Online Communications Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its communications courses to be successful communication disorder specialists, speech therapists, speech language pathologists, teacher of the speech and hearing handicappeds, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 25,090 people employed as communications teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $65,190. Rehabilitation counselors make on average $34,710 per year and there are about 112,690 of them employed today.

Communications Organizations Communications Common Job Tasks
  • contacting people in the media
  • planning conventions
  • responding to inquiries
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Communications Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Associate's (AABA) - Visual Communication
English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: None In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN 105
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed, and controlled.



Principles of Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 205
Credits 4.5

"This course introduces students to financial accounting. Students can learn the fundamentals of the accounting cycle."


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON 220
Credits 4.5

"This course focuses on Economic theory of the firm, resource allocation and price determination, the free market supply/demand mechanism, and pure and imperfect competition models are analyzed."


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON 224
Credits 4.5

"Presents basic economic concepts emphasizing the part the United States plays in a global economy. Foundations of economic theory are presented, using topics from television news and mass media. Topics introduced are GDP, National Income Accounting, United States fiscal policy and economic growth."


Business Management and Leadership
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

"Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix."


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix.


Lower Division Capstone
Course Number BUSN 300
Credits 4.5

This course requires students completing their AABA degree to demonstrate knowledge learned throughout the program and apply the theories to real world issues. Students are expected to synthesize and integrate learning experiences acquired throughout their program and to evaluate research and current topics relative to their area of concentration.


Design Principles
Course Number VCDD 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a foundation class in principles relating to all areas of visual design. In this course, students can develop an awareness of the basic elements of visual language, aesthetics sensitivity, and the ability to think and act as a designer. Students explore methods for evoking intuitive responses through color, shape, texture, rhythm, line, and other compositional elements. The class consists of both practical studio-based assignments and contextual studies areas.


Fundamentals of Color
Course Number VCDD102
Credits 4.5

This is a theoretical and practical course examining the visual forces of color and color relationships in traditional and electronic media. This foundation-level class is essential to all design students. Students can develop knowledge of color principles and the ability to manipulate hue, value and chroma as well as sensitivity to aesthetic and psychological qualities.


Computer Design I
Course Number VCDD 201
Credits 4.5

Utilizing digital media and traditional visualization techniques in the production of graphic art for print and screen, this course will develop skills accrued during Intro to Mac; examining closely the potential of the Macintosh or PC as a creative and communication tool. All assignments are related to professional practice. Adobe CS (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Flash, Acrobat) is the default software set for this class.


Drawing Concepts
Course Number VCDD 202
Credits 4.5

The techniques of drawing basic forms and shapes are developed through exercises that are designed to develop perceptual skills. The student studies volume, tone, texture, perspective, and composition. The exercises are presented in sequence and are designed to develop the individual student's basic drawing methods and techniques. Subject matter can vary from still life to figure drawing.


Program description: The AIU Online AABA degree with a concentration in Visual Communication combines the business skills from our University's AABA degree program with specific skills needed to pursue career opportunities in the creative, diverse field of visual communication. This career-focused curriculum is for students wishing to parlay their creative skills into fulfilling, interesting professions.

For students wishing to pursue their creative interests in Visual Communication, AIU Online's rich multimedia courses can be an excellent way to quickly acquire industry-current skills and real-world knowledge.

Communications Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Visual Communication Certificate
Image Editing
Course Number VCT300

This course is an introduction to image editing and its role in the disciplines of web design, electronic publishing and multimedia development. An overview is presented on file formats, composition, color, text design, retouching and manipulation of graphic and photographic images. Topics and Objectives Photo Manipulation * Explain photo manipulation. * Apply photo optimization techniques. Photo Retouching * Explain photo retouching. * Apply photo retouching. Non-destructive Editing * Explain non-destructive editing. * Apply non-destructive editing. Drawing and Painting * Identify drawing and painting tools. * Apply drawing and painting tools. Text Manipulation * Identify text manipulation techniques. * Apply text manipulation techniques.


Web Design
Course Number VCT310

This course focuses on the principles of good web design and the essential role of the web designer in today's business environment. Topics covered include layout, style, artistic quality, navigation, performance, communication, community, e-commerce and marketing. Topics and Objectives Plan a Web Site * Identify steps for developing a Web site. * Plan a Web site. Web Site Design * Identify critical elements of Web site design. * Analyze the design aspects of a Web site. Web Site Style * Identify elements of style in a Web site. * Critique the style (in contrast to the design) of a Web site. Graphics and Media Integration * Explain the effective use of graphics and media in Web site design. * Critique the use of graphics and media in a Web site. Usability of a Web Site * Identify attributes of usability. * Critique usability of a Web site.


Electronic Publishing
Course Number VCT320

This Course Presents The Essential Role Of Electronic Publishing In The Delivery Of Information To Today's Businesses And Consumers. Most Of The Course Is Concerned With Methods And Techniques Involved In The Electronic Publishing Of Business Presentations, Corporate Reports, Newsletters, Training Materials, Manuals And Electronic Books, But Other Information Formats Such As Wikis And Blogs Are Also Considered. Topics And Objectives Ebooks * Compare And Contrast Print And Electronic Books. Epublishing Production And Delivery * Identify Common Epublishing Formats. * Explain The Use Of Common Epublishing Formats. Content Management * Compare And Contrast Course, Learning And Content Management Systems. Digital Rights Management (drm) And Maintenance * Explain Drm. Trends In Epublishing * Identify Alternatives To Traditional Publishing.


Multimedia Development
Course Number VCT420

This course introduces the fundamentals of developing interactive, multimedia enriched content for delivery across alternative platforms such as the Internet, CDs and handheld devices. The focus is on the integration of animation, audio and video content to maximize communication. Topics and Objectives Multimedia Concepts * Identify elements of multimedia. * Differentiate between multimedia technologies. Graphics * Identify graphic formats. * Compare and contrast graphic formats. * Apply effective use of graphics. Audio and Video * Identify audio formats. * Compare and contrast audio formats. * Apply audio formats. * Identify video formats. * Compare and contrast video formats. * Apply video formats. Interactive Multimedia * Explain characteristics of interactive multimedia. * Apply interactive multimedia. Advanced Multimedia * Identify trends in multimedia. * Apply storyboarding.


Computers and Information Processing
Course Number CIS319
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of computer systems and the role of information processing in today’s business environment. An overview is presented of information systems, systems development, operating systems and programming, database management, networking and telecommunications, and the Internet. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 300.


Instructional Design
Course Number AET515

This course focuses on systematic approaches to instructional design. Learners create an instructional plan that outlines each of the five components of a systematic instructional design model (i.e., ADDIE: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation). The course identifies trends and issues in instructional design for adult learners. Topics and Objectives Instructional Design Models and Analysis Analyze systematic approaches to instructional design. Examine the components of a needs assessment. Identify performance gaps based on a needs assessment. Design Construct goals for an instructional plan. Create performance-based objectives that align with instructional goals. Describe a summative assessment to support learner outcomes. Analyze the impact of learner characteristics and learning context on instructional design. Development Determine delivery modality. Select instructional strategies. Implementation Create an implementation schedule for the instructional plan. Evaluate resources for instructional delivery. Analyze the purposes of formative evaluations. Evaluation Examine strategies for evaluating a systematic approach to instructional design. Identify criteria for determining that design goals, performance-based objectives, and learning outcomes were achieved. Analyze possible recommendations for future use. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design Describe issues and trends in various instructional settings. Analyze issues and trends in the use of various instructional modalities. Predict how current issues and trends will impact the future of instructional design.


Program description: The Visual Communication Certificate is available to undergraduate students not enrolled in the BSIT program who wish to expand their technical knowledge using software tools for Visual Communication. Students enrolling in the Visual Communication Certificate will learn the graphic design and technology tools to create visual communications that are relevant to organizations. Students in the Visual Communication Certificate will develop a diverse portfolio of rich media that can be used in Web sites, advertising, corporate reports, business presentations, instructional materials, animated movies and electronic publications that fulfill business and training needs.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Associate's - Communications
Introduction to Communication
Course Number XCOM100
Credits 0.0

This Course Is An Introduction To The Field Of Communication, With Emphasis On The History Of Communication Study, Theories Important To All Areas Of Communication, Contexts In Which Communication Occurs, And Issues That Students Of Communication Must Consider. The Course Serves As An Introduction To The Strands Of Communication: Interpersonal, Small Group And Team, Mass, Organizational, Intercultural, And Rhetoric. Topics And Objectives Overview Of Communication * Identify Historical Developments In Communication. * Describe Communication Models. * Analyze Importance Of Communication. * Identify Careers In Communication. Self-concept, Identity, And Communication * Explain How Self-awareness Impacts Communication Skills. * Identify The Relationship Between Communication And Self-esteem. * Describe How Perception Influences Communication. Verbal And Nonverbal Communication * Distinguish Between Verbal And Nonverbal Messages. * Describe How To Avoid Bias In Language. * Identify Listening Styles And Strategies. Interpersonal Communication * Recognize Types Of Interpersonal Communication. * Identify The Stages Of Relationship Development. * Analyze The Impact Of Technology On Interpersonal Communication. * Identify Interviewing Skills And Techniques. Small Group And Team Communication * Identify Elements Of Group Dynamics. * Describe Phases Of Group Development. * Recognize Characteristics Of Effective Teams. * Identify Problem-solving Steps. * Explain Technology's Impact On Small Groups And Team Communication. Communication And Conflict * Describe Types Of Conflict. * Differentiate Between Assertive And Aggressive Communication. * Identify Conflict Management Styles. * Explain Strategies For Improving Conflict Management Skills. Power Of Presentation * Identify Steps In Presentation Development And Organization. * Describe Elements Of An Effective Presentation. * Compare Informative And Persuasive Presentations. Mass Communication * Explain How Mass Communication Influences Society. * Explain The Importance Of Media Literacy. * Analyze The Role Of Advertising In Society. * Analyze Impact Of Technology On Mass Media. Special Issues In Communication * Explain How Diversity Affects Communication. * Describe The Role Of Ethics In Communication. Prerequisites: Hum111, Psy201


Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
Course Number XCOM200
Credits 0.0

This course includes the application of communication principles, theory, and research to the process of interpersonal communication; includes verbal, nonverbal, listening, conflict management, and communication skills most relevant to a broad range of interpersonal settings. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Interpersonal Communication * Define interpersonal communication. * Explain the importance of interpersonal communication. * Identify key principles of interpersonal communication. Listening * Identify listening barriers and their effects on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate listening strategies for interpersonal interaction. Word Use * Identify word barriers and their effects on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate word use for interpersonal communication situations. Diversity * Identify cultural barriers and their effects on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate intercultural communication strategies. Nonverbal Communication * Explain the effect of nonverbal communication codes on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate nonverbal communication strategies for interpersonal communication. Self and Perception * Explain how interpersonal perceptions are formed. * Identify barriers to accurate interpersonal perception. * Determine appropriate strategies for improving interpersonal perception and self-esteem. The Development of Interpersonal Relationships * Explain the importance of attraction and power in interpersonal relationships. * Explain how interpersonal relationships develop. Managing Interpersonal Relationships * Determine appropriate interpersonal relationship management skills. * Create a strategy for managing interpersonal relationships. Conflict Management * Compare conflict management styles. * Determine appropriate conflict management skills for specific interpersonal relationship challenges. * Create a plan to manage interpersonal relationship challenges. Prerequisites: XCOM100


Foundations of Mass Communication
Course Number XCOM225
Credits 0.0

This Course Is A Survey Of The Basic Theories Upon Which Our Understanding Of Mass Communication Is Based. Ethical And Related Problems Of Mass Communication Will Be Studied From Contemporary And Historical Viewpoints. The Course Will Encourage A Critical Analysis Of The Performance Of The Mass Media. Topics And Objectives Print Media * Describe The Historical And Contemporary Roles Of The Print Media Industry In Society. * Compare And Contrast Major Publications In The Print Media Industry. Technology And The Print Media * Describe Types Of New Technology That Affect The Print Media Industry. * Analyze The Influence Of New Technology On The Print Media Industry. Electronic Media * Describe The Historical And Contemporary Roles Of Electronic Media Industries In Society. * Explain How Technological Transitions Have Shaped Electronic Media Industries. Technology And The Electronic Media * Analyze The Influence Of Digital Technology On The Electronic Media Industry. * Describe The Interaction Between Mass Media, New Technology, And The Public. Mass Media Messages * Analyze The Influence Of New Technology On Advertising And News Reporting Techniques. * Identify The Role Of Mass Media In Distributing Public Relations Messages. Sex And Gaming As Media Content * Evaluate The Fcc’s Process Of Classifying Material As Indecent, Obscene, Or Profane. * Analyze The Effects Of Objectionable Material On Children And Adult’s Behavior. Government And The Media * Compare And Contrast Authoritarian And Libertarian Styles Of Mass Media. * Explain The Interaction Between Mass Media And Government. Law And Ethics In The Mass Media * Explain Laws That Apply To Mass Media Messages. * Analyze Ethical Issues In Mass Media. Effects Of Mass Media Messages * Analyze Effects Of Mass Media Messages In Society. Prerequisites: Xcom100


