effective practices in teaching and integrating movement, physical activity, and physical education in early childhood settings. Curricular content, modifications, development of hands-on learning experiences, integration of content area standards, and the impact of new technology are explored. Prerequisite: ECH 548.


Advanced Structured English Immersion Methods
Course Number SEI 503
Credits 3.0

This Course Addresses Structured English Immersion (sei) Instruction And Assessment Of K-12 English Language Learners (ells), And Is Designed To Meet The Standards Set By The Arizona Department Of Education. It Examines The Legal, Historical, And Educational Reasons For Sei, As Well As Theoretical Principles Of Language Acquisition And The Role Of Culture In Learning. It Also Emphasizes The Alignment Of Ell Proficiency Standards To Arizona’s Academic Standards And Their Application To Lesson Planning. The Arizona English Language Learner Assessment (azella), Use Of Alternative Assessments, Analysis Of Data, And The Application Of Data To Instruction, Are Emphasized As Well. A Final Project Synthesizes The Concepts And Instructional Strategies Taught In The Course. Prerequisite: Sei 500.


Early Childhood Student Teaching, Part A
Course Number ECH 546
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the practical application of educational theories and methods. The course will focus on the following topics: the student teaching experience, the school/learning center culture, the learning environment, and planning, preparing, and implementing the Teacher Work Sample. The seminar also provides a forum for open discussion and problem solving based on student teaching classroom experiences. This seminar course will be completed simultaneously during the first of two required student teaching practicum experiences. Prerequisite: 38 credits.


Early Childhood Student Teaching, Part B
Course Number ECH 556
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the design and implementation of the Teacher Work Sample. It also provides students practical guidance in securing a teaching position. Students will examine resumes and cover letters, teaching applications, and interview strategies. Assistance in preparing an employment portfolio will be provided. This seminar also provides a forum for open discussion and problem solving based on student teaching classroom experiences. This course will be completed simultaneously during the second of two required student teaching practicum experiences. Prerequisite: ECH 546.


Program description: The Master of Arts in Education (MAED) with a specialization in Early Childhood Education is a graduate degree program preparing candidates for teacher licensure in the field of early childhood (birth to age eight). Candidates for this program have already earned a bachelor’s degree and wish to gain the pedagogical skills and knowledge that will assist them in becoming competent and effective early childhood educators. The curriculum is based on state and national standards for early childhood education. It includes theories of early childhood growth and development, the significance of family and cultural diversity for learning, the use of developmentally appropriate practices, assessment techniques, and technology to promote learning.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education
Orientation to Teacher Education
Course Number MTE 507
Credits 0.0

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the primary components of the Teacher Education Program. Students will be introduced to the program’s progression and degree completion requirements. Field Experience, Electronic Resources, E-Portfolio, Student Teaching, and Teacher Work Sample will be discussed


Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


The Art and Science of Teaching
Course Number MTE501

This course introduces teaching as both an art and a science. Topics for discussion include an historical overview, basic philosophies, professionalism, legal/ethical ramifications, in addition to trends and issues in education. Students will reflect on their motivations to teach and will begin developing a personal philosophy of education.


Child and Adolescent Development
Course Number MTE506

This course explores the range of issues related to human development from birth through age 18. The focus of the course is on defining the various stages as they impact instructional practice and decisions in a K-12 environment. Emotional, intellectual, physiological, social, and cultural factors are discussed. Peer and family influences, along with issues related to media themes and gender bias, are examined.


Models, Theories and Instructional Strategies
Course Number MTE508

This course focuses on the theoretical models that underlie teaching and learning. Students examine methods for teaching all students, explore lesson plan designs, analyze the most effective teaching strategies to promote student learning, and develop a lesson plan. Topics and Objectives Lesson Planning Describe the components of a lesson plan. Compare and contrast different approaches to lesson planning. Explain the role of standards in planning and instruction. Learning Goals and Objectives Analyze the difference between goals and objectives. Relate Bloom's Taxonomy to writing goals and objectives. Learning Goals and Objectives continued Write developmentally appropriate objectives. Develop a task analysis based on your lesson plan objective. Theoretical Models and Lesson Plan Designs Examine the three domains (affective, psychomotor, and cognitive)of learning. Examine educational theories. Analyze how the domains affect planning and instruction. Identify different theoretical models. Identify a variety of lesson plan designs. Apply the principles of theoretical models to planning and instruction. Instructional Strategies Compare and contrast different instructional strategies, such as direct instruction, individual study, indirect instruction, experiential instruction, and collaborative learning. Explain how different questioning strategies contribute to learning. Examine graphic organizers, concept mapping, and how they can enhance lesson planning and instruction. Examine how technology can be used to support instruction. Promoting Student Learning and Development Describe how students' critical thinking can be promoted through effective objectives, questioning, and activities. Demonstrate how to use various instructional strategies to promote student-centered learning. Describe how addressing student diversity in lesson planning can promote student learning. Evaluation Evaluate a lesson plan. Evaluate your personal disposition toward the teaching profession. Examine basic management skills that foster a positive, productive learning climate. Describe how assessment and evaluation of student learning can be used in lesson planning. All topics and objectives apply All topics and objectives apply.


Assessment and Evaluation
Course Number MTE562

This course focuses on developing the skills necessary to become effective assessors. It provides the fundamentals of a variety of classroom assessments, including standardized, formative and summative, traditional, and performance classroom assessments. Learners focus on using a variety of assessment tools and construct objective and performance assessments. Additionally, the purposes, the methods, and the reporting of evaluations are explored.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessments: Reading and Language Arts
Course Number RDG530

This course focuses on the most current research, theory, and methods of reading instruction, while providing students with the background knowledge in language arts necessary to prepare an integrated unit of instruction. Various instructional and assessment techniques, including research-based phonics, are modeled. A practical application project, based on work with a student in a K-8 school setting, is incorporated into the course requirements. Topics and Objectives Theories and Strategies for Reading Instruction * Analyze the reading process * Identify theories and principles on which effective reading is based * Examine the components of phonology, morphology, semantics, graphophonics, and syntax * Identify the effective components of a lesson plan Preparation for the Practicum * Investigate the use of informal assessments * Plan for initial tutoring sessions Assessing Growth in Literacy * Interpret an Informal Reading Inventory (IRI) or Running Record to identify student strengths, weaknesses, and reading level * Analyze ways to organize and manage diagnostic information * Implement a program of remediation based on assessment findings Children’s Literature * Explore a variety of genres * Integrate children’s literature into units and lessons Learning to Read * Examine the roles of listening comprehension and oral expression in the development of literacy * Examine the use of effective oral reading practices to support literacy development * Analyze the relationship of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking * Analyze the interrelationships among cognitive development, metalinguistic awareness, and language learning * Examine the concept of early literacy * Apply the relationship of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking to lesson planning and an integrated unit Language Learning and Literacy * Identify instructional strategies and activities for language acquisition * Examine the value and importance of parental support and involvement in literacy development The Place of Explicit and Systematic Phonics in Learning to Read and Write * Examine word attack strategies readers use to process written language for meaning * Investigate the utility of phonics and structural analysis generalizations * Analyze the place of phonics in a reading program * Analyze methods of evaluating phonics mastery * Analyze print processing techniques and how they relate to developing appropriate and useful reading strategies * Analyze student writing to evaluate application of phonics elements * Examine the depth of present knowledge of phonics elements through pretest/posttest measures Comprehension Connections * Examine schema theory and how it relates to reading comprehension * Examine pre-reading, during-reading, and post-reading activities that enhance comprehension * Evaluate the use of pre-reading, during-reading, and post-reading activities in a tutorial/small group/classroom context * Identify instructional practices and methods for teaching comprehension * Deliver and evaluate lessons based on continuous diagnostic assessment * Examine the relationship between fluency and comprehension Reading to Learn * Examine the elements of reading comprehension in reading to learn * Analyze various study strategies and their application Vocabulary Building * Evaluate pedagogical approaches in vocabulary development Applications of Writing in the Classroom * Describe the stages of the writing process Applications of Writing in the Classroom (continued) * Identify student ...show more »


Instruction and Assessment of English Language Learners
Course Number MTE553

This course focuses on education for the English Language Learner (ELL). It emphasizes knowledge of and sensitivity to the history and to the culture of other languages and ethnic groups, as well as to multiethnic curriculum and instruction. It provides strategies for effective instruction, including standards-based lesson planning and implementation models, and assessment of linguistically diverse K-12 students. In addition, the course addresses ways in which a learner-centered approach to teaching can provide English Language Learners with a greater opportunity to interact meaningfully with educational materials as they learn subject matter and acquire English.


Structured English Immersion
Course Number SEI 500
Credits 3.0

This Course Will Introduce Students To The Concept Of And Methods For Instructing In A Structured English Immersion (sei) Environment. Students Will Learn About Assessment Of K-12 Students, State Standards, Research-based Instructional Activities, And Lesson Planning And Implementation Models. Students Will Study How A Learner-centered Approach To Teaching Can Provide English Language Learners (ell), As Well As Native English Speakers, With A Greater Opportunity To Interact Meaningfully With Educational Materials As They Learn Subject Matter And El Learners Acquire English.


Survey of Special Populations
Course Number ECH 514
Credits 2.0

This course provides an overview of special populations in early childhood education. The course focuses on developmentally effective methods and techniques used for the identification, assessment, and instruction of children with special needs from birth to age eight. Legal structures, public policy, and information related to current practices serving special populations in early childhood are also examined.


Maintaining an Effective Learning Climate
Course Number ECH 521
Credits 3.0

This course examines developmentally effective strategies used in managing a positive learning environment within the framework of today’s diverse early childhood population. Topics include models of discipline, establishing expectations and procedures, motivating children, family communication, managing disruptive children, technology integration, and materials management and record keeping. Students will develop an individual classroom management plan for an early childhood setting.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: History and Social Science
Course Number MTE531

Course Description This course defines and provides a context for teaching and assessing K-8 students in the area of history and social science based on scope, sequence, and national and state standards. Instructional approaches for the content area within the framework of an integrated curriculum are explored, including the use of critical thinking skills and study skills. Students develop alternative assessments and traditional testing tools based on clear criteria, which are designed to yield accurate information on student progress. Topics and Objectives Defining History and Social Science Content •Examine the content and skills associated with history and social science instruction. •Analyze the nature of citizenship education and its potential impact on students. •Compare and contrast the different content areas that comprise history and social science. •Examine ways in which history and social science may fit within an elementary curriculum. •Apply national and state history and social science standards. •Evaluate applicable Internet resources for use in history and social science instruction. The History and Social Science K-8 Curriculum •Analyze the elementary student's perspective on history and social science. •Devise curriculum that expands children's knowledge of the world community. •Devise strategies for curriculum mapping. •Integrate history and social science instruction with other content areas. Teaching a Diverse Population •Examine how personal experiences shape teaching/learning perceptions in the history and social science classroom. •Accommodate instruction and assessment for diverse learners. Unit Planning •Create a unit skeleton that includes goals, objectives, essential questions, sample activities, and assessment tasks. •Create lessons that require students to utilize critical thinking and study skills. •Explain how to use questioning to encourage critical thinking. •Create lessons that incorporate strategies for active learning. •Integrate the use of primary sources into history and social science lessons. •Create assessments that appropriately match the established objectives and include performance-oriented tasks. Integrating History and Social Science and Other Content •Construct themes and content connections for integrated units of study. •Design an integrated instructional unit. •Evaluate integrated and/or interdisciplinary lessons.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Science and Mathematics
Course Number MTE532

This course focuses on the pedagogy and assessment strategies that enhance learning in science and mathematics. Integrated content, interdisciplinary teaching, and curriculum and assessment issues are emphasized. Multiple perspectives of students as learners of math and science are explored. This course provides students with an opportunity to develop the ability to evaluate and use instructional methods, curricular materials and resources, and appropriate assessment strategies. Topics and Objectives Science and Mathematics Content and Standards * Identify the specific content and process standards in P-8 science and mathematics. * Apply national, state, and local science and mathematics standards to instruction and assessment. * Integrate national, state, and local technology standards with science and mathematics. Management in the Science and Mathematics Classroom * Identify specific classroom management issues related to successful teaching when implementing instructional strategies in science and mathematics. * Examine a classroom environment that provides opportunities for productive discourse. Students as Learners of Science and Mathematics * Analyze the impact that student culture, ethnicity, ideas, and learning styles have on science and mathematics instruction. * Examine various models of differentiated instruction for science and mathematics. Problem Solving in Science and Mathematics * Apply questioning strategies and learning activities that elicit, engage, and challenge a student’s thinking for successful problem solving in real-life scenarios. * Analyze a variety of learning tools designed to help students reason, solve problems, and communicate effectively in science and mathematics. Inquiry and Interactive Learning in Mathematics * Identify the key components of inquiry-based learning in mathematics. * Use appropriate, interactive learning strategies in the teaching of mathematics. * Demonstrate understanding of the principles and standards for school mathematics. Inquiry and Interactive Learning in Science * Identify the key components of inquiry-based learning in science. * Use appropriate, interactive learning strategies in the teaching of science. * Demonstrate understanding of the principles and standards for school science. Assessment in Mathematics and Science * Determine the need for ongoing program evaluation in both science and mathematics. * Develop formative and summative assessments in science and mathematics that are aligned with standards and guide instruction. * Evaluate assessment techniques, tools, and strategies used to measure student learning in science and mathematics. Integration of Science and Mathematics in Curriculum, Instruction, and Technology * Develop an integrated unit involving mathematics, science, technology, and other content areas as appropriate. * Examine the impact of technology on science and mathematics content and processes.


Advanced Structured English Immersion Methods
Course Number SEI 503
Credits 3.0

This Course Addresses Structured English Immersion (sei) Instruction And Assessment Of K-12 English Language Learners (ells), And Is Designed To Meet The Standards Set By The Arizona Department Of Education. It Examines The Legal, Historical, And Educational Reasons For Sei, As Well As Theoretical Principles Of Language Acquisition And The Role Of Culture In Learning. It Also Emphasizes The Alignment Of Ell Proficiency Standards To Arizona’s Academic Standards And Their Application To Lesson Planning. The Arizona English Language Learner Assessment (azella), Use Of Alternative Assessments, Analysis Of Data, And The Application Of Data To Instruction, Are Emphasized As Well. A Final Project Synthesizes The Concepts And Instructional Strategies Taught In The Course. Prerequisite: Sei 500.


Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties
Course Number RDG535

This course addresses instructional reading/language arts strategies, student activities, and resources that can be utilized, based on students’ contextual information and assessment results. It provides foundational information about stages of reading, factors that impact reading ability, and the nature of reading difficulties. This information serves as a context for learning about the administration and interpretation of formal and informal classroom assessments for the purposes of screening, diagnosing difficulties, monitoring progress, and evaluating instruction. In addition, a final case study report and intervention plan is developed based on student data provided.


Elementary Student Teaching, Part A
Course Number ELM519

This course emphasizes the practical application of educational theories and methods. The course will focus on the following topics: the student teaching experience, the school culture, the learning environment, and planning, preparing, and implementing the Teacher Work Sample. The course also provides a forum for open discussion and problem solving based on student teaching classroom experiences.


Elementary Student Teaching, Part B
Course Number ELM520

This course will focus on the design and implementation of the Teacher Work Sample. It also provides students practical guidance in securing a teaching position. Students will examine resumes and cover letters, teaching applications, and interview strategies. Assistance in preparing an employment portfolio will be provided. This seminar also provides a forum for open discussion and problem-solving based on student teaching classroom experiences.


RDG530FE
Course Number RDG530FE

SPE514FE
Course Number SPE514FE

Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Visual and Performing Arts
Course Number MTE534

This course defines and provides a context for teaching and assessing students in the area of visual and performing arts based on scope, sequence, and national and state standards. An emphasis is placed on integrating art across the curriculum.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Physical Education and Health
Course Number MTE537

This course defines and provides a context for the classroom teacher to teach and assess K-8 students in the area of physical education and health based on a scope and sequence, and on state and national standards. This course includes framework-based teaching strategies effective in helping K-8 students develop a variety of motor skills and abilities, recognize the importance of a healthy lifestyle, gain knowledge of human movement, learn the rules and strategies of games and sports, and develop self-confidence and self-worth. This course also includes framework-based teaching strategies effective in helping K-8 students achieve the goals of lifelong health; understand growth and development; and utilize health-related information, products, and services. Instructional approaches for the integration of physical education and health with other content areas are explored.


Children's Literature
Course Number MTE536

This course will examine the use of children's literature in the elementary school classroom. Various genres will be studied as well as the application of children's literature to instruction and assessment in reading. Methods for incorporating the use of children's literature in all content areas will also be examined.


Reading and Phonological Theory
Course Number MTE529

This course expounds upon the basic premise that systematically integrated phonics instruction is a fundamental component of effective reading programs. Students will study the relevant research and applications that support principles of sequential phonics instruction and phonological awareness and review traditional and contemporary phonics approaches.


Program description: The Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education (MAED/TED-E) is a graduate degree program preparing candidates for teacher licensure. The guiding philosophy of the MAED/ TED-E program is to provide the adult student, who already has a degree in a discipline other than education, with the skills and knowledge that will allow them to become a competent and effective educator. This program focuses on elementary student learning by improving the educator-s responsibility for that learning. Student teaching is an integral component of the Teacher Education Program. It provides students with a field-based experience at the appropriate grade and content level. Student teachers work with a cooperating teacher from a school site and with a University of Phoenix faculty advisor. The student teaching experience is designed to emphasize the achievement of state standards leading to certification and to present individuals with growth opportunities that best prepare them to assume the duties of a certified classroom teacher. Throughout the program, students are required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of verified field experiences, covering a variety of developmental levels. The focus of each observation will relate to specific course content. Documentation will be maintained in the student-s professional portfolio.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education
Instruction and Assessment of English Language Learners
Course Number MTE553

This Course Focuses On Education For The English Language Learner (ell). It Emphasizes Knowledge Of And Sensitivity To The History And To The Culture Of Other Languages And Ethnic Groups, As Well As To Multiethnic Curriculum And Instruction. It Provides Strategies For Effective Instruction, Including Standards-based Lesson Planning And Implementation Models, And Assessment Of Linguistically Diverse K-12 Students. In Addition, The Course Addresses Ways In Which A Learner-centered Approach To Teaching Can Provide English Language Learners With A Greater Opportunity To Interact Meaningfully With Educational Materials As They Learn Subject Matter And Acquire English. Topics And Objectives Historical, Philosophical, And Legal Overview Of Ell Education * Examine The Historical, Philosophical, Legal, Social, And Political Issues Regarding Educational Programs For Non-english Speakers And Limited English Proficient (lep) Students * Demonstrate An Awareness Of Ell Terms * Identify Language Acquisition Theoretical Principles * Demonstrate An Awareness Of The State Laws Governing Ell Requirements * Outline The Role Of Culture In Learning * Introduce Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (bics) And Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (calp) Ell Proficiency Standards For Listening And Speaking, Reading, And Writing * Examine The Format And The Alignment Of Ell Proficiency Standards To State Language Arts (listening And Speaking, Reading, And Writing) Academic Standards * Use Ell Proficiency Standards To Plan, Deliver, And Evaluate Instruction * Demonstrate The Integration Of Ell Proficiency Standards Into Content Areas Impact Of Culture On Language Use And Acquisition * Demonstrate The Ability To Integrate Cultural Diversity Into The Classroom By Preparing Students To Maintain Identification With And Pride In Their Native Culture Including Language, Customs, And Traditions, And By Enabling Them To Successfully Interact In Cross-cultural Settings * Evaluate The Impact Of Culture-related Factors Used In Determining Educational Strategies And Interventions * Demonstrate A Basic Awareness Of How Different Cultures Impact Schools And Districts Second Language Acquisition * Examine Current Theory And Research In Second Language Acquisition Data Analysis And Application * Analyze And Apply Disaggregated Data To Differentiate Instruction * Interpret And Use “snapshots” Of Longitudinal Data * Track Student Status And Progress On The Ell Proficiency Standards Using The Stanford English Language Proficiency (selp) Results Formal And Informal Assessment * Integrate Diagnostic, Formative, And Summative Assessments For Ells * Create And Offer Multiple Assessments * Use Assessment Results For Placement And Accommodation For Special Education And Gifted Students * Use Standardized Testing And Language Proficiency As Methods For Monitoring Student Progress Learning Experiences: Sei Strategies * Identify And Use Multiple Strategies To Improve Student Achievement * Integrate Comprehensible Input; On-going, Specific, And Immediate Feedback; Grouping Structures And Techniques; Building Background And Vocabulary Development; And Student Engagement * Extend Sei Methods For Beginning English Language Development (eld) (tpr Storytelling®, Contextual Clues, Narrative Approach) * Describe The Silent Period (ways Of Responding, Developmental Processes) * Grasp Meaning Of Pre- And Early Production Strategies Of Students * Integrate Current Materials In Eld Instruction (lesson And Text Modifications) * Extend Sei Content Methods (preview/review, Content Area Reading And Writing Strategies, Experiential Methods) * Analyze And ...show more »