Image Editing and Implementation
Course Number IT235
Credits 0.0

Design elements such as basic composition, style, use of color, textures, graphic manipulation, photographic re-touching and text/font design are introduced. File formats, sizing, and packaging for export are covered in this class. Concepts such as pre-press production and printing are introduced. Toolwire® will host Adobe® Photoshop® CS4 for this class. Topics and Objectives Navigation and Configuration * Identify functions and features of Photoshop®. * Determine the capabilities of imaging tools available in Photoshop®. Acquiring and Saving Images * Examine the legal issues associated with image acquisition and implementation. * Retrieve files and images from the internet and storage. * Apply methods of viewing and saving images. Correcting and Restoring Images * Differentiate image correction and restoration methods. * Compare and contrast quick-fix functions with those of standard editing functions. * Apply basic changes to parts of an image. Using Selection Tools * Demonstrate lasso tool functions. * Illustrate the function and use of various selection tool applications. Creating and Managing Layers and Masks * Execute methods of layering within images. * Demonstrate how masks integrate with layers. Adding Objects and Shapes * Produce images that include objects, masks, and shapes. Applying Effects, Filters, and Text * Demonstrate how filters are applied to images. * Create text effects within images. Saving and Organizing Images * Appraise a Photoshop® creation. * Organize images using Adobe® Bridge. * Produce an image presentation. Modifying Images and Creations * Describe the benefits of using Photoshop® in Web design. * Construct an electronic photo creation. Prerequisites: IT205, IT220, XCOM100


Communication Variety: The Spice of Life
Course Number CMC260
Credits 0.0

The field of communications underlies virtually every aspect of today’s increasing global interdependence. This course addresses how customs, values, and societal systems generate expectations—often tacit—about how communication should occur, and problems—often misunderstood—about how communication is occurring. Students develop greater sensitivity to intercultural and intra-cultural differences to foster effective information exchange and develop mutually satisfying communication solutions. Topics and Objectives Cultural Foundations—The Basis of Our Expectations * Discuss intracultural differences. * Evaluate examples of cultural diffusion. * Justify both sides of a cultural disagreement. Cultural Systems—Different Solutions to Similar Needs * Relate cultural knowledge to effective business relationships. * Define distinguishing characteristics of U.S. social, economic, political, and educational systems. Cultural Values—What Makes Us Tick * Determine strategies for accommodating differing work attitudes abroad. * Distinguish the effects of individualism and collectivism on business communication. * Outline core American values that may not be found in other cultures. Culture Shock—How We Cope With Difference * Formulate a plan to anticipate and cope with culture shock. * Analyze critical issues and underlying assumptions in an intercultural scenario. Language Diversity—How We Frame Meaning * Identify conversational taboos. * Explain how ethnic or subcultural groups in the U.S.engage in verbal dueling. * Apply the relationship between culture and language to personal experience. Manners and Customs—How We Behave * Assess the importance of dining etiquette. * Analyze parameters of position and status. Business Protocol—Workplace Dos and Don'ts * Determine the role of bribery in other countries. * Evaluate the role of humor in business communication. * Compose a guide of American business practices for international visitors. Negotiation Strategies—Navigating Intercultural Communication * Describe the cultural bases of negotiation conflict. * Contrast the negotiation models, styles, and outcome preferences of various countries. International Business—Preparing for Success * Prioritize cultural differences for effective business communication. * Summarize key information that promotes effective intercultural communication. Prerequisites: XCOM200


Information Strategies: Putting 2 and 2 Together
Course Number CMC240
Credits 0.0

This course addresses effective communication strategies via the gathering, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis that comprise information literacy as a standard of modern problem solving. Students recognize the need for information, formulate meaningful questions to guide their search, assess what is cogent, interpret bias, and integrate material for a compelling presentation. Furthermore, they perform these tasks with a regard for social responsibility and professional ethics. Topics and Objectives Message Analysis—The Story * Review bias and ethical use of information. * Determine information credibility, recognizability, and verifiability. * Evaluate effects of message context and content. Resource Analysis—The Landscape * Prepare search questions to avoid message bias. * Evaluate effective information sources. Information Gathering—The Quest * Identify purpose, audience, and information sources. * Conduct an interactive information search. * Compare news monitoring services. Journalistic Information—The Media * Associate types of journalistic information with types of journalistic stories. * Apply effective journalistic sources to multiple points of view. Informal Information—The Lore * Analyze yourself as an informal source. * Identify effective informal sources. * Summarize cautions regarding the use of information from informal sources. Library Information—The Data * Classify information characteristics associated with different kinds of libraries. * Provide an information trail from indexes, bibliographies, or references. Information Analysis—The Selection * Prioritize critical thinking questions. * Evaluate tests of evidence. * Demonstrate critical evaluation of information. Information Organization—The Synthesis * Explain the effect of different information syntheses. * Distinguish between the minimum story and the maximum story. Information Use—The Limit * Delineate a journalist’s societal, organizational, and individual obligations regarding information ethics. * Evaluate information strategies. Prerequisites: XCOM100


Program description: The Associate of Arts in Communications degree concentration provides a foundation and overview within the academic disciplines of communication arts, social sciences, mathematics, life sciences and the humanities.

The Associate of Arts with a concentration in Communications degree focuses on the growth and convergence of telecommunications technologies, the role of media in a democratic society, and standards of social responsibility within the culture of journalism. The courses in this communications degree will help you develop communication processes and information strategies for problem solving.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Networking & Telecommunications
Intro to LAN Technologies
Course Number NTC240

This Foundational Course Covers Local Area Network Topics Including Rationale For Networking, Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Models, Common Network Topologies And Architecture, Client/server Concepts, Basic Hardware Devices And Usage, And Basic Networking Security Concepts. Topics And Objectives Local Area Networks And The Osi Model * Differentiate Between Types Of Networks. * Define Key Terms Related To The Osi Model. Media Topologies And Technologies * Differentiate Different Lan Topologies. * Differentiate Between Types Of Connectivity. Protocols * Distinguish Between Various Networking Protocols. Network Operating Systems * Distinguish Between Windows, Novell Netware, And Linux Networking. Network Services And Security * Explain The Various Network Services. * Give Examples Of Threats, Vulnerabilities, And Exploits To Networks And How They Relate To Each Other. * Plan A Lan.


Intro to WAN Technologies
Course Number NTC242

This Course Covers Wide Area Networking Concepts And Its Interface With Metropolitan Area Networks (man) And Local Area Networks (lan). The Course Will Cover Telecommunication Technologies, Backbone Technologies, Hardware Device Protocol, Hardware Selection And Usage, And Basic Wan Security Considerations And Planning. Topics And Objectives Networking Basics * Describe The Components That Make Up A Wide Area Network (wan). * Differentiate Between Data, Voice, And Video Network Traffic. * Define A Private Branch Exchange (pbx). * Describe The Main Protocols Used For Voice Over Ip (voip). Network Technology And Protocols * Discuss The Differences Between Public And Private Networks. * Identify The Purpose Of Subnetting And Default Gateways. * Describe Ethernet, Token Ring, And Fddi. * Explain How A Virtual Local Area Network (vlan) Would Be Used In A Corporate Environment. Wan Technology * Identify The Function Of A Channel Service Unit/data Service Unit (csu/dsu). * Determine Appropriate Situations For Using Dsl And Cable Connection Services. * Compare And Contrast Packet Switching And Circuit Switching. Network Security * Analyze Network Security Risks. * Identify How Different Types Of Firewalls Protect Networks. * Compare And Contrast Private Key And Public Key Encryption. Wireless Technology * Discuss The Different Types Of Wireless Signals As They Relate To A Wan. * Design A Wan.


Intro to IT Security
Course Number CMGT244

This course introduces general concepts of information systems security. Content includes governmental views, positions and processes of national security. Coursework explores other concepts, including contingency and business resumption planning, backup schemes and implementation strategies, as well as various types of invasive actions and prevention measures. Topics and Objectives Information Security Principles and Security Architecture * Explain the principles of information security. * Differentiate among types of security policies. * Summarize the concept of a trusted computing base. * Explain the ring of trust model. * Describe the Trusted Computer Security Evaluation Criteria. Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery Planning, and Security Law * Outline the steps involved in developing a Business Continuity Plan. * Describe the key elements of a Disaster Recovery Plan. * Describe the different types of cyber crime and the areas of risk. Physical Security Control and Operations Security * Distinguish between logical and physical security. * Outline the major categories of physical security threats. * Outline the types of controls needed for secure operations. * Differentiate between the principle of least privilege and the principle of separation of duties. Access Control Systems, Cryptography, and Network Security * Discuss how access control and authentication methodologies secure systems. * Explain the concept of cryptography. * Outline the roles of packet-filtering routers and firewalls and how they protect a network. Intrusion Selection and Application Development Security * Describe the two main classes of intrusion. * List the characteristics of a good intrusion detection system. * Distinguish among several types of malicious software. * Create a security policy.


Skills for Professional Development
Course Number GEN300
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Skills Necessary For Successful Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Research, And Communication. The Course Is Designed To Aid Adult Learners In Acquiring And Improving The Core Competencies That Are Necessary At University Of Phoenix. Students Examine Their Reasons For Returning To School And Develop Strategies For Achieving Educational Goals In School, Work, And Personal Settings. Students Are Also Introduced To The University Library And Learn How To Access Its Resources Successfully. (3 Credits) *for Flexibility In Scheduling, Campuses Are Permitted To Schedule Gen/200 To Satisfy Gen/300 Requirements.


Management Information Systems
Course Number CIS205

This course introduces the fundamentals of computer systems and the role of information processing in today's business environment. An overview is presented of information systems, systems development, operating systems and programming, database management, networking and telecommunications, and the Internet.


Fundamentals of Programming with Algorithms and Logic
Course Number IT210

This course provides students with a basic understanding of programming practices. Concepts covered include flowcharting, pseudocode methodologies, and an understanding of programming practices. Students will learn how these concepts, when properly applied, improve program design.


Web Design I
Course Number WEB236

This course introduces effective web design principles and the essential role of the web designer in today's business environment. Topics covered include site architecture, page layout, navigation, content, functionality and usability. Students will evaluate existing web sites and apply best practices to prototype a unique design using a web authoring application. Topics and Objectives Website Planning * Identify purpose and target audience. * Illustrate a site architecture map. Web Design Concepts & Techniques * Define fundamental Web design terminology. * Explain design principles for effective site navigation. * Identify Web design tools and their applications. Website Content * Recognize common media formats and plug-ins. * Explain the effective use of graphics and media in Web site design. * Discuss copyright implications. * Explain how to optimize content for search engines. Website Effectiveness * Recognize design principles of basic website appearance and functionality. * Evaluate business and e-business Web page layouts, navigation, and performance. * Identify attributes of usability. * Critique usability of a website. * Recognize accessibility standards. Website Prototyping * Apply effective design concepts and techniques to prototype a homepage and secondary page. Prerequisites: CIS205,GEN300,GEN101


Web Design II
Course Number WEB237

This Course Introduces Development Tools And Techniques Used To Publish Web Pages On The World Wide Web. Students Use Basic Hypertext Markup Language, Scripting And Presentational Technologies To Create Web Sites Without The Aid Of A Software Authoring Application. Topics Include Xhtml, Css, Javascript, Server Hosting, Site Publication, Site Maintenance And Search Engine Optimization. Topics And Objectives Introduction To Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (xhtml) * Identify Basic Xhtml Tags And Attributes. * Explain Viewing And Testing Markup Code In Various Web Browsers. * Describe How Cascading Style Sheets (css) Are Applied For Formatting Web Content. Website Development * Develop Xhtml Code That Displays Content In A Web Browser. * Apply Styles And Style Sheets To Control Various Attributes Of A Web Page And Its Content. * Create Internal, External And Anchor Hyperlinks In A Web Page. * Distinguish The Development Environment From A Production Environment. Website Interaction * Create An Effective Navigation System. * Create A Basic Web Form. * Describe How To Integrate Multimedia Files Into A Web Page. * Apply Usability Best Practices. * Apply Principles Of Effective Technical Writing And Web Design. Introduction To Javascript * Explain The Basic Application For Javascript. * Explain Javascript Arrays, Loops And Conditional Statements. * Apply Javascript Effectively In Website. Website Publication & Maintenance * Identify The Importance Of Professional Standards In Web Development. * Explain How Meta Data Can Promote A Website. * Identify The Process To Publish A Website. * Identify The Need To Maintain And Redesign A Website. Prerequisites: Web236


Technical Writing Fundamentals
Course Number ENG221

This Course Covers The Fundamentals And Best Practices Of Using Written Communication In Business And In The Information Technologies. Topics Include Strategies, Techniques, And Nuances For Producing Emails, Memos, Reports, Proposals, Project Specifications, And User Manuals, As Well As Other Technical Documents. Topics And Objectives The Technical Writing Process * Identify Uses Of Technical Writing In The Corporate Environment. * Describe The Differences Between Technical Writing And Expository Writing. Technical Writing In The Corporate Environment * Identify Intellectual Property Issues In The Corporate Environment. * Create Letters And Memos With Appropriate Formatting For The Corporate Environment. Writing Reports & Proposals * Apply Effective Document Design And Graphics In Technical Writing. * Create A Request For Proposal. Writing Technical Instructions & User Manuals * Integrate Appropriate Visual Elements Into A User Manual. * Create Clear, Concise, Accurate, And Coherent Written Communication For A User Manual. * Identify The Criteria For Writing A User Manual. Preparing Presentations * Use Effective Layout And Design In Presentations. * Prepare A Presentation For A Management Audience. Prerequisites: Gen300, Gen101


Business Systems
Course Number BSA310

This Course Reviews Common Business Systems And Their Interrelationships. Business Systems Covered Include Finance, Accounting, Sales, Marketing, Human Resources, Legal And Operations. Emphasis Is Placed Upon The Inputs And Outputs Of Information Systems, The Potential For Integration Of The Systems, And Information Systems Security. Topics And Objectives Business Structure * Identify The Application Of Information Systems In Business. * Examine The Impact Of Information Systems On The Business Structure. Business Environment * Identify Economic, Government And Legal Influences On Business. * Describe The Ethical And Security Considerations For An Information System In Business. * Describe The Need For Security Measures In It Organizations And Information Systems. Finance And Accounting * Examine Accounting Information Systems. * Analyze Accounting Information Systems And Business Processes. Sales And Marketing * Examine Contemporary Marketing Practices. * Describe Marketing In The Electronic Commerce Environment. Information Systems * Identify Types Of Information Systems And Required Security. * Apply The Concepts Of Information Systems To Business Processes. Prerequisites: Cis205, Eng221, Gen300, Gen101


Fundamentals of Business Systems Development
Course Number BSA375

This Course Introduces The Fundamental, Logical, And Design Considerations Addressed During System And Application Software Development. It Provides A Solid Background In Information Systems Analysis And Design Techniques Through A Combination Of Theory And Application. The Systems Development Life Cycle Will Be Fundamental To The Course. Topics And Objectives Systems Development Life Cycle * Define The Systems Development Life Cycle. Systems Analysis * Explain Scope And Feasibility. * Define Systems Analysis And Systems Requirements. Systems Design * Define Design Specifications. Systems Development And Implementation * Analyze Development. * Analyze Implementation. Maintenance * Identify Types Of Maintenance. Prerequisites: Bsa310, Cis319, Gen300, Gen101, Comm215, Mth209


Project Planning & Implementation
Course Number CMGT410

This course provides the foundation for understanding the broad concepts of successful planning, organization, and implementation within the realm of information technology. This course uses real-world examples and identifies common mistakes and pitfalls in project management. Topics covered include project scoping, estimating, budgeting, scheduling, tracking and controlling.


Database Concepts
Course Number DBM381

This course covers database concepts. Topics include data analysis, the principal data models with emphasis on the relational model, entity-relationship diagrams, database design, normalization, and database administration.


SQL for Business
Course Number POS410

This Course Covers Structured Query Language (sql) That Provides A Unified Language That Lets You Query, Manipulate, Or Control Data In A Business Applications Environment. Topics And Objectives Sql Table * Create Tables Using Sql. Table Queries * Apply Single-table Queries. * Apply Multiple-table Queries. Data Changes * Apply Changes To Data. * Apply Changes To Tables. Reports * Apply Reporting In Sql. Embedded Sql * Explain Embedded Sql. * Apply Sql To A Business Application. Prerequisites: Comm215, Dbm380, Gen300, Mth209, Gen101, Mth212, Mth233


Network and Telecommunications Concepts
Course Number NTC360

This course provides an overview of telecommunication systems in a business environment. Topics covered include voice communications, standards, transmission, networks, and internetworking.


Java Programming I
Course Number PRG420

This Course Introduces Object-oriented Programming In The Context Of Business Applications Development. The Basics Of The Java Programming Language Are Covered. Topics And Objectives Java Basics * Explain The Java Virtual Machine. * Explain The Terminology Of Object-oriented Terminology. * Explain Documenting, Coding, Compiling, Executing, Testing, And Debugging Java Programs. Data Types * Define Data Types. * Explain Classes And Methods. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Selection And Repetition * Explain Selection. * Explain Repetition. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Arrays * Explain Arrays. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Objects * Explain Objects. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Pos370, Gen101, Mth212, Prg210, Mth233


Java Programming II
Course Number PRG421

This Course Continues The Subject In Prg/420, Java Programming I. Topics Include Designing Complex Applications And The Use Of Data Files. Topics And Objectives User Interface * Explain Java User Interfaces. Applets * Explain Applets. * Apply Java Programming. Threads * Explain Error Handling. * Explain Threads. * Apply Java Programming. Files * Explain File Read And Write. * Apply Java Programming. Multimedia * Explain Graphics, Sound, And Animation. * Apply Java Programming. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Prg420, Gen101, Mth212, Mth233


Intro to W-Lan Technologies
Course Number IT241

This Course Explores Concepts Of Wireless Networking Systems, Including Wireless Networking Topologies, Hardware Protocols, Hardware Selection And Implementation, Interfaces With Lan, Man, And Wan Networks, Basic Wireless Security, And Network Integration Concepts. Topics And Objectives Introduction To Wireless Technologies * Identify Various Applications Of Wireless Technologies. * Explain The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Wireless Networks. How Wireless Works * Calculate Radio Frequency Gain And Loss. * Describe The Role Of Antennas In Radio Wave Transmission. * Explain Principles Of Radio Wave Transmission. Wireless Lan Components And Standards * Compare And Contrast Types Of Wireless Networks. * Identify The Hardware Devices Used In A Wireless Lan. Wireless Physical Layer Standards * Identify The Purpose Of The Physical Layer In The Osi Reference Model. * Compare Wireless Modulation Schemes Used In Ieee Wireless Lans. Conducting A Site Survey * Identify The Benefits Of Performing A Site Survey. * Describe The Tools Used In A Site Survey And Their Functions. * Analyze Building Layouts For Wireless Network Performance. Planning, Designing, And Deploying A Wireless Lan * Assess The Need For A Wireless Network. * Outline The Steps For Designing A Wireless Lan. * Explain The Importance Of Providing User Support. * Design A Layout For Wireless Lan Components. Wireless Mac And Network Layer Standards * Explain The Benefits Of Mobile Ip. * Describe The Functions Of The Mac Layer In A Wireless Lan. * Compare Wireless Lan Configurations. Securing And Managing A Wireless Network * Compare Network Monitoring Tools And Their Uses. * Explain Basic Wireless Network Maintenance Functions. * Analyze Wireless Lan Security Protections And Their Vulnerabilities. * Identify Types Of Wireless Network Attacks. Future Wireless Technologies * Summarize The Uses Of Wpan, Wlan, Wman, And Wwan Networks. * Develop A Plan For A Wireless Lan.


Introduction to UNIX
Course Number POS420

This Course Is A Survey Of The Unix Operations. The Student Will Gain An Understanding Of The Internal Operations Of The Unix System, Which Enables The User To Make Efficient Use Of Files, File Systems And Processes. Commands For Efficient Management Of Unix System Files, File Systems And Processes Are Also Examined.


Application Implementation
Course Number CMGT445

This Course Will Cover The Process And Issues Associated With The Implementation Of A Computer Application Information System. Topics Will Include The Processes Associated Sponsor And Stakeholder Approvals, End User Training, Technical Staff Training, Conversion From Existing Application(s) And Integration Into The Information System Production Environment. This Course Will Also Examine The Use Of Development And Testing Environments And The Testing Procedures Related To The Implementation Of A Computer Application Information System. Topics And Objectives Implementation Planning * Identify Implementation Milestones And Resources. * Explain Phases Of Application Implementation. * Explain The Implementation Plan. * Identify Implementation Stakeholders. * Explain The Implementation Plan Approval Process. Software Acquisition * Explain The Request For Proposal Process. * Compare Methods Of Software Evaluation And Selection. * Explain The Vendor Selection Process. Change Control And Project Risk Management * Explain The Change Control Process. * Explain Software Versioning. * Evaluate Methods For Identifying Areas Of Project Risk. * Explore Project Risk Mitigation Strategies. Application Documentation * Describe The Content And Purpose Of Application Documentation. * Compare Technical, User And System Training Documentation. Technical Environment Preparation * Compare Development, Test, And Production Technical Environments. * Explain The System Turnover Process. Application Testing * Compare Application Testing Objectives And Methods. * Explain Test Data Preparation. * Organization Preparation * Explain Organizational Change Strategies. * Explain Process Business Procedures. Training * Compare Technical Training And End User Training. * Explain Methods And Timing Considerations For Training Personnel. Data Conversion * Explain Data Transformation And Migration. * Explain Conversion Programs And Procedures. * Explain Sample Data Extraction For Testing. * Describe The Conversion Schedule. System Launch * Compare System Startup Alternatives. * Identify Implementation Roles. * Explain Timeline For Key Activities. * Describe Startup Activities. System Support And Maintenance * Explain System Support Roles And Functions. * Explain The Process Of Enhancing System Functionality. Prerequisites: Bsa310, Bsa375, Bsa400, Bsa411, Bsa412, Cis205, Cmgt410, Cmgt411, Dbm380, Eng221, Gen300, Ntc360, Pos355, Pos410, Prg210, Prg420, Prg421, Web236, Web237, Gen101


Program description: This program is focused on the acquisition of theory and application of technical competencies associated with the information technology profession. The courses prepare students with fundamental knowledge in core technologies, such as systems analysis and design, programming, database design, network architecture and administration, Web technologies and application development, implementation and maintenance. The Networking and Telecommunications concentration of the BSIT is designed to provide specific theories, competencies, and skills necessary for success as a network administrator. This concentration is developed with a focus on the Networking+ body of knowledge, including local area networks and wide are networks

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Communications Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Network and Communications Management
Principles of Ethics
Course Number HUMN-445
Credits 3.0

This course provides knowledge of ethics students need to make moral decisions in both their professional and personal lives. Combining moral theories and applied ethics topics, coursework helps students explore traditional and contemporary ethics dilemmas, as well as reflect on and evaluate their moral beliefs. Balancing respect for diversity and claims of universality, the course puts ethics principles in the social and cultural context of the world today


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized


Management of Technology Resources
Course Number MGMT-408
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on developing and applying management and business skills in typical technical environments, as well as on technical support operations. Management approaches in resource planning, resource utilization, staffing, training, customer service, cost/benefit analysis and ongoing support are presented. Students apply business skills in developing and evaluating requests for proposal (RFPs) and related acquisition methods, and consider issues related to in-house and outsource solutions.


Introduction to Networking with Lab
Course Number NETW-202
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Underlying Technology Of Local Area Networks (lans), Wide Area Networks (wans) And The Internet. Topics Include Networking Media, The Open System Interconnection (osi) Model, Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip), An Overview Of Routing And Switching, And Small Network Configuration And Troubleshooting. Students Prepare And Test Cabling And Become Familiar With Protocol Analyzers.