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Secondary Methods
Course Number MTE539

This course focuses on the methodology and assessment strategies that enhance learning at the secondary level. Integrated content, interdisciplinary teaching, and curriculum and assessment issues are emphasized. Multiple perspectives of students as learners of secondary content, along with current research on pedagogy, are explored. This course provides students with an opportunity to develop the ability to use and evaluate instructional and curricular materials and appropriate assessment strategies. Topics and Objectives Educational Needs of Secondary Students * Identify the educational needs and attitudes of secondary students. * Analyze social and developmental issues that impact secondary classrooms. Instructional Planning in the Secondary School * Apply methods of integrating secondary curricula. Methods of Teaching in Specific Content Areas * Analyze basic teaching methods and their application in a secondary school setting. * Apply current methods for teaching in a specific content area. * Demonstrate an awareness of the variety of materials available for instructional use. Classroom Assessment * Evaluate effective pre-assessment strategies to determine what to teach and assess. National, State, and Local Curriculum and Instruction Standards * Apply national, state, and local standards for instruction in a specific content area. Role of Assessment * Analyze personal beliefs about classroom assessment. Instructional Planning in the Secondary School (continued) * Apply the concept of “backwards design” to instructional planning. Role of Assessment (continued) * Explain the role of assessment in learning and instruction. * Examine the characteristics of sound classroom assessments. * Analyze critical issues related to assessment. Classroom Assessment (continued) * Analyze various assessment methods. * Describe the appropriate uses of various assessment methods. * Compare and contrast formative and summative assessment. * Select appropriate achievement targets to measure. * Construct appropriate objective tests. Performance Assessments * Describe various types of performance assessments. * Examine scoring tool(s), either analytic or holistic, that accompany performance assessments. * Design a complete performance assessment for students in (a) selected content area(s) and level(s). Special Needs Students and Educational Assessment * Examine various assessment tools for evaluation of special needs students. Student Portfolio Assessments * Describe the key elements of an effective student portfolio. Standardized Testing: Norm- and Criterion-Referenced Tests * Examine standardized testing formats and terms and the vocabulary used to explain student results. * Analyze appropriateness of standardized tests and procedures for administration and score reporting. * Compare and contrast norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests. * Examine critical issues related to assessment. Reporting Student Progress * Analyze factors in report card grades. * Compare and contrast arguments for each factor in report card grades. * Examine methods for recording student progress and determining final grades.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Secondary English/Language Arts
Course Number MTE546

This course explores the application of basic instructional methods to the content area of English/language arts in middle school and high school settings. Participants identify the educational needs of middle level and secondary students by exploring current instructional theory, models, and strategies; state, local, and national standards as they relate to instruction, assessment, and accountability; and social issues that impact reading, listening, speaking, and writing in the classroom. The course also helps prospective educators develop skills in selecting and adapting delivery methods and behavior management plans for diverse individual students and student populations. Topics and Objectives English/Language Arts State Standards * Understand the progression of K-12 state standards in English and language arts. Envisioning the English/Language Arts Professional * Describe the role and function of an English and language arts professional. Lesson Planning and Assessment * Utilize state and national standards to create lesson plans and develop units of study. * Analyze the elements of an effective lesson plan that integrates assessment strategies. Factors that Impact English/Language Arts Instruction * Define the developmental differences between middle- and secondary-level students and how this impacts lesson design and instructional strategies. * Identify strategies for promoting positive learning environments in English and language arts classrooms. Teaching Reading * Examine strategies for building students' comprehension and vocabulary skills in reading. * Develop strategies for helping students become reflective readers. State Assessments * Identify the state-approved assessment tools and the academic areas they measure. English/Language Arts Curriculum * Examine the course outlines for local education agencies (districts). Media and Technology in the English/Language Arts Classroom * Develop strategies for establishing critical reading skills for various media. * Analyze the role of technology in English and language arts instruction. Teaching Literature * Utilize state standards to define the skills students must develop to read and respond to a variety of texts critically. * Develop strategies for expanding student literacy through the study of a wide variety of genres. Factors that Impact English/Language Arts Instruction (cont.) * Analyze instructional strategies that meet the learning needs of diverse students. State Assessments (cont.) * Identify the state-approved assessment tools and the academic areas they measure. Teaching Writing * Define the developmental stages of writing. * Analyze the elements of an effective writing workshop and adapt those elements to meet student needs. * Analyze the use of rubrics in teaching and evaluating writing. Reporting Student Achievement * Define the state's method for reporting student achievement. Oral Language and Speech * Analyze the components of an effective speech. * Create a rubric for evaluating speeches. Media and Technology in the English/Language Arts Classroom (cont.) * Analyze the influence of visual and print media in our society and its impact on learning. Federal Legislation and Accountability * Examine the implications of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Secondary History/Social Science
Course Number MTE547

This course explores the application of basic instructional methods and strategies of teaching social studies in middle school and high school settings. Participants identify the educational needs of secondary students by exploring current instructional and assessment theory; national, state, and local standards; and social issues that are found in various social studies courses. The course also helps prospective educators develop skills in selecting and adapting delivery methods and behavior management plans for diverse individual students and student populations. Topics and Objectives Rationale for Social Studies Education * Compare and contrast different rationales for the teaching of social studies. * Analyze differing visions of social studies education. * Develop a class mission statement for teaching social studies. * Identify the historical developments that have impacted social studies education. Teaching Skills and Values * Identify skills and values that should be developed in social studies classrooms. Standards-Based Instruction * Identify relevant content standards to use in structuring lessons and units. * Develop essential questions in order to focus a standards-based unit of study. * Select appropriate standards for chosen learning goals. * Analyze the use of standards-based teaching and learning strategies when constructing social studies lessons and units. Planning Lessons and Units * Write lesson plans that provide clear instructions for conducting social studies lessons. * Analyze social studies lessons that meet the needs of diverse learners and take into account multiple learning styles. Classroom Teaching Strategies and Management * Analyze the use of a wide variety of teaching strategies in the social studies classroom. * Identify traditional and alternative instructional strategies to use with middle and high school students. * Integrate the use of literature, other non-textbook resources, and technology into social studies instruction. * Integrate writing into social studies instruction. * Identify strategies for promoting positive learning environments in social studies classrooms. Assessment in the Social Studies Classroom * Identify the goals of assessment in the social studies classroom and the different means of assessing student learning. * Evaluate effective assessment strategies for the social studies classroom. * Develop standards-based assessments appropriate for the social studies classroom. Question-Asking Strategies * Compare and contrast different levels of questioning using Bloom's Taxonomy. * Analyze specific questioning strategies using different levels of questioning for the social studies classroom.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Secondary Science
Course Number MTE548

This course is designed to prepare students to teach science at the secondary school level. To meet this objective, students will explore the instructional methods in science content areas in middle level and high school settings. Participants will identify the educational needs of secondary students by exploring current instructional theory; national, state, and local standards; and social issues that impact the science classroom. The course also helps prospective educators develop skills in selecting and adapting instruction and management plans for diverse student populations.


Adolescent Psychology
Course Number MAT504

This course provides an overview of adolescent development, including the biological, cognitive, and social changes during the period between childhood and adulthood. The psychosocial developmental period is explored, and current trends and methods of teaching and learning in a middle school are examined and practiced. Topics and Objectives Fundamental Changes During Adolescence * Examine biological transitions in adolescence including puberty and somatic development. * Examine cognitive transitions during adolescence. * Evaluate popular theoretical perspectives on adolescent thinking. * Analyze changes in social status. * Identify the process of social redefinition. Psychosocial Development * Compare and contrast the theoretical perspectives of the adolescent identity crisis. * Examine the development of emotional and behavioral autonomy. * Assess the importance of intimacy and sexuality as adolescent issues. * Examine psychosocial problems in adolescence. * Utilize technology to access reliable adolescent development resources from electronic media. Contexts of Adolescence * Examine adolescent relationships with family and peer groups. Contexts of Adolescence Cont. * Inspect the role of the school in adolescent development. Middle-Level Factors, Characteristics, and Effects on Adolescence * Classify factors that affect adolescent achievement in middle school. Middle-Level Factors, Characteristics, and Effects on Adolescence Cont. * Evaluate characteristics of effective middle-level instruction, management, and organization.


Middle School Foundations and Philosophy
Course Number MAT538

This course examines middle level education. It evaluates the structure of middle schools and their characteristics, including curriculum, instruction, and learning in middle level education. It also addresses issues such as managing the middle level environment. Students in this course will demonstrate knowledge through application, analysis, and observation of middle level environments. Topics and Objectives Middle School Structure * Examine the history of junior high and middle schools. * Analyze how the components of the school affect the learning environment. * Describe an appropriate classroom configuration for adolescent learners. * Appraise resources and opportunities unique to the middle level. Characteristics of Middle Level Education * Analyze how physical, intellectual, emotional, character, and social development impact learning. * Examine the implications of diversity for instruction and for learning in middle level education. * Describe important ideas, principles, and understandings needed to be effective middle level teacher. Curriculum and Instruction in Middle Level Education * Assess the benefits and the disadvantages of tracking or grouping students in middle school. * Correlate a middle level content curriculum area to national and state standards. * Analyze the interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary curriculum approach. * Examine the implications of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) for middle school education. Curriculum and Instruction in Middle Level Education (cont.) * Evaluate middle school instructional strategies. * Apply assessment tools used to measure instructional success. * Determine effective uses of technology in a middle school setting. Managing the Middle Level Learning Environment * Analyze classroom management theories used in the middle school. * Describe a positive and productive middle school learning environment. * Examine the link between effective teaching and classroom management. Managing the Middle Level Learning Environment (cont.) * Evaluate physical, emotional, and academic safety of a middle school campus. * Examine the importance of family and community involvement.


Using Computers in Education
Course Number CMP521

This course examines how emerging technology can affect the classroom teacher, school administrator, school board members, students, and parents. It explores how technology influences curriculum, instructional design, and educational standards. Equity issues and the consequences to students who lack technological skills and knowledge are also the focal points of this course. This course uses a variety of media and technologies to prepare teaching materials, develop curriculum, and deliver instruction. Topics and Objectives Current State of Educational Technology * Identify professional associations that represent technology teachers. * Justify the use of technology in education. * Analyze the impact of cultural diversity and educational equity on current uses of technology in education. * Examine aspects for planning technology integration at a district/school level. * Apply the five phases of a technology integration model. * Evaluate emerging trends in educational technology. * Demonstrate appropriate strategies essential to continued growth and development of skills in understanding and implementing emerging technology concepts. Integrating Software and Applications * Coordinate instructional software and software tools to learner needs. * Compare and contrast various types of instructional software. * Analyze Integrated Learning Systems (ILS) and other networked products. * Devise criteria and methods for educational software selection. * Identify uses of software applications in the classroom. * Evaluate software applications integration in the classroom. * Examine effective distance learning instructional strategies. * Assess Internet integration in the classroom. Integrating Technology in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies * Identify exemplary Internet sites and software packages for subject-area instruction in language arts, math, science, and social studies. * Examine current issues in language arts, math, science, and social studies instruction that may impact the selection and use of technology. Integrating Technology in Art, Music, Physical Education and Special Education * Identify exemplary Internet sites and software packages for subject-area instruction in art, music, physical education, and special education. * Examine current issues in art, music, physical education, and special education instruction that may impact the selection and use of technology. Hypermedia and Multimedia * Compare and contrast hypermedia and multimedia. * Examine planning models to implement hypermedia and multimedia projects. * Generate effective presentation software techniques. Computers as a Tool for Teachers * Assess ways teachers can use computers as a productivity tool for teaching. * Examine ways teachers can use computers as a management tool.


RDG542FE
Course Number RDG542

n/a


Orientation to Teacher Education
Course Number MTE 507
Credits 0.0

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the primary components of the Teacher Education Program. Students will be introduced to the program’s progression and degree completion requirements. Field Experience, Electronic Resources, E-Portfolio, Student Teaching, and Teacher Work Sample will be discussed


Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


The Art and Science of Teaching
Course Number MTE501

This course introduces teaching as both an art and a science. Topics for discussion include an historical overview, basic philosophies, professionalism, legal/ethical ramifications, in addition to trends and issues in education. Students will reflect on their motivations to teach and will begin developing a personal philosophy of education.


Child and Adolescent Development
Course Number MTE506

This course explores the range of issues related to human development from birth through age 18. The focus of the course is on defining the various stages as they impact instructional practice and decisions in a K-12 environment. Emotional, intellectual, physiological, social, and cultural factors are discussed. Peer and family influences, along with issues related to media themes and gender bias, are examined.


Models, Theories and Instructional Strategies
Course Number MTE508

This course focuses on the theoretical models that underlie teaching and learning. Students examine methods for teaching all students, explore lesson plan designs, analyze the most effective teaching strategies to promote student learning, and develop a lesson plan. Topics and Objectives Lesson Planning Describe the components of a lesson plan. Compare and contrast different approaches to lesson planning. Explain the role of standards in planning and instruction. Learning Goals and Objectives Analyze the difference between goals and objectives. Relate Bloom's Taxonomy to writing goals and objectives. Learning Goals and Objectives continued Write developmentally appropriate objectives. Develop a task analysis based on your lesson plan objective. Theoretical Models and Lesson Plan Designs Examine the three domains (affective, psychomotor, and cognitive)of learning. Examine educational theories. Analyze how the domains affect planning and instruction. Identify different theoretical models. Identify a variety of lesson plan designs. Apply the principles of theoretical models to planning and instruction. Instructional Strategies Compare and contrast different instructional strategies, such as direct instruction, individual study, indirect instruction, experiential instruction, and collaborative learning. Explain how different questioning strategies contribute to learning. Examine graphic organizers, concept mapping, and how they can enhance lesson planning and instruction. Examine how technology can be used to support instruction. Promoting Student Learning and Development Describe how students' critical thinking can be promoted through effective objectives, questioning, and activities. Demonstrate how to use various instructional strategies to promote student-centered learning. Describe how addressing student diversity in lesson planning can promote student learning. Evaluation Evaluate a lesson plan. Evaluate your personal disposition toward the teaching profession. Examine basic management skills that foster a positive, productive learning climate. Describe how assessment and evaluation of student learning can be used in lesson planning. All topics and objectives apply All topics and objectives apply.


Assessment and Evaluation
Course Number MTE562

This course focuses on developing the skills necessary to become effective assessors. It provides the fundamentals of a variety of classroom assessments, including standardized, formative and summative, traditional, and performance classroom assessments. Learners focus on using a variety of assessment tools and construct objective and performance assessments. Additionally, the purposes, the methods, and the reporting of evaluations are explored.


Structured English Immersion
Course Number SEI 500
Credits 3.0

This Course Will Introduce Students To The Concept Of And Methods For Instructing In A Structured English Immersion (sei) Environment. Students Will Learn About Assessment Of K-12 Students, State Standards, Research-based Instructional Activities, And Lesson Planning And Implementation Models. Students Will Study How A Learner-centered Approach To Teaching Can Provide English Language Learners (ell), As Well As Native English Speakers, With A Greater Opportunity To Interact Meaningfully With Educational Materials As They Learn Subject Matter And El Learners Acquire English.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Reading Methods
Course Number RDG542

This course focuses on the most current research, theory, and methods of teaching reading at the secondary level. Various instructional and assessment techniques are modeled. A practical application project, based on work with a student in a 7th -12th-grade setting, is incorporated into the course requirements.


Survey of Special Populations
Course Number ECH 514
Credits 2.0

This course provides an overview of special populations in early childhood education. The course focuses on developmentally effective methods and techniques used for the identification, assessment, and instruction of children with special needs from birth to age eight. Legal structures, public policy, and information related to current practices serving special populations in early childhood are also examined.


Maintaining an Effective Learning Climate
Course Number ECH 521
Credits 3.0

This course examines developmentally effective strategies used in managing a positive learning environment within the framework of today’s diverse early childhood population. Topics include models of discipline, establishing expectations and procedures, motivating children, family communication, managing disruptive children, technology integration, and materials management and record keeping. Students will develop an individual classroom management plan for an early childhood setting.


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Secondary Mathematics
Course Number MTE544

This course explores the secondary mathematics classroom, curriculum, and teaching and assessment strategies. Participants identify the educational needs of secondary students by exploring current instructional theory, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards, state standards, and social issues that impact the mathematics classroom. The course also helps prospective educators develop skills in selecting and adapting instruction for diverse student populations. The course will also emphasize classroom management skills as they relate to mathematics instruction. EFFECTIVE 2/1/2008: The Field Experience Observation Record no longer needs to be submitted to TaskStream.


Advanced Structured English Immersion Methods
Course Number SEI 503
Credits 3.0

This Course Addresses Structured English Immersion (sei) Instruction And Assessment Of K-12 English Language Learners (ells), And Is Designed To Meet The Standards Set By The Arizona Department Of Education. It Examines The Legal, Historical, And Educational Reasons For Sei, As Well As Theoretical Principles Of Language Acquisition And The Role Of Culture In Learning. It Also Emphasizes The Alignment Of Ell Proficiency Standards To Arizona’s Academic Standards And Their Application To Lesson Planning. The Arizona English Language Learner Assessment (azella), Use Of Alternative Assessments, Analysis Of Data, And The Application Of Data To Instruction, Are Emphasized As Well. A Final Project Synthesizes The Concepts And Instructional Strategies Taught In The Course. Prerequisite: Sei 500.


n/a
Course Number RDG504

n/a


Secondary Student Teaching, Part A
Course Number SEC519

This course emphasizes the practical application of educational theories and methods. The course will focus on the following topics: the student teaching experience, the school culture, the learning environment, and planning, preparing, and implementing the Teacher Work Sample. The course also provides a forum for open discussion and problem solving based on student teaching classroom experiences.


Secondary Student Teaching, Part B
Course Number SEC520

This course will focus on the design and implementation of the Teacher Work Sample. It also provides students practical guidance in securing a teaching position. Students will examine resumes and cover letters, teaching applications, and interview strategies. Assistance in preparing an employment portfolio will be provided. This seminar also provides a forum for open discussion and problem-solving based on student teaching classroom experiences.


Business Systems Analysis
Course Number N/A
Credits 0.0

In the Business Systems Analysis concentration, you'll examine analysis methodologies, the use of analysis tools and the components of project planning and management.


Program description: The Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education (MAED/TED-S) is a graduate degree program preparing candidates for teacher licensure. The guiding philosophy of the MAED/TED-S program is to provide the adult student, who already has a degree in a discipline other than education, with the skills and knowledge that will allow them to become a competent and effective educator. This program focuses on secondary student learning by improving the educator’s responsibility for that learning.

Student teaching is an integral component of the Teacher Education Program. It provides students with a field-based experience at the appropriate grade and content level. Student teachers work with a cooperating teacher from a school site and with a University of Phoenix faculty advisor. The student teaching experience is designed to emphasize the achievement of state standards leading to certification and to present individuals with growth opportunities that best prepare them to assume the duties of a certified classroom teacher.

Throughout the program, students are required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of verified field experiences, covering a variety of developmental levels. The focus of each observation will relate to specific course content. Documentation will be maintained in the student’s professional portfolio.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Special Education
Orientation to the Exceptional Child
Course Number SPE513

This course provides an overview of the different categories of exceptionality. Students will be introduced to special education laws and their implications for delivery systems, transition plans, and identification and placement procedures. Topics and Objectives Philosophical, Historical, and Cultural Foundations of Special Education * Summarize the theories and philosophies that form the basis for special education practice. * Explain how cultural differences impact the identification and education of individuals with exceptional learning needs. Basic Terminology and Acronyms in Special Education * Examine current terminology used in the education of individuals with exceptional learning needs. Legal Foundations of Special Education * Analyze the laws, regulations, and policies related to special education. Prereferral and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Procedures * Analyze procedures for initiating special education services. Characteristics of Learners * Compare and contrast the characteristics of learners with and without exceptional learning needs. Professional Collaborative Partnerships * Analyze the process of collaboration. * Generate strategies that promote successful collaboration. Family Collaborative Partnerships * Explore the dynamics of families who have individuals with exceptional learning needs. * Propose strategies for parental involvement in the education of individuals with exceptional learning needs.