Introduction to Routing with Lab
Course Number NETW-204
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Router Configuration, Maintenance And Troubleshooting; Routing Protocols; And Use Of Access Control Lists (acls) As A Traffic Management Tool. Students Gain Commandline- Interface (cli) Knowledge And Configure Local And Wide Area Networks With Routers. In Addition, Students Apply The Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip) Suite Of Commands And Acls To Real Networks Under Troubleshooting And Traffic Management Scenarios. Prerequisite: Netw-202


Introduction to Switching with Lab
Course Number NETW-206
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Advanced Internet Protocol (ip) Addressing Techniques, Intermediate Routing Protocols, Switch Configuration And Maintenance, Virtual Local Area Networks (vlans) And Related Protocols, And Network Design Strategies. Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks. Prerequisite: Netw-204 / 4-3


Introduction to WAN Technologies with Lab
Course Number NETW-208
Credits 3.0

The Course Addresses Wide Area Network (wan) Design Using Various Technologies; Wan Protocols Configuration And Troubleshooting; And Network Management. In The Lab, Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks, As Well As Design, Configure And Troubleshoot Various Wan Topologies. Use Of The Following Protocols And Technologies Is Expanded Or Introduced: Network Address Translation And Port Address Translation, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, Point-topoint Protocol Authentication, Integrated Services Digital Network, Dial-on-demand Routing And Frame Relay. Prerequisite: Netw-206 / 4-3


Network Operating Systems - Windows, with Lab
Course Number NETW-230
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using The Microsoft Network Operating System (nos). Topics Include Installation Of Server And Workstation Software, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Domain Controllers, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Network Operating Systems - UNIX, with Lab
Course Number NETW-240
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using Unix Or Similar Network Operating Systems (noss). Topics Include Server And Workstation Software Installation, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Voice/VoIP Administration with Lab
Course Number NETW-250
Credits 3.0

This course examines technologies and systems that serve voice traffic, including enterprise switches (e.g., private branch exchanges and Centrex), networked telephony solutions, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), call centers, voice processing and wireless systems. Administration of these systems is emphasized, and relevant troubleshooting and security issues are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-204 / 4-3


Wired, Optical and Wireless Communications with Lab
Course Number NETW-310
Credits 4.0

This course examines wired, optical and wireless signals and their transmission in the network. Topics include codes and numbering systems, data transmission methods, basic pointto- point networks, error detection and correction, and Internet access technologies. Prerequisite: NETW-204


Converged Networks with Lab
Course Number NETW-320
Credits 4.0

This course examines foundations for current and emerging networks that deliver voice, data and video/imaging through various technologies. Topics include core switching, broadband and edge access, Internet protocol telephony, adding packet capabilities to circuit-switched networks, 3G solutions, presence-enabled communications, security and troubleshooting. Telecommunications regulation and standards are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-208


Wireless Technologies and Services with Lab
Course Number NETW-360
Credits 4.0

This course examines wireless technology and how wireless networks operate. Wireless network components, design, security and troubleshooting are explored, as is wireless network regulation. Trends and related issues in wireless technology and services are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-310 /


Enterprise Network Design with Lab
Course Number NETW-410
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Apply Knowledge Of Wired And Wireless Network Technologies And Services – As Well As Network Security And Cost Consideration – To Develop Network Solutions That Meet Business Requirements. Critical Thinking, Problem-solving, Troubleshooting And Teamwork Are Emphasized. Prerequisite: Netw-230 Or Netw-240


Enterprise Network Management with Lab
Course Number NETW-420
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Develop Skills Related To Ongoing Network Management. Topics Include Issues Relating To Wireless; Traffic Analysis; Troubleshooting/problem-solving; And Improving Network Performance, Reliability And Security. Coursework Integrates Business Management Considerations With Network Management To Support Business Goals. Prerequisites: Math-221 And Netw-410


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Advanced Topics in Networking
Course Number NETW-471
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on emerging and advanced topics in the networking field. Students explore advances in technology and their implications in designing, implementing, securing and managing networks. Prerequisite: NETW-420


Senior Project with Lab
Course Number NETW-490
Credits 5.0

Through An Applications-oriented Team Project, Students Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project Management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation, Troubleshooting And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisites: Mgmt-404 And Netw-420


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 3-3


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In The Context Of A General Introduction To Psychology And The Social Sciences, This Course Explores Human Development Across The Life Span. Topics Include Physical, Cognitive, Psychological, Social And Moral Development Of Infants, Children, Adolescents And Adults. Coursework Also Addresses Developmental Theories, Motivation, Personality Development, Culture, And General Psychological Theories And Principles. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


PC Hardware and Software with Lab
Course Number COMP-129
Credits 3.0

This course explores the PC system from software, hardware and operating system points of view. Hardware topics include system boards, processors, memory, power supplies, input/output (I/O) ports, internal adapters, printers and basic networking devices. Software topics include client/server operating systems and installation, as well as licensing software applications.


Introduction to Scripting and Database with Lab
Course Number COMP-230
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic programming concepts, logic and scripting language tools used to automate basic system administrator processes. Critical thinking, logic and troubleshooting are emphasized. Database applications are also introduced, helping students develop basic skills in using a typical database. Security topics are discussed. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 5-4


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.

Program Name: Graduate Certificate in Network & Communications Management
Networking Concepts and Applications
Course Number IS589
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on design, development and operation of a data communications system and computer network, and emphasizes managing data distribution and access. The course includes essential elements of networks including hardware, software and interfaces. Students use a networking software tool to build and analyze network models. No prerequisite


Principles of Information Security and Privacy
Course Number SE571
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of security in information systems. Covered are various aspects of security in computing, including security threats and controls; basic cryptography and its applications; network intrusion detection and prevention; security administration and planning; anonymity and privacy; legal issues; protection; and ethics. Coursework also examines controls in information systems, and addresses security issues surrounding information systems and computer-generated data. No prerequisite


Network Security
Course Number SE572
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Telecommunications Law and Regulation
Course Number TM584
Credits 3.0

This course covers the legal and regulatory environment for telecommunications services. Coursework focuses on developing telecommunications law and policy as related to a variety of telecommunications technologies, including the broadcast spectrum of radio and television; cable and satellite; wireline and cellular telephone; and the Internet. Emphasized are the interconnected nature of media, as well as the policy rationale and techniques of government oversight.


Network Design and Management
Course Number TM585
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on technologies and processes used to design, optimize and manage networks. Topics include functions of network standards, protocols and architecture; network design and optimization processes; and network management. Topics also include network design requirements for support of high bandwidth multimedia applications, wireless local area connections and security strategies. Students use a networking software tool to build and simulate network models.


Wireless Communication Systems
Course Number TM589
Credits 3.0

This course provides an essential foundation in core wireless technologies. Topics provide managers with required knowledge of voice and data systems. The current wireless industry, its recent past and emerging systems are explored through real-world projects and practitioner-based case studies. P


IP Telephony/VoIP
Course Number TM590
Credits 3.0

This course examines technologies that carry voice communications over an IP network, including digitization and packetization of voice streams. Coursework addresses VoIP standards and protocols such as SIP and H.323 that support creation of telephony systems using advanced VoIP technology applications. Fundamentals of VoIP such as QoS, traffic aggregation issues, bandwidth management and network assessment are also investigated.


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking
solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding
of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.
Program Objectives
The NCM program is designed to produce graduates
who are able to:
• Develop network solutions matched to the needs
of the business.
• Manage technologies to support business objectives.
• Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
• Demonstrate project management skills.
• Apply research and problem-solving skills.
DeVry accomplishes these goals by:
• Providing coursework on networking principles
and technologies to develop networking solutions
for business using industry standards.
• Incorporating networking and communications
technologies into courses based on current and
emerging demands such as, but not limited to,
wireless and security.

Program Name: Graduate Certificate in Wireless Communications
Network Security
Course Number SE572
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Wireless Devices and Applications
Course Number TM562
Credits 3.0

Wireless Devices and Applications


Wireless Technologies
Course Number TM561
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Wireless Networks
Course Number TM563
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Management of Wireless Systems
Course Number TM564

By completing just six courses you can earn your Keller Wireless Communications Certificate. If you earn a stand-alone credential and decide to pursue a Keller master's degree at a later date, you may be eligible to transfer your wireless communications certificate course credits toward that degree. The following are the required courses for Keller's Wireless Communications Certificate:


Wireless Communication Systems
Course Number TM589

By completing just six courses you can earn your Keller Wireless Communications Certificate. If you earn a stand-alone credential and decide to pursue a Keller master's degree at a later date, you may be eligible to transfer your wireless communications certificate course credits toward that degree. The following are the required courses for Keller's Wireless Communications Certificate:


Networking Concepts and Applications
Course Number IS589
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on design, development and operation of a data communications system and computer network, and emphasizes managing data distribution and access. The course includes essential elements of networks including hardware, software and interfaces. Students use a networking software tool to build and analyze network models. No prerequisite


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.

Program Name: Master of Network and Communications Management
Wired, Optical and Wireless Communications with Lab
Course Number NETW-310
Credits 4.0

This course examines wired, optical and wireless signals and their transmission in the network. Topics include codes and numbering systems, data transmission methods, basic pointto- point networks, error detection and correction, and Internet access technologies. Prerequisite: NETW-204


Converged Networks with Lab
Course Number NETW-320
Credits 4.0

This course examines foundations for current and emerging networks that deliver voice, data and video/imaging through various technologies. Topics include core switching, broadband and edge access, Internet protocol telephony, adding packet capabilities to circuit-switched networks, 3G solutions, presence-enabled communications, security and troubleshooting. Telecommunications regulation and standards are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-208


Wireless Technologies and Services with Lab
Course Number NETW-360
Credits 4.0

This course examines wireless technology and how wireless networks operate. Wireless network components, design, security and troubleshooting are explored, as is wireless network regulation. Trends and related issues in wireless technology and services are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-310 /


Enterprise Network Design with Lab
Course Number NETW-410
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Apply Knowledge Of Wired And Wireless Network Technologies And Services – As Well As Network Security And Cost Consideration – To Develop Network Solutions That Meet Business Requirements. Critical Thinking, Problem-solving, Troubleshooting And Teamwork Are Emphasized. Prerequisite: Netw-230 Or Netw-240


Enterprise Network Management with Lab
Course Number NETW-420
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Develop Skills Related To Ongoing Network Management. Topics Include Issues Relating To Wireless; Traffic Analysis; Troubleshooting/problem-solving; And Improving Network Performance, Reliability And Security. Coursework Integrates Business Management Considerations With Network Management To Support Business Goals. Prerequisites: Math-221 And Netw-410


Information Storage and Management with Lab
Course Number NETW-430
Credits 3.0

This course covers core logical and physical components that make up a storage system infrastructure, as well as application of those components for maintaining business continuity, storage security, and storage infrastructure monitoring and management. Prerequisite: NETW-320


Advanced Topics in Networking
Course Number NETW-471
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on emerging and advanced topics in the networking field. Students explore advances in technology and their implications in designing, implementing, securing and managing networks. Prerequisite: NETW-420


Senior Project with Lab
Course Number NETW-490
Credits 5.0

Through An Applications-oriented Team Project, Students Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project Management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation, Troubleshooting And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisites: Mgmt-404 And Netw-420


Senior Project I with Lab
Course Number NETW-494
Credits 2.0

In This Course, The First In A Two-course Sequence, Students Begin An Applications-oriented Team Project To Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project-management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisites: Mgmt-404 And Netw-420


Senior Project II with Lab
Course Number NETW-497
Credits 3.0

In This Course, A Continuation Of Netw-494, Students Further Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project-management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisite: Netw-494


Introduction to Networking with Lab
Course Number NETW-202
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Underlying Technology Of Local Area Networks (lans), Wide Area Networks (wans) And The Internet. Topics Include Networking Media, The Open System Interconnection (osi) Model, Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip), An Overview Of Routing And Switching, And Small Network Configuration And Troubleshooting. Students Prepare And Test Cabling And Become Familiar With Protocol Analyzers.