Special Education Methods
Course Number SPE511

This Course Provides An Overview Of Methodologies Used In Teaching Learners With Special Needs From Early Childhood On, With An Emphasis On Students With Learning Disabilities, Mental Retardation, And Emotional Handicaps. Students Explore The Relationship Between Individual Student Characteristics And The Development Of The Individualized Education Program, Instructional Implications Of Special Education Categories, Characteristics Of Various Service Delivery Models, Task Analysis, Unit And Lesson Development, Instructional Strategies, Classroom Organization And Management, Behavior Management, Crisis Prevention, And Transition Planning/career Counseling. Communication Through Consultation And Collaboration And Professional/ethical Practices Are Also Considered. Topics And Objectives Synthesis Of Assessment * Examine Formal And Informal Assessments Used To Evaluate Student Strengths And Needs. * Distinguish Among Special Education Categories Based On Idea Eligibility Criteria And Their Implications For Instruction. Overview Of The Individualized Education Program (iep) * Identify Components Of The Individualized Education Program (iep) As Defined In The Idea. * Explain The Process Of Iep Development And Implications For Due Process. * Analyze An Iep That Results In Appropriate Educational Services Based Upon Evaluation Of Student Strengths, Needs, Category Of Disability, And State And/or District Standards. * Describe Iep Considerations That Maximize Opportunities For Learning In The Least Restrictive Environment (lre). Planning For And Implementing Instruction * Describe Differing Learning Styles Of Individuals With Exceptional Learning Needs. * Describe Characteristics Of Culture And Implications For Instructional Practice. * Apply Task Analysis To The Development Of Instructional Sequences. * Evaluate The Effectiveness Of Instructional Materials For Varying Student Needs. * Explain Effective Unit And Lesson Development Based On The Essential Elements Of Instruction. * Examine Instructional Strategies That Promote Student Success And Modifications And Accommodations That Support Student Needs. * Analyze Informal Assessment Strategies To Measure Student Progress. * Propose Various Grading Methods. Managing The Teaching And Learning Environment * Describe Basic Classroom Management Theories And Strategies For Individuals With Exceptional Learning Needs. * Propose Environmental Modifications That Contribute To Student Learning. Managing Student Behavior And Social Interaction * Describe Social Skills Needed For Educational And Other Environments. * Describe Approaches That Influence Behavior Of Individuals With Exceptional Learning Needs. * Describe Components Of A Behavioral Intervention Plan (bip). * Describe Crisis Prevention And Intervention. Planning For Other Needs * Identify Processes Of Assisting Students In Making Transitions From One Setting To Another. * Identify Issues In Management Of Health Care Needs. * Describe Career Awareness And Vocational Activities For Students With Special Needs. * Describe Strategies That Promote Cultural Diversity And Disability Awareness. Communication And Collaborative Partnerships * Describe Models Of Consultation And Collaboration Among Professionals. * Describe The Role Of The Paraprofessional In Special Education. * Propose Ways In Which Parents And Non-professional Community Resources Contribute To Student Success. * Identify Advantages And Disadvantages Of Consultation And Collaboration In An Instructional Environment. Professionalism And Ethical Practices * Examine Professional And Ethical Practices Related To Educating A Student With Special Needs. * Describe A Personal Philosophy Of Educating A Student With Special Needs Based Upon Appropriate Professional And Ethical Practices.


Special Education Assessment and Interpretation
Course Number SPE512

This course focuses on the task of assessing the exceptional child, with an emphasis on measuring a child's abilities and diagnosing his or her strengths and needs. Commonly used tests and evaluation systems used in public school special education programs are examined. The course also addresses specific diagnostic procedures and the link between interpretation and the instructional process. Basic instructional, assessment, and behavioral recommendations are discussed. Topics and Objectives Foundations of Special Education Assessment and Interpretation * Compare and contrast current assessment practices with historical foundations of assessment. * Explain the legal requirements of assessment and evaluation. * Analyze the differences between assessment practices as mandated by the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation Act. * Define the steps in the special education evaluation and disability determination process. * Identify key terms in assessment terminology. Assessment Instruments * Identify the purposes of a variety of assessment instruments. * Identify assessments used in determining current performance levels. Collection of Assessment Data * Analyze effective data collection procedures. * Determine performance levels. Interpretation of Assessment Data * Interpret assessment data by analyzing attributes of student learning and performance. * Evaluate components of an educational assessment report. * Explain how assessment data contributes to disability determination. Linking Assessment and Instruction * Recommend instructional strategies, modifications, and accommodations. * Recommend classroom assessment strategies. * Recommend behavioral and social strategies. Communication and Collaborative Partnerships * Examine attributes of effective communication.


Characteristics of Exceptionalities
Course Number SPE590

This Course Examines Teaching And Managing Students With Mild Disabilities. Special Emphasis Is Placed On Learning Disabilities, Mental Retardation, And Emotional Disabilities. The Etiology, Characteristics, Philosophies, Service Delivery Models Available, Methods Of Instruction, And Behavior Management Techniques Of Each Disability Area Are Discussed In Depth. Topics And Objectives Background And Characteristics Of Learning Disabilities * Analyze The Federal Definition Of “specific Learning Disabilities,” As Well As Some Common Components Of Various Definitions Of Learning Disabilities * Examine The Phases In The History Of Learning Disabilities * Identify The Legal Classifications Of Specific Learning Disabilities * Identify Legislation That Addresses Issues In The Field Of Learning Disabilities * Examine The Etiology And Prevalence Of Learning Disabilities Among Children And Young Adults * Examine Various Characteristics Of Students With Learning Disabilities Background And Characteristics Of Mental Retardation And Developmental Disabilities * Examine Early Advocates And Issues In The Field Of Mental Retardation And Developmental Disabilities * Analyze Laws And Litigation In The Field Of Mental Retardation And Developmental Disabilities * Analyze Current Definitions And Issues Of Students With Mental Retardation And Developmental Disabilities * Evaluate Current Perspectives On Students With Mental Retardation And Developmental Disabilities * Examine The Etiology And Prevalence Of Mental Retardation Among Children And Young Adults * Examine Various Characteristics Of Students With Mental Retardation And Developmental Disabilities Background And Characteristics Of Emotional And Behavioral Disorders * Identify The Purpose And Impact Of The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (idea) On Students With Emotional And Behavioral Disorders * Examine Federal And State Definitions For Emotional And Behavioral Disorders * Analyze Historical Roots Of Emotional And Behavioral Disorders * Analyze Key Legislation In The Field Of Emotional And Behavioral Disorders * Summarize The Differing Perceptions Of Deviance In The Context Of Emotional And Behavioral Disorders * Analyze The Effects Of Dysfunctional Behavior On Learning * Examine Various Characteristics Of Students With Emotional And Behavioral Disorders Instructional Planning For Students With Mild Disabilities * Identify Educational Considerations For Students With Mild Disabilities * Describe The Nature And Function Of Curriculum For Students With Mild Disabilities * Describe Curriculum Structure And Implementation For Students With Mild Disabilities * Apply Concepts Of Curriculum Development To Unit Planning For Students With Mild Disabilities Methods Of Instruction For Students With Mild Disabilities * Identify The Purpose And Components Of The Individualized Education Program (iep) * Analyze Methods Of Instruction For Students With Mild Disabilities * Compare And Contrast Instructional Methods For Students With Mild Disabilities * Identify Assessment Alternatives For Students With Mild Disabilities Creating An Effective Learning Climate For Students With Mild Disabilities * Describe Attributes Of An Effective Learning Climate For Students With Mild Disabilities * Identify Strategies For Teaching And Managing Student Behavior Of Students With Mild Disabilities Service Delivery Models Available For Mild Disabilities * Describe The Continuum Of Service Delivery Models For Students With Mild Disabilities


Curriculum Constructs and Assessments: Reading and Language Arts
Course Number RDG530

This course focuses on the most current research, theory, and methods of reading instruction, while providing students with the background knowledge in language arts necessary to prepare an integrated unit of instruction. Various instructional and assessment techniques, including research-based phonics, are modeled. A practical application project, based on work with a student in a K-8 school setting, is incorporated into the course requirements. Topics and Objectives Theories and Strategies for Reading Instruction * Analyze the reading process * Identify theories and principles on which effective reading is based * Examine the components of phonology, morphology, semantics, graphophonics, and syntax * Identify the effective components of a lesson plan Preparation for the Practicum * Investigate the use of informal assessments * Plan for initial tutoring sessions Assessing Growth in Literacy * Interpret an Informal Reading Inventory (IRI) or Running Record to identify student strengths, weaknesses, and reading level * Analyze ways to organize and manage diagnostic information * Implement a program of remediation based on assessment findings Children’s Literature * Explore a variety of genres * Integrate children’s literature into units and lessons Learning to Read * Examine the roles of listening comprehension and oral expression in the development of literacy * Examine the use of effective oral reading practices to support literacy development * Analyze the relationship of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking * Analyze the interrelationships among cognitive development, metalinguistic awareness, and language learning * Examine the concept of early literacy * Apply the relationship of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking to lesson planning and an integrated unit Language Learning and Literacy * Identify instructional strategies and activities for language acquisition * Examine the value and importance of parental support and involvement in literacy development The Place of Explicit and Systematic Phonics in Learning to Read and Write * Examine word attack strategies readers use to process written language for meaning * Investigate the utility of phonics and structural analysis generalizations * Analyze the place of phonics in a reading program * Analyze methods of evaluating phonics mastery * Analyze print processing techniques and how they relate to developing appropriate and useful reading strategies * Analyze student writing to evaluate application of phonics elements * Examine the depth of present knowledge of phonics elements through pretest/posttest measures Comprehension Connections * Examine schema theory and how it relates to reading comprehension * Examine pre-reading, during-reading, and post-reading activities that enhance comprehension * Evaluate the use of pre-reading, during-reading, and post-reading activities in a tutorial/small group/classroom context * Identify instructional practices and methods for teaching comprehension * Deliver and evaluate lessons based on continuous diagnostic assessment * Examine the relationship between fluency and comprehension Reading to Learn * Examine the elements of reading comprehension in reading to learn * Analyze various study strategies and their application Vocabulary Building * Evaluate pedagogical approaches in vocabulary development Applications of Writing in the Classroom * Describe the stages of the writing process Applications of Writing in the Classroom (continued) * Identify student ...show more »


Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Science and Mathematics
Course Number MTE532

This course focuses on the pedagogy and assessment strategies that enhance learning in science and mathematics. Integrated content, interdisciplinary teaching, and curriculum and assessment issues are emphasized. Multiple perspectives of students as learners of math and science are explored. This course provides students with an opportunity to develop the ability to evaluate and use instructional methods, curricular materials and resources, and appropriate assessment strategies. Topics and Objectives Science and Mathematics Content and Standards * Identify the specific content and process standards in P-8 science and mathematics. * Apply national, state, and local science and mathematics standards to instruction and assessment. * Integrate national, state, and local technology standards with science and mathematics. Management in the Science and Mathematics Classroom * Identify specific classroom management issues related to successful teaching when implementing instructional strategies in science and mathematics. * Examine a classroom environment that provides opportunities for productive discourse. Students as Learners of Science and Mathematics * Analyze the impact that student culture, ethnicity, ideas, and learning styles have on science and mathematics instruction. * Examine various models of differentiated instruction for science and mathematics. Problem Solving in Science and Mathematics * Apply questioning strategies and learning activities that elicit, engage, and challenge a student’s thinking for successful problem solving in real-life scenarios. * Analyze a variety of learning tools designed to help students reason, solve problems, and communicate effectively in science and mathematics. Inquiry and Interactive Learning in Mathematics * Identify the key components of inquiry-based learning in mathematics. * Use appropriate, interactive learning strategies in the teaching of mathematics. * Demonstrate understanding of the principles and standards for school mathematics. Inquiry and Interactive Learning in Science * Identify the key components of inquiry-based learning in science. * Use appropriate, interactive learning strategies in the teaching of science. * Demonstrate understanding of the principles and standards for school science. Assessment in Mathematics and Science * Determine the need for ongoing program evaluation in both science and mathematics. * Develop formative and summative assessments in science and mathematics that are aligned with standards and guide instruction. * Evaluate assessment techniques, tools, and strategies used to measure student learning in science and mathematics. Integration of Science and Mathematics in Curriculum, Instruction, and Technology * Develop an integrated unit involving mathematics, science, technology, and other content areas as appropriate. * Examine the impact of technology on science and mathematics content and processes.


Inclusion Strategies for the Special Educator
Course Number SPE575

This course examines the roles of special educators when including students with disabilities into general education classrooms. Options for success that consider peer relationships, systematic instruction, behavior management, and collaboration are explored. This course focuses on inclusion strategies and collaborative activities that enable special educators, general classroom teachers, and administrators to successfully provide an optimal educational environment for students with disabilities. Topics and Objectives Philosophical, Historical, and Legal Foundations for Inclusion * Examine the impact of personal and United States philosophies of education * Identify historical and legal foundations of inclusion Issues of Inclusion * Contrast inclusion and mainstreaming * Identify resistance to inclusion * Describe the Regular Education Initiative * Define inclusion as an instructional intervention Professional Roles for Successful Inclusion * Identify contributions of general education teachers * Outline the role of the special education teacher * Examine the role of administrators * Examine the issues related to training and working with paraprofessionals Inclusive Learning Environments * Examine the role of technology in instruction * Describe the impact of culturally and linguistically diverse settings * Examine the impact of heterogeneous groupings * Recognize the value of cooperative learning * Identify the use of multiple intelligences in instruction * Identify the need for adaptation of curriculum Planning and Managing the Inclusive Teaching and Learning Environment * Determine a process for meeting individual student needs * Develop a systematic approach for inclusion * Describe the need for a systems-level plan Managing Student Behavior and Social Interaction Skills * Recognize the importance of peer relationships and support * Identify the benefits of social skills training programs * Outline the steps of contingency management * Examine aspects of contracting for behavior management Communication and Collaborative Partnerships * Identify communication as the foundation of cooperation and collaboration * Describe the key components of the communication process * Examine the roadblocks to communication * Recognize the steps in conflict management * Identify the key characteristics of collaborative consultation * Define collaborative teamwork * Identify the key characteristics of a collaborative team * Outline collaborative strategies for educators and families Professionalism and Ethical Practices * Identify ethical issues in managing behavior * Examine issues related to culturally and linguistically diverse populations


Special Education Student Teaching: Cross-Categorical, Part A
Course Number SPE588

This course emphasizes the practical application of educational theories and methods. The course will focus on the following topics: the student teaching experience, the school culture, the learning environment, and planning, preparing, and implementing the Teacher Work Sample. The course also provides a forum for open discussion and problem solving based on student teaching classroom experiences. Topics and Objectives The Student Teaching Experience * Review the procedures, expectations, and requirements for student teaching * Analyze stress management techniques and strategies * Examine the importance of appropriate attire for the professional educator * Examine expectations of the formal student teaching observation process * Analyze the attributes of an effective cooperating teacher and student teacher relationship * Review the components, process, and timeline of the Teacher Work Sample The School Culture * Compare and contrast the cultures of various districts, schools, and classrooms * Analyze the different demographics of schools and school districts * Examine relationships within the school among teachers, colleagues, administrators, support staff, and students * Develop techniques for collaborating with grade-level or subject-level teachers * Describe various ways to create a team atmosphere within the school setting Planning and Preparation * Develop goals and objectives for the Teacher Work Sample instructional unit based on the teaching and learning context * Justify selected learning goals and objectives based on teaching and learning contexts * Examine various classroom arrangements and available resources Preparing and Implementing Assessments * Compare and contrast formative and summative assessments * Evaluate the usability and applicability of a variety of assessment methods * Design an assessment plan to monitor students’ progress Instructional Design * Compare and contrast different lesson plan formats * Design standards-based lesson plans * Demonstrate the use of differentiated instructional strategies * Apply technology to the creation of instruction and instructional activities The Learning Environment * Compare and contrast various methods of classroom management * Analyze the implications that contextual factors may have on learning and the learning climate * Evaluate the aspects of the classroom environment that contribute to positive learning experiences * Explore how brain-based research can contribute to building a positive learning climate * Analyze strategies for remediation of disruptive and non-disruptive student behaviors * Compare and contrast various classroom and school procedure


Special Education Student Teaching: Cross-Categorical, Part B
Course Number SPE589

This course will focus on the design and implementation of the Teacher Work Sample. It also provides students practical guidance in securing a teaching position. Students will examine resumes and cover letters, teaching applications, and interview strategies. Assistance in preparing an employment portfolio will be provided. This seminar also provides a forum for open discussion and problem-solving based on student teaching classroom experiences. Topics and Objectives Instructional Decision-Making * Apply formative assessment information to make instructional planning decisions. * Analyze examples of instructional decision-making based on students’ learning or responses. Analysis of Learning Results * Evaluate assessment data to diagnose student learning. * Analyze data to report performance of the following groups: whole class, subgroups, and individual students. * Create visual representations to profile student performance. Reflection and Self-Evaluation * Identify areas for improving instructional skills and classroom management skills. * Evaluate your teaching performance relative to the instructional unit implemented for the Teacher Work Sample. Seeking a Teaching Position * Evaluate the components of a teaching employment portfolio. * Compare and contrast various teaching application formats. * Evaluate personal and professional considerations when applying for a teaching position. Managing the First Year of Teaching * Describe effective personal and professional time management strategies. * Identify best practice strategies. Program Reflection * Evaluate personal and professional growth throughout the University of Phoenix Special Education Program.


Orientation to Teacher Education
Course Number MTE 507
Credits 0.0

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the primary components of the Teacher Education Program. Students will be introduced to the program’s progression and degree completion requirements. Field Experience, Electronic Resources, E-Portfolio, Student Teaching, and Teacher Work Sample will be discussed


Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


Models, Theories and Instructional Strategies
Course Number MTE508

This course focuses on the theoretical models that underlie teaching and learning. Students examine methods for teaching all students, explore lesson plan designs, analyze the most effective teaching strategies to promote student learning, and develop a lesson plan. Topics and Objectives Lesson Planning Describe the components of a lesson plan. Compare and contrast different approaches to lesson planning. Explain the role of standards in planning and instruction. Learning Goals and Objectives Analyze the difference between goals and objectives. Relate Bloom's Taxonomy to writing goals and objectives. Learning Goals and Objectives continued Write developmentally appropriate objectives. Develop a task analysis based on your lesson plan objective. Theoretical Models and Lesson Plan Designs Examine the three domains (affective, psychomotor, and cognitive)of learning. Examine educational theories. Analyze how the domains affect planning and instruction. Identify different theoretical models. Identify a variety of lesson plan designs. Apply the principles of theoretical models to planning and instruction. Instructional Strategies Compare and contrast different instructional strategies, such as direct instruction, individual study, indirect instruction, experiential instruction, and collaborative learning. Explain how different questioning strategies contribute to learning. Examine graphic organizers, concept mapping, and how they can enhance lesson planning and instruction. Examine how technology can be used to support instruction. Promoting Student Learning and Development Describe how students' critical thinking can be promoted through effective objectives, questioning, and activities. Demonstrate how to use various instructional strategies to promote student-centered learning. Describe how addressing student diversity in lesson planning can promote student learning. Evaluation Evaluate a lesson plan. Evaluate your personal disposition toward the teaching profession. Examine basic management skills that foster a positive, productive learning climate. Describe how assessment and evaluation of student learning can be used in lesson planning. All topics and objectives apply All topics and objectives apply.


Instruction and Assessment of English Language Learners
Course Number MTE553

This course focuses on education for the English Language Learner (ELL). It emphasizes knowledge of and sensitivity to the history and to the culture of other languages and ethnic groups, as well as to multiethnic curriculum and instruction. It provides strategies for effective instruction, including standards-based lesson planning and implementation models, and assessment of linguistically diverse K-12 students. In addition, the course addresses ways in which a learner-centered approach to teaching can provide English Language Learners with a greater opportunity to interact meaningfully with educational materials as they learn subject matter and acquire English.


Program description: The Master of Arts in Education (MAED) with a specialization in Special Education is a graduate degree program preparing candidates for teacher licensure in the field of special education. Candidates for this program have already earned a bachelor’s degree and wish to gain the pedagogical skills and knowledge that will assist them in becoming effective special education educators. The program’s curriculum includes orientation to the exceptional child, foundations and methodologies of mild disabilities, diagnosis and assessment of disabilities, structured English immersion, reading and language arts instruction, inclusion strategies, and collaboration and resource management for the special educator.