Introduction to Routing with Lab
Course Number NETW-204
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Router Configuration, Maintenance And Troubleshooting; Routing Protocols; And Use Of Access Control Lists (acls) As A Traffic Management Tool. Students Gain Commandline- Interface (cli) Knowledge And Configure Local And Wide Area Networks With Routers. In Addition, Students Apply The Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip) Suite Of Commands And Acls To Real Networks Under Troubleshooting And Traffic Management Scenarios. Prerequisite: Netw-202


Introduction to Switching with Lab
Course Number NETW-206
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Advanced Internet Protocol (ip) Addressing Techniques, Intermediate Routing Protocols, Switch Configuration And Maintenance, Virtual Local Area Networks (vlans) And Related Protocols, And Network Design Strategies. Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks. Prerequisite: Netw-204 / 4-3


Introduction to WAN Technologies with Lab
Course Number NETW-208
Credits 3.0

The Course Addresses Wide Area Network (wan) Design Using Various Technologies; Wan Protocols Configuration And Troubleshooting; And Network Management. In The Lab, Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks, As Well As Design, Configure And Troubleshoot Various Wan Topologies. Use Of The Following Protocols And Technologies Is Expanded Or Introduced: Network Address Translation And Port Address Translation, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, Point-topoint Protocol Authentication, Integrated Services Digital Network, Dial-on-demand Routing And Frame Relay. Prerequisite: Netw-206 / 4-3


Network Operating Systems - Windows, with Lab
Course Number NETW-230
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using The Microsoft Network Operating System (nos). Topics Include Installation Of Server And Workstation Software, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Domain Controllers, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Network Operating Systems - UNIX, with Lab
Course Number NETW-240
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using Unix Or Similar Network Operating Systems (noss). Topics Include Server And Workstation Software Installation, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Voice/VoIP Administration with Lab
Course Number NETW-250
Credits 3.0

This course examines technologies and systems that serve voice traffic, including enterprise switches (e.g., private branch exchanges and Centrex), networked telephony solutions, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), call centers, voice processing and wireless systems. Administration of these systems is emphasized, and relevant troubleshooting and security issues are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-204 / 4-3


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.

Communications Courses at University of Maryland University College

Program Name: MS in Information Technology: Telecommunications Management
Telecommunications Industry: Structure and Environment
Course Number TLMN 602
Credits 3.0

A study of major technological, legal, and regulatory developments (national and international) that have molded the structure of the current telecommunications industry. Topics include early legislation, the regulated monopoly, antitrust, divestiture, and recent legislation that has led to the current industry environment of competition and incipient integration of different industry segments. The roles of various national and international institutions in shaping the telecommunications industry are discussed.


Telecommunications Networks
Course Number TLMN 623
Credits 3.0

A Study Of Computer Networks And Telecommunications Functionality, Characteristics, And Configurations. Recent Advances In Standardization, Internetworking, And Deployment Of Lans (local Area Networks), Mans (metropolitan Area Networks), And Wans (wide Area Networks) Are Examined. Topics Include Network Topologies; Protocols; Architectures; And Current And Emerging Protocols Such As Asynchronous Transfer Mode (atm), 10 Gigabit Ethernet, And The Open Systems Interconnect (osi) Reference Model. Emphasis Is On Emerging Trends In Telecommunications, Network Technologies, And Services. Discussion Also Covers Strategies For Network Planning, Implementation, Management, And Security.


Satellite Communication Systems
Course Number TLMN 630
Credits 3.0

An analysis of issues surrounding the design and use of satellite communications systems. Topics include satellite system characteristics such as type, class (bandwidth, standards, and availability), applications, interfaces, traffic patterns, network installation, performance criteria, hardware, and cost. Current and planned satellite communications are examined and compared to future needs and technologies.


Network Management and Design
Course Number TLMN 641
Credits 3.0

A study of techniques that network managers can utilize to maintain and improve the performance of a telecommunications network. Network management systems are defined and explained. A description of how software package programs can monitor real-time performance of a network to identify problems is provided. Emphasis is on the five tasks traditionally involved with network management (fault management, configuration management, performance management, security management, and accounting management). Examples of current specific network management products are reviewed. Discussion also covers how the performance data gathered from monitoring can be archived and used later as an input when decisions are made on changes in the network architecture. Network design is studied for the development of new network architecture when only user requirements are known.


Wireless Telecommunications Systems
Course Number TLMN 645
Credits 3.0

A Review Of Wireless Telecommunications Systems From Micro-cell To Global Infrastructures. Emphasis Is On The Technology, Applications, And Limitations Of These Systems, Which Have Become An Essential Element Of The World Information Infrastructure. Topics Include Cellular Communication Principles, Coding, Antenna And Propagation Effects, Channel Access Schemes, Traffic Engineering, And Wireless Network Design, As Well As Terrestrial Systems Such As Cellular, Personal Communication Services (pcs), Dispatch, Wireless Local-area Networks (lans), And Wireless Data Systems. Discussion Also Covers Market Trends, Regulations, And Standards. Students Assess The Role Of Wireless Systems In Comparison With Other Telecommunications Alternatives Available To Organizations.


Capstone Course in Telecommunications Management
Course Number TLMN 670
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: Completion of 27 credits of program coursework. The application of knowledge and skills gained from previous study in telecommunications to real-world projects and to related business, technical, and ethical issues. Topics include entrepreneurship and venture creation, emerging telecommunications technologies and their applications, future trends, ethical development, and management. Focus is on demonstrating analytical, entrepreneurial, leadership, planning, managerial, and communication skills through a strategic research and development project for a telecommunications company.


Introduction to Graduate Library Research Skills
Course Number UCSP 611
Credits 0.0

(required Within The First 6 Credits Of Graduate Study For All New Graduate Students And All Inactive Students Who Reapply For Admission.) An Overview Of Online Library And Information Resources—material That Is Critical For 21st-century Managers. An In-depth Introduction To The Library Research Process And The Tools Necessary To Succeed In Graduate Study Are Provided. Emphasis Is On The Efficient And Effective Use Of A Variety Of Electronic Retrieval Systems, Including The Online Catalog Of The University System Of Maryland And Affiliated Institutions (usmai), Umuc’s Subscription Databases, And The Web. Discipline-specific Research Is Conducted In Order To Gain Experience In Formulating Viable Research Questions, Selecting The Most Appropriate Investigative Methods And Resources For Research, Locating Relevant Research Materials, Evaluating The Scholarly Value Of Sources, And Effectively Citing Sources. Introduction To Graduate Library Research Skills Is Designed To Familiarize Students With Online Library And Information Resources—material That Is Critical For 21st-century Managers. This Noncredit Course Is Required For All New Graduate Students And All Inactive Students Who Reapply For Admission. The Grading Method Is Pass/fail. Ucsp 611 Must Be Completed Within The First 6 Credits Of Graduate Study.


Information Technology Foundations
Course Number ITEC 610
Credits 3.0

A fundamental study of technology and its applications, as well as the economic and social issues they have raised. Topics include computers, peripherals, databases, and networks; operations (of business, government, and other enterprises), decision support systems, and acquisition of information technology resources; and information security, productivity, equitable access by users, intellectual property rights, and global reach. Discussion also covers current and future developments in the field and their implications.


Information Systems Analysis, Modeling, and Design
Course Number ITEC 630
Credits 3.0

(Formerly CSMN 635.) A study of systems analysis and design, using selected engineering and management science techniques and practices. Topics include requirements determination, modeling, decision making, and proposal development. The System Development Life Cycle Model, including system implementation and post implementation activities, is examined. Emphasis is on the specification of the information system�s logical and physical analysis and design from a management perspective. Research and project assignments related to information systems analysis, design, implementation, and/or project planning and control, require individual and group work.


Information Technology Project Management
Course Number ITEC 640
Credits 3.0

An examination of the fundamental principles and practice of managing programs and projects in an information processing and high-tech environment. The dynamic nature of IT and the effect of life cycles are explored. The fundamental building blocks of high-tech management styles (including project planning, organizational structure, team building, and effective control mechanisms) are addressed. Discussion covers the effect of product and project life cycles in delivering a successful IT project, considering the obsolescence factors in procurement/ stakeholder contracts. The goal is to gain a solid foundation to successfully manage each phase of the project life cycle, work within organizational and cost constraints, set goals linked directly to stakeholder needs, and utilize proven management tools to execute a dynamic project on time and within budget. Emphasis is on how to apply the essential concepts, processes, and techniques in the management of large-scale governmental or commercial programs.


Economics and Financial Analysis for Technology Managers
Course Number TMAN 625
Credits 3.0

A study of the financial tools managers use to find answers to four important questions: What is the financial condition of the firm What long-term investment should the firm make How can the money be raised for the investments And how will the firm meet its daily financial requirements Topics include accounting statements, tax implications, types of costs, profit recognition, financial markets, investment decision tools, net present value, free cash flows, project financing, valuation of firms, risk-return, cost of capital, long-term financing, short-term financing, and equity financing for entrepreneurs. Discussion also covers mergers and acquisition activities, governance and ethics, and international aspects. Business cases from contemporary firms and readings relevant to technology management are used to illustrate the application of financial concepts.


Network and Internet Security
Course Number INFA 620
Credits 3.0

(formerly Tlmn 672.) An Introduction To The Security Concepts Needed For The Design, Use And Implementation Of Secure Voice And Data Communications Networks, Including The Internet. A Brief Review Of Networking Technology And Standards (including An Introduction To Internet Communication Protocols) Is Provided. Security Subjects Addressed Include Defense Models, Security Policy Development, Authentication And Authorization Controls, Firewalls, Packet Filtering, Virtual Private Networks (vpns) And Wireless Network Security


Program description: The Telecommunications Management specialization is designed to provide the technical knowledge and management skills needed to plan, acquire, operate, and evaluate telecommunication systems. This specialization emphasizes critical management concepts, such as the structure and environment of the telecommunications industry, strategic planning, financial management, and quality improvement.

Communications Courses at Jones International University

Program Name: BABC in Communication Management
College Mathematic
Course Number MATH101
Credits 3.0

This course helps students to apply financial mathematics to personal finance decisions. The two main goals of this course are to introduce students to important financial calculations essential for healthy personal finances and to teach students how to apply these to real-world financial situations. The course project, Personal Financial Plan: Understanding Personal Finances, introduces the student to various financial plans and reports. Students build an MS Excel financial plan workbook that includes personal protection, tax and retirement plans,budgets, credit report analysis, personal balance sheets, and income statements.


Leadership
Course Number BC403
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the study of leadership both in theory and in practice. Students will consider what it means to be a leader,and how to carry out the tasks of leadership from a variety of perspectives. Along the way, students will assess their own leadership strengths and limitations, and develop a Personal Leadership Profile. They will examine such topics as: The personal traits and qualities of an effective leader Leadership skills, strategies, and styles Leading with vision and inspiration Leading in a global, multicultural society For the course project, Personal Leadership Profile: A Self-reflective Case Study, students will conduct a case study of a leader of their choice whom they admire and about whom they can gather substantial research. Each week, they will analyze a different dimension of the selected leader's strengths and limitations (such as personal traits, behavioral styles, situational responsiveness,communication skills, relationship-building, and more). They will also evaluate their own strengths and limitations on these same leadership dimensions. Prerequisites: At least 80% of the student's coursework must be completed.


Negotiation and Conflict Management
Course Number BC465
Credits 3.0

This course presents a comprehensive process for conflict management, from needs assessment to final program evaluation. Students will explore topics such as: Assessment of various dimensions of conflict, including structural, psychological, and interactional Conflict intervention strategies, including negotiation, conversation, problem solving, dialogue, mediation, and arbitration Evaluation of conflict management programs and strategies The course project, Conflict Assessment Report: Analyzing and Managing Organizational Conflict, engages students in identifying an organizational conflict, assessing its dimensions, analyzing it from three theoretical perspectives, determining what interventions strategies have been attempted, recommending strategies for managing the conflict, and proposing options for evaluating the success of their conflict management plan.


Collaboration Technology Systems
Course Number BC470
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on collaborative technology systems’ influence on the content, context, and processes of professionals and organizations. Current developments in collaborative technologies and research about applying them to create measurable value and affect society at large are highlighted. The course project, Collaborative Technology Analysis: Evaluating Key Factors Contributing to Collaboration in Organizations, is a report of benchmarked assessments of collaboration in an organization. Students evaluate the factors of technology, culture,economics, and politics to obtain scores reflecting the perceived level of collaboration. The final report includes the results of these assessments along with a project for improving the collaboration capability of an organization.


Organizational Training and Development
Course Number BC475
Credits 3.0

This course examines the role of training and development in organizations to support business strategy. Course content focuses on the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of training programs from a global perspective. The course project, Training Proposal: Developing Employee Orientation Training for a Global Audience, is a proposal prepared for senior management in a company that has employees in several international locations. The focus of the training is on helping new employees become aligned with a newly formulated mission, vision statement, and business goals. The proposal addresses the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the new employee orientation training course.


Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving
Course Number CRT100
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth.This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree. .


The Writing Process
Course Number ENG100
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Art Appreciation
Course Number ART101
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Composition
Course Number ENG101
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


English Literature
Course Number ENG102
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Computer Information Systems
Course Number IT102
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Science and Technology
Course Number SCI201
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Physics of Modern Technology I
Course Number SCI202
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Physics of Modern Technology II
Course Number SCI203

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Course Number SPCH101 F

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Business Communication Capstone
Course Number BC491

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


The Art of Human Experience
Course Number BC300

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Business Mathematics
Course Number MATH301

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Technical Writing
Course Number BBA212

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Management
Course Number BBA211

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Financial Flow - Follow the Money
Course Number BBA210

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.



History of Business
Course Number BBA110

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BBA101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Using the Internet in Business
Course Number BBA311

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Organizational Communication
Course Number BC345

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Program description: Communication is key to your success. The value of exceptional communication skills in the corporate setting can't be
underestimated. In fact, a company's or organization's performance can be directly tied to its ability to effectively communicate,
both internally and externally. If you are looking for comprehensive knowledge of business communication and the how to
strategically manage this valuable resource, this degree specialization is for you.

Communications Courses at Westwood College

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Graphic Design: Major in Visual Communications
Digital Photography
Course Number GD221
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd111 This Course Focuses On Traditional And Contemporary Photography, With An Emphasis On Digital Tools And Techniques. Topics Include The History Of Photography And Its Impact On Studio And On-location Photographic Techniques, Lighting, And Composition. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply The Technical And Mechanical Skills Necessary To Produce Relevant Photography For Effective Visual Communications.


Typography
Course Number GD306
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd131 This Course Explores The Parallels Between Typographic History And Contemporary Visual Communication, Leading Up To A Contemporary Skill Set Focusing On The Expressive Qualities Of Type And The Evolution Of Typographic Style. Topics Include Technical Aspects Of Typography, Output Options, The Anatomy And Expressive Qualities Of Type And Its Formal Applications, And Intuitive Design. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Creatively And Effectively Incorporate Typography Into Multi-faceted Design Projects.


Advanced Image Editing
Course Number GD308
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd111, Gd221 This Course Presents Advanced Image Manipulation, Color Management, And Editing Techniques For Print And Web Technologies. Topics Include Photographic Collage, Composition, Filters, Layers, Masking, And Effects. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Incorporate Advanced Image Editing Techniques Into Design Projects.


Packaging Design
Course Number GD332
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd121, Gd131 This Course Investigates Design Concepts As They Relate To 3d Forms And Current Packaging Trends. Topics Include Contemporary Package Design, Manufacturing And Printing Technologies, And Design Elements Related To Products And Promotional Materials. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze And Apply Contemporary Package Design Elements, Tools, And Techniques To Produce Effective Industry-standard 3d Designs.


Advanced Illustration
Course Number GD350
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd121 This Course Offers An Advanced Study Of Illustrative Techniques From The Classical To The Contemporary. Topics Include Hand And Digital Illustrative Techniques For Figure Construction, Perspective, And Design Composition. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Develop Contemporary Concepts And Illustrations Appropriate To A Variety Of Professional Applications Including Editorial Content And Media.


Advertising Campaign Concepts
Course Number GD355
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd131 This Course Focuses On Advertising Campaigns And Concepts Related To Graphic Design. Topics Include Concept Development And Creative Brief Writing That Incorporates Media Types, Media Mixing, Client Positioning, And Branding. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Design An Integrated Advertising Campaign Using Targeted Marketing Messages To Effectively Promote A Product Or Service.


Color Theory
Course Number GD375
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd111, Gd121 This Course Provides An In-depth Study Of The Principles Of Color As It Applies To Print And Digital Media. Topics Include Color Relationships, Color Composition, And Visual Color Mixing. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze The Impact And Psychology Of Color On The Development Of Design, And The Power Of Color To Create And Influence Effective Visual Marketing.


Motion Graphics
Course Number GD432
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd252 This Course Explores Digital Effects For Video. Topics Include Storyboarding, Effects Design, Motion Effects, Morphing, Titling, Blue Screen, And 3d Camera Matching. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Create Effective Visual Effects Using Current Mastering Technologies.


Visual Communications Portfolio Review
Course Number GD480
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Upper-division Status This Course Focuses On The Development And Critique Of A Professional Design Portfolio. Topics Include Design Industry Business Practices, Industry Interviewing Techniques, Portfolio Refinement, And Self-marketing Skills. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Their Personal Traits And Present A Print, Digital, And Web Portfolio, And A Résumé That Highlight Their Individual Design Skills In A Professional Manner.


Fundamentals of Design
Course Number GD100
Credits 6.0

This course introduces basic design concepts using a hands-on approach to the development of design concepts and solutions to basic design problems. Topics include the design principles and process, drawing, color theory, typography, illustration and layout techniques and the vocabulary of design. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply visual problem-solving skills to create a concept development plan and a creative brief.


History of Graphic Design
Course Number GD102
Credits 3.0

This course explores the parallels between graphic design history and contemporary visual communications. Topics include major trends in design as well as the evolution of paper, type design, typography, image making, photography, and printing techniques. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify the relationships between fine art and political and social movements, and explain their influence on graphic design.


Fundamentals of Image Editing
Course Number GD111
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD100 This course covers the basics of digital image editing, manipulation, and creation of pixel-based imagery. Topics include digital photography, scanning techniques, photo retouching and manipulation, electronic color theory, special effects, print, and web graphics. Upon successful completion of this course,students will be able to utilize digital imaging software to digitally correct images, blend and composite images and create layered photographic compositions.


Fundamentals of Digital Illustration
Course Number GD121
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD100 This course introduces the basic concepts of illustration. Topics include traditional and digital methods of concept development,drawing, typography and design. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply illustration theory,tools, and techniques to create effective illustrations.


Digital Layout
Course Number GD131
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD111, GD121 This course presents the skills necessary to combine imagery and typography to produce effective layouts. Topics include grid theory, style sheets, master pages, pre-flight technologies, printing standards, resolution, and image placement. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to import images and format text to create multi-page layouts using industry-standard software.


Fundamentals of Web Design
Course Number GD241
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD111 This course introduces the basics of web site design and layout. Topics include foundational mark up languages including formatting, design theory, layout, utilization of typography, and web-appropriate imagery. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply the principles of web site design and use industry-standard software to create functional web sites.


Audio-Video
Course Number GD252
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD111 This course provides an overview of video editing, sound editing, and special effects. Topics covered include working with timelines to animate still clips, importing and editing digital video and audio clips, and creating special effects. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to use industry relevant non-linear digital editing software to produce a short video production.


Fundamentals of Interactive Design
Course Number GD261
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD241 This course provides an overview of multimedia graphics focusing on interactive design for 2D animation and the Internet. Topics include storyboarding, basic scripting, and utilizing key frames and timelines. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to design and create basic interactive presentations utilizing animations, video, and sound delivered through interactive media and web technologies.


Print Production
Course Number GD270
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD131 This course presents the current software tools and techniques for print production of a wide variety of projects and materials. Topics covered include forming concepts that produce layouts with impact, designing with type, creating a visual hierarchy, and identifying current production and pre-press standards. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to use current industry software tools and techniques to conceptualize, create, and carry a project through the print production process.


Portfolio Review and Business Practices
Course Number GD280
Credits 6.0

Prerequisite(s): Program Chair’s Approval This Course Covers Business Practices In The Design Industry And Focuses On The Development And Critique Of A Professional Portfolio And Résumé. Topics Include Design Industry Business Practices, Portfolio Development Process For Traditional And Digital Portfolios, Industry Research, Peer Critiques, And Design Continuity. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Have Created And Presented Both A Print And Digital Portfolio And Résumé That Highlights Their Individual Design Skills.


Art History
Course Number ART300
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Hum250 This Course Provides A Brief Overview Of Historical Ideas And Events In The Development Of The Arts. Topics Include A Review Of The Styles And Schools Of Art As Well As The Functions Of Art In Varying Cultures. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Describe Major Characteristics Of Art And Architecture, Analyze Visual Images, And Identify Historically Significant Artistic Styles, Individual Artists, And Works Of Art.


Communication Skills
Course Number COM112
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Foundational Course(s) If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Presents An Overview Of The Various Theories And Methods Of Personal And Professional Communications. Topics Include Written And Oral Communication Techniques, Presentation Skills, Intercultural Communication Skills,and Negotiation Skills.upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Communicate Effectively In Personal And Professional Environments And Be Able To Manage Personal And Professional Conflicts.


Public Speaking
Course Number COM305
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Com112 This Course Presents Public Speaking Concepts And Applications. Topics Include Assessing Audience And Environments, Incorporating Subject Matter Research, Verbal And Nonverbal Communications, Use Of Visual Aids, Outlining, And Developing Speeches For A Variety Of Purposes. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Create And Present Speeches And Presentations With Appropriate Visual Aids, Research, And Organizational Plans.


College Writing I
Course Number ENG121
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Foundational Course(s) If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Introduces Productive Writing Techniques With An Emphasis On The Writing Process. Topics Include Brainstorming,critical Reading And Thinking, Analyzing Audience And Purpose, Developing Clear Thesis Statements, Developing Effective Sentences And Paragraphs, Drafting, Revising, And Editing. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Use The Writing Process To Produce Effective Essays.


College Writing II
Course Number ENG221
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 This Course Builds On The Skills Taught In College Writing I, With Increased Emphasis On The Writing Process, Argumentation, Research, And Documentation. Topics Include Brainstorming, Analyzing Audience And Purpose, Developing Clear Thesis Statements, Evaluating Sources, Performing Research, And Presenting Correctly Documented Research Results. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Adequately Support A Position, Perform And Correctly Document Research, And Report The Results Of A Research Project.


Creative Writing
Course Number ENG421
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Lit301 This Course Emphasizes The Interdependence Of Writing And Literary Studies, Knowledge Of Literature And Literary Theory, Literary Creativity, Innovation, And The Creative Process. Topics Include Fiction, Non-fiction, Poetry, Drama, Screenplays, And The Study Of Literary Works That Urge Students To Think Outside The Box. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Works Of Fiction, Expand Their Powers Of Observation And Imagination, Develop A Unique Voice In Creative Writing, And Cultivate Good Writing Habits.


Ethical and Critical Thinking
Course Number HUM180
Credits 3.0

This course covers the principles and applications of ethical and critical thinking. Topics include argument construction and analysis, inductive and deductive reasoning, logical fallacies, perception, moral approaches, and social responsibility. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze ethical issues, evaluate and clarify their own thinking,create sound and valid arguments, and effectively weigh the arguments of others.


Humanities
Course Number HUM250
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng221 This Course Explores The Foundations And Development Of Western Culture From Its Origins In The Ancient Near East To Modern Western Civilization. Topics Include Cultural History,philosophy, Religion, Literature, Art, And Music. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Influential Figures And Events, Appreciate And Discuss Well-known Works Of Art And Thought, And Recognize And Analyze Significant Movements And Genres In Western Culture.


Introduction to Literature
Course Number LIT301
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng221 This Course Introduces Students To The Literary Genres Of Fiction, Poetry, And Drama. Topics Include Literary Terminology, Criticism, Forms, Elements, Themes, And Major Works And Authors Within These Genres. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Actively Read, Appreciate, Analyze, And Respond To Works Of Literature.


Science Fiction and Fantasy
Course Number LIT415
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Lit301 This Course Covers The Genres Of Science Fiction And Fantasy. Topics Include The Use Of Language, Composition, And Characterization Within Different Forms Of Science Fiction And Fantasy. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Major Authors And Analyze Significant Works Of Science Fiction And Fantasy.


Literature and Film
Course Number LIT417
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Lit301 This Course Explores The Relationship Between Film And Literature. Topics Include Narrative Techniques And The Differences Between The Media. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify The Narrative Techniques Used In Film And Literature, And Compare And Analyze The Two Formats.


American Government
Course Number POL107
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to present an overview of American government. Topics include the federal system; political parties; nominations and elections; the legislative, executive and judicial branches; and civil liberties and civil rights. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to trace the development of the U.S. Constitution, understand and analyze issues in American government, and discuss the policy-making process.


Political Science
Course Number POL423
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng221, Pol107 This Course Explores Some Of The Most Pressing Political Issues Facing The United States And Other Nations. Topics Include Problems And Issues Inherent In Different Governmental Styles And The Political Process Of Democracies And Other Forms Of Government. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course Students Will Be Able To Research, Analyze, And Discuss Issues Related To The Function Of Political Institutions, Issues Relating To A Variety Of Social Changes, Public Policy Matters, And America’s Role As A Global Leader In Foreign Affairs.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY101
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 This Course Is Designed To Present A General Overview Of Psychology As A Social Science. Topics Include Historical Perspectives, Research Methods, Therapies, Applied Psychology,and Other Current Issues. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Psychological Concepts And Methods As Used Commonly To Address Real-world Situations.