Throughout the program, students are required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of verified field experiences. The focus of each observation will relate to specific course content. Documentation will be maintained in the student’s electronic portfolio. Students’ field experiences are designed to prepare them for student teaching.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Leadership
EDL501
Course Number EDL501

Personal Leadership
Course Number EDL500

This course focuses on developing a personal philosophy of leadership. Students engage in self-assessment activities that reveal how individual values and beliefs directly influence personal leadership. Students examine their own organization and stakeholders who may play a role in their journey in school leadership. Aspects of effective communication are also addressed as students explore contemporary leadership theorists and popular beliefs behind organizations and school systems that will help build a foundation for a personal growth.


Cultural Competency
Course Number EDL505

This course focuses on developing a personal philosophy of leadership. Students engage in self-assessment activities that reveal how individual values and beliefs directly influence personal leadership. Students examine their own organization and stakeholders who may play a role in their journey in school leadership. Aspects of effective communication are also addressed as students explore contemporary leadership theorists and popular beliefs behind organizations and school systems that will help build a foundation for a personal growth.


Teacher Leadership in a Global Society
Course Number EDL510

Students in this course have the opportunity to critically analyze the field of education from a global perspective. Students investigate the implications of the globalization of knowledge on micro and macro educational systems. Multicultural implications, diversity, and the use of technology as a vehicle of pedagogy are explored. Building collaborative organizational communities and empowering teacher leaders to think strategically about school change are emphasized.


Organizational Leadership
Course Number EDL515

This course focuses on the principles of organizational leadership. It examines the origins and components of effective organizations, as well as frames of leadership. Candidates apply their knowledge of these frames in reflecting on their organization. Additionally, they learn the skills to reframe their organization, provide leadership in turbulent times, and become agents and advocates of change.


Accountability and Evaluation
Course Number EDL525

This course is designed to provide teacher leaders with an understanding of assessment, evaluation, and accountability components that are necessary to analyze curriculum, educational resources, test data and current accountability regulations. Students will apply procedures for evaluating and recommending strategies for improving the quality and effectiveness of curriculum and assessment as they relate to instruction.



Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


E-Learning
Course Number AET541

Course Description This course focuses on e-learning for adult learners. Students apply instructional design techniques, learning theory, and technical tools for e-learning activities. The course also addresses the challenges associated with the e-learning environment. Topics and Objectives Foundations of E-Learning Identify the characteristics of e-learning. Summarize the evolution of e-learning. Analyze the purposes, benefits, and challenges of e-learning. Describe the instructional methods of an e-learning environment. Designing E-Learning Summarize the principles for designing effective e-learning instruction. Analyze the effect of personalization on e-learning. Evaluate the benefits of segmentation and pretraining. Explain methods for incorporating worked examples in e-learning environments. Instructional Considerations: Text and Graphics Summarize the principles for effective use of text in e-learning. Summarize the principles for integrating graphics in e-learning. Evaluate the use of text and graphics in instruction. Integrate text and graphics for effective instruction. Instructional Considerations: Text and Audio Identify the various technologies for audio in e-learning. Determine appropriate uses of audio in e-learning. Integrate text and audio for effective instruction. Analyze the application of audio in e-learning environments. Effective E-Learning Practices Describe the principles behind the effective use of practice in e-learning. Determine the effectiveness of feedback in practice exercises. Apply multimedia principles in practice exercises. Justify collaboration in e-learning. Evaluate the level of learner control in e-learning. Applications of E-Learning Guidelines Summarize e-learning principles that promote thinking skills. Analyze the role of simulations and games in e-learning. Prioritize guidelines for developing e-learning courseware.


Instructional Leadership
Course Number EDD724

This course analyzes the process of instruction and curriculum development. Effective teaching and learning strategies are explored as they relate to the use of technology, motivating staff and students, and creating dynamic learning environments. The importance of faculty development and their involvement in research and public service are of special focus.


Coaching and Mentoring
Course Number EDL531

This course provides an exploration into how mentoring and coaching improves teaching and learning. This course examines mentoring and coaching competencies, including ethical guidelines, creating collegial relationships, building learning communities, effective communication, problem-solving and conflict resolution, and facilitating learning and accountability. Candidates will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to integrate and apply these competencies in real life and instructional leadership situations. Topics and Objectives Foundations of Coaching and Mentoring Identify characteristics of coaching. Identify characteristics of mentoring. Compare and contrast coaching and mentoring. Identify the dispositions necessary to be an effective coach and mentor. Explore the International Coach Federation Code of Ethics. Collegial Relationships Identify the role and responsibilities of a coach and of a mentor. Examine the elements of cognitive coaching. Analyze the 16 Habits of Mind. Demonstrate effective collaboration skills. Effective Communications Describe factors that impact communication. Describe effective communication processes. Illustrate strategies for promoting dialogue, resolving conflict, and problem solving. Mentors as Instructional Coaches Examine topics for instructional coaching. Analyze opportunities to cultivate learning focused relationships. Facilitating Results Explain the stages of mentoring. Identify ways to create awareness. Establish realistic goals and objectives. Design an action plan. Analyze effective modeling and motivation strategies. Develop a process to monitor progress and accountability. Coaches as Leaders of Change Develop an understanding of the effects of change on school culture. Identify ways to create and communicate support. Examine ways to manage change effectively. Explore mentoring and coaching as elements of professional growth.


Action Research and Evaluation
Course Number EDD581

This course examines action research and its role in decision-making and in educational practices. Students are introduced to various types of action research and to the elements of the action research process, including identifying a problem, determining a problem statement and a purpose, conducting a literature review, planning for the collection and the analysis of data, and creating a plan of action. Methods for collecting, evaluating, and analyzing data are discussed. Students identify ethical issues related to research as well, including a professional code of ethics, confidentiality, and research using human subjects. In addition, they synthesize and apply the content of the course by writing a proposal for an action research study. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Action Research Define action research. Distinguish between types of action research. Identify the components of action research. Review examples of action research. Explain how action research can be utilized to effect school improvement and change. Examine opportunities to conduct action research collaboratively. Introduction to the Action Research Process Examine the role of reflection on practice in generating ideas for a research focus. Determine appropriate topics for an action research study. Identify the elements of an effective research question. Determine varied sources relevant to a research problem. Explain the importance of the literature review. Compare qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Collecting Data Explain processes for selecting research participants. Describe varied types of data that can be collected to answer research questions. Examine qualitative research designs, methods, and issues in collecting data. Initial Steps in Developing an Action Research Study Examine quantitative research designs and methods, and issues in collecting data. Explain ways of ensuring validity in action research. Develop a plan for collecting data. Analyzing and Interpreting Data Explain the purpose of interim data analysis and its importance in action research. Describe ways to analyze and report results for qualitative data. Describe ways to analyze and report results for quantitative data. Draw conclusions from data. Ethical Issues Related to Educational Research Outline guidelines for conducting research using human subjects. Analyze the impact of technology on the ethical issue of confidentiality in educational research. Discuss the ethical use of data in educational decision-making. Assess ethical considerations when publishing reports of a research study. Develop a process for following ethical guidelines throughout an action research study. Creating a Proposal for an Action Research Study Produce a proposal for an action research study. Prepare an overview of the proposal for presentation.


E-Learning Design Technologies
Course Number AET545

This Course Provides Adult Learners The Opportunity To Design A Web-based E-learning Tutorial. The Focus Is On The Importance Of Planning, Principles Of Good Web-page Design, Storyboarding, And Elements Of Multimedia. Web-based Design Standards, As Well As Appropriate Use Of Web Pages And Multimedia, Are Analyzed. It Reviews E-learning Software, Computer-mediated Delivery Platforms, And Learning Management Systems. Topics And Objectives Analysis Phase And Introduction To Multimedia Review The Addie Instructional Design Process. Perform A Needs Assessment To Address A Training Need That Will Be Solved By A Web-based Tutorial. Identify Performance Gaps Based On The Needs Assessment. Identify Different Types Of Multimedia That Can Be Integrated Into E-learning. Design Phase And Storyboarding Write Instructional Goals And Performance Objectives Based On The Needs Analysis (gap Analysis). Apply Storyboard Principles For Creating A Web-based Tutorial. Select Appropriate Web-based Platforms For E-learning. Identify Different Strategies That Increase Adult Learner Engagement. Development Phase And Introduction To Web Design Analyze Effective E-learning Instructional Strategies And Delivery Modalities. Examine Html Development Techniques For An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Review Effective Web Design Techniques. Creation Of A Web-based Tutorial Create An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Analyze Page Layout Techniques. Compare And Contrast Multimedia Elements. Determine A Summative Assessment For A Web-based Tutorial. Implementation Of E-learning Publish An E-learning Tutorial To The Web. Analyze The Preparedness Of Learners For E-learning. Review E-learning Standards. Evaluation Of A Web-based Tutorial Examine E-assessment Tools. Evaluate The Instructional Effectiveness Of A Web-based Tutorial.


Performance Improvement and Management
Course Number AET550

This Course Provides Learners With An Overview Of Performance Improvement Principles. Learners Identify And Analyze Organizational Performance Gaps, Create Learning Interventions To Diminish Those Gaps, And Evaluate Training Using Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels. Topics And Objectives Human Performance Technology Define Performance Improvement Describe The Human Performance Technology (hpt) Process Demonstrate That Performance Improvement Is Systems-based Compare And Contrast The Components Of Performance Improvement And Of Instructional Design Relate The Performance Improvement Process To The Addie Model Human Performance Management Define Performance Management Examine The Key Features Of Ideal Performance Management Analyze Learning Theories And Their Impact On The Performance Management Process Performance Gaps Determine The Nature Of A Performance Gap Based On Motivation (affective Domain), Declarative Knowledge (cognitive Domain), And Procedural Knowledge (psychomotor Domain) Examine The Role Of The Performance Model In Identifying Performance Gaps Inspect The Causes Of Performance Gaps Performance Interventions Define Performance Interventions And The Role They Play In The Hpt Process Examine The Types Of Performance Interventions Inspect The Factors That Influence The Selection Of Performance Interventions Determine The Risks In Selecting An Inappropriate Intervention Performance Evaluations Examine The Four Levels Of Kirkpatrick’s Evaluation Model Examine The Types Of Performance Evaluations To Measure Results Of An Intervention Analyze The Factors That Influence The Evaluation Of Performance Justify The Success Of The Performance Intervention Becoming A Practitioner In Performance Management Inspect Roles Of Successful Practitioners In The Field Of Performance Management Review Opportunities In Performance Management Outline A Career Development Plan That Includes Certification, Continuing Education, And Job Outlook Examine Ethical Standards In Performance Management


Supervision of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
Course Number EDA524

This course examines principals’ responsibilities related to supervision of curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Principal candidates study the relationships among supervision, curriculum design, national and state standards, and effective instructional practice for diverse learners. Candidates also review the types of assessments that school leaders must be familiar with, the use of assessments to measure and support student achievement, the continuous school improvement model, and the development of school improvement plans. In addition, candidates participate in field experiences related to curriculum, instruction, and assessment.


School Improvement Processes
Course Number EDA565

This course focuses on the use of assessments in K-12 education and in developing school improvement plans from a principal perspective. Candidates review the types of assessments that a school leader needs to be familiar with, and how a school leader can use assessment data to measure student achievement. Additionally, the model and processes of continuous school improvement are explored.


Family, Community, and Media Relations
Course Number EDA575

This course focuses on the role of the school principal as a catalyst for developing and for maintaining collaborations with families, business and community groups, and the media to support a school’s vision and programs. Candidates analyze the research on school and community relations and its implications for their particular school. They also examine ways of learning about the nature of community resources, interests, and needs; establishing reciprocal relationships; the use of conflict resolution and decision making tools; and ethical issues when working with families, business, community, and media groups. In addition, candidates plan a social action project that involves school, families, community, and the media.


Program description: The Master of Arts in Education program with a specialization in Teacher Leadership is intended for P-12 teachers who define themselves as learners, teachers, and leaders. Teachers become servant leaders who empower themselves and others to directly impact school culture as champions of innovation and facilitators of school improvement, professional development, and student achievement. The program provides advanced knowledge in collaboration, coaching and mentoring, decision making, planning, action research, and evaluation. Graduates will be able to serve their students, colleagues, and communities as ethical leaders committed to excellence.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Arts Courses at Ivy Bridge College of Tiffin University

Program Name: Associate of Arts in General Studies
Expository Research & Writing
Course Number ENG 141
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes The Development, Structure, And Writing Of Abstracts, Summaries, And Critiques. This Course In Written Communication Teaches Literary Devices Such As Pro/con, Cause/effect, Comparison/contrast, Persuasion/argumentation Essays-plus Research/synthesis Skills-through The Development Of A Research Paper. Students Must Receive A Grade Of C Or Better To Enroll In Eng142. Prerequisite: Eng141 ("c" Or Better).


Intro to Literature & Criticism
Course Number ENG 142
Credits 3.0

Presents literature-drama, short stories, novel, poetry and critical essays-from several literary critical perspectives. Through reading, discussion, and critical writing, students become familiar with representative genres in literature as well as authentic critical approaches.


Visual Communication - Graphics and Presentation Strategies
Course Number COM 204
Credits 3.0

Explores visual design, graphics and presentational strategies by introducing students to digital photography and layout and design skills. Students learn digital and graphic design techniques using the leading industry software applications for desktop publishing and graphics illustration. Students also incorporate visual expression techniques and presentational strategies to produce brochures and newsletters.


Intro to Mass Communication
Course Number COM 241
Credits 3.0

Examines the various media (i.e., newspaper, radio, television, film, etc.) comprising the mass media in contemporary American society. Emphasis in this survey course is given to the history, structure, and potential effects of each medium


Intro to Information Technology
Course Number CIT 105
Credits 3.0

Covers the basics of information technology, including common Microsoft Office applications, responsible use of software and technology, file management techniques, and sound information consumption practices. CIT105 is designed for beginners with little or no experience using Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint. Participants are required to demonstrate software proficiency in the lab and through objective written tests.


Finite Mathematics
Course Number MAT 174
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes business applications that involve the study of linear functions, applications using linear equations in two variables, counting methods, probability, finance applications, interpretation of date presented graphically, and computation of mean, median, standard deviation, normal distribution curve, and z scores.


College Algebra
Course Number MAT 181
Credits 3.0

Focuses on developing a conceptual understanding of college algebra and problem solving skills. Topics include functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, and combinatorics and probability.


Comparative Cultures
Course Number CUL 210
Credits 3.0

Introduces the concept of culture, discusses its role in a society, and explores its many different manifestations.


Religions of the World
Course Number CUL 220
Credits 3.0

Surveys the prominent religions that influence the lives of people around the world.


Art Appreciation
Course Number ART 210
Credits 3.0

Introduces students to the vocabulary of the art world, investigates methods and processes used in the creation of artistic and culturally significant objects, and the historical and aesthetic importance of art within a multi-cultural context.


Survey of Music Performance/Practice
Course Number MUS 223
Credits 3.0

Focuses on the aesthetics of music, the listening skills necessary to fully appreciate music, and the societal and cultural roles that music plays. Various folk and art musical styles are studied, with attention to their historical evolution and influence on each other.


American Society
Course Number HIS 111/112 OR
Credits 3.0

Examines the changes in social, political, economic and cultural institutions from the first European contact with North America through the American Civil War. Emphasis is on understanding events in historical context. Students work with primary and secondary source materials to develop both content knowledge and process skills.


Western Society
Course Number HIS 211/212
Credits 3.0

Introduces students to the evolving civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas before 1500. It seeks to make students aware of the evolving cultures, key events, and major themes that drove human history during these times. A special effort is made to highlight those areas where cultures intersect. The lecture and discussion format holds the expectation of active student participation.


Any 200 English Literature Course
Course Number ENG 200 + (242)
Credits 3.0

Examines the short story with a view to helping students understand, enjoy, critique and appreciate more fully any story they read. This is a writing-intensive course.


British Literature - Chaucer to Romantics
Course Number ENG 291
Credits 3.0

Studies the development and history of British literature through a survey of the major prose and poetry of English writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the early 19th century. The ideas and literary genres that define these periods are examined to build a foundation for advanced studies in English literature. All readings are considered in a literary and historical context so that students gain an understanding of the historical, cultural and philosophical influences that shape the texts.


British Literature 2 - Romntics to WW II
Course Number ENG 292
Credits 3.0

Introduces students to a broad range of important and influential works in British literature from the late 1700s to the end of WWII, including poetry, essays, novels, and short stories by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Alfred Tennyson, T. S. Eliot, George Bernard Shaw, and Virginia Woolf. Students gain an overview of the various socio-cultural and historical pressures that shaped these writers' work as well as our understandings of the origins of modernity.


American Literature Colonial to Civil War
Course Number ENG 293
Credits 3.0

Introduces students to major trends in American literature from the Colonial Period through the Civil War. Students read works by authors such as John Winthrop, William Bradford, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass and Herman Melville with a focus on issues such as American identity and purpose, the relationship of self to community, and the role of imaginative expression in human life.


American Literature 2 - Civil War to WW II
Course Number ENG 294
Credits 3.0

Introduces students to major works and trends of American literature from 1865 to 1945. Students read works from writers such as Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Jack London, Langston Hughes and Ernest Hemingway with a focus on the development and impact of American literary realism, naturalism, and modernism.


The Art of Reasoning
Course Number PHL 110 OR
Credits 3.0

Introduces students to philosophy through a study of the art of reasoning, which is essential in any field or endeavor that requires clear, skillful and critical thinking. Students learn how to classify concepts, formulate definitions, analyze and evaluate propositions, analyze, construct and evaluate arguments, and identify common fallacies in reasoning. The study is oriented towards practical applications and involves a variety of skills in the analysis and evaluation of reasoning in daily life, scientific inquiries and professional fields. Note: All students except those whose majors require this course may take PHL110 to fulfill the Philosophy requirement of the Liberal Education Core.


Great Philosophers
Course Number PHL 112
Credits 3.0

Introduces students to philosophy through a historical study of great philosophers and their representative works. The course study may be a survey of the history of philosophy, the history of philosophy in a particular culture (e.g., a history of Chinese philosophy), the history of a particular area in philosophy (e.g., a history of epistemology), a survey of a particular historical period (e.g., ancient Greek philosophy), a study of a particular school (e.g., pragmatism) or a study of one philosopher's work (e.g., Plato). Note: This course may be taken to fulfill the Philosophy requirement of the Liberal Education Core.


Applied Statistics
Course Number MAT 273
Credits 3.0

Examines the descriptive and inferential statistical methods that aid decision-making by covering the following topics: probability, probability distributions, calculation of parameters from a universe, calculation of statistics from a sample, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation. A hand-held calculator with scientific functions is required.


Earth Science
Course Number NAT 105
Credits 3.0

Introduces the basic concepts of earth science. Topics include the structure and composition of earth, physical and chemical processes that have shaped or are shaping the earth, types and distribution of rocks and minerals, natural resources, and environmental and economic impacts of the earth.


Oceanography
Course Number NAT 110
Credits 3.0

Introduces the basic physical and chemical aspects of oceanography. Topics include the origin and evolution of oceans, physical, and chemical properties of ocean waters, physical and chemical processes operating in oceans, climate/weather patterns, and the interaction between humans, oceans, and the atmosphere.


Environmental Science
Course Number NAT 115
Credits 3.0

Introduces the basic chemical, physical, and geological aspects of environmental science. Topics include ecosystems; physical, chemical, and geological processes involved in shaping the environment; political, economic, and social impacts of the environment; pollution; and several major contemporary environmental issues, including real-life examples from Ohio and surrounding states.


Survey of Health Issues
Course Number NAT 120
Credits 3.0

Assists students in making personal health decisions by introducing resources and information pertaining to various health issues, health trends and examining issues pertinent to the life of today's college student. Through lecture, personal assessments, personal contracts for behavior change, group presentation, and debate, students are given the opportunity to examine their own health decisions and encouraged to take an informed proactive role in their personal health. Practice in access to and use of scientific literature is also provided.


Special Topics
Course Number ECO 190
Credits 3.0

Topics will vary.


Principles of Macroeconomics
Course Number ECO 221
Credits 3.0

Examines macroeconomics (the whole economy), concepts and principles, and current issues in macroeconomics. Required for business and economics majors. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.