Human Relations
Course Number SOC121
Credits 3.0

This course explores the nature and importance of human relations. Topics include the communication process, working in diverse environments, teambuilding skills, controlling emotions,and managing conflict. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate essential transferable skills to function effectively in society.


Research Methodologies
Course Number SOC401
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng221, Mth340 This Course Covers Research Methods To Gather, Organize, Analyze, And Convert Data Into Information For The Purposes Of Presentation And Decision Making. Topics Include Primary And Secondary Research, Documentation And Interpretation Of Data, And Presentation To Multicultural Populations. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Conduct Independent Research, Analyze The Data Collected, And Present The Information In Written And Oral Forms.


College Mathematics
Course Number MTH107
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Mth097 If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Develops Problem-solving And Decision-making Strategies Using Mathematical Tools From Arithmetic, Algebra,geometry, And Statistics. Topics Include Consumer Mathematics,key Concepts In Statistics And Probability, Sets Of Numbers, And Geometry. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply Mathematical Tools And Methods To Solve Real-world Problems.


Introduction to Statistics
Course Number MTH340
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Mth107 Or Mth170 This Course Introduces Basic Concepts In Statistics With Emphasis On Quantitative Analysis. Topics Include Measures Of Center And Variation, Applications Of Normal Distribution, Interpretations Of Correlation Coefficients, Analyzing And Graphing Linear Regression Models And Fundamentals Of Probability. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Realworld Data, Interpret Graphs, Create Simple Linear Regression Models, And Form Valid Conclusions On The Basis Of Such Analysis.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI121
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 And Either Mth107 Or Mth170 This Course Is Designed As An Introduction To Physical Science.topics Include Motion, Conservation Laws, Gravity, Waves, And Thermodynamics. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course,students Will Be Able To Describe The Scientific Method, Explain And Define The Principles And Terminology Of Physical Science,and Use Formulas To Solve Related Problems.


Earth Science
Course Number SCI311
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng121 This Course Integrates The Various Fields Of Earth Science And Explores How These Fields Interact. Topics Include Meteorology, Geology, Astronomy, And Oceanography. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze The Interactions Of Geological Events, The Weather, The Oceans, And Astronomy.


Computer Applications
Course Number CA101
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to increase proficiency in the use of common word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation application software. Topics include the production of business documents and reports. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to prepare documents using word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.


Success Strategies
Course Number PDC111
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on providing the skills and strategies to achieve personal and educational goals. Topics include learning styles, accountability, self-directed learning, managing resources,goal setting, self-esteem, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate self-reliance and apply the tools for success.


Career Management
Course Number PDC200
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Student Must Have Completed 50% Of Degree Requirements This Course Provides The Foundation For Developing Long-term Career Management Skills. Topics Include Tips For Producing Quality Résumés And Cover Letters And Interactive Techniques For Interviewing Success. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course,students Will Be Able To Research Job Leads, Write A Résumé,prepare For A Job Interview, Follow Up On A Job Interview, And Apply Strategies To Keep A Job And Advance In A Career.


Program description: The Visual Communications Bachelor’s program is designed to
prepare students with the design and technical skills necessary to
advance in the field of visual communications. Students take a
combination of design theory, web design, imaging, print design,
and multimedia courses. In addition, the general education
courses in the program help students apply skills in critical
thinking, communication, and problem solving to workplace
challenges.

Communications Courses at Arizona State University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Technical Communications
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

Program description: In the BS in Technical Communication degree program, delivered fully online, students learn how to produce, design and manage information, using technologies both traditional and developing. Software and electronics companies, media corporations, financial institutions, government agencies, non and for-profit organizations are some areas that employ technical communicators. The curriculum brings together information, writing, multimedia, and communications technology to prepare students for careers as technical writer/editors, publication managers, information designers, instructional and training developers, and more.

Communications Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in Media and Communications
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

n/a


Program description: An undergraduate degree in media and communications is a stepping stone to a wide variety of career and educational paths. Students enrolled in this program expand their knowledge and interests in writing, mass media, journalism, advertising, public relations and communications, and design technology. Methods of communication in contemporary society are examined against the advancing technology of media outlets and the Internet. Increasingly, the gathering, analysis, interpretation, storing, and presentation of information have influenced decision-making in political, economic, and cultural society. Students are taught both theoretical and practical skills in media and communications including the development and evolution of the media, mass media roles in democratic society, legal and ethical responsibilities of media, media as business, and written and oral skills.

Communications Courses at Ashworth College

Program Name: Marketing Communications
Lesson 1: Introduction to Advertising

Elements of a successful advertising campaign; the role of marketing, communication, society, and economics in advertising; the five major players in advertising; evolution of advertising from the 'age of print' to the global business environment; niche marketing; interactive advertising; the global marketplace.


Lesson 2: Advertising and the Marketing Process

Defining marketing; consumer, business-to-business, industrial, institutional and reseller markets; the four tools of marketing; channels of distribution from producers to consumers; types of ad agencies; how agencies are organized; how agencies make money; the effect of technological changes on ad agencies.


Lesson 3: The Consumer Audience

Consumer behavior; dynamics of the consumer's relationship to advertising; target markets; the influences of culture, social class, family, demographics and geographic location on consumers; psychological influences such as perception, learning, motivation and other factors that contribute to the purchasing process; low- and high-involvement decision processes.


Lesson 4: The Integrated Campaign

Elements of integrated marketing campaigns; stakeholder audiences; situation analysis; concept testing; the message strategy; the media plan; developing and executing components of the campaign; advertising research; evaluating a campaign to gauge its effectiveness. Time Management Guide How to improve your efficiency and productivity as a student and later in your marketing career.


Lesson 5: Corporations and Consumers

Components of the IMC plan; the importance of communications; promoting a corporate image; corporate names and logos; branding; brand equity; packaging; brand extensions and flanker brands; co-branding; private brands; positioning; consumer modeling; the purchase decision; the consumer buying environment; changing trends.


Lesson 6: The IMC Foundation

Types of business consumers; business buying centers; the business-to-business buying process; dual channel marketing; 21st century trends; promotional opportunity analysis; communication market analysis; establishing marketing communications objectives; the communications budget; types of budgets; market segmentation by consumer and business-to-business groups.


Lesson 7: Advertising Management

The role of advertising in the IMC process; choosing an ad agency; advertising planning and research; the roles of account executives and creatives; campaign management; communication and advertising objectives; media selection; the creative brief; advertising theory and appeals; the structure of an advertisement.


Lesson 8: Advertising Design and Media Selection

Message strategies; cognitive strategies; executional frameworks; sources and spokespersons; creating advertising; beating ad clutter; media strategy and planning; achieving advertising objectives; selecting media; the media mix; selecting media in international and business-to-business markets.


Lesson 9: Trade and Consumer Promotions

Types of trade promotions: allowances, contests, incentives, training programs, vendor support programs, trade shows, specialty advertising and point-of-purchase advertising; meeting trade promotion objectives; coupons premiums; contests and sweepstakes; refunds and rebates; sampling; bonus packs; price-offs; planning for consumer promotions.


Lesson 10: Personal Selling and Public Relations

Retail sales; retail sales presentations; buyer-seller relationships; managing the business-to-business selling process; new trends in business-to-business personal selling; personal selling in international markets; database marketing; direct marketing; permission marketing; the public relations department and its function; types of stakeholders; damage control; social responsibility; the FTC; regulating marketing communications; sponsorship and event marketing.


Lesson 11: The Top of the IMC Pyramid

Marketing On The Internet; E-commerce; International E-commerce; Imc And The Internet; Direct Marketing On The Internet; Viral Marketing; Marketing Entrepreneurial And Small Business Ventures; Starting A Company; The Market Analysis; Finding Customers; Advertising Small Business; Making Customers Advocates; Evaluating The Marketing Message, Public Relations Activities And The Overall Imc Program; Recognition Tests; Behavioral Evaluations.


Career Search Guide

Locating the best opportunities; assembling your resume; interview preparation; landing the job you want.


Program description: marketing strategies for building a brand, developing effective ad campaigns, selecting appropriate media, managing customer relationships, organizing public relations and more. Get the latest marketing techniques from knowledgeable instructors with years of experience in their field.
Comprehensive marketing textbook
Career search & time management guides
Open-book, online exams
Instructor guidance and unlimited tutoring
Invitations to live events with career experts
Networking with Ashworth's active student and alumni social community

Communications Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BA in Communications
Communications and the Media
Course Number COM 126
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of media history and theory with an emphasis on the implications and impact of mass messages on meaning, culture, and society.


History and Criticism of Visual Media
Course Number COM 151
Credits 4.0

This course presents the history of visual art and its connection and influence on modern media. Students gain an artistic vocabulary by becoming familiar with many kinds of visual art, developing their skills in visual analysis, increasing their understanding of aesthetic theory, and applying that understanding in presentations. Prerequisite: COM 126.


Persuasive Theory
Course Number COM 231
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the theory and practice of communication as it relates to influencing attitude and behavioral change. The course begins by presenting a historical overview of persuasive theory from its classical beginnings and progresses to analyzing persuasive strategies and their use by contemporary practitioners. Examples for analysis are taken from advertising, public relations, religion, sales, politics, and propaganda.


Writing for the Media
Course Number COM 302
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the content, styles, and formats of media writing, with an emphasis on the differences in writing across diverse media modalities.


Principles of Public Relations
Course Number COM 311
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of the theory and practice of public relations, media relations, promotion, research, and campaigns, as well as an application of theory, through problem solving and case study.


Intercultural Communications
Course Number COM 315
Credits 4.0

This course creates an awareness of the skills necessary to promote positive communication and relationships across cultural differences. Students explore verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors. Other cultures are explored through an examination of demographics, family structure, religion, politics, education, social life, art, and literature.


Public Relations Writing and Design
Course Number COM 321
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of planning, producing, and evaluating written public relations messages for and from a variety of media, including print, broadcast, and the Web. Student writing assignments include news releases, newsletters, public service announcements, coverage memos, position papers, background papers, reports, and proposals.


Visual Media and Storytelling
Course Number COM 331
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the elements that make up almost all storytelling. Students are encouraged to discover and develop their unique voices as writers and storytellers, while understanding the critical importance of working as part of a creative team. This course emphasizes the use of traditional storytelling, classic mythology, and the ways in which these devices apply to contemporary media.


Consumer Communications and Behavior
Course Number COM 435
Credits 4.0

This course provides an integrated marketing communications perspective for today’s changing world as well as a behavioral science approach that studies distinct buyer strategies and decision-making processes of purchase by consumers. Topics include external and internal influences on today’s buyers, purchase and postpurchase processes, customer satisfaction, customer commitment, branding and positioning, creative strategies, media strategies, distribution strategies, and integrated marketing communications.


Communication Issues and Critical Thinking
Course Number COM 445
Credits 4.0

This course provides a capstone, or practicum, for the communications student that facilitates the practical application of historical and modern communications styles across modalities in language that is industry-specific. The course emphasizes the ethical and social responsibility of communications in real-world situations.


Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Communications program develops leaders in the fields of
human communication and media. The program is built on a values-based liberal arts foundation. Students
develop the knowledge, creativity, and intermodal communication skills necessary to design and deliver
compelling messages.

Program Name: BA in Communications: Digital Film Production
History and Aesthetics
Course Number DFP 101
Credits 4.0

This course covers multiple eras and movements throughout the age of film.


Digital Video Production I
Course Number DFP 111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the technical and aesthetic aspects of small format digital production as well as the basic principles of motion picture production. Students learn the language of film/digital video and how its manipulation can express one’s individual message or purpose.


Film Financing, Budgeting, and Distribution
Course Number DFP 113
Credits 4.0

This course is an intense overview of the entire process beyond the creation of a production. Students review film financing, contracting, budgeting, insurance, etc.


Acting for the Camera
Course Number DFP 115
Credits 4.0

This introductory course helps digital film production students to develop skills and gain experience in acting and directing for the camera. Students participate on both sides of the camera. Course sessions include lecture, practical exercises, and preparation for analyzing and blocking a scene and working on a set. Students screen selected film clips to evaluate performances, explore methods to prepare for an audition, discuss the actor/director relationship, and examine the professional requirements of relating to a crew.