Intro To The American Political Process
Course Number POL 101
Credits 3.0

Introduces the American democratic process and the distribution of authority and responsibility between the federal, state, and local levels


The Presidency
Course Number POL 205
Credits 3.0

Examines the American presidency from 1787 to the present and examines the history, development, and operation of the U.S. Presidency. Analysis is of the institution of the presidency, its functions, formal and informal relationships, and its limitations within the American political system. Emphasis is on the dynamics of the presidency, including presidential personality, conceptions of role, impact of public opinion, and responses to changes in the environment. Also considered is the evolution of the presidency, its powers and restraints, organizing and using White House staff, executive decision-making, and contemporary views of the office.


Intro To Psychology
Course Number PSY 101
Credits 3.0

Introduces psychology as a behavioral science, including historical background, human development (genetic and physical) from birth through death, the senses and perception, intelligence and creativity, and the principles of conditioning, learning, memory, and forgetting.


Theories of Personality
Course Number PSY 263
Credits 3.0

Surveys the historical and current theories regarding personality formation and development, and methods of measuring personality characteristics. Psychodynamic, humanistic, behaviorist, trait, and cognitive approaches are discussed.


Principles of Sociology
Course Number SOC 101
Credits 3.0

Introduces the basic concepts of sociological study, elements of social life, social patterns and institutions, and the process of maintenance and change in society.


Social Psychology
Course Number SOC 250
Credits 3.0

Examines the influences people have on the beliefs and behaviors of others. Topics include social perception and attribution, self-presentation, attitudes and attitude change, aggression and violence, group dynamics, and their relationship to selected fields.


Program description: This academic concentration is designed to satisfy the general education and elective requirements of most four-year institutions.

And because an AA in General Studies from Ivy Bridge is awarded by Tiffin University, you’re qualified to apply to the four-year institution of your choice to continue your academic journey.

Better yet, when you graduate with an AA in General Studies from Ivy Bridge, you are guaranteed admission into any of the dozens of fully accredited four-year colleges and universities currently honoring an Ivy Bridge transfer agreement.

Of course, if you choose not to pursue a four-year degree right away, your Ivy Bridge AA in General Studies still provides you with a solid foundation on which to build long-term career success.

Arts Courses at Gonzaga University

Program Name: Master of Arts in Communication and Leadership Studies
Organizational Leadership
Course Number COML 500
Credits 3.0

Drawing on material from various social science disciplines, this integrated course focuses on research and models of leadership relevant to defining and achieving collective goals in a variety of organizational settings.


Communication and Organizational Research
Course Number COML 501
Credits 3.0

Study of the inquiry process, emphasizing research design and methodologies appropriate to investigation of organizational dynamics and human behavior; both qualitative and quantitative methods are explored.


Communication and Organizational Ethics
Course Number COML 503
Credits 3.0

Inquiry into the philosophic foundations of interpersonal relations and values in organizational contexts with emphasis on applications of ethical systems to the responsibilities of people in organizations toward society and individuals.


Organizational Communication and Leadership
Course Number COML 504
Credits 3.0

Study of research findings, theories, and models of communication in organizations and examination of the impact of organizational culture and structure on the communication process, including factors maximizing effective communication and overcoming communication barriers.


International and Intercultural Communication
Course Number COML 506
Credits 3.0

This course provides students with an opportunity for reflection on experience, examination of theory and practical application of organizational leadership in the context of diversity. Diversity will be studied within the framework of race, culture, gender, orientation and disability awareness. The goal of the class is to assist students in developing their own understanding and skills in becoming more effective leaders in organizations that acknowledge, value, and incorporate differences.


Theorizing Communication
Course Number COML 508
Credits 3.0

This course investigates the major social scientific theories of communication, with emphasis on understanding theorizing as a process of constructing visions of reality. Additionally, advanced study of the relationship between communication, media language, and human perception will be explored.


Social Dynamics of Communication and Technology
Course Number COML 509
Credits 3.0

Does communication technology cause social change or do social factors cause change in communication technologies Examination of relationships between mass media and community and computers and the self.


Seminar in Communication Consulting and Training
Course Number COML 511
Credits 3.0

This seminar is about communication training and consulting. Based on communication theory and research, our goal will be to understand and explore the factors that help communication effectiveness in organizational settings and develop your rhetorical skills to become effective trainers and consultants. There will be practice in developing resources, marketing, proposal writing, workshop development, and evaluation.


Seminar in Strategic and Corporate Communication
Course Number COML 512
Credits 3.0

Using communication theory and public relations practices, this seminar will focus on strategic and corporate communication in profit and not-for-profit corporate settings.


Seminar in Advanced Topics in Communication
Course Number COML 513
Credits 3.0

Seminar in Advanced Criticism
Course Number COML 514
Credits 3.0

Seminar in Interpersonal and Small Group
Course Number COML 515
Credits 3.0

Students consider the dynamics of interpersonal and small group contexts and theories to improve the quality of these experiences. The course also covers the connection of communication practices with ethical social change.


Seminar in Media Literacy
Course Number COML 516
Credits 3.0

Media literacy is developing an understanding of the mass media both form and function: the techniques they use, the ideologies they carry, the business motivations that drive them and the artistic expressions reached. This seminar examines the implications of several forms of communication on how we live and what we believe. Impact of mass media on modern societies, conflicting social interest, and the needs of different groups in society. Formation of public opinion, diffusion of innovation, and the nature of propaganda.


Communication Practicum: Speech, Writing and Multi-Media
Course Number COML 517
Credits 3.0

This practicum is designed to merge theory and praxis and provide practical application of communication knowledge and action with a focus on public speaking, group processes writing, and multi-media products.


Communication Leadership Internship
Course Number COML 520
Credits 1.0

The graduate internship is designed for students who enter the degree program without prior practical work in the communications industries, or are looking for updating their in situ knowledge of communication practices and the opportunity to work in a communication industry either locally, nationally or internationally. Additional possibilities exist in educational or organizational contexts, beyond the student’s normal work experience.


Communication and Leadership Seminar/Thesis
Course Number COML 680
Credits 3.0

Directed Readings Arranged with faculty.
Course Number COML 660/661
Credits 3.0

Directed Study Arranged with faculty.
Course Number COML 690
Credits 1.0

Program description: The Master of Arts in Communication and Leadership Studies is designed to provide graduate-level expertise for solving communication problems in modern organizations and social systems from a communication and leadership perspective. By their very nature, organizations depend upon complex communication functions for effective operation – formal and informal, and increasingly technologically-based, communication networks.What is likely to distinguish the 21st Century from the 20th is the unprecedented degree to which communication and information technology enable creation of active networks linking individuals, functions and organizations that exchange messages and data on a regular basis.
This degree builds upon the historic tradition of rhetoric as the cornerstone of a Jesuit education and lays the groundwork for high leverage skills in communication and leadership that work in today's complex world. This program combines classic theories with applied learning that is relevant in its depiction of the latest workplace developments. The program is grounded in both scientific and humanistic theory and methodology, global communication and ethics, and is relevant for those seeking leadership in:

Corporate communications
Public relations
Media management and media criticism
Human resources
Marketing
Strategic planning
Training and consulting
Media literacy
Community college teaching or Ph.D. work in Communication
The Communication and Leadership Studies master's degree is designed to meet the needs and schedules of working adults as well as continuing students from undergraduate programs. Flexible scheduling, weekend, evening, and Internet courses will be offered. The program consists of 36 semester credits.

Distinctive features of the M.A. in Communication and Leadership Studies are: a unique blend of communication and leadership theory, a thesis option for those seeking to go on to doctoral work in Communication, the new Center for Media Literacy Excellence, a range of Visiting Scholars and Professionals who visit to discuss cutting-edge work in communication and leadership, intensive periods where workshops are held to develop practical communication skills in speaking, writing and multi-media design, internship and service-learning possibilities for students who need practical experience, and possible foreign study for students to gain global media and communication experience. With the aid of advanced technology, the M.A. Degree in Communication and Leadership Studies is available both on-campus and Online.

Arts Courses at Hawaii Pacific University

Program Name: Master of Arts in Organizational Change
Scope and Methods of Research
Course Number PSOC 6005
Credits 3.0

A course designed for entering graduate students. The course: acquaints students with the theories of current and historical importance; introduces or reinforces the tenets of the scientific method; introduces the faculty, and previews key concept areas being taught in the program; discusses research designs and methods appropriate in graduate programs; and introduces students to research materials, knowledge technology, communications skills, and both quantitative and qualitative methods to be used throughout the program of studies.


Org Change and Development
Course Number PSOC 6440
Credits 3.0

Psoc 6440 Is The Foundation For All Ma/oc And Professional Certificate In Ocd Courses. Students First Learn The Basic Nature Of Human Culture And Organizational Change. Then The Practice Of Ocd Is Studied Within Larger Holistic And Comparative Contexts For Global And Local Change. Discussions And Assignments Are Designed To Assist The Student In Differentiating Between Change And Adaptation. Change And Development Initiatives In Governments, Communities, And Corporations Are Discussed.


Natl & Community Chg & Dev
Course Number PSOC 6441
Credits 3.0

National and community-level change and development is being experienced in almost every area of our contemporary world. Resolving ethnic and religious conflicts, developing market economies for global competition, resource acquisition, technology transfer, education, and creating new apporcahes to governance are some of the related issues. This course presents a holistic perspective on the issues of change and development at the macro levels of government and community organization. Models for change and development are reviewed as well as their applications in various human and environmental contexts. Specifically, change and development initiatives in economic development, public health improvement projects, stakeholder reconciliation, urban and environmental planning and educational programs are reviewed and analyzed.


Innovations and Creativity
Course Number PSOC 6444
Credits 3.0

Innovation and creativity are critical aspects of organizational change and development in contemporary societies. This course explores the significance of innovation and creativity to the human experience. Relationships among creativity, change, and innovation are discussed within a multidisciplinary perspective. Practical methods for creating innovation in organization and group processes are illustrated via cases and simulations.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number PSOC 6445
Credits 3.0

This course provides HPU graduate students with a broad overview of the OB field. Theoretical and methodological understandings of OB are discussed and analyzed via a combination of practically based cases and research studies. Fundamental aspects of human behavior, such as motivation, communication, decision making, problem solving, power, leadership, conflict resolution, and technology transfer are discussed in a globally appropriate perspective. Both non-Western and Western approaches to OB are compared and discussed.


Consulting Theory and Practice
Course Number PSOC 6446
Credits 3.0

Consulting has become a global industry, with a wide range of professional disciplines involved. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the consulting profession, with particular focus on organizational structures and processes for providing consultation services, product development and marketing, and approaches for implementing effective projects and initiatives. Learning will be enhanced by the use of cases, simulations, and experiential assignments.


Consult & Group Proc Facilit
Course Number PSOC 6447
Credits 3.0

Participants in this integrative seminar will learn approaches for creating change interventions in organizational settings. Group process, facilitation methods, dealing with stakeholders’ resistance, aligning power systems, and organizational design will be among the issues to be discussed. Learning will be enhanced by cases, simulations, and experiential assignments.


Knowledge Management
Course Number IS 6230
Credits 3.0

The course provides an awareness of current theories and best practices associated with Knowledge Management (KM). Using a seminar approach, IS 6230 will ask students to become expert in the areas of: identifying and valuing knowledge assets, properly managing intellectual capital, choosing and evaluating KM information architectures, and developing appropriate KM strategies for complex organizations.


Sustainable Human Systems
Course Number PSGL 6000
Credits 3.0

Students will learn to think systematically through the study of the systemic structure and values that underlying the modern world view. Alternative, emerging world views focused on sustainable structures will be emphasized. Systems thinking and a systems perspective will be developed through the study of environmental, cultural, and social sytems. A critical perspective is emphasized throughout the course.


Applied Research Methods
Course Number IS 6010
Credits 3.0

IS 6010 is a course in applied research methods. Its principal objective is to help students deepen their understanding of research analysis techniques and become proficient users and consumers of modern statistical analysis procedures. Participants in this course will learn to apply the scientific method to investigations of research problems arising from observations of social problems and organization-based phenomena. Students will study acceptable methods for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and testing data; and for communicating findings in a professional research environment.


Power and Social Systems
Course Number PSGL 6001
Credits 3.0

This course will focus on the relations between stakeholders' interests, conflict, and power in large organizations and other human social systems. Power models and dynamics in the cultures of nations, communities, corporations, and small groups will be examined. Creative problem solving and reconciliation approaches are presented as means for effective and sustainable social transformation. A written critical analysis of existing power relationships in the social system of the students' choice will be required. Cases, exercises, group discussions are used throughout the course.


Professional Paper I
Course Number PSOC 7100
Credits 3.0

Initial design and development of the major research paper for students in the MA/OC program.


Professional Paper II
Course Number PSOC 7200
Credits 3.0

Continuing design and development of the major research paper for students in the MA/OC program.


Prof Consulting Practicum
Course Number PSOC 7300
Credits 3.0

This Course Involves A Research-based Consultation Experience In A Client Organization. Students Engage In A Supervised Learning Process Including Entry And Contracting, Data Collection And Management, Goal Setting, Planning And Facilitation For Implementation, To An Evaluation And Termination Of The Initiative. Students Work Under The Guidance Of A Field Supervisor And Course Professor. Psoc 7300 May Be Substituted For Psoc 7200.


Program description: Hawaii Pacific University's Master of Arts in Organizational Change (MA/OC) emphasizes the management, design, implementation, and application of such change methods as continuous improvement and performance management. Students learn how to design innovations for organizational culture change, as well as how to implement an actual program of change in an organization.

Certificate Programs:

The certificate programs are offered in both traditional, in-class or distance-learning formats. Our distance learning approach is based on multiple teaching methods. Our software, WEBCT, is supported by online discussions, conference calls, and other means that ensure the interactive advantages of traditional education remain part of the learning experience.

* Certificate in Organizational Change and Development (PCOCD)
* Certificate in National and Community Change and Development (PCNCCD)

Arts Courses at Arizona State University

Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in Political Science
Comparative Government
Course Number POS 150

Comparative government is the systematic study of similar and different political systems with the twofold aim of increasing our substantive knowledge of several countries and using this knowledge to generate theory for a better understanding of all systems, both individually and collectively. A major objective of the course will be to examine different types of political systems in the modern world (Great Britain, France, Germany, Japan, and China) in terms of their structures and political processes. Following an introductory lecture on the history of post-war comparative politics, and a discussion of Roskin's approach, the political institutions of each country will be described and analyzed with respect to how members are socialized politically, how they participate in the political process, and how they formulate and implement public policies. The focus allows for comparisons with our own political system and others, yet does not overlook the uniqueness of each political system by itself.


Government and Politics (SB)
Course Number POS 110
Credits 3.0

Major Institutions Of Modern Government And Processes Of Individual And Group Political Activity, With Emphasis On The American Experience. Meets The Federal Government Requirement For Teacher Certification. Credit Is Allowed For Only Pos 110 Or 310. Enroll Requirements: Students May Not Enroll For Pos 110 Who Have Received A D Or Better In Pos 310, Pol 110, Or Pol 310


Global Politics (SB, G)
Course Number POS 160
Credits 3.0

Nature of contemporary world politics through the study of both general theoretical topics and specific geographical areas. Credit is allowed for only POS 160 or 362.


Political Ideologies (SB)
Course Number POS 210
Credits 3.0

Leading political ideas and belief systems, e.g., Marxism, liberalism, conservatism, theories of democracy, and alternative futures.


Empirical Political Inquiry (SB)
Course Number POS 301
Credits 3.0

Logic of political inquiry, including research problems, concepts, hypotheses, theories, measurement, data collection, and analysis.


Program description: The Bachelor Science Political Science offers students the necessary skills and knowledge to participate effectively as citizens in a democratic political system and to flourish in the rapidly developing globalization of the world's political institutions, cultures and economies. The major aims to provide students with the tools and skills necessary to make connections linking theory with real world problems and ideas.

Arts Courses at Abilene Christian University

Program Name: Master of Arts in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation
Conflict Theory and Communication
Course Number CONR 601
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Designed to prepare professionals for the field of conflict resolution. Provides advanced opportunities to analyze case studies, critique basic assumptions of conflict theories and role-play appropriate behavior in conflict scenarios.


Managing Conflict in Schools
Course Number CONR 615
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

. Provides a basic understanding of the nature and management of conflict in schools. Students will learn to identify and deal with conflict through appropriate strategies, processes, and interpersonal skills.


Managing Conflict in Schools
Course Number CONR 615
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Provides a basic understanding of the nature and management of conflict in schools. Students will learn to identify and deal with conflict through appropriate strategies, processes, and interpersonal skills.


Managing Conflict in Churches
Course Number BIBM 645
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/bibm.html

The course will offer an examination of the causes, arenas, and dynamics of conflict in churches with an introduction to five major approaches to interviewing in conflicted situations. A variety of instructional methods, including lectures, case studies, role plays, media, expert resource persons, and personal style instruments will be employed. Additional course fee required.


Negotiation and Mediation
Course Number CONR 605
Credits 6.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Comprehensive study of the conceptual and interpersonal skills required to engage in effective negotiation and mediation. Topics include analysis of conflict, negotiation and mediation planning, effective negotiation and mediation skills and process, impasse resolution, and agreement documentation. Emphasis on skill development and strategic approach to creating opportunity for agreement.


Advanced Mediation: Marital Disputes
Course Number CONR 630
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Applies the concepts of negotiation and mediation to the resolution of conflicts which arise during and after termination of a marital relationship.


Conflict Management Systems Design
Course Number CONR 612
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Provides a framework for understanding organizational conflict prevention and resolution systems. Analysis of case studies and practical application are featured throughout the course


Identity, Culture, and Conflict
Course Number CONR 635
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Examines self and social contexts in which people with incompatible goals, assumptions, and behaviors conflict because of cultural differences. Proposes intercultural competence as an approach for managing cultural conflict from differences in cultural patterns and variables, problem perspectives of self and identity, and differences of race, gender, and class.



Ethics and Conflict Resolution
Course Number CONR 638
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Investigates contemporary policies, historical perspectives, and significant theoretical systems of ethics in the study of conflict resolution and reconciliation. Examines the relationship of ethics to decisions-making and problem solving in conflict resolution contexts.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number MGMT 636
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2010_11/courses/mgmt.html

Individual, group, and organizational variables that inhibit or facilitate effective organizational functioning. Topics may include rewards, motivation, leadership, culture, decision-making, and ethics.


Practicum
Course Number CONR 643
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

A graduate level practicum tailored to meet the individual interests of the student and to utilize the student’s God-given, unique talents in advancing the field of conflict resolution.


Practical Skills and Theory in Conflict Resolution
Course Number CONR 645
Credits 3.0
More Info http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2009_10/courses/conr.html

Examines contemporary ideas in negotiation and mediation, reflects on the personal experience of conflict resolution, studies a holistic model of conflict, and engages practical applications of conflict processes.


Program description: The MA in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation is a 36-hour degree program that teaches you how to analyze, address, and manage conflict effectively and professionally. You will gain in-depth preparation that is invaluable to you if you are seeking a career in dispute resolution or find yourself with significant peacemaking opportunities in your chosen career. The program will prepare you for leadership roles in careers in dispute resolution and in a wide range of disciplines requiring the effective management of conflict. The Graduate Certificate in Conflict Resolution is offered for those students who are not seeking the graduate degree, yet desire specialized education in conflict management. The certificate is a 15 credit hour program and tracks with the first year of the master's program.

Arts Courses at International Academy of Design and Technology

Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in Fashion Merchandising
Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN101
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the practice of business through analysis of the role and function of accounting, management, marketing, finance, and economics within business organizations. Common business terms and principles will be discussed and the various activities of businesses in daily operations will be examined.


Marketing Communication
Course Number BUSN110
Credits 4.0

This course will explore various modes of communication to harvest the information necessary to make effective decisions regarding the organization of strategic planning.


Merchandising Principles and Practices
Course Number BUSN150
Credits 4.0

This course introduces merchandising principles and practices employed within retail environments. Topics include store organization, inventory control, financial considerations, operational management, and customer services. Merchandising concepts, retailing techniques, and consumer behavior are discussed.


Visual Merchandising
Course Number BUSN201
Credits 4.0

This course involves the study of visual merchandising and merchandise presentation techniques with an emphasis on psychological motivation, retail design, and display teamwork. Topics include the creation of specialty and department store displays, the design of visuals for walls and windows, the effects of color and lighting on consumer behavior, and professional presentation techniques for apparel and accessories.


Retail Management
Course Number BUSN205
Credits 4.0

This course examines contemporary management issues in the retail environment with a focus on theoretical principles, problem solving techniques, and decision-making processes. Students will discuss a range of retail management topics, including inventory planning and control, location assessment and store design, merchandising and retail promotion, product and brand management, human resources administration, legal and ethical concerns, information technology resources, financial and accounting needs, and sales and trend forecasting.