Cinematography
Course Number DFP 223
Credits 4.0

This course will be an intensive exploration of the craft, technologies, and aesthetic principles of cinematography, lighting, and set design techniques. Lectures and in-class demonstrations cover video formats, cameras, exposure, lenses and optics, lighting units, lighting placement, lighting control, camera support, and camera movement


Nonlinear Editing
Course Number DFP 225
Credits 4.0

This course follows the general chronology of editing from capture and logging, through editing and effects, to final output of a finished program. The first half of the course is devoted entirely to a mastery of the editing software. The second half of the course is devoted to examining how and why editing is important. Different editing theories are explored, including montage, fast cut, long take, jump cut, and others. Lab fee required.


Audio Production and Design
Course Number DFP 227

This course is an interactive exploration and implementation of audio production for cinema, including multimodal and theoretical approaches.


Cinema Directing
Course Number DFP 311
Credits 4.0

This course utilizes techniques of directing, sound editing, lighting, and advanced editing programs. Several practical and written exercises lead to a short digital production. Students spend time working with actors in front of the camera as well as composing shots to convey a story visually.


Entertainment Union and Guilds
Course Number DFP 345
Credits 4.0

Students learn the impact, use, and history of entertainment guilds and unions. The course also covers value, membership requirements, and alternative opportunities outside of the union system.


Music Video/Documentary Production
Course Number DFP 361

This course is a survey of music video and documentary productions. Students study, analyze, and implement techniques in both types of productions. Prerequisite: DFP 311.


Digital Production II
Course Number DFP 451
Credits 4.0

This course exposes students to every aspect of media production. Students also learn how to work well in a team environment and to adhere to deadlines, time constraints, and medium limitations. Prerequisite: DFP 111.


Advanced Digital Post-Production
Course Number DFP 455
Credits 4.0

This class is about developing students’ understanding of the art of cinematic storytelling and montage and exposing them to the cueing, performing, and editing of Foley and Automated Dialogue Replacement. Students work on more advanced projects is integrated into the class as a means of mastering advanced editing tools and techniques. Prerequisite: DFP 225.


Screenwriting II
Course Number DFP 457Δ
Credits 4.0

implement advanced techniques in creating cinema screenplays. This course emphasizes the use of traditional storytelling and classic mythology, and how these devices apply to contemporary screenplays. Prerequisite: COM 221


Adapting Media to Screenplays
Course Number DFP 463
Credits 4.0

Students learn to adapt various forms of media to screenplays. Prerequisite: DFP 457.


Screenwriting Capstone
Course Number DFP 470
Credits 4.0

Students Participate In Individually Writing A Full-length Feature Film. They Also Explore All Aspects Of Structure, Character, Settings, Theme, Obstacle, And Expressive Writing Storytelling. Prerequisites: Dfp 457 And Dfp 463.


Digital Production Practicum
Course Number DFP 480
Credits 4.0

This practicum provides students with the foundation and practice in digital production. Students learn how to use different media forms to express creativity and ideas. The course goal is to teach students to analyze a script by identifying character objectives, through-lines, key facts, circumstances, and emotional events while transferring that to an on-set production experience. Thecourse focuses on the process and completion of a short production piece. Prerequisite: DFP 451.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Digital Film program develops leaders in the fields of narrative
film and video production. The program is built on developing a strong foundation in narrative storytelling,
creativity, technical skills, and hands on experience necessary to design and deliver poignant messages.

Program Name: BA in Communications: Graphic Design
Introduction to 3D Animation
Course Number DGN 205
Credits 3.0

This is an introductory course on the creation of elements for 3D animation using industry standard Maya software. Students will be introduced to the entire production pipeline of 3D animation


Graphic Design I
Course Number DGN 220
Credits 4.0

This is an introductory course in the study of the primary elements and principles of design, type, and imagery, and their application to graphic design problems


Advertising Design
Course Number DGN 223
Credits 3.0

An overview of skills needed to develop successful advertising campaigns. Coursework is a combination of lecture and lab work.


Web Design
Course Number DGN 230
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development of students’ ability to plan a Web site and develop multiple design solutions for the needs of this media.


Graphic Design II
Course Number DGN 333
Credits 3.0

Intensified study of typography and its use as a communications design tool. Continued study of the use of images, color and texture.


3D Modeling: Theory and Practice
Course Number DGN 360
Credits 9.0

Studying the tools to convert 2D hand drawings, photos and other references into 3 dimensional elements


Computer Graphics
Course Number DGN 365:
Credits 3.0

A study of the evolution of computer generated imagery from film, television and photography.


Graphic Design III
Course Number DGN 433:
Credits 3.0

A highly aesthetic and technical class where students bring all design skills together, including typography, illustration, photography, graphics and production planning


Graphic Design IV
Course Number DGN 434
Credits 3.0

Students plan and complete their professional portfolio and produce self-promotional pieces including resume, cover letter, and Web site


3D Animation
Course Number DGN 455:
Credits 3.0

Students will learn the 12 principles of animation and apply it to specific animation assignments


3D Animation for Film
Course Number DGN 465
Credits 3.0

A highly aesthetic and technical class in which students bring all design skills together, including preproduction, graphic design, modeling, animation, texturing and rendering.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Communications program develops leaders in the fields of
human communication and media. The program is built on a values-based liberal arts foundation. Students
develop the knowledge, creativity, and intermodal communication skills necessary to design and deliver
compelling messages.

Program Name: BA in Communications: Public Relations
Communications and the Media
Course Number COM125
Credits 3.0

Media history and theory are studied with an emphasis on the implications and impact of mass messages on meaning, culture, and society


Public Speaking
Course Number COM210
Credits 4.0

This basic course in oral communication uses focused content to practice the principles of effective oral presentation. The lectures, speaking assignments, and all written work will acquaint the student with the theory, practice, and necessary technological literacy required for effective message building and presentation.


Screenwriting I
Course Number COM221
Credits 4.0

Students in this writing-intensive course learn storytelling for the screen through a managed regimen of in-class and out-of-class experiences that emphasize the essential mix of imagination and craft in writing. They hone their skills in observation, communication, and visualization, and receive instruction on structure for screenwriting and how to employ written language to articulate dramatic and visual expression.


Introduction to Digital Media
Course Number COM260
Credits 3.0

Introduction to the theory, process, and procedure of electronic media production. Lecture and lab. Lab fee required


Principles of Public Relations
Course Number COM310
Credits 3.0

An overview of theory and practice of public relations, media relations, promotion, research, and campaigns. An application of theory through problem solving and case study. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status or instructor’s approval.


Intercultural Communication
Course Number COM314
Credits 3.0

This course creates an awareness of the skills necessary to promote positive communication and relationships across cultural differences. Students will explore verbal and non-verbal communication behaviors. Other cultures are explored through an examination of demographics, family structure, religion, politics, education, social life, art, and literature. A Writing-Intensive course. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status or instructor’s approval.


Screenwriting
Course Number COM340
Credits 3.0

In the Screenwriting course students learn storytelling for the screen through a managed regimen of in-class and out-of-class experiences that emphasizes the essential mix of imagination and craft in writing. They will hone their skills in observation, communication, and visualization, and receive instruction on structure for screenwriting and how to employ written language to articulate dramatic and visual expression.


Cinematography and Set Design
Course Number COM350
Credits 3.0

This course will be an intensive exploration of the craft, technologies, and aesthetic principles of cinematography, lighting, and set design techniques. Lectures and in-class demonstrations will cover video formats, cameras, exposure, lenses and optics, lighting units, lighting placement, lighting control, camera support, and camera movement. Lab fee required.


Current Issues in Communication
Course Number COM400
Credits 3.0

Special topics and current issues of interest to communication and media students are studied.


Effective Ministerial Communications
Course Number COM410
Credits 3.0

The theory and practice of effective ministerial communications including preaching, writing, and teaching techniques that spread the gospel will be the basis of this course. An application of theory through problem solving and case study of current effective ministerial speakers. The student will learn the tools and preparation needed to communicate with a variety of audiences, to employ creative pedagogy that challenges and engages the audience, and to develop a message that is culturally relevant and biblically accurate.


Media Production and Editing
Course Number COM460
Credits 3.0

This course will follow the general chronology of editing from capture and logging, through editing and effects, to final output of a finished program. The first half of the course will be devoted entirely to a mastery of the editing software. The second half of the course will be devoted to the “why” we cut. Different editing theories will be explored including montage, fast cut, long take, jump cut, etc. Lab fee required.


Production Management
Course Number COM470
Credits 3.0

This course explains how a movie is transformed from a screenplay to the screen. Students will learn how to break down a screenplay, organize a shooting schedule, create a budget, secure locations, find actors, hire crews, and communicate with unions. Students will also learn the art of storyboards by conceptualizing and rendering the drawings that will communicate continuity. Lab fee required.


Media Production and Directing
Course Number COM480
Credits 3.0

The course utilizes techniques of directing, sound editing, lighting, and advanced editing programs. Several practical and written exercises lead to a short digital production. Students will spend time working with actors in front of the camera as well as composing shots to convey a story visually. Lab fee required.


Senior Seminar
Course Number COM495
Credits 3.0

This capstone course examines in depth the concepts of Global Citizenship, Critical Thinking, Effective Communication, and Responsible Leadership, focusing on the ethical and intellectual challenges such concepts evoke for the individual. Students contemplate a values-based view of success, and critically assess the impact their GCU education has had on their future personal and professional lives.


Internship
Course Number COM497
Credits 3.0

An opportunity for students to practice principles learned in their functional area by working in an outside organization under the supervision of a practitioner. Prerequisites: Senior status, admission to Communications program, and instructor’s approval.


Communications and the Media
Course Number COM 126
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of media history and theory with an emphasis on the implications and impact of mass messages on meaning, culture, and society.


History and Criticism of Visual Media
Course Number COM 151
Credits 4.0

This course presents the history of visual art and its connection and influence on modern media. Students gain an artistic vocabulary by becoming familiar with many kinds of visual art, developing their skills in visual analysis, increasing their understanding of aesthetic theory, and applying that understanding in presentations. Prerequisite: COM 126.


Persuasive Theory
Course Number COM 231
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the theory and practice of communication as it relates to influencing attitude and behavioral change. The course begins by presenting a historical overview of persuasive theory from its classical beginnings and progresses to analyzing persuasive strategies and their use by contemporary practitioners. Examples for analysis are taken from advertising, public relations, religion, sales, politics, and propaganda.


Writing for the Media
Course Number COM 302
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the content, styles, and formats of media writing, with an emphasis on the differences in writing across diverse media modalities.


Principles of Public Relations
Course Number COM 311
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of the theory and practice of public relations, media relations, promotion, research, and campaigns, as well as an application of theory, through problem solving and case study.


Intercultural Communications
Course Number COM 315
Credits 4.0

This course creates an awareness of the skills necessary to promote positive communication and relationships across cultural differences. Students explore verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors. Other cultures are explored through an examination of demographics, family structure, religion, politics, education, social life, art, and literature.


Public Relations Writing and Design
Course Number COM 321
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of planning, producing, and evaluating written public relations messages for and from a variety of media, including print, broadcast, and the Web. Student writing assignments include news releases, newsletters, public service announcements, coverage memos, position papers, background papers, reports, and proposals.


Visual Media and Storytelling
Course Number COM 331
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the elements that make up almost all storytelling. Students are encouraged to discover and develop their unique voices as writers and storytellers, while understanding the critical importance of working as part of a creative team. This course emphasizes the use of traditional storytelling, classic mythology, and the ways in which these devices apply to contemporary media.


Consumer Communications and Behavior
Course Number COM 435
Credits 4.0

This course provides an integrated marketing communications perspective for today’s changing world as well as a behavioral science approach that studies distinct buyer strategies and decision-making processes of purchase by consumers. Topics include external and internal influences on today’s buyers, purchase and postpurchase processes, customer satisfaction, customer commitment, branding and positioning, creative strategies, media strategies, distribution strategies, and integrated marketing communications.


Communication Issues and Critical Thinking
Course Number COM 445
Credits 4.0

This course provides a capstone, or practicum, for the communications student that facilitates the practical application of historical and modern communications styles across modalities in language that is industry-specific. The course emphasizes the ethical and social responsibility of communications in real-world situations.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Communications program develops leaders in the fields of
human communication and media. The program is built on a values-based liberal arts foundation. Students
develop the knowledge, creativity, and intermodal communication skills necessary to design and deliver
compelling messages.

Communications Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Communications Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Princeton University
Total Programs 56
Number of Subjects 59
Rank in USA 8th
Brown University
Total Programs 135
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 9th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
California Institute of Technology
Total Programs 38
Number of Subjects 41
Rank in USA 21st