Principles of Accounting
Course Number BUSN210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to financial recordkeeping for small business proprietors. Accounting theory is stressed. Topics include business transaction analysis, general journals and ledgers utilization, financial statement preparation, accounting cycle completion and payroll accounting.


Electronic Marketing
Course Number BUSN225
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the development and implementation of an effective Internet marketing program. The use of marketing levers will be considered with a focus on the individual and interactivity to develop consumer and customer relationships.


Principles of Finance
Course Number BUSN250
Credits 4.0

This course is designed as an introduction to financial management principles for business. Topics include financial statements, the time value of money, bonds, stocks, working capital management, and capital budgeting.


Business Law
Course Number BUSN301
Credits 4.0

This course examines business law. Topics include legal, business and e-commerce environments, business regulations, dispute resolutions, liabilities, and the ethical and social responsibilities of business.


Pricing Strategies
Course Number BUSN325
Credits 4.0

This course covers the principles and terminology important to profitable merchandising. Concepts of financial management for merchandising fashion goods will be taught. Basic financial skills needed to succeed when planning, procuring, and selling fashion goods will be included. Merchandising principles, mathematical formulas, and real world applications will be discussed.


Merchandise Planning and Inventory Control
Course Number BUSN355
Credits 4.0

Merchandise sourcing, buying, and management are analyzed within the retail industry. Product development and distribution processes are examined. Emphasis will be placed on financial and organizational needs including planning, purchasing, pricing, and presenting inventory to meet customer demand.


Buying
Course Number BUSN360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on merchandise buying and retail management. The structure of the retail industry will be analyzed and the development and distribution of consumer products will be examined. Emphasis is on the financial aspects of merchandising, pricing, planning, and purchasing retail inventories as it relates to buying. Merchandise control and presentation will also be covered.


Salesmanship
Course Number BUSN375
Credits 4.0

This course investigates sales presentations, communication styles, prospecting, closing, and the evaluation of selling techniques and practices. Various methods to improve sales effectiveness will be explored and selling from the various viewpoints of the consumer, the business, and society will be contemplated.


Fashion Marketing and Consumer Behavior
Course Number BUSN400
Credits 4.0

This course examines the planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products and services within the fashion industry and discusses how consumer motives and attitudes contribute to marketing decisions. Psychological, social, ethical, and financial factors that affect the marketplace are examined through case analyses.


International Business
Course Number BUSN401
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the nature of international business operations. Intercultural relations and communication standards, international financial and trade frameworks, political and economic constraints, legal contracts and regulatory requirements, and international business and marketing plans will be examined.


Business Professionalism
Course Number BUSN420
Credits 4.0

This comprehensive course in career exploration and professional development provides the opportunity for students to develop career objectives, assess skills, identify accomplishments and describe professional experiences. Professional resumes are prepared, business correspondence is produced and interview techniques are practiced. Job search strategies are explored, including Internet resources and electronic resumes. Resources to continue professional development and to increase marketability are examined.


Project Management in Merchandising
Course Number BUSN460
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development and management of merchandising projects. The course will provide the opportunity for students to work as part of a team to create business plans and cost analyses for a variety of merchandising ventures and will design sales strategies based on forecasted trends and market research data. Regulatory compliance, inventory management, financial recordkeeping, and customer service needs within retail environments will be addressed.


Global Sourcing and Product Development
Course Number BUSN475
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the globalization of textile apparel production, the issues of importing, exporting, tariff, quality control, quotas, regulatory requirements, and the effects of offshore manufacturing on delivery and quality of goods and services.


Entrepreneurship
Course Number BUSN499
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the essentials of entrepreneurship. Business organization, business plans and proposals, as well as ethical and legal issues will be discussed. Additionally, this course focuses on the fundamentals of profitability.


Introduction to Fashion
Course Number FASH101
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of fashion as a profession with an emphasis on its industry and careers. The processes of creating, producing and selling a fashion product, including terminology, professional organizations, and important designers in the field will be covered.


Fashion Sketching I
Course Number FASH105
Credits 4.0

This course demonstrates the relationship of clothing to the human figure, its proportion and how that translates into a line drawing or a ‘flat’, used by designers, manufacturers, retailers and merchandisers. Nomenclature of clothing items and parts and fashion vocabulary will be emphasized. Various drawing media will also be introduced.


Evolution of Fashion
Course Number FASH115
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the ideologies and elements of fashion design throughout history. Students will study sociological, political, religious aesthetic, and cultural issues related to the evolution of fashion, and will examine contemporary theories, designers, strategies, and techniques related to fashion design.


Textiles for Fashion
Course Number FASH120
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to textiles and the textile industry with a focus on terminology, fiber properties, yarns, and fabric characteristics. Emphasis is on the selection, performance, use, and care of textiles. The construction, dyeing, printing, and finishing of textiles will be explored.


Computer Graphics for Fashion Design
Course Number FASH202
Credits 4.0

This course covers the basics of computer illustration as applied to fashion design. Focus will be on computer needs for the fashion industry and will include scanning and manipulation of line drawings, fabric and other images.


Trend Forecasting
Course Number FASH315
Credits 4.0

This course researches and analyzes social, cultural, religious, aesthetic, economic, political, and world events from the past as well as today. Events that impacted changes in fashion in the past will be explored as a means to predict changes in future fashion. Various fashion theories, cycles, and styles will be discussed.


Fashion Product Development
Course Number FASHM175
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the processes of apparel production, from concept to consumer design, development of patterns, manufacturing, quality control, use of fabrics and the categories of apparel and consumer markets. The many interrelated aspects of design and merchandising careers will be addressed.


Fashion Media
Course Number FASHM330
Credits 4.0

This course involves the design of editorial, promotional, and marketing material for the fashion industry. Students will practice researching, writing, and editing a variety of fashion articles, press releases, advertisements, biographies, and business documents as a means of developing technical and creative proficiency.


Fashion Publicity and Promotion
Course Number FASHM425
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on public relations, stylization, and publicity practices employed within the fashion and entertainment industries. Students will have the opportunity to learn principles and techniques used to create press kits, promote fashion events, coordinate photo shoots, develop celebrity images, and guide consumer preferences and behavior.


Fashion Merchandising Capstone
Course Number FASHM485
Credits 4.0

The capstone is a research-based course that integrates skills, knowledge, and creativity to produce a project that will showcase professional expertise in a chosen career field.


Senior Fashion Merchandising Portfolio
Course Number FASHM490
Credits 4.0

This course will facilitate analysis of the needs of the fashion industry and creation of a portfolio that will showcase student work.


Global Economics
Course Number ECON315
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the economic aspects of globalization and examines why the interdependent economies of various nations are regarded as a single economic system or entity. It examines barriers and bridges to the world’s markets, including trade agreements and obstacles to international trading.


History of Art I
Course Number HUMN301
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from the early Renaissance through the 20th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


History of Art II
Course Number HUMN302
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from Prehistoric time through the 14th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


Literature and Film
Course Number HUMN401
Credits 4.0

This course examines literature and film and provides the opportunity for the student to compare and contrast the presentation of a story through different media. Analysis of literary works and critique of their film adaptations will allow the student to determine the characteristics of “successful” adaptation.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL405
Credits 4.0

Ethics is the study of moral philosophy in relation to society and human behavior. Students will study theoretical and applied ethical constructs, from both a Western and non- Western approach, that shape beliefs and relate to decision-making processes.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE201
Credits 4.0

This course investigates biological science and the effects of humans on the earth’s ecosystem. Topics discussed may include basic ecology, human populations, water, air, and land pollution, energy consumption, allocation of natural resources, alternative forms of energy, legislation, and citizen action.


Physical Anthropology
Course Number SCIE310
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the principles of Physical Anthropology, covering genetic processes underlying the expression of population, the appearance of the hominids approximately 4 million years ago, and their subsequent development to the present. Students will be introduced to primate evolution, theoretical perspectives, and the technologies associated with human development. Medical anthropology and basic genetics will be examined.


Political Science
Course Number SOCS401
Credits 4.0

This course examines the scope and method of political science. This course explores the social nature of politics, with a focus on how power and opinions are distributed throughout a variety of populations, colleges, and political entities. Students will have the opportunity to analyze the effects of American culture and media on political structures and decision-making processes, and will contemplate the effects of international relations and political changes on contemporary society.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN101
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the practice of business through analysis of the role and function of accounting, management, marketing, finance, and economics within business organizations. Common business terms and principles will be discussed and the various activities of businesses in daily operations will be examined.


Marketing Communication
Course Number BUSN110
Credits 4.0

This course will explore various modes of communication to harvest the information necessary to make effective decisions regarding the organization of strategic planning.


Merchandising Principles and Practices
Course Number BUSN150
Credits 4.0

This course introduces merchandising principles and practices employed within retail environments. Topics include store organization, inventory control, financial considerations, operational management, and customer services. Merchandising concepts, retailing techniques, and consumer behavior are discussed.


Visual Merchandising
Course Number BUSN201
Credits 4.0

This course involves the study of visual merchandising and merchandise presentation techniques with an emphasis on psychological motivation, retail design, and display teamwork. Topics include the creation of specialty and department store displays, the design of visuals for walls and windows, the effects of color and lighting on consumer behavior, and professional presentation techniques for apparel and accessories.


Retail Management
Course Number BUSN205
Credits 4.0

This course examines contemporary management issues in the retail environment with a focus on theoretical principles, problem solving techniques, and decision-making processes. Students will discuss a range of retail management topics, including inventory planning and control, location assessment and store design, merchandising and retail promotion, product and brand management, human resources administration, legal and ethical concerns, information technology resources, financial and accounting needs, and sales and trend forecasting.


Principles of Accounting
Course Number BUSN210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to financial recordkeeping for small business proprietors. Accounting theory is stressed. Topics include business transaction analysis, general journals and ledgers utilization, financial statement preparation, accounting cycle completion and payroll accounting.


Electronic Marketing
Course Number BUSN225
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the development and implementation of an effective Internet marketing program. The use of marketing levers will be considered with a focus on the individual and interactivity to develop consumer and customer relationships.


Principles of Finance
Course Number BUSN250
Credits 4.0

This course is designed as an introduction to financial management principles for business. Topics include financial statements, the time value of money, bonds, stocks, working capital management, and capital budgeting.


Business Law
Course Number BUSN301
Credits 4.0

This course examines business law. Topics include legal, business and e-commerce environments, business regulations, dispute resolutions, liabilities, and the ethical and social responsibilities of business.


Pricing Strategies
Course Number BUSN325
Credits 4.0

This course covers the principles and terminology important to profitable merchandising. Concepts of financial management for merchandising fashion goods will be taught. Basic financial skills needed to succeed when planning, procuring, and selling fashion goods will be included. Merchandising principles, mathematical formulas, and real world applications will be discussed.


Merchandise Planning
Course Number BUSN355
Credits 4.0

Merchandise sourcing, buying, and management are analyzed within the retail industry. Product development and distribution processes are examined. Emphasis will be placed on financial and organizational needs including planning, purchasing, pricing, and presenting inventory to meet customer demand.


Buying
Course Number BUSN360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on merchandise buying and retail management. The structure of the retail industry will be analyzed and the development and distribution of consumer products will be examined. Emphasis is on the financial aspects of merchandising, pricing, planning, and purchasing retail inventories as it relates to buying. Merchandise control and presentation will also be covered.


Salesmanship
Course Number BUSN375
Credits 4.0

This course investigates sales presentations, communication styles, prospecting, closing, and the evaluation of selling techniques and practices. Various methods to improve sales effectiveness will be explored and selling from the various viewpoints of the consumer, the business, and society will be contemplated.


Fashion Marketing and Consumer Behavior
Course Number BUSN400
Credits 4.0

This course examines the planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products and services within the fashion industry and discusses how consumer motives and attitudes contribute to marketing decisions. Psychological, social, ethical, and financial factors that affect the marketplace are examined through case analyses.


International Business
Course Number BUSN401
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the nature of international business operations. Intercultural relations and communication standards, international financial and trade frameworks, political and economic constraints, legal contracts and regulatory requirements, and international business and marketing plans will be examined.


Business Professionalism
Course Number BUSN420
Credits 4.0

This comprehensive course in career exploration and professional development provides the opportunity for students to develop career objectives, assess skills, identify accomplishments and describe professional experiences. Professional resumes are prepared, business correspondence is produced and interview techniques are practiced. Job search strategies are explored, including Internet resources and electronic resumes. Resources to continue professional development and to increase marketability are examined.


Project Management in Merchandising
Course Number BUSN460
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development and management of merchandising projects. The course will provide the opportunity for students to work as part of a team to create business plans and cost analyses for a variety of merchandising ventures and will design sales strategies based on forecasted trends and market research data. Regulatory compliance, inventory management, financial recordkeeping, and customer service needs within retail environments will be addressed.


Global Sourcing and Product Development
Course Number BUSN475
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the globalization of textile apparel production, the issues of importing, exporting, tariff, quality control, quotas, regulatory requirements, and the effects of offshore manufacturing on delivery and quality of goods and services.


Entrepreneurship
Course Number BUSN499
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the essentials of entrepreneurship. Business organization, business plans and proposals, as well as ethical and legal issues will be discussed. Additionally, this course focuses on the fundamentals of profitability.


Introduction to Fashion
Course Number FASH101
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of fashion as a profession with an emphasis on its industry and careers. The processes of creating, producing and selling a fashion product, including terminology, professional organizations, and important designers in the field will be covered.


Fashion Sketching I
Course Number FASH105
Credits 4.0

This course demonstrates the relationship of clothing to the human figure, its proportion and how that translates into a line drawing or a ‘flat’, used by designers, manufacturers, retailers and merchandisers. Nomenclature of clothing items and parts and fashion vocabulary will be emphasized. Various drawing media will also be introduced.


Evolution of Fashion
Course Number FASH115
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the ideologies and elements of fashion design throughout history. Students will study sociological, political, religious aesthetic, and cultural issues related to the evolution of fashion, and will examine contemporary theories, designers, strategies, and techniques related to fashion design.


Textiles for Fashion
Course Number FASH120
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to textiles and the textile industry with a focus on terminology, fiber properties, yarns, and fabric characteristics. Emphasis is on the selection, performance, use, and care of textiles. The construction, dyeing, printing, and finishing of textiles will be explored.


Computer Graphics for Fashion Design
Course Number FASH202
Credits 4.0

This course covers the basics of computer illustration as applied to fashion design. Focus will be on computer needs for the fashion industry and will include scanning and manipulation of line drawings, fabric and other images.


Trend Forecasting
Course Number FASH315
Credits 4.0

This course researches and analyzes social, cultural, religious, aesthetic, economic, political, and world events from the past as well as today. Events that impacted changes in fashion in the past will be explored as a means to predict changes in future fashion. Various fashion theories, cycles, and styles will be discussed.


Fashion Product Development
Course Number FASHM175
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the processes of apparel production, from concept to consumer design, development of patterns, manufacturing, quality control, use of fabrics and the categories of apparel and consumer markets. The many interrelated aspects of design and merchandising careers will be addressed.


Fashion Media
Course Number FASHM330
Credits 4.0

This course involves the design of editorial, promotional, and marketing material for the fashion industry. Students will practice researching, writing, and editing a variety of fashion articles, press releases, advertisements, biographies, and business documents as a means of developing technical and creative proficiency.


Fashion Publicity and Promotion
Course Number FASHM425
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on public relations, stylization, and publicity practices employed within the fashion and entertainment industries. Students will have the opportunity to learn principles and techniques used to create press kits, promote fashion events, coordinate photo shoots, develop celebrity images, and guide consumer preferences and behavior.


Fashion Merchandising Capstone
Course Number FASHM485
Credits 4.0

The capstone is a research-based course that integrates skills, knowledge, and creativity to produce a project that will showcase professional expertise in a chosen career field.


Senior Fashion Merchandising Portfolio
Course Number FASHM490
Credits 4.0

This course will facilitate analysis of the needs of the fashion industry and creation of a portfolio that will showcase student work.


College Success
Course Number COLL101
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development of professional and personal skills that will assist students in their collegiate and career performance. Topics covered include time management, interpersonal relations, personal expression, test-taking strategies, goal setting, study habits and techniques, self-esteem, image, and motivation.


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number COMM101
Credits 4.0

Communication theory and the principles of effective speech communication are presented. Students are given the opportunity to learn communication techniques, how to adapt to variations in audience and context, elements of effective audience research, speechwriting and delivery. Organizational and expressive strategies for informative and persuasive arguments are reviewed.


Global Economics
Course Number ECON315
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the economic aspects of globalization and examines why the interdependent economies of various nations are regarded as a single economic system or entity. It examines barriers and bridges to the world’s markets, including trade agreements and obstacles to international trading.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL101
Credits 4.0

In this course, students are given the opportunity to study and apply composition principles to a variety of writing modes, focusing on the writing process, intended audience, consistent point of view, correct grammar, concise language, appropriate style, and effective organizational strategies


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL102
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to allow students to expand their English skills by exploring advanced essay modes that include persuasive writing, literary analysis, and term paper research. Students will have the opportunity to analyze basic literary texts for style and content, and to present a researched, documented term paper.


Information Literacy
Course Number HUMN101
Credits 4.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to information literacy. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills to access digital and print source material and to evaluate and appropriately integrate this information into their own coursework. Students will be asked to assess their own thought processes and examine fallacies associated with their reasoning. The use of digital technology to communicate effectively is also a key component of this course


History of Art I
Course Number HUMN301
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from the early Renaissance through the 20th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


History of Art II
Course Number HUMN302
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from Prehistoric time through the 14th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


Literature and Film
Course Number HUMN401
Credits 4.0

This course examines literature and film and provides the opportunity for the student to compare and contrast the presentation of a story through different media. Analysis of literary works and critique of their film adaptations will allow the student to determine the characteristics of “successful” adaptation.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH130
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enable students to reason quantitatively from a variety of mathematical perspectives. Topics include statistics, logic, geometry, estimation, and the process of problem solving.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL405
Credits 4.0

Ethics is the study of moral philosophy in relation to society and human behavior. Students will study theoretical and applied ethical constructs, from both a Western and non- Western approach, that shape beliefs and relate to decision-making processes.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE201
Credits 4.0

This course investigates biological science and the effects of humans on the earth’s ecosystem. Topics discussed may include basic ecology, human populations, water, air, and land pollution, energy consumption, allocation of natural resources, alternative forms of energy, legislation, and citizen action.


Cultural Diversity
Course Number SOCS201
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enhance understanding of and appreciation for human diversity through the critical analysis of sociological, socioeconomic and cultural issues. The class will explore topics from a variety of perspectives and viewpoints as a means of developing deeper insight into how race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and religion affect human relations.


Physical Anthropology
Course Number SCIE310
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the principles of Physical Anthropology, covering genetic processes underlying the expression of population, the appearance of the hominids approximately 4 million years ago, and their subsequent development to the present. Students will be introduced to primate evolution, theoretical perspectives, and the technologies associated with human development. Medical anthropology and basic genetics will be examined.


Political Science
Course Number SOCS401
Credits 4.0

This course examines the scope and method of political science. This course explores the social nature of politics, with a focus on how power and opinions are distributed throughout a variety of populations, colleges, and political entities. Students will have the opportunity to analyze the effects of American culture and media on political structures and decision-making processes, and will contemplate the effects of international relations and political changes on contemporary society.


Program description: The Bachelor of Arts degree program in Fashion Merchandising at the Academy helps to prepare students for exciting career opportunities and is designed to provide the skills needed to be successful in merchandising, marketing, buying, sales, management, negotiation, customer relations and creative technologies. The program allows students to partner their interest in the world of fashion with the development of key business competencies critical to employment in today's global marketplace. Students also have the opportunity to explore the evolution of fashion, fashion trend forecasting, fashion media, and fashion promotion. The program requires integration of conceptual and creative abilities with business practices.
If you are ready to take the first step to a rewarding career full of challenges and opportunities, pursue your Fashion Merchandising Degree here. In addition to comprehensive coursework and professional instruction, students will have the opportunity to participate in a real world internship to help prepare them for the competitive fashion world.

Program Name: Bachelor of Fine Arts in Advertising and Design
Project Management
Course Number BUSN450
Credits 4.0

Through the use of environmental simulation and detailed case study, students are exposed to the intention, responsibility, scope and requirements of effective project management. Students will have the opportunity to learn to move fluidly between both broad management and compartmentalized roles, viewing a project as a manageable organism dependent upon structured guidance and oversight for success.


Storyboarding
Course Number DESIGN215
Credits 4.0

The role of storyboarding in developing visual storytelling and design needs, and its ability to facilitate the preproduction process will be examined. The style and intent of storyboards, both in hand render and digital media, will be explored. Development of visual representation as a tool for clients, production crew, technical crew and creative professionals will serve as the focus of the course.


Branding and Corporate Identity
Course Number GRAPH360

This course will focus upon the essential skills necessary for the development of a corporate brand. Research, strategy formulation, design and implementation of a new brand identity and/or a re-branding will be covered in this course.


Advertising Concepts
Course Number ADVT110
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the advertising environment and advertising as a communications tool, including how it affects the target audience. Topics include integrated marketing communications, consumer behavior, brand strategy, and media.


Elements of Visual Advertising
Course Number ADVT120
Credits 4.0

This course will address the fundamental elements of Visual Advertising. Students will have the opportunity to apply design principles and the design process to positively affect advertising communication.


Principles of Marketing
Course Number ADVT250
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of the creation of customer value, targeting the correct market, building customer relationships and the significance of brand loyalty in attempting to meet shifting customer expectations. The relationship of marketing to advertising and their dual approach to a common mission are explored


Copywriting
Course Number ADVT260
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the role of text in advertising and marketing concept, creation and placement. In order to successfully convey client message and connect with audiences, students will be expected to demonstrate a working command of language, vocabulary, syntax, hidden persuasion and the conventions of text copy within specific media and advertising outlets.


Photography for Advertising
Course Number ADVT275
Credits 4.0

This course will explore the nature of advertising photography. Topics will include the principles of the photographic process as well as how it is used in the advertising industry. Special emphasis will be placed on the logistics of an advertising shoot.


Consumer Behavior
Course Number ADVT340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon the basic concepts and theories of consumer behavior, emphasizing the key factors that influence consumer purchasing decisions. Market segmentation and consumer demographics are analyzed and incorporated into marketing strategies. Qualitative and quantitative research techniques will be explored as a means to interpret data.


Audio/Video for Advertising
Course Number ADVT350
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the creation of audio and video advertising and marketing elements and their power to reach and impact the broadest audiences. The essential elements of audio and video creation will be presented for study, as well as conventions, limitations and potential of the spoken word and moving images to present products and services, and influence audiences to purchase.


Direct Marketing
Course Number ADVT360

This course will examine the creation of audio and video advertising and marketing elements and their power to reach and impact the broadest audiences. The essential elements of audio and video creation will be presented for study, as well as conventions, limitations and potential of the spoken word and moving images to present products and services, and influence audiences to purchase.


Public Relations
Course Number ADVT370
Credits 4.0

This course contemplates the power of various demographics, and the role of the media, events, and public awareness in forming opinions about a product, service, or organization


Art Direction Project
Course Number ADVT380
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon the development and production of two audience-focused advertising projects. Case studies will be used as a means to develop advertising strategies, construct creative briefs, and produce portfolio-quality projects. Market research, consumer behavior, and sales techniques will be discussed.


Special Topics in Advertising Design
Course Number ADVT400
Credits 4.0

This course offers an exploration into topics of special interest related to Advertising Design.


Senior Advertising Design Project
Course Number ADVT410
Credits 4.0

Building upon foundational skill sets and conceptual examinations, this course directs students to design and execute individual projects that demonstrate a mastery of advertising and marketing principles, concepts, industry and application.


Campaign Advertising
Course Number ADVT420
Credits 4.0

This course examines strategies for developing and directing a media mix across a variety of print and online formats and for designing messages which reflect both audience and client “contact” relationships


e-Commerce
Course Number ADVT430
Credits 4.0

This course presents the opportunities, challenges and strategies for conducting successful e-Commerce ventures. The impact of e-Commerce on business models, consumer behavior, and market segmentation for both Business-to- Business and Business-to-Consumer operations will be explored. The technical and infrastructure requirements for conducting business on the Internet, including security systems, payment systems and client/product support will be discussed. Laws, regulations and ethical issues related to e-Commerce business practices will also be examined.


Media Planning
Course Number ADVT450
Credits 4.0

This course will challenge students with the problems, techniques and strategy of buying advertising space and time effectively and economically in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, Internet and outdoor media


Advertising Design Capstone
Course Number ADVT485
Credits 4.0

The Advertising Design capstone is a research-based course that integrates concepts and work from throughout the program. Students are expected to integrate skills, knowledge, and creativity to produce a project that will showcase professional expertise in a chosen career field


Senior Advertising Design Portfolio
Course Number ADVT490
Credits 4.0

This course will serve as the culmination of all Advertising Design projects completed throughout the program of study. The course will emphasize professionalism, and increased creative and technical proficiency while extending the range, variety and quality of final projects. The final presentation of resume, portfolio and professional attitude will culminate with an individual mock interview.


Marketing Business
Course Number ADVT499
Credits 4.0

This course examines the application of marketing principles and theories to businesses and entrepreneurial efforts. Topics include marketing tools and techniques required for start-up businesses, including new business development, core competencies and technologies, marketing research, marketing planning, relationship marketing, and partnerships with customers and suppliers.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN101
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the practice of business through analysis of the role and function of accounting, management, marketing, finance, and economics within business organizations. Common business terms and principles will be discussed and the various activities of businesses in daily operations will be examined.


Project Management
Course Number BUSN450
Credits 4.0

Through the use of environmental simulation and detailed case study, students are exposed to the intention, responsibility, scope and requirements of effective project management. Students will have the opportunity to learn to move fluidly between both broad management and compartmentalized roles, viewing a project as a manageable organism dependent upon structured guidance and oversight for success.


Design Fundamentals
Course Number DESIGN101
Credits 4.0

This course provides an examination of the different elements of visual design, as well as a general overview of the design process. The material in this course will focus on design for projects essential to all areas of visual design.


Introduction to Drawing
Course Number DESIGN130
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the tools and techniques of drawing. Principles of composition, balance, rhythm, color, line, texture, and light are addressed through a series of studio assignments.


Digital Illustration
Course Number DESIGN140
Credits 4.0

This course covers the foundations of vector-based artwork in order to create digital illustrations, graphics, and interfaces. Students will have the opportunity to create illustrations and will experiment with type as a graphical element. The differences between vector and raster based artwork will be delineated.


Typography
Course Number DESIGN150
Credits 4.0

This course covers the language of the visual letterform, the history of typography, and its appropriate use in design.


Digital Illustration
Course Number DESIGN140
Credits 4.0

This course covers the foundations of vector-based artwork in order to create digital illustrations, graphics, and interfaces. Students will have the opportunity to create illustrations and will experiment with type as a graphical element. The differences between vector and raster based artwork will be delineated.


Storyboarding
Course Number DESIGN215
Credits 4.0

The role of storyboarding in developing visual storytelling and design needs, and its ability to facilitate the preproduction process will be examined. The style and intent of storyboards, both in hand render and digital media, will be explored. Development of visual representation as a tool for clients, production crew, technical crew and creative professionals will serve as the focus of the course.


Creativity in Design
Course Number DESIGN275
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the creative problemsolving process used to generate concept and design for an original design solution. A variety of layout techniques will be critiqued as the students originate creative concepts.


Graphic Design I
Course Number GRAPH160
Credits 4.0

This course examines complex and multi-faceted commercial design problems as a means of developing dynamic and innovative solutions. Design projects are analyzed according to their conceptual and graphical composition, and are developed to effectively and creatively communicate a message to a specific audience.


Digital Layout
Course Number GRAPH250
Credits 4.0

This course provides the fundamentals of publication design and page layout using a current page-layout software to produce quality publications and print materials. The focus will also be on graphic design skills including composition, layout, and content.


Branding and Corporate Identity
Course Number GRAPH360

This course will focus upon the essential skills necessary for the development of a corporate brand. Research, strategy formulation, design and implementation of a new brand identity and/or a re-branding will be covered in this course.


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number COMM101
Credits 4.0

Communication theory and the principles of effective speech communication are presented. Students are given the opportunity to learn communication techniques, how to adapt to variations in audience and context, elements of effective audience research, speechwriting and delivery. Organizational and expressive strategies for informative and persuasive arguments are reviewed.


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number COMM101
Credits 4.0

Communication theory and the principles of effective speech communication are presented. Students are given the opportunity to learn communication techniques, how to adapt to variations in audience and context, elements of effective audience research, speechwriting and delivery. Organizational and expressive strategies for informative and persuasive arguments are reviewed.


Global Economics
Course Number ECON315
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the economic aspects of globalization and examines why the interdependent economies of various nations are regarded as a single economic system or entity. It examines barriers and bridges to the world’s markets, including trade agreements and obstacles to international trading.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL101
Credits 4.0

In this course, students are given the opportunity to study and apply composition principles to a variety of writing modes, focusing on the writing process, intended audience, consistent point of view, correct grammar, concise language, appropriate style, and effective organizational strategies


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL102
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to allow students to expand their English skills by exploring advanced essay modes that include persuasive writing, literary analysis, and term paper research. Students will have the opportunity to analyze basic literary texts for style and content, and to present a researched, documented term paper.


Information Literacy
Course Number HUMN101
Credits 4.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to information literacy. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills to access digital and print source material and to evaluate and appropriately integrate this information into their own coursework. Students will be asked to assess their own thought processes and examine fallacies associated with their reasoning. The use of digital technology to communicate effectively is also a key component of this course


History of Art I
Course Number HUMN301
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from the early Renaissance through the 20th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


History of Art II
Course Number HUMN302
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from Prehistoric time through the 14th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


Literature and Film
Course Number HUMN401
Credits 4.0

This course examines literature and film and provides the opportunity for the student to compare and contrast the presentation of a story through different media. Analysis of literary works and critique of their film adaptations will allow the student to determine the characteristics of “successful” adaptation.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH130
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enable students to reason quantitatively from a variety of mathematical perspectives. Topics include statistics, logic, geometry, estimation, and the process of problem solving.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL405
Credits 4.0

Ethics is the study of moral philosophy in relation to society and human behavior. Students will study theoretical and applied ethical constructs, from both a Western and non- Western approach, that shape beliefs and relate to decision-making processes.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE201
Credits 4.0

This course investigates biological science and the effects of humans on the earth’s ecosystem. Topics discussed may include basic ecology, human populations, water, air, and land pollution, energy consumption, allocation of natural resources, alternative forms of energy, legislation, and citizen action.


Physical Anthropology
Course Number SCIE310
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the principles of Physical Anthropology, covering genetic processes underlying the expression of population, the appearance of the hominids approximately 4 million years ago, and their subsequent development to the present. Students will be introduced to primate evolution, theoretical perspectives, and the technologies associated with human development. Medical anthropology and basic genetics will be examined.


Cultural Diversity
Course Number SOCS201
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enhance understanding of and appreciation for human diversity through the critical analysis of sociological, socioeconomic and cultural issues. The class will explore topics from a variety of perspectives and viewpoints as a means of developing deeper insight into how race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and religion affect human relations.


Audio / Video for Advertising
Course Number ADVT350
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the creation of audio and video advertising and marketing elements and their power to reach and impact the broadest audiences. The essential elements of audio and video creation will be presented for study, as well as conventions, limitations and potential of the spoken word and moving images to present products and services, and influence audiences to purchase


Digital Imaging
Course Number DESIGN160
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon raster-based software to create manipulate, and modify images for design purposes. The tools used to manipulate raster based images and associated terminology will be introduced. The differences between raster and vector images will be addressed.


Program description: The Advertising Design Program is designed to
prepare students in the design, creation and
implementation of advertising campaigns as well
as marketing design. The program examines
the graphic, typographic, photographic and
audio/video elements of advertising with
supportive advertising copy. The development of
marketing and advertising campaigns will be
covered and the roles of e-commerce, branding,
project management, media planning, and
consumer behavior will be studied.

Program Name: Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Media Production
Building Information Modeling III
Course Number BIM108
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: Bim105, Bim106 This Course Will Be Applied With An Introduction To Building Information Modeling (bim). Bim Software Will Be Used To Understand The Concepts And Development Of A 3d Model To Help Create A Set Of Working Drawings. File Management Of Bim Software Will Be Introduced And Applied. Knowledge Taught In Bim105 – Building Construction Methods Will Be Practiced.


Project Management
Course Number BUSN450
Credits 4.0

Through the use of environmental simulation and detailed case study, students are exposed to the intention, responsibility, scope and requirements of effective project management. Students will have the opportunity to learn to move fluidly between both broad management and compartmentalized roles, viewing a project as a manageable organism dependent upon structured guidance and oversight for success.


Entrepreneurship
Course Number BUSN499
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the essentials of entrepreneurship. Business organization, business plans and proposals, as well as ethical and legal issues will be discussed. Additionally, this course focuses on the fundamentals of profitability.


Design Fundamentals
Course Number DESIGN101
Credits 4.0

This course provides an examination of the different elements of visual design, as well as a general overview of the design process. The material in this course will focus on design for projects essential to all areas of visual design.


Web Design I
Course Number DESIGN110
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the fundamentals of web creation and usage. Browsers, Internet terminology, and Internet usage will be addressed. Use of XHTML in the creation of web design will be discussed. The course will provide an introduction to graphic web applications and the development of a web site.


Introduction to Drawing
Course Number DESIGN130
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the tools and techniques of drawing. Principles of composition, balance, rhythm, color, line, texture, and light are addressed through a series of studio assignments.


Digital Illustration
Course Number DESIGN140
Credits 4.0

This course covers the foundations of vector-based artwork in order to create digital illustrations, graphics, and interfaces. Students will have the opportunity to create illustrations and will experiment with type as a graphical element. The differences between vector and raster based artwork will be delineated.


Typography
Course Number DESIGN150
Credits 4.0

This course covers the language of the visual letterform, the history of typography, and its appropriate use in design.


Digital Imaging
Course Number DESIGN160
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon raster-based software to create manipulate, and modify images for design purposes. The tools used to manipulate raster based images and associated terminology will be introduced. The differences between raster and vector images will be addressed.


Visual Composition
Course Number DESIGN175
Credits 4.0

Students explore composition using digital photography. Students will have the opportunity to develop an appreciation of photography as well as to begin to build their own photographic library. The camera’s viewfinder is used as a vehicle for demonstrating the designer’s frame of reference.


Web Design II
Course Number DESIGN210
Credits 4.0

Students will be introduced to the concepts governing website design and implementation. Students will explore a number of design problems, including interface design, navigation, design continuity and design process.


Storyboarding
Course Number DESIGN215
Credits 4.0

The role of storyboarding in developing visual storytelling and design needs, and its ability to facilitate the preproduction process will be examined. The style and intent of storyboards, both in hand render and digital media, will be explored. Development of visual representation as a tool for clients, production crew, technical crew and creative professionals will serve as the focus of the course.


Web Design III
Course Number DESIGN220
Credits 4.0

This course provides an opportunity for students to develop skills involved in website design, development, and maintenance. Troubleshooting issues will also be addressed.


Interactive Media I
Course Number DESIGN230
Credits 4.0

This course will explore interface design theory and its implementation. This will serve as a foundation course covering drawing, animation, importing external graphics, audio and video elements and using them to construct effective web interfaces.


Audio Production
Course Number DESIGN245
Credits 4.0

This course will introduce the basic concepts of sound recording and editing within the multimedia environment. Computer hardware and software will be used to experiment with recording/capturing, converting and editing audio. The course will provide a basic understanding of sound and acoustics, and analog and digital recording and editing methods in the creation of a basic stereo audio project.


Screenwriting
Course Number DESIGN250
Credits 4.0

In this course the role of original text in the creation of visual images and story will be examined. The depiction of vivid, engaging visuals through various screenplay formats, industry syntax, descriptive verbiage and identifiable style will be explored. The process of telling a story and inspiring a director, producer, onscreen talent, art director and/or other storytellers will be discussed.


Video Production
Course Number DESIGN255
Credits 4.0

This course will introduce the basic concepts of video production within a multimedia environment. The use of industry standard hardware and software to capture, convert and edit video will be explored. Different shooting techniques of small format distribution will be compared and contrasted.


Advanced Digital Imaging
Course Number DESIGN260
Credits 4.0

Advanced techniques and aesthetics in digital image creation and editing are explored and applied through the completion of computer design projects.


Creativity in Design
Course Number DESIGN275
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the creative problemsolving process used to generate concept and design for an original design solution. A variety of layout techniques will be critiqued as the students originate creative concepts.


Interactive Design
Course Number DESIGN325
Credits 4.0

This course covers the skills necessary to produce effective “information design” in a multimedia environment. Design principles as they relate to the use of typography, photographs, video, illustration, and interface elements will be explored with the goal of developing designs that effectively deliver content to given audiences.


Interactive Media II
Course Number DESIGN330
Credits 4.0

This course covers intermediate scripting for interactive interfaces. This will include designing dynamically-loaded interfaces and loading external files as well as scripting to manipulate video and audio.


Advanced Audio Production
Course Number DESIGN345
Credits 4.0

This course will cover audio production and editing using industry standard hardware and software. Emphasis will be placed on mixing, hard disk recording, midi production and professionalism. Music theory will be addressed as context for the creation of audio for the multimedia environment.


Video Editing
Course Number DESIGN355
Credits 4.0

This course is an examination of editing theory, history and aesthetics leading toward post-production technology and techniques required to deliver professional quality digital video. Students capture and edit digital footage using traditional techniques and effects, with output to be distributed in a variety of formats. Visual quality, broadcast standards, and format compression will also be examined.


Interactive Media III
Course Number DESIGN360
Credits 4.0

The course will cover advanced scripting techniques geared towards design solutions and an entirely dynamic construction of an application.


Motion Graphics
Course Number DESIGN365
Credits 4.0

This course will allow students to explore the elements of time and space to convey messages and meaning through type, image, video, 3D and visual effects for the screen. Individual creativity will be stressed as well as the use of industry-standard software for developing motion graphics.


Media Production I
Course Number DESIGN370
Credits 4.0

This course examines the total production process from initial concept and storyboard through production. Students will have the opportunity to aggregate a range of specific disciplines and software in the creation of complex multimedia and / or interactive projects.


Media Distribution
Course Number DESIGN395
Credits 4.0

In this course, students will have the opportunity to learn various methods to deliver media to audiences, including broadband streams, dynamic web pages, and optical disc storage (Blu-ray, DVD, etc.). Students will have the opportunity to apply compression schemes to digital audio, video, and animation files as well as have the opportunity to learn to determine appropriate delivery at specific bandwidths and to specific user devices.


Media Production II
Course Number DESIGN470
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon advanced topics in digital media production, addressing post-production and distribution of projects. Application of artistic vision to solving problems encountered in a real-world production environment and workflow is emphasized. Efficient balance of competing resource needs such as budgets, timelines, staff management, client relations and target audiences will be covered.


Special Topics in Digital Media Production
Course Number DIGI400
Credits 4.0

This course offers an exploration into topics of special interest related to Digital Production.


Digital Media Production Capstone
Course Number DIGI485
Credits 4.0

The digital production capstone is a research-based course that integrates concepts and work from throughout the program. Projects will simulate a professional digital media studio environment.


Senior Digital Media Production Portfolio
Course Number DIGI490
Credits 4.0

This course begins with a review of portfolio worthy media projects produced in other courses. Project revisions, as well as new projects are assigned in order to enhance the students’ portfolios and prepare them for employment interviews. Interviewing and presentation techniques will be introduced, along with strategies for developing an effective résumé, cover letter, and self-promotional campaign.


College Success
Course Number COLL101
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development of professional and personal skills that will assist students in their collegiate and career performance. Topics covered include time management, interpersonal relations, personal expression, test-taking strategies, goal setting, study habits and techniques, self-esteem, image, and motivation.


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number COMM101
Credits 4.0

Communication theory and the principles of effective speech communication are presented. Students are given the opportunity to learn communication techniques, how to adapt to variations in audience and context, elements of effective audience research, speechwriting and delivery. Organizational and expressive strategies for informative and persuasive arguments are reviewed.


Global Economics
Course Number ECON315
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the economic aspects of globalization and examines why the interdependent economies of various nations are regarded as a single economic system or entity. It examines barriers and bridges to the world’s markets, including trade agreements and obstacles to international trading.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL101
Credits 4.0

In this course, students are given the opportunity to study and apply composition principles to a variety of writing modes, focusing on the writing process, intended audience, consistent point of view, correct grammar, concise language, appropriate style, and effective organizational strategies


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL102
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to allow students to expand their English skills by exploring advanced essay modes that include persuasive writing, literary analysis, and term paper research. Students will have the opportunity to analyze basic literary texts for style and content, and to present a researched, documented term paper.


Information Literacy
Course Number HUMN101
Credits 4.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to information literacy. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills to access digital and print source material and to evaluate and appropriately integrate this information into their own coursework. Students will be asked to assess their own thought processes and examine fallacies associated with their reasoning. The use of digital technology to communicate effectively is also a key component of this course


History of Art I
Course Number HUMN301
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from the early Renaissance through the 20th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


History of Art II
Course Number HUMN302
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from Prehistoric time through the 14th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


Literature and Film
Course Number HUMN401
Credits 4.0

This course examines literature and film and provides the opportunity for the student to compare and contrast the presentation of a story through different media. Analysis of literary works and critique of their film adaptations will allow the student to determine the characteristics of “successful” adaptation.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH130
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enable students to reason quantitatively from a variety of mathematical perspectives. Topics include statistics, logic, geometry, estimation, and the process of problem solving.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL405
Credits 4.0

Ethics is the study of moral philosophy in relation to society and human behavior. Students will study theoretical and applied ethical constructs, from both a Western and non- Western approach, that shape beliefs and relate to decision-making processes.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE201
Credits 4.0

This course investigates biological science and the effects of humans on the earth’s ecosystem. Topics discussed may include basic ecology, human populations, water, air, and land pollution, energy consumption, allocation of natural resources, alternative forms of energy, legislation, and citizen action.


Physical Anthropology
Course Number SCIE310
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the principles of Physical Anthropology, covering genetic processes underlying the expression of population, the appearance of the hominids approximately 4 million years ago, and their subsequent development to the present. Students will be introduced to primate evolution, theoretical perspectives, and the technologies associated with human development. Medical anthropology and basic genetics will be examined.


Cultural Diversity
Course Number SOCS201
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enhance understanding of and appreciation for human diversity through the critical analysis of sociological, socioeconomic and cultural issues. The class will explore topics from a variety of perspectives and viewpoints as a means of developing deeper insight into how race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and religion affect human relations.


Political Science
Course Number SOCS401
Credits 4.0

This course examines the scope and method of political science. This course explores the social nature of politics, with a focus on how power and opinions are distributed throughout a variety of populations, colleges, and political entities. Students will have the opportunity to analyze the effects of American culture and media on political structures and decision-making processes, and will contemplate the effects of international relations and political changes on contemporary society.


Advertising Concepts
Course Number ADVT110
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the advertising environment and advertising as a communications tool, including how it affects the target audience. Topics include integrated marketing communications, consumer behavior, brand strategy, and media.


Elements of Visual Advertising
Course Number ADVT120
Credits 4.0

This course will address the fundamental elements of Visual Advertising. Students will have the opportunity to apply design principles and the design process to positively affect advertising communication.


Principles of Marketing
Course Number ADVT250
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of the creation of customer value, targeting the correct market, building customer relationships and the significance of brand loyalty in attempting to meet shifting customer expectations. The relationship of marketing to advertising and their dual approach to a common mission are explored


Copywriting
Course Number ADVT260
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the role of text in advertising and marketing concept, creation and placement. In order to successfully convey client message and connect with audiences, students will be expected to demonstrate a working command of language, vocabulary, syntax, hidden persuasion and the conventions of text copy within specific media and advertising outlets.


Photography for Advertising
Course Number ADVT275
Credits 4.0

This course will explore the nature of advertising photography. Topics will include the principles of the photographic process as well as how it is used in the advertising industry. Special emphasis will be placed on the logistics of an advertising shoot.


Consumer Behavior
Course Number ADVT340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon the basic concepts and theories of consumer behavior, emphasizing the key factors that influence consumer purchasing decisions. Market segmentation and consumer demographics are analyzed and incorporated into marketing strategies. Qualitative and quantitative research techniques will be explored as a means to interpret data.


Audio / Video for Advertising
Course Number ADVT350
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the creation of audio and video advertising and marketing elements and their power to reach and impact the broadest audiences. The essential elements of audio and video creation will be presented for study, as well as conventions, limitations and potential of the spoken word and moving images to present products and services, and influence audiences to purchase


Direct Marketing
Course Number ADVT360

This course will examine the creation of audio and video advertising and marketing elements and their power to reach and impact the broadest audiences. The essential elements of audio and video creation will be presented for study, as well as conventions, limitations and potential of the spoken word and moving images to present products and services, and influence audiences to purchase.


Public Relations
Course Number ADVT370
Credits 4.0

This course contemplates the power of various demographics, and the role of the media, events, and public awareness in forming opinions about a product, service, or organization


Art Direction Project
Course Number ADVT380
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon the development and production of two audience-focused advertising projects. Case studies will be used as a means to develop advertising strategies, construct creative briefs, and produce portfolio-quality projects. Market research, consumer behavior, and sales techniques will be discussed.


Special Topics in Advertising Design
Course Number ADVT400
Credits 4.0

This course offers an exploration into topics of special interest related to Advertising Design.


Senior Advertising Design Project
Course Number ADVT410
Credits 4.0

Building upon foundational skill sets and conceptual examinations, this course directs students to design and execute individual projects that demonstrate a mastery of advertising and marketing principles, concepts, industry and application.


Campaign Advertising
Course Number ADVT420
Credits 4.0

This course examines strategies for developing and directing a media mix across a variety of print and online formats and for designing messages which reflect both audience and client “contact” relationships


e-Commerce
Course Number ADVT430
Credits 4.0

This course presents the opportunities, challenges and strategies for conducting successful e-Commerce ventures. The impact of e-Commerce on business models, consumer behavior, and market segmentation for both Business-to- Business and Business-to-Consumer operations will be explored. The technical and infrastructure requirements for conducting business on the Internet, including security systems, payment systems and client/product support will be discussed. Laws, regulations and ethical issues related to e-Commerce business practices will also be examined.


Media Planning
Course Number ADVT450
Credits 4.0

This course will challenge students with the problems, techniques and strategy of buying advertising space and time effectively and economically in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, Internet and outdoor media


Advertising Design Capstone
Course Number ADVT485
Credits 4.0

The Advertising Design capstone is a research-based course that integrates concepts and work from throughout the program. Students are expected to integrate skills, knowledge, and creativity to produce a project that will showcase professional expertise in a chosen career field


Senior Advertising Design Portfolio
Course Number ADVT490
Credits 4.0

This course will serve as the culmination of all Advertising Design projects completed throughout the program of study. The course will emphasize professionalism, and increased creative and technical proficiency while extending the range, variety and quality of final projects. The final presentation of resume, portfolio and professional attitude will culminate with an individual mock interview.


Marketing Business
Course Number ADVT499
Credits 4.0

This course examines the application of marketing principles and theories to businesses and entrepreneurial efforts. Topics include marketing tools and techniques required for start-up businesses, including new business development, core competencies and technologies, marketing research, marketing planning, relationship marketing, and partnerships with customers and suppliers.


Computer Aided Design Interface
Course Number BIM101
Credits 4.0

Course emphasis is placed on software graphic user interface, screen navigation, profiles, toolbars, palettes, drawing and editing commands, dimensioning, annotation, and saving different file formats for communication via the internet. Installing and troubleshooting methods will be discussed. Computer hardware will be overviewed


Introduction to Computer Aided Design
Course Number BIM102
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the introduction to computer aided design. Design problem solving through the intersection of points, lines and basic geometric shapes will be covered. Exercises include creation of two and three-dimensional shapes, objects and spatial thinking in relation to the practice of drafting and design using software applications


Drawing Document Methods
Course Number BIM103
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the communication and organization of a complete comprehensive working drawing set. Techniques for creating and managing sheet sets and streamlining the drawing process are emphasized.


Building Information Modeling I
Course Number BIM104
Credits 4.0

This course explores two-dimensional computer aided design used to develop skills for understanding the practice of construction planning and design. Techniques for creating and managing sheet sets and streamlining the drawing process are emphasized. Maintenance of file management is reviewed and applied. Topics include development of plan, elevation, section and schedules for project.


Building Construction Methods
Course Number BIM105
Credits 4.0

This course is used to become familiar with a complete comprehensive working drawing set with the understanding of both commercial and residential building structures and construction methods.


Building Information Modeling II
Course Number BIM106
Credits 4.0

This course will further develop the content of drawing and production skills. Topics further the development of floor plans, elevations, sections and 3D perspective projection principles of a previously designed project. Drawings incorporating foundations, elevations, wall sections and roof framing details will be created using drafting and 3D computer aided design skills. Knowledge taught in BIM 103 - Drawing Document Methods will be practiced.


Building Systems Methods
Course Number BIM107
Credits 4.0

Basic mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems used in construction are addressed in relation to working drawings. This course also examines building codes and regulatory processes applied to the construction environment. The importance of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems and how they can be integrated into the design process with support for sustainable design will also be covered.


Program description: This program of study is designed to prepare the
student to create, produce, and distribute
interactive media, including video, audio, and 2D
for purposes of communication and entertainment.
Students will have the opportunity to develop
basic design skills for application to visual problem
solving. Additionally, students are expected to
develop skills in project management and team
collaboration demonstrating business and communication practices required for employment
in the worldwide workplace. The program will
culminate in the preparation of a professional
entry-level portfolio.

Program Name: Bachelor of Fine Arts in Game Production
Survey of the Game Industry
Course Number GAME101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to game terminology, principles, tools, and techniques. Students will be given the opportunity to examine the history and theories of game design, and will explore a variety of game genres and production processes. Business principles, social and economic issues, and technological developments are discussed in relation to the creation of games and preproduction documents.


Drawing Techniques I
Course Number GAME105
Credits 4.0

This course presents foundational design concepts and techniques that are used to create assets for games. Students will be given the opportunity to study prop, perspective, character, and environment design.


Drawing Techniques II
Course Number GAME110
Credits 4.0

Principles of Design
Course Number GAME120
Credits 4.0

This course provides theoretical and practical exercises to introduce students to the elements and principles of design, 3D Design, and color theory. Scale, form, line, color, texture, and pattern will be studied in conjunction with the principles of balance, harmony, rhythm, emphasis, focus, proportion, and contrast.


User Interface
Course Number GAME125
Credits 4.0

The course introduces students to usability and interface design. Students have the opportunity to create designs for various interfaces using fundamental layout and design theory skills.


Game Theory and Mechanics
Course Number GAME130
Credits 4.0

This course will study the mechanics of games across a variety of genres and platforms in order to discover what properties a game must have to be compelling, interesting and fun. Students will be given the opportunity to analyze games and game play elements through play tests and critiques. Upon the successful completion of the course, students should be able to write design documents that convey concepts for games within constraints.


Modeling I
Course Number GAME205
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to learn to navigate a 3D interface and to use modeling tools to create and manipulate three dimensionally modeled assets and props.


Game Play Scripting I
Course Number GAME210
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of the Adobe Flash environment and ActionScript for creating games, prototypes, and tutorials. Students will be given the opportunity to gain proficiency in the use of scripting and interactive techniques to create games that convey effective timing, style, and animation.


Game Play Scripting II
Course Number GAME220
Credits 4.0

This course furthers the understanding of ActionScript scripting through object-oriented, event-driven, and interactive techniques that are used in games. The course also covers basic game design math concepts and formulas.


Texture and Lighting
Course Number GAME225
Credits 4.0

This course explores lighting in the real world and in virtual space. Texturing assets, props and environments will be the focus of this course. Students will also be given the opportunity to learn techniques to create, manipulate, and optimize the use of lighting.


Storyboarding and Storytelling
Course Number GAME230
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the development of visual representations of story and game-play elements through the study and creation of screenplay and storyboards. Emphasis will be placed on visual language, story conventions, element creation and the ability to translate story from text to image.


Web Game Development
Course Number GAME235
Credits 4.0

This course explores real world game scenarios. Students have the opportunity to analyze and produce a series of projects that use scripting to solve these problems. Students also complete a final project that synthesizes the interaction design and scripting techniques covered in the previous courses.


Sound Design
Course Number GAME240
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore, examine, create, and implement audio for interactive projects. Multiple processes in the creation, recording, and distribution of said audio will also be covered in depth. A sound library of all original work will be presented at the end of the course using industry standard compression formats for both client and server side applications.


Level Design
Course Number GAME245
Credits 4.0

This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts used to create levels for games. Students will incorporate level design and architecture theory, level design principles, game balancing, play testing and storytelling. Students will be expected to build and test levels that reflect design concepts.


Portfolio Review
Course Number GAME250
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to critique and refine existing portfolio-level projects, including work from previous courses that demonstrate their technical and conceptual understanding of and proficiency in the design production process. The student will have the opportunity to learn to produce an industry standard electronic portfolio for the purpose of exhibiting and presenting their work to a worldwide audience.


Modeling II
Course Number GAME305
Credits 4.0

This course builds upon the modeling techniques taught in Modeling I and equips students to create 3D interior and exterior environments. Students will have the opportunity to create complex objects from primitive objects, refine the models, and the end product will show clean game topology.


Business Concepts of the Game Industry
Course Number GAME310
Credits 4.0

In this course, students will be directed to examine ethical, intellectual property, contractual and management issues as they relate to the game industry. Market analysis, business plans, production timelines, budgets, and development and distribution processes associated with game development will be explored and implemented.


Game Production I
Course Number GAME350
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to acquire the integration skills needed to successfully build a 3D game. Using a Game Engine they will explore both the technical construction and practical design of games. The technical skills required to use the game engine software are combined with utilizing level creating, constructing an interface, and defining the user’s interaction with the game world.


Modeling III
Course Number GAME355
Credits 4.0

This course involves modeling and rigging of a 3D character for games. Topics include low-polygonal 3D modeling, texture mapping, and rigging for future game character animation.


Game Production II
Course Number GAME360
Credits 4.0

Students will build upon Game Production I knowledge of building 3D games in an engine. Students will have the opportunity to advance their technical skills in level creation, lighting and camera angles to create a complete working game level.


World Building
Course Number GAME365
Credits 4.0

Students will be expected to apply level design principles to the creation of entire game environments, interactive elements and objects, storytelling through level design, texturing, and lighting.


Game Production III
Course Number GAME370
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to teach students to function as a productive member of a game design team to create a playable 3D game level. Explore popular tools utilized to document, schedule, and ship a successful 3D game on time and at an acceptable level of completion. Student groups will complete an entire conversion of a game, including characters, vehicles, and custom scripts.


Game Animation
Course Number GAME390
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the creation of 3D animated cycles, characters, and props for games using animation software. Topics include the development of walk cycles, linking and hierarchies, and forward and inverse kinematics.


Advanced Modeling
Course Number GAME405
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to further develop the student’s 3D modeling and texturing skills. Industry based software and practices will be implemented through character development and advanced character creation projects. Students will be gathering reference to model and sculpt characters using preproduction techniques necessary in the creation of game characters.


Team Project I
Course Number GAME410
Credits 4.0

This project-based course introduces professional-level concepts and techniques in game development including team-building, advanced ideation, visual design and technical implementation, quality assurance and distribution. The research, planning, design, and construction of a game will meet alpha criteria including design documentation and asset creation schedules using waterfall project management methodologies.


Team Project II
Course Number GAME420
Credits 4.0

A continuation of Team Project I, the focus of this course is on professional concepts and techniques that relate to level design, usability, professionalization, post-production and distribution. This course focuses on Agile project management methodology and allows the students to explore alternate management styles. The end of course milestone is a professionally developed “one-level” playable game as a portfolio asset. Students will continue work on their original game concept from Alpha to Gold release status.


Senior Game Project
Course Number GAME450
Credits 4.0

In this course, students have the opportunity to develop and process a senior thesis project demonstrating their creative and technical abilities and expertise. Students will be expected to plan, produce and document all phases of production from pre-production through delivery of a final product.


Game Production Capstone
Course Number GAME485
Credits 4.0

The game development capstone is a research-based course that integrates concepts and work from throughout the program. Projects will simulate a professional game design studio environment.


Senior Game Portfolio
Course Number GAME490
Credits 4.0

Under faculty supervision, students will review, revise, and refine previous deliverables based on peer and faculty evaluation, and create a portfolio that demonstrates a mastery of industry standards and expectations. The student will present and discuss their portfolio of work to an audience/jury.


Digital Imaging
Course Number DESIGN160
Credits 4.0

This course focuses upon raster-based software to create manipulate, and modify images for design purposes. The tools used to manipulate raster based images and associated terminology will be introduced. The differences between raster and vector images will be addressed.


College Success
Course Number COLL101
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development of professional and personal skills that will assist students in their collegiate and career performance. Topics covered include time management, interpersonal relations, personal expression, test-taking strategies, goal setting, study habits and techniques, self-esteem, image, and motivation.


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number COMM101
Credits 4.0

Communication theory and the principles of effective speech communication are presented. Students are given the opportunity to learn communication techniques, how to adapt to variations in audience and context, elements of effective audience research, speechwriting and delivery. Organizational and expressive strategies for informative and persuasive arguments are reviewed.


Global Economics
Course Number ECON315
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the economic aspects of globalization and examines why the interdependent economies of various nations are regarded as a single economic system or entity. It examines barriers and bridges to the world’s markets, including trade agreements and obstacles to international trading.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL101
Credits 4.0

In this course, students are given the opportunity to study and apply composition principles to a variety of writing modes, focusing on the writing process, intended audience, consistent point of view, correct grammar, concise language, appropriate style, and effective organizational strategies


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL102
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to allow students to expand their English skills by exploring advanced essay modes that include persuasive writing, literary analysis, and term paper research. Students will have the opportunity to analyze basic literary texts for style and content, and to present a researched, documented term paper.


Information Literacy
Course Number HUMN101
Credits 4.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to information literacy. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills to access digital and print source material and to evaluate and appropriately integrate this information into their own coursework. Students will be asked to assess their own thought processes and examine fallacies associated with their reasoning. The use of digital technology to communicate effectively is also a key component of this course


History of Art I
Course Number HUMN301
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from the early Renaissance through the 20th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


History of Art II
Course Number HUMN302
Credits 4.0

Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of human thought, culture, and creativity dating from Prehistoric time through the 14th century through an examination of selected achievements in the humanities and the arts. This course will help students foster an understanding of human heritage as it recognizes individuals, societies, and cultures that have shaped our modern existence.


Literature and Film
Course Number HUMN401
Credits 4.0

This course examines literature and film and provides the opportunity for the student to compare and contrast the presentation of a story through different media. Analysis of literary works and critique of their film adaptations will allow the student to determine the characteristics of “successful” adaptation.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH130
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enable students to reason quantitatively from a variety of mathematical perspectives. Topics include statistics, logic, geometry, estimation, and the process of problem solving.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL405
Credits 4.0

Ethics is the study of moral philosophy in relation to society and human behavior. Students will study theoretical and applied ethical constructs, from both a Western and non- Western approach, that shape beliefs and relate to decision-making processes.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE201
Credits 4.0

This course investigates biological science and the effects of humans on the earth’s ecosystem. Topics discussed may include basic ecology, human populations, water, air, and land pollution, energy consumption, allocation of natural resources, alternative forms of energy, legislation, and citizen action.


Physical Anthropology
Course Number SCIE310
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the principles of Physical Anthropology, covering genetic processes underlying the expression of population, the appearance of the hominids approximately 4 million years ago, and their subsequent development to the present. Students will be introduced to primate evolution, theoretical perspectives, and the technologies associated with human development. Medical anthropology and basic genetics will be examined.


Cultural Diversity
Course Number SOCS201
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enhance understanding of and appreciation for human diversity through the critical analysis of sociological, socioeconomic and cultural issues. The class will explore topics from a variety of perspectives and viewpoints as a means of developing deeper insight into how race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and religion affect human relations.


Political Science
Course Number SOCS401
Credits 4.0

This course examines the scope and method of political science. This course explores the social nature of politics, with a focus on how power and opinions are distributed throughout a variety of populations, colleges, and political entities. Students will have the opportunity to analyze the effects of American culture and media on political structures and decision-making processes, and will contemplate the effects of international relations and political changes on contemporary society.


Program description: This program of study is designed to prepare the
student to create, produce, and distribute
interactive media, including video, audio, and 2D
for purposes of communication and entertainment.
Students will have the opportunity to develop
basic design skills for application to visual problem
solving. Additionally, students are expected to
develop skills in project management and team
collaboration demonstrating business and communication
practices required for employment
in the worldwide workplace. The program will
culminate in the preparation of a professional
entry-level portfolio.

Arts Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Arts Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Brown University
Total Programs 135
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 9th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd