Online Computer Information Systems Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its computer information systems courses to be successful computer information systems specialists, computer support specialists, network engineers, database engineers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 287,210 people employed as computer and information systems managers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $120,640. Computer support specialists make on average $47,360 per year and there are about 540,560 of them employed today.

Computer Information Systems Organizations Computer Information Systems Common Job Tasks
  • creating program flow charts
  • programming in C++
  • maintaining servers
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Computer Information Systems Courses at Walden University

Program Name: B.S. in Computer Information Systems
Introduction to Information Systems
Course Number CMIS 1001
Credits 5.0

This course presents a broad overview of the field of information systems, covering technology, application and career issues. Students gain an appreciation of the role that information systems play in the lives of individuals, organizations and societies. (Prerequisites: Contemporary Communications)


Information Technology Infrastructure
Course Number CMIS 1002
Credits 5.0

This course introduces some of the most important aspects of the technology infrastructure that underlies information systems. Students learn about both hardware (computers, networks, interface devices) and software (operating systems, middleware, applications, system software) elements. They also gain an appreciation of key issues of capacity, performance, reliability, scale, and obsolescence. (Prerequisites: Contemporary Communications)


Object-Oriented Programming I
Course Number CMIS 1003
Credits 5.0

This course introduces students to fundamental notions of computer programming in an object-oriented language. Key concepts include the representation of real-world objects, actions and information in terms of data and algorithms; the translation and execution of computer programs; and the notion of an organized process of software development. Students gain hands-on practice in designing, creating, running and testing programs. (Prerequisites: Contemporary Communications, College Algebra)


Internet Computing
Course Number CMIS 2001
Credits 5.0

Students learn how the Internet stitches together many disparate devices and software components into a flexible fabric that supports an enormous variety of uses. Topics include the design of the Internet protocol stack, the structure and function of some of the most important Internet services and applications, and Internet governance. Students learn how to apply concepts of performance, scale, and reliability in the design of information systems. (Prerequisite: Information Technology Infrastructure)


Object-Oriented Programming II
Course Number CMIS 2002
Credits 5.0

This course elaborates on Object-Oriented Programming I by delving deeper into the key concepts of programming with objects. Design concepts covered, which will play out in later courses, include hierarchy, modularity and abstraction. In addition to furthering their hands-on programming experience, students will learn to use and create documentation in a web-based environment. (Prerequisite: Object-Oriented Programming I)


Computing and Society
Course Number CMIS 3001
Credits 5.0

This course introduces students to the interaction of information systems with core social concerns: privacy, democracy, equity, security, economic progress, intellectual property rights, etc. Students learn to consider the social, ethical and legal considerations inherent in the design and use of information systems. Issues are illustrated through real-world and hypothetical cases. (Prerequisite: Internet Computing)


Database Management Systems
Course Number CMIS 3002
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on the representation and manipulation of information in relational database management systems. Students learn how to map real-world concepts onto relational representations, and how to manipulate them through relational queries to implement data-intensive applications. Students learn to use a core subset of the Structured Query Language (SQL), and learn how relational databases fit into a wide variety of practical information systems. (Prerequisite: Object-Oriented Programming II)


Requirements Analysis
Course Number CMIS 3003
Credits 5.0

A critical step in the development of information systems, and one in which the seeds of disaster often are sown, is the analysis and definition of system requirements, both functional and non-functional. In this course, students learn about the identification of stakeholders and techniques for requirement elicitation, representation (e.g. use cases), and life cycles (e.g. iterative methods, maintenance). Students carry out a small real-world analysis project solo or in teams. (Prerequisite: Database Management Systems)


Object-Oriented Design
Course Number CMIS 3004
Credits 5.0

Students learn the discipline of reducing requirements to the structural and functional design of information systems. Topics include conceptual modeling, design patterns, and application frameworks. Students learn the basics of modeling, design representations, and the role of Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools. (Prerequisite: Requirements Analysis)


Information Security and Privacy
Course Number CMIS 4101
Credits 5.0

Students learn the key concepts and concerns of information security and privacy, including technical, social and policy issues. Fundamental notions of authentication, authorization, and encryption are examined in the context of everyday information systems activities. Students analyze case studies of security and privacy breaches to understand economic and human impact. (Prerequisite: Internet Computing)


Structure of the Healthcare Industry
Course Number CMIS 4301
Credits 5.0

Students examine the main elements of the healthcare industry in the United States and elsewhere, analyzing the interests and information needs of healthcare professionals, provider organizations, researchers, pharmaceutical companies, public health agencies, regulators, insurers, individuals and others. Trends toward, and obstacles to, information exchange are considered. (Prerequisite: Introduction to Business)


Patient Records Practice and Policy
Course Number CMIS 4302
Credits 5.0

This course examines trends in the development of standardized patient records for a variety of health-related applications. Students apply their requirements analysis and design skills to the challenges found in this field. Issues covered include privacy, confidentiality, standardization, and anonymization. (Prerequisite: Structure of the Healthcare Industry, Information Security and Privacy)


Healthcare Information Systems Applications
Course Number CMIS 4303
Credits 5.0

Students examine some of the most important classes of healthcare information systems, ranging from patient care management to epidemiology to billing to research data analysis. Case studies provide students with the opportunity to exercise their information systems design and analysis skills, as well as to consider social and ethical issues. (Prerequisite: Patient Records Practice and Policy)


Developing Student Portfolios for CIS
Course Number CMIS 1000
Credits 1.0

This course provides students with a framework for developing a student portfolio. Students learn about the value of creating a student portfolio and how it is used to communicate and demonstrate their academic accomplishments. Students are introduced to tools and techniques that help them to develop, manage, and maintain their portfolios. They demonstrate the ability to apply the structure and methods presented in this course by composing a high-level design and comprehensive outline for a student portfolio.


CIS Capstone Course
Course Number CMIS 4001
Credits 5.0

In the capstone course, students carry out an integrative independent study that combines multiple aspects of their CIS program. They also review the work they have collected in their portfolio, carrying out a thoughtful reflection on the field and their educational experience. They revisit the career priorities they expressed upon entry into the program, and consider their professional goals in the context of their education. They develop plans and goals for continued learning and career development, in the context of their personal goals and priorities.


Introduction to Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 1003
Credits 5.0

An Introduction To Accounting, This Course Takes A Top-down Approach To Understanding Introductory Accounting Documents And Procedures By Exploring A Business’ Financial Statements Including The Balance Sheet, Income Statement And Cash Flow Statement. The Properties And Characteristics Of Each Of These Statements Is Presented And Students Completing This Course Are Expected To Understand What Information Can Be Gleaned From These Statements Both Separately And Taken As A Whole. The Course Also Discusses Regulations That Need To Be Followed When Preparing The Financial Statements As Promulgated By Generally Accepted Accounting Procedures (gaap). In Addition, The Course Presents Changes To Gaap That Will Take Place When The U.s. Adopts International Financial Reporting Standards. (prerequisites: Math 1001 College Algebra, Busi 1001 Introduction To Business Or Busi 1002 Introduction To Management And Leadership.)


Introduction to Management and Leadership
Course Number BUSI 1002
Credits 5.0

This introductory course addresses the role and functions of managers, specifically principles and procedures for planning, organizing, leading and controlling organizations. Emphasized is the practical application of theory to reality. This course is structured so that students have the opportunity to see the interrelationships among the functions, components and disciplines that comprise the field of management and thereby gain a comprehensive perspective as a foundation for the further study of management. (Prerequisites: Foundations for Undergraduate Studies, Developing Student Portfolios)


Dynamics of Change
Course Number BUSI 3003
Credits 5.0

Students examine change as it impacts people, processes, and products. They learn to employ tools for dealing with and managing change. They learn methods for coping with change as an individual, a member of a group, and a member of an organization. (Prerequisite: Introduction to Management and Leadership)


Critical Thinking
Course Number BUSI 3005
Credits 5.0

Microeconomics
Course Number ECON 1002
Credits 5.0

The Principles Of Microeconomics Explain How In A Market Economy The Price System Answers The Fundamental Economic Questions: What Goods And Services Are Produced And Distributed, And How And For Whom The Behaviors Of Households That Supply Factors Of Production—natural Resources, Labor, And Capital—to Firms, And That Purchase Consumer Goods And Services From Firms, Are Examined. Also Examined Are Firms That Maximize Profit Through Their Decisions About Acquiring Factors Of Production, Controlling Costs Of Production, Choosing The Optimal Level Of Output, Competing With Other Firms Under Different Market Structures, And Making Investment Decisions About Entering New Markets. (prerequisite: Math 1001 College Algebra And Econ 1001 Macroeconomics.) Stat 2001 Statistics This Course Examines The Fundamentals Of Probability And Descriptive And Inferential Statistics. Hypothesis Testing, Simple Regression And Correlation Analysis Are Covered, With Emphasis On The Application Of These Techniques To Business Decision-making. The Analysis And Application Of Statistics In Cases Are Stressed. (prerequisite: Math 1001 College Algebra.) Fnce 3001 Financial Management The Principles Of Finance Are Examined From An Applied Perspective Of The Difficult Strategic And Operational Decisions That Exist In The Business Environment. The General Objective Of This Course Is To Provide Decision-makers With The Financial And Managerial Finance Theory, Concepts, And Tools Necessary To Make Better Financial Management Decisions As Well As To Conduct Sound Financial Analysis. (prerequisites: Acct 1001 Accounting I) Isys 3001 Information Systems In Enterprise An Introduction To Enterprise Information Systems, This Course Reviews Their Characteristics, Their Impact On The Enterprise, Their Role In Organizations, And Their Current Architectures, Enabling Tools, And Project Cycles. (prerequisite: Busi 1001 Introduction To Business.) Busi 3002 Ethical Leadership This Online Leadership Course Helps Prepare Students To Assume A Leadership Role In The Modern Organization. The Basic Principles Of Leadership, Motivational Theory, The Importance Of Communication, And Current And Future Trends Are Introduced. Students Assess, Discuss, And Learn How To Apply Their Own Styles Of Leadership In The Workplace And The Community. Emphasis Is On Ethical Leadership Through Personal And Interpersonal Effectiveness And Organizational Development. Students Also Learn The Importance Of Followership And The Similarities Between The Roles Of Follower And Leader At All Levels Of The Organization. (prerequisite: Busi 1001 Introduction To Business.) Acct 3001 Intermediate Accounting I This Course Is The First In A Four-course Sequence. It Reviews The Principles Of Accrual Accounting And The Accounting Cycle, And Emphasizes The Presentation Of Transactions In Financial Statements. It Emphasizes The Conceptual Framework And Measurement Principles Underlying Financial Accounting. Financial Statement Presentation And Format Are Reviewed. The Relationship Between The Reporting And Auditing Functions In Corporations Is Emphasized. The Course Uses The Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Accounting Standards Codification And The International Accounting Standards Board’s International Financial Reporting Standards. (prerequisites: Acct 2003 Introduction To Accounting Ii) Acct 3003 Intermediate Accounting Ii This Course Is The Second In A Four-course Sequence And Is A Continuation Of Acct 3001 (intermediate Accounting I). It Reviews The Measurement And Reporting Principles For Cash, Receivables, Inventories, And Investments. Financial Statement Presentation Is Emphasized And The Relationship ...show more »


Statistics
Course Number STAT 2001
Credits 5.0

This course examines the fundamentals of probability and descriptive and inferential statistics. Hypothesis testing, simple regression and correlation analysis are covered, with emphasis on the application of these techniques to business decision-making. The analysis and application of statistics in cases are stressed. (Prerequisite: MATH 1001 College Algebra.)


Information Systems Project Management
Course Number NSEI 6511
Credits 3.0

Students develop the skills needed to plan, lead, and manage an information systems project. Topics include estimation, budgeting, and scheduling; risk management; team leadership; engineering process management; open source processes. Prerequisite: System and Service Architecture.


Program description: Are you looking to advance in the rapidly evolving technology field? Walden University’s B.S. in Computer Information Systems program can give you experience in designing, implementing, and managing information systems projects and programs. Learn to use specialized information technology tools to effectively diagnose, address, and respond to computer and technology issues within your organization.

Concentrations

  • Healthcare Informatics
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Information Systems Management
  • Information Systems Security
  • New Media Communication Technologies
  • Online Work and Communities
  • Self-Designed
  • Web and Mobile Applications Design

Computer Information Systems Courses at Post University

Program Name: B.S. in Computer Information Systems
Introduction to Information Technolog
Course Number CIS120
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of information technology (IT). Students gain practical knowledge of IT systems and the different frameworks in which IT is managed in business. Topics include computer architecture and organization, application platforms, database management, Web technologies, and network configurations. In addition, the course examines the history of information technology and its impact on society


Programming VBII
Course Number CIS230
Credits 3.0

This course applies structured techniques to programming business applications in Visual Basic. Emphasis is on using Visual Basic programming language to build business applications that access and manipulate databases, display and print reports.


Decision Support Systems/ Expert Systems
Course Number CIS317
Credits 3.0

Management strategies utilizing computer support systems, simulations, decision modeling tools, and sample expert systems resulting in improved decisions for all levels of management are examined.


Networking in Business
Course Number CIS337
Credits 3.0

Emphasis in this course is placed on networked-based information technology (local and wide-area networks) used togain efficiency and effectiveness for competitive advantages and for building new strategic relationships.


Web Design
Course Number CIS350
Credits 3.0

In this course, students will go through the entire process of planning and building well-designed interactive web sitesusing HTML and Web authoring tools. Emphasis is on designing the functional features and aesthetic qualities of a web site. This course may not be substituted for a programming language.


Systems Analysis I
Course Number CIS360
Credits 3.0

This course introduces an overview of the traditional systems development life cycle and emphasizes prototyping for the continuous improvement of technology-based systems.


Systems Analysis II
Course Number CIS356
Credits 3.0

This course examines advanced system analysis techniques for determining business information systems requirements.Topics include object-oriented analysis, agile analysis, prototype development, quality control, and configuration management. Emphasis is on the development and maintenance of software systems. This course builds on Systems Analysis I.


Global E-Commerce
Course Number CIS370
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to the theory and practice of electronic commerce emphasizing how computer technology presently influences online business strategies and initiatives.


Information Resource Management
Course Number CIS415
Credits 3.0

This seminar provides a broad overview of information systems management with particular attention to planning, organizing, and controlling user services and managing the computer information systems development process. The case study approach is used. Oral and written reports are required.


Database I
Course Number CIS422
Credits 3.0

Principles and methodologies of database design are presented with the objective of developing a basic database model for a personal computer. Students are required to build a database system that demonstrates basic menus, input screens, queries, and reports. Emphasis is on relational theory, SQL concepts, and database integrity.


Advanced Database Management Systems
Course Number CIS423
Credits 3.0

This course reinforces topics introduced in the first course and initiates building complete database systems using Visual Basic and Oracle. The final project requires the creation of an operational, menu-driven, customized database system.


Computer Control and Audit
Course Number CIS425
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of auditing and controlling computer information systems. Emphasis is placed on the design and application of controls within computer information systems. This course may be used to fulfill either a CIS or Accounting elective.


Web I
Course Number CIS351
Credits 3.0

This introductory course provides students with practical methods and skills to plan, design, and develop an interactiveWebsite. Emphasis is on using essential principles and techniques for building an effective Web layout and user interface. The course will conclude with the submission of a final project demonstrating the rudiments of Web development.


Database II
Course Number CIS424
Credits 3.0

This course reinforces topics introduced in Database I and initiates building complete database systems using Microsoft Visual Basic and Oracle. Students are required to submit a final project that includes planning and creating an operational, menu-driven, customized database management system.


Database III
Course Number CIS427
Credits 3.0

This Course Reinforces Topics Introduced In The Database Ii Course. This Course Provides Advanced Knowledge Of Relational Database Management Systems (rdbm) And Distributed Databases. Practical Exercises Will Be Used To Highlight Rdbm Strategies; Develop Oracle Pl/sql-based Applications; Diagnose Problems; And Improve Database Performance.


Database IV
Course Number CIS429
Credits 3.0

This Course Reinforces Themes Introduced In Database Iii And Highlights Essential Techniques In Oracle Database Performance Tuning. Practical Exercises Will Be Used To Formulate Sql Queries And Tune Sql Statements For Optimal Performance. Topics Include Performance Diagnostics And Tuning; Using Tuning Tools And Utilities; Using Triggers To Customize Information Management In The Oracle Database; Managing Memory; And Tracking And Managing Dependencies.


Project Management I
Course Number CIS213
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to essential project management tools and methodology. Course topics highlight modern PM techniques for managing applications development projects from initiation through delivery. Emphasis is on business strategies that focus on planning, organizing, and controlling significant activities of software project management.


Project Management II
Course Number CIS314
Credits 3.0

This course provides advanced approaches for managing and tracking medium and large scale software developmentprojects. The focus of the course is to present practical methods for monitoring work schedules and milestones; reducing risks; estimating project resources and cost; integrating scope changes; and maintaining quality throughout the project. Emphasis is on using project management techniques to analyze and control the activities of the project management team. This course builds on topics introduced in CIS 213 Project Management I.


Software Engineering I
Course Number CIS303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to theoretical and functional aspects of software engineering. Course topics cover systematic approaches for developing complex software systems and practical strategies for documenting each phase of the software development process. Emphasis is on using software engineering techniques to complete collaborative software development projects.


Software Engineering II
Course Number CIS404
Credits 3.0

This course presents advanced topics on software engineering practices for the design and development of software products. The course focuses on software engineering measures for analyzing and documenting requirements; preparing design specifications; and developing and testing applications. Emphasis is on disciplined software engineering techniques that are used to produce quality and sustainable software products. This course builds on the topics introduced in CIS303 Software Engineering I.


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number ACC430
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the system flow of financial information in the contexts of the system development process and the actual applications of computer technology to record keeping and information gathering functions. Applications studied include procurement and receiving, inventory control, accounts payable, marketing and shipping, billing and collections, etc. The course includes case studies and a hands-on computer project.


Program description: Keiser University's Bachelor of Science degree in Management Information Systems is the study of the uses of computers in business. Students study both business and information technology and learn how to solve business problems using hardware, operating systems, networking.

Program Name: B.S. in Computer Information Systems / Database
Seminar in CIS
Course Number CIS450
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides The Opportunity To Do In-depth Research On A Topic Of Individual Interest In Cis In Order To Integrate And Assimilate Information Issues. It Is The Capstone Course For The Major And Enables Students To Prepare Documents Representing Their Accomplishments, Perceptions, And Expertise For Future Evaluation. Frequent Meetings Between Students And Instructor Serve To Focus And Direct The Study. Prerequisites: 21 Credits In Cis And Senior Standing


Internship in CIS
Course Number CIS398
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides Students With Practical Experience In Cis Within Private Or Public Sectors Under The Supervision Of A Practicing Professional. Students Are Required To Spend 15 Hours Per Semester In Seminar Meetings And Work At Least 90 Hours Per Semester In A Computer Facility. A Journal Describing Daily Activities Is Required. Prerequisites: 18 Credits In Cis And At Least Junior Standing. You Must Speak With Your Academic Advisor As Well As The Career Services Office Before Registering.


Programming Fundamentals VBI
Course Number CIS200
Credits 3.0

This course provides opportunities to practice the critical organizational and logical skills required when using data structures for writing programs in high level programming languages. Planning tools for modularity and data structures are introduced. Prerequisite: CIS112


Programming in C++
Course Number CIS240
Credits 3.0

The C++ Language Will Be Explored For Modular Programming Structures, Arrays, And Pointers. Comparisons Between C++ And Other Programming Methodologies, Especially C, Will Be Made. Prerequisites: Cis112 And Cis200


End-User Computing
Course Number CIS312
Credits 3.0

This course gives students the opportunity to explore advanced topics in word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications focusing on information support for the managerial end user. Cases and reading assignments alert students to ethical and societal dimensions of systems, information strategies, e-commerce, and global information transfer. The course intends to serve management and computer information students who will need to integrate information theory with advanced computer skills. Prerequisite: CIS112


End-User Systems Design
Course Number CIS412
Credits 3.0

This Is A Hands-on Course In Designing End-user Managerial Computer Information Systems Using The Integrated Microsoft Office Professional Suite Of Applications Including Powerpoint And The Internet For System Implementation. Students Will Design A Web Page Suitable For Web Publication And At Least One Integrated System. Prerequisites: Cis112, Cis312, Cis360, Cis420 Or Cis422, Strongly Suggested.


College Reading & Writing
Course Number ENG110
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to develop and refine the analytical/critical reading skills and the substantive writing skills of freshmen. This intensive writing class will focus on writing essays of varying length and expose students to the various rhetorical modes of writing that will contribute to their success in university courses and their chosen careers.


College Writing Workshop
Course Number ENG120
Credits 3.0

This course looks to expand upon the rhetorical skills attained in ENG110. As a student-centered course, students explore their own writing in peer, group, and self-review skill sessions. Students enhance self-editing skills and increase awareness of the revision skills needed in both college coursework and in careers. The course will further develop students’ understanding of the writing process from pre-writing to final draft. This course encourages students to have their writing evaluated across the curriculum. The addition of thematic readings further enhances students’ knowledge base. The course culminates in a portfolio of original work.


Intro to Communications
Course Number COM107
Credits 3.0

This introductory course will focus on the knowledge and skills that students need to become competent communicators. This information and these skills will include speaking, listening, media literacy, computer-mediated communication, cultural sensitivity, workplace communication, group dynamics, and critical thinking. Students will prepare and present speeches and group projects that utilize media and technology. Emphasis will be place on personal, social and workplace interaction both individually and in group settings.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number CIS112
Credits 3.0

This course strives to meet the high level of computer literacy required of all students earning a degree from the university. Special emphasis is placed on the ethical use of computer technology for information analysis and communications. Computer units introduce the Internet, Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. Students who feel they have attained computer literacy and earn 70 percent on an exemption exam may substitute any other 3-credit course for this core requirement. Students may prove competency by passing a waiver examination. No credit is granted if the requirement is waived.


College Algebra
Course Number MAT120
Credits 3.0

This course provides a review of the fundamentals of algebra: a study of function theory, specifically linear and quadratic functions; matrix operations; and linear programming. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving techniques with special attention given to business and other applications. Prerequisite: MAT101 or placement examination.


Statistics
Course Number MAT220
Credits 3.0

This course acquaints students with the fundamentals of modern statistics. It includes basic concepts of descriptive statistics and inferences about the mean, proportion, and variance of one population. The course also includes an introduction to probability and to linear correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT120 or placement examination.


Elements of Organizations
Course Number LCS105
Credits 3.0

Students need a basic understanding of how organizations work in order to manage their personal and professional lives. This course provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the foundations underlying all organizations (businesses, non-profit and governmental organizations) specifically as they relate to the nature of: management and leadership, economics both domestically and internationally, ethics, social responsibility, entrepreneurship, human resource management, marketing/advertising, e-commerce, information technology, accounting, investments, money and personal finances.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC111
Credits 3.0

This course is for the student to learn about accounting as an information development and communications function that supports economic decision-making. The course will help students perform financial analysis; derive information for personal or organizational decisions; and understand business, governmental, and other organizational entities.


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECO201
Credits 3.0

This course examines the fundamental analytical structure of a macro economy and familiarizes students with the problems of employment, inflation, interest rates, and business cycles. Topics include the determination of income and output, the role of fiscal and monetary policy, and the interaction of an economy with the rest of the world within a global framework.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGT105
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the principles of management and their application in public and private, profit and non-profit organizations. The areas of employee motivation, group behavior, leadership, strategic planning, organizational design, and career opportunities represent a variety of subjects presented and discussed in the course. Emphasis is on the research and techniques available to assist in the development of requisite management skills.


Principles of Finance
Course Number FIN301
Credits 3.0

This course examines the role of finance in relation to other business operations and within the financial community. It covers the development and use of the basic tools for financial administration, financial analysis, planning and control, investment decisions, and management of sources of funds.


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKT101
Credits 3.0

This course examines the basic marketing principles practiced by modern organizations including product development, distribution, promotion, and pricing. It is the foundation course for upper-level marketing courses.


Programming VBII
Course Number CIS230
Credits 3.0

This course applies structured techniques to programming business applications in Visual Basic. Emphasis is on using Visual Basic programming language to build business applications that access and manipulate databases, display and print reports.


Systems Management
Course Number MGT347
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Systems Approach To Management With A View Towards The Entire Range Of Managerial Responsibilities Associated With Achieving Effective Performance From A “learning” Organization. Management Simulations And Short Cases Applying Systems Tools Reinforce Systems Theory. Prerequisite: Mgt105, Cis112


College Success Seminar
Course Number CSA100
Credits 3.0

The College Success Seminar is designed to provide first year students with the academic and social skills necessary for success in the university environment. Its mission is to provide students with an introduction to the many dimensions of university life and Post University.


Professional Success Seminar
Course Number CSA200
Credits 1.0

The course will enable students to develop their own individualized plan for personal, academic and career success. Students will engage in self-evaluation exercises and highly interactive classroom activities to evaluate their own “fit” for certain careers. Students will also participate in resume and cover letter writing activities to prepare for the experiential learning of the next course. This course will allow students to establish short-term career goals and begin a career portfolio to be refined during successive semesters.


Career Capstone
Course Number CSA400
Credits 2.0

This course is a culmination of the career and self-awareness series, a comprehensive program for career and life planning. The course prepares students for a transition from university life to independent work life. Students will learn valuable financial and money management planning and skills. Students will explore life balance issues, life roles, and self-concept as it relates to their future plans. Students will explore employment issues, such as the changing nature of work, diversity, trends, and job outlook. The course will require students to engage in networking and a job search with the goal of employment upon graduation. In addition, students who are seeking graduate school will engage in the application process, interviewing, and essay writing.


Introduction to Information Technolog
Course Number CIS120
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of information technology (IT). Students gain practical knowledge of IT systems and the different frameworks in which IT is managed in business. Topics include computer architecture and organization, application platforms, database management, Web technologies, and network configurations. In addition, the course examines the history of information technology and its impact on society


Decision Support Systems/ Expert Systems
Course Number CIS317
Credits 3.0

Management strategies utilizing computer support systems, simulations, decision modeling tools, and sample expert systems resulting in improved decisions for all levels of management are examined.


Networking in Business
Course Number CIS337
Credits 3.0

Emphasis in this course is placed on networked-based information technology (local and wide-area networks) used togain efficiency and effectiveness for competitive advantages and for building new strategic relationships.


Program description: Post University’s Computer Information Systems (CIS) degree program is designed to help prepare students for careers in a field that is expected to grow by 20% between now and 2018.Our program includes a carefully configured set of courses guiding students towards knowledge and skills necessary for competitively administering technology-driven businesses, communicating effectively, and working efficiently as part of an enterprise business team. The CIS learning environment combines Information Technology (IT) theory with practical IT hands-on experience.Throughout the CIS curriculum, students develop an understanding of ethical IT responsibilities; a recognition of the impact of IT on cultural, economic and legal differences; and an understanding of the importance of protecting the privacyand security of IT systems and information.Internship and cooperative education experiences also are available to students in a variety of professional settings.Graduates pursue careers in information services, database administration, systems analysis, and application programming

Program Name: B.S. in Computer Information Systems / Software Development Management
Project Management I
Course Number CIS213
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to essential project management tools and methodology. Course topics highlight modern PM techniques for managing applications development projects from initiation through delivery. Emphasis is on business strategies that focus on planning, organizing, and controlling significant activities of software project management.


Project Management II
Course Number CIS314
Credits 3.0

This course provides advanced approaches for managing and tracking medium and large scale software developmentprojects. The focus of the course is to present practical methods for monitoring work schedules and milestones; reducing risks; estimating project resources and cost; integrating scope changes; and maintaining quality throughout the project. Emphasis is on using project management techniques to analyze and control the activities of the project management team. This course builds on topics introduced in CIS 213 Project Management I.


Systems Analysis II
Course Number CIS356
Credits 3.0

This course examines advanced system analysis techniques for determining business information systems requirements.Topics include object-oriented analysis, agile analysis, prototype development, quality control, and configuration management. Emphasis is on the development and maintenance of software systems. This course builds on Systems Analysis I.


Software Engineering I
Course Number CIS303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to theoretical and functional aspects of software engineering. Course topics cover systematic approaches for developing complex software systems and practical strategies for documenting each phase of the software development process. Emphasis is on using software engineering techniques to complete collaborative software development projects.


Software Engineering II
Course Number CIS404
Credits 3.0

This course presents advanced topics on software engineering practices for the design and development of software products. The course focuses on software engineering measures for analyzing and documenting requirements; preparing design specifications; and developing and testing applications. Emphasis is on disciplined software engineering techniques that are used to produce quality and sustainable software products. This course builds on the topics introduced in CIS303 Software Engineering I.


Introduction to Information Technolog
Course Number CIS120
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of information technology (IT). Students gain practical knowledge of IT systems and the different frameworks in which IT is managed in business. Topics include computer architecture and organization, application platforms, database management, Web technologies, and network configurations. In addition, the course examines the history of information technology and its impact on society


Programming VBII
Course Number CIS230
Credits 3.0

This course applies structured techniques to programming business applications in Visual Basic. Emphasis is on using Visual Basic programming language to build business applications that access and manipulate databases, display and print reports.


Decision Support Systems/ Expert Systems
Course Number CIS317
Credits 3.0

Management strategies utilizing computer support systems, simulations, decision modeling tools, and sample expert systems resulting in improved decisions for all levels of management are examined.


Networking in Business
Course Number CIS337
Credits 3.0

Emphasis in this course is placed on networked-based information technology (local and wide-area networks) used togain efficiency and effectiveness for competitive advantages and for building new strategic relationships.


Web Design
Course Number CIS350
Credits 3.0

In this course, students will go through the entire process of planning and building well-designed interactive web sitesusing HTML and Web authoring tools. Emphasis is on designing the functional features and aesthetic qualities of a web site. This course may not be substituted for a programming language.


Systems Analysis I
Course Number CIS360
Credits 3.0

This course introduces an overview of the traditional systems development life cycle and emphasizes prototyping for the continuous improvement of technology-based systems.


Systems Analysis II
Course Number CIS356
Credits 3.0

This course examines advanced system analysis techniques for determining business information systems requirements.Topics include object-oriented analysis, agile analysis, prototype development, quality control, and configuration management. Emphasis is on the development and maintenance of software systems. This course builds on Systems Analysis I.


Global E-Commerce
Course Number CIS370
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to the theory and practice of electronic commerce emphasizing how computer technology presently influences online business strategies and initiatives.


Information Resource Management
Course Number CIS415
Credits 3.0

This seminar provides a broad overview of information systems management with particular attention to planning, organizing, and controlling user services and managing the computer information systems development process. The case study approach is used. Oral and written reports are required.


Database I
Course Number CIS422
Credits 3.0

Principles and methodologies of database design are presented with the objective of developing a basic database model for a personal computer. Students are required to build a database system that demonstrates basic menus, input screens, queries, and reports. Emphasis is on relational theory, SQL concepts, and database integrity.


Advanced Database Management Systems
Course Number CIS423
Credits 3.0

This course reinforces topics introduced in the first course and initiates building complete database systems using Visual Basic and Oracle. The final project requires the creation of an operational, menu-driven, customized database system.


Computer Control and Audit
Course Number CIS425
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of auditing and controlling computer information systems. Emphasis is placed on the design and application of controls within computer information systems. This course may be used to fulfill either a CIS or Accounting elective.


Web I
Course Number CIS351
Credits 3.0

This introductory course provides students with practical methods and skills to plan, design, and develop an interactiveWebsite. Emphasis is on using essential principles and techniques for building an effective Web layout and user interface. The course will conclude with the submission of a final project demonstrating the rudiments of Web development.


Database II
Course Number CIS424
Credits 3.0

This course reinforces topics introduced in Database I and initiates building complete database systems using Microsoft Visual Basic and Oracle. Students are required to submit a final project that includes planning and creating an operational, menu-driven, customized database management system.


Database III
Course Number CIS427
Credits 3.0

This Course Reinforces Topics Introduced In The Database Ii Course. This Course Provides Advanced Knowledge Of Relational Database Management Systems (rdbm) And Distributed Databases. Practical Exercises Will Be Used To Highlight Rdbm Strategies; Develop Oracle Pl/sql-based Applications; Diagnose Problems; And Improve Database Performance.


Database IV
Course Number CIS429
Credits 3.0

This Course Reinforces Themes Introduced In Database Iii And Highlights Essential Techniques In Oracle Database Performance Tuning. Practical Exercises Will Be Used To Formulate Sql Queries And Tune Sql Statements For Optimal Performance. Topics Include Performance Diagnostics And Tuning; Using Tuning Tools And Utilities; Using Triggers To Customize Information Management In The Oracle Database; Managing Memory; And Tracking And Managing Dependencies.


Project Management I
Course Number CIS213
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to essential project management tools and methodology. Course topics highlight modern PM techniques for managing applications development projects from initiation through delivery. Emphasis is on business strategies that focus on planning, organizing, and controlling significant activities of software project management.


Project Management II
Course Number CIS314
Credits 3.0

This course provides advanced approaches for managing and tracking medium and large scale software developmentprojects. The focus of the course is to present practical methods for monitoring work schedules and milestones; reducing risks; estimating project resources and cost; integrating scope changes; and maintaining quality throughout the project. Emphasis is on using project management techniques to analyze and control the activities of the project management team. This course builds on topics introduced in CIS 213 Project Management I.


Software Engineering I
Course Number CIS303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to theoretical and functional aspects of software engineering. Course topics cover systematic approaches for developing complex software systems and practical strategies for documenting each phase of the software development process. Emphasis is on using software engineering techniques to complete collaborative software development projects.


Software Engineering II
Course Number CIS404
Credits 3.0

This course presents advanced topics on software engineering practices for the design and development of software products. The course focuses on software engineering measures for analyzing and documenting requirements; preparing design specifications; and developing and testing applications. Emphasis is on disciplined software engineering techniques that are used to produce quality and sustainable software products. This course builds on the topics introduced in CIS303 Software Engineering I.


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number ACC430
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the system flow of financial information in the contexts of the system development process and the actual applications of computer technology to record keeping and information gathering functions. Applications studied include procurement and receiving, inventory control, accounts payable, marketing and shipping, billing and collections, etc. The course includes case studies and a hands-on computer project.


Program description: Post University’s Computer Information Systems (CIS) degree program is designed to help prepare students for careers in
a field that is expected to grow by 20% between now and 2018.
Our program includes a carefully configured set of courses guiding students towards knowledge and skills necessary for
competitively administering technology-driven businesses, communicating effectively, and working efficiently as part of an
enterprise business team.
The CIS learning environment combines Information Technology (IT) theory with practical IT hands-on experience.
Throughout the CIS curriculum, students develop an understanding of ethical IT responsibilities; a recognition of the impact of IT on cultural, economic and legal differences; and an understanding of the importance of protecting the privacy
and security of IT systems and information. Internship and cooperative education experiences also are available to students in a variety of professional settings.

Computer Information Systems Courses at Penn Foster College

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Computer Information Systems
Computer Technology Orientation
Course Number INT 101
Credits 1.0

Overview of Internet technology course; role of technology in society; strategies for completing the Internet Technology Program as an independent learner.


Introduction to Programming
Course Number CSC 105
Credits 3.0

Examines the basic logic common to all programming languages; shows students how to create their own programs not based on any particular programming language; concentrates on the basic guidelines and best practices for developing good programming skills. PREREQ: Introduction to Computers or equivalent


Internet Marketing and E-Commerce
Course Number INT 114
Credits 3.0

Provides a concise introduction to electronic commerce with balanced coverage of both technology and business topics; contains a comprehensive online companion that links the concepts in the book to real online examples; security, implementation, ethics, and legal issues in electronic commerce; case studies of real businesses. PREREQ: Computer Literacy


Advanced PC Applications
Course Number CSC 221
Credits 3.0

Database applications; integrating word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software applications. PREREQ: PC Applications or equivalent


HTML Coding
Course Number INT 120
Credits 3.0

Teaches how to create Web pages with hypertext links, tables, frames, and forms; covers cascading style sheets, programming with JavaScript,® working with content and layout, controlling mouse and keyboard events, and creating new frames and windows. PREREQ: Computer Literacy


Internet Server Environments
Course Number INT 125
Credits 3.0

Explores the fascinating world of Internet server environments, while teaching industry terminology, domain name registration techniques, and characteristics of Web-hosting services. Examines Unix® servers, Windows® 2000 servers, and tools that are used to remotely connect to these servers. Covers the many features and elements involved when working with the Internet server environment. PREREQ: Computer Literacy


Pre-calculus
Course Number MAT 222
Credits 3.0

Covers pre-calculus concepts all college students need as prerequisites to calculus and related courses required in many undergraduate majors. Specific topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and analytical trigonometry, systems of equations, and inequalities.


Network Protocols and Internetworking
Course Number INT 128
Credits 3.0

Covers topics related to how computers communicate with each other, how computers are grouped together to form networks, networking concepts and issues that are key to the successful implementation of computer networks, and the different networking implementation strategies and technologies currently available. PREREQ: Computer Literacy; Internet Server Environments


Visual Basic®
Course Number CSC 218
Credits 3.0

Introduction To Visual Basic® And Managing Controls; Dialog Boxes And Controls; Nature Of Visual Basic® Programs; Visual Basic® Forms, Files, And Output; Graphics, Multimedia, And Form Templates; Activex And Ado Controls; Internet Access, Help Files, And Distributing Programs; Multidimensional Arrays And The Windows® Api. Prereq: Pc Applications Or Equivalent


Introduction to Database Technology
Course Number INT 225
Credits 3.0

Offers An Overview Of Essential Database Concepts, With A Focus On The Relational Model Of Database Management; Covers Structured Query Language (sql), Design Methodology, Functions Of A Database Management System, And Database Administration; Includes Advanced Topics Such As Object-oriented (oo) Databases, Data Warehouses, And Client Server Systems. Prereqs: Internet Server Environments


Programming in Java™
Course Number INT 215
Credits 3.0

Introduces Object-oriented Techniques Early; Features Short Code Examples Built From The Bottom Up; Offers More Thorough Coverage Of The Basics, Explanations And Examples Using The Stringbuffer Class; Devotes An Entire Chapter To Swing; Designed To Teach Java™ To Those Studying Programming For The First Time, But Is Also Appropriate For Those Building On Experiences In Another Programming Language. Prereqs: Html Coding


Structured Systems Analysis
Course Number CIS 235
Credits 3.0

The system development cycle; information gathering and reporting activities on the analysis phase; interaction of various participants in the systems process. PREREQ: Introduction to Computers; Business Computer Systems and Applications or equivalent


Systems Design
Course Number CIS 240
Credits 3.0

Role Of The Systems Analyst In Developing Business Applications; Hierarchy Charts; Ipo; Decision Tables; Structured English. Prereq: Structured Systems Analysis.


Confidentiality of Health Information
Course Number HIT 109
Credits 3.0

Ethical and legal rules concerning the confidentiality of health information is presented with particular emphasis on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Background material will include operation of the legal system and principles of legal liability. PREREQ: Law and Ethics in Medicine


Medical Coding 2
Course Number HIT 204
Credits 3.0

The Medical Coding 2 Course Utilizes The Application Of The Cpt And Icd-9-cm Classification Systems To Code Diagnoses And Procedures. Prereq: Medical Coding 1


Information Literacy
Course Number ENG 103
Credits 1.0

Teaches students to become effective in finding and utilizing information at libraries and other information centers, and through electronic resources available in libraries and on the World Wide Web. PREREQ: None


College Algebra
Course Number MAT 120
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to basic algebraic concepts. Topics covered include the real number system, exponents, scientific notation, equations of lines, graphing, inequalities, absolute values, polynomials, factoring polynomials, and rational expressions. PREREQ: None


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Readings in World Civilization
Course Number SSC 105
Credits 3.0

Importance of the study of history; major events of the sixteenth through twentieth centuries; causal relationships between events and trends. PREREQ: None


English Composition
Course Number ENG 100
Credits 3.0

This course teaches the skills and techniques of effectively developing, drafting, and revising college-level essays toward a specific purpose and audience: active reading, prewriting strategies, sentence and paragraph structure, thesis statements, varied patterns of development (e.g., illustration, comparison/contrast, classification), critical reading toward revision of structure and organization, editing for the standard written conventions, use and documentation of outside sources. Students submit three essays (process analysis, causal analysis, argumentation) and a course journal. PREREQ: None


Introduction to Biology
Course Number SCI 120
Credits 3.0

An introductory course that explains the origin of life and the relationships between all living things. It describes how a significant number of organisms are structured and how they work, in order to enable students to discuss intelligently the various forms of life and their processes. PREREQ: None


Art Appreciation
Course Number HUM 102
Credits 3.0

Artistic media; historical periods and artistic movements; roles of the artist and the viewer; art criticism. PREREQ: None


Program description: There are certain skills you need to begin a career as a computer science professional. With Penn Foster College's distance learning, you can earn your Associate Degree in Computer Information Systems quickly and conveniently.

Learn valuable skills with courses in these subjects and more:
PC Applications and Web Development
Network Protocols and Internet working
Database Technology, Systems Analysis and Design
Java™ Programming and Visual Basic® .NET

Why earn your Associate Degree through distance learning?
Average income is $60,000 a year. With more experience you can earn much more.
Job openings are expected to increase 34% by 2014.
You can specialize in Computer Programming, System Design, or System Analysis.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, systems analysts, computer scientists, and database administrators are expected to be among the fastest growing occupations through 2014. Earning your distance learning Computer Information Systems Degree means more opportunity for you!

PROGRAM OUTLINE
This outline covers all four semesters of your at-home degree program. You will receive credit for previous college coursework if you meet Penn Foster standards. If you wish to receive credit for previous coursework, contact the college you attended and ask that your transcripts be forwarded to Penn Foster for evaluation. There is a non-refundable transcript processing fee of $30. All previous college work must have been completed with a grade of "C" or better, and as much as 50% of the required credits may be transferred. We will also credit your tuition for all the courses that are acceptable.

Computer Information Systems Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Business/Management
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them. Prerequisite: CIS-170A or the equivalent / 4-3


MAFM elective course

Choose one from the courses in the Keller academic catalog for which you meet the prerequisite(s).


Information Systems Security Planning and Audit
Course Number SEC-440
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth look at risk factor analysis that must be performed in order to design a flexible and comprehensive security plan. Topics include assessing threats, developing countermeasures, protecting information and security designs processes. Auditing practices used to verify compliance with policies and procedures, as well as for building a case for presentation in private and public settings, are also covered.


Business Continuity
Course Number SEC-340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on preparing for, reacting to and recovering from events that threaten the security of information and information resources, or that threaten to disrupt critical business functions. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s information assets and critical business functions, as well as develop policies, procedures and plans to address them. Technology specific to thwarting disruption and to supporting recovery is also covered.


Data Privacy and Security
Course Number SEC-360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on legal, ethical and security issues involving data and information assets organizations must address to ensure operational continuity as well as compliance with standards, policies and laws. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s data and develop standards, policies, procedures and plans to combat them. Security technology specific to safeguarding data and information assets is also covered.


Web Security
Course Number SEC-370
Credits 4.0

This course examines issues involved in protecting web-based applications from external threats while safeguarding customer privacy and accessibility. Students examine external threats to an organization’s systems and develop strategies that support systems and business goals.


Advanced Topics in Enterprise Analysis
Course Number SAI-440
Credits 4.0

Students in this course explore enterprise analysis tools and methodologies; capacity planning as related to information systems; enterprise architecture; and risk analysis and management. Prerequisite: CIS-339 / 4-4


Organizational Process Analysis
Course Number SAI-460
Credits 4.0

This course addresses analytical techniques used to model process flow. Process rules and process maturity are explored in the context of characterizing workflow effectiveness and identifying opportunities for process improvement. Also covered are systematic approaches for comparing existing processes to process change solutions, documenting requirements for resource proposals and change management competencies critical for successful implementation. Prerequisite: CIS-321 / 4-4


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential
roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing
hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.
The program offers tracks as shown in the following program
outline, as well as a flex option, which students may take in lieu
of a specific track. Students who have not chosen an area of
specialization may begin the program in “Undeclared” status;
however, they must select a track or the flex option by the time
they have earned 60 semester-credit hours toward their degree.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Computer Forensics
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Digital Crime: Evidence and Procedure
Course Number CCSI-330
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic legal concepts and evidentiary procedures for investigating criminal activity involving computers and computer-based systems. Students explore practical application of law and legal procedures in the digital age.


Computer Ethics
Course Number CCSI-360
Credits 3.0

This course explores the nature and social impact of computer technology, as well as the corresponding formulation and justification of governmental and organizational policies for ethical uses of such technology. Addressed are legal, ethical and sociological concerns about the ubiquity of computer software and hardware, as well as concerns about the proliferation and pervasive nature of computer networks


Digital Forensics I with Lab
Course Number CCSI-410
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the study of forensics by outlining integrative aspects of the discipline with those of other sciences. Coursework focuses on applying basic forensic techniques used to investigate illegal and unethical activity within a PC or local area network (LAN) environment and then resolving related issues.


Digital Forensics II with Lab
Course Number CCSI-460
Credits 5.0

This course builds on forensic computer techniques introduced in CCSI-410, focusing on advanced investigative techniques to track leads over local and wide area networks, including international computer crime.


Information Systems Security Planning and Audit
Course Number SEC-440
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth look at risk factor analysis that must be performed in order to design a flexible and comprehensive security plan. Topics include assessing threats, developing countermeasures, protecting information and security designs processes. Auditing practices used to verify compliance with policies and procedures, as well as for building a case for presentation in private and public settings, are also covered.


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Database Management
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Advanced Database with Lab
Course Number DBM-405A
Credits 16.0

This Course Introduces Database Implications Of Efficient And Effective Transaction Processing, Including Error Handling, Data Validation, Security, Stored Procedures And Triggers, Record Locking, Commit And Rollback. Data Mining And Warehousing Are Also Explored. Oracle Is The Primary Relational Database Management System (rdbms) Used. Prerequisite: Cis-336 / 5-4


Database Administration with Lab
Course Number DBM-438
Credits 16.0

Students Are Introduced To A Variety Of Database Administration Topics, Including Capacity Planning, Database Management System (dbms) Architecture, Performance Tuning, Backup, Recovery And Disaster Planning, Archiving, Reorganization And Defragmentation. Prerequisite: Dbm-405a / 5-4


Advanced Topics in Database with Lab
Course Number DBM-449
Credits 16.0

Students In This Course Explore Database Topics Such As Dynamic Structured Query Language (sql), Complex Queries, Data Warehousing, Reporting Capability Creation, Performance Tuning, And Data Security Practices And Technologies. Prerequisite: Dbm-438 / 5-4


Program description: Computer information systems specialists and management professionals design, build, and implement software solutions that are the driving force in every business, not-for-profit, and government agency. They're also relied upon to analyze existing systems and discover new ways to optimize their performance. So, it's no surprise that significant job growth is expected in computing fields over the next several years. When you earn your bachelor's degree in Computer Information Systems (CIS) from DeVry University, choosing from nine career-specific specializations, you'll gain skills and knowledge that can be applied in nearly every industry.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Information Systems Security
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Business Continuity
Course Number SEC-340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on preparing for, reacting to and recovering from events that threaten the security of information and information resources, or that threaten to disrupt critical business functions. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s information assets and critical business functions, as well as develop policies, procedures and plans to address them. Technology specific to thwarting disruption and to supporting recovery is also covered.


Data Privacy and Security
Course Number SEC-360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on legal, ethical and security issues involving data and information assets organizations must address to ensure operational continuity as well as compliance with standards, policies and laws. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s data and develop standards, policies, procedures and plans to combat them. Security technology specific to safeguarding data and information assets is also covered.


Web Security
Course Number SEC-370
Credits 4.0

This course examines issues involved in protecting web-based applications from external threats while safeguarding customer privacy and accessibility. Students examine external threats to an organization’s systems and develop strategies that support systems and business goals.


Information Systems Security Planning and Audit
Course Number SEC-440
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth look at risk factor analysis that must be performed in order to design a flexible and comprehensive security plan. Topics include assessing threats, developing countermeasures, protecting information and security designs processes. Auditing practices used to verify compliance with policies and procedures, as well as for building a case for presentation in private and public settings, are also covered.


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Systems Analysis and Integration
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


System Integration with Lab
Course Number SAI-430
Credits 5.0

This Course Integrates Previous Coursework In Information Systems Analysis And Design, Database Management, Transaction Processing And Application Development. Through A Business Case Involving Several Functional Areas, Students Examine Relationships Among Information Systems Supporting Each Area, And Explore Organizational And Technical Issues That Arise When Business Needs Require Separate Systems To Work Together. Prerequisite: Cis-355a Or Cis-355b / 5-4


Advanced Topics in Enterprise Analysis
Course Number SAI-440
Credits 4.0

Students in this course explore enterprise analysis tools and methodologies; capacity planning as related to information systems; enterprise architecture; and risk analysis and management. Prerequisite: CIS-339 / 4-4


Organizational Process Analysis
Course Number SAI-460
Credits 4.0

This course addresses analytical techniques used to model process flow. Process rules and process maturity are explored in the context of characterizing workflow effectiveness and identifying opportunities for process improvement. Also covered are systematic approaches for comparing existing processes to process change solutions, documenting requirements for resource proposals and change management competencies critical for successful implementation. Prerequisite: CIS-321 / 4-4


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Web Development and Administration
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Principles of E-Commerce
Course Number WEB-320
Credits 4.0

This course provides comprehensive coverage of a broad spectrum of e-commerce principles, models and practices. Topics include Internet marketing and retailing; payment and order fulfillment; and various e-commerce models such as businessto- business (B2B) and consumer-to-consumer (C2C).


Web Architecture with Lab
Course Number WEB-375
Credits 5.0

Building On Networking Concepts And Principles Explored In Cis-246, This Course Introduces Students To Web Architecture And Connectivity. Topics Include Internet Protocols Such As Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip); Domain Name Server (dns); Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (smtp), Hypertext Transfer Protocol (http) And File Transfer Protocol (ftp); And Design Of An Internet Or Corporate Intranet Infrastructure To Meet Specific Needs.


Advanced Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number WEB-460
Credits 5.0

This course builds on basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. Coursework introduces concepts of data interchange, message exchange and web application components. A programming language such as Java, C++.Net or Visual Basic.Net is used to implement business-related web-based applications.


Program description: The CIS program is designed to produce graduates who are
able to:
• Analyze, design and implement solutions to business problems.
• Create and test computer information systems solutions
for business problems.
• Demonstrate project management skills.
• Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
• Apply information literacy and problem-solving skills that
support lifelong personal and professional development.
DeVry accomplishes these goals by:
• Providing a sound foundation in structured, event-driven,
object-oriented and web programming, as well as systems
analysis and design, database design and management,
and networking across multiple platforms.
• Incorporating a strong applications-oriented component with
each technical course, which reinforces learning of fundamental
concepts, principles and theory through use of computer hardware and software for problem-solving.
• Integrating general competencies such as applied research,
written and oral communication, critical thinking, problemsolving and team skills in technical and nontechnical courses.

Computer Information Systems Courses at Baker College

Program Name: Associate of Business - Accounting/Computer Information Systems
Intermediate Database Management
Course Number CIS 302A
Credits 4.0

Provides An Intermediate Level Of Study Of Personal And/or Business Database Applications Including Relational Database Structure And Theory, The Structure And Maintenance Of Tables, Queries, Forms, And Reports, And An Introduction To Macros And Switchboards. Prerequisite(s): Inf 114a Or Net 101.


Intermediate Spreadsheets
Course Number CIS 313A
Credits 4.0

Explores further the features of spreadsheets. Topics include a more in-depth study of spreadsheet functions, database techniques, graphing, and an introduction to macros. Prerequisite(s): INF 113.


Microsoft PowerPoint
Course Number INF 141A
Credits 2.0

Computerized Accounting
Course Number ACC 231
Credits 4.0

Accounting Concepts
Course Number ACC 241
Credits 4.0

Payroll Accounting
Course Number ACC 251
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACC 301
Credits 4.0

Begins An In-depth Study Of The Theory And Conceptual Issues Relevant To Presentation Of Financial Information For Use In External Decision-making Processes.emphasis Is Placed On Reporting And Disclosure Requirements For A Complex,classified Balance Sheet. Other Topics Include A Review Of The Accounting Cycle,preparation Of Financial Statements, The Conceptual Framework, Gaap, And Account Reconciliation. Prerequisite(s): Acc 241 Or Acc 291.


Individual Taxation
Course Number ACC 341B
Credits 4.0

Visual BASIC
Course Number CIS 310
Credits 4.0

Introduces Object-oriented Programming Design Using Visual Basic.net For Windows. Students Will Learn The Tools And Methods Used To Analyze Real-life Problems And Develop Programs That Address Those Problems. Basic Language Has Been A Long-standing Standard For Learning Programming. Visual Basic.net Builds On This Tradition Plus Introduces Students To The Powerful Tools Of Objectoriented Programming That Have Fast Become A Standard In Most Windows Programming Languages. Prerequisite(s): Cs 111.


Introduction to Programming
Course Number CS 111
Credits 4.0

Introduces Students To Programming Concepts Such As Logic And Flow Charting As Well As Some Basic Programming Techniques. Prerequisite(s): Any Inf Course Or Net 101. Corequisite(s): Mth 111.


Professional Career Strategies
Course Number WRK 291B
Credits 1.0

Internship
Course Number WRK 201
Credits 2.0

Cooperative Education I
Course Number WRK 211
Credits 1.0

Fundamentals of Accounting I
Course Number ACC 121
Credits 4.0

Fundamentals of Accounting II
Course Number ACC 122
Credits 4.0

Continues the study of accounting concepts begun in Fundamentals of Accounting I, emphasizing financial statement analysis. Annual reports will be utilized extensively to reinforce key concepts. Managerial accounting and its role in decision making will also be examined. Prerequisite(s): ACC 121.


Principles of Macroeconomics
Course Number ECN 201
Credits 4.0

Principles of Microeconomics
Course Number ECN 202
Credits 4.0

Personal Finance
Course Number FIN 101
Credits 4.0

Business Law
Course Number LAW 211
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Business
Course Number MGT 101
Credits 4.0

Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKT 111B
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENG 101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number ENG 102
Credits 4.0

Word Processing
Course Number INF 112
Credits 4.0

Electronic Spreadsheets
Course Number INF 113
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Database Applications
Course Number INF 114A
Credits 2.0

Introductory Algebra
Course Number MTH 111
Credits 4.0

Oral Communication
Course Number SPK 201
Credits 4.0

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presenta


Workplace Communication
Course Number WRI 115
Credits 4.0

Prepares students to be effective communicators in the workplace. This course includes fundamental techniques and formats used in business and technical communication. Clear, concise, factual communication is stressed through a variety of applications including letters, memoranda, business and technical proposals, manuals, and research writing. Preparation of a resume and associated job-search documents is included. Prerequisite(s): ENG 102.


Human Relations
Course Number PSY 101
Credits 4.0

General Psychology
Course Number PSY 111
Credits 4.0

Program description: Accounting/Computer Information Systems
In a dynamic technological environment, accounting and computer information systems are highly interrelated. The utilization of the computer in information retention, maintenance, and summarization has greatly enhanced the accountant’s effectiveness in presenting relevant, useful information. Students completing this degree will develop a combination of analytical skills and technological knowledge of benefit to any organization.

Accreditation/Approval/Certification Status
External peer review is the primary means of assuring and improving the quality of higher education institutions and programs in the United States. This recognition is accomplished through program accreditation, approval or certification.

The Accounting/Computer Information systems Program is accredited through the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education.

Program Name: Associate of Business - Computer Information Systems - Microcomputer Applications
Accounting and Financial Management
Course Number ACC 351R
Credits 4.0

Provides an introduction to the application of fundamental concepts of accounting and finance to managerial decision making. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and use of accounting information and its use in planning and control of organizational assets and operations. This course is exclusive to accelerated Bachelor of Business Leadership.


Accounting Seminar II
Course Number ACC 491
Credits 4.0

Integrates material from the bachelor degree program through practical application of the procedures and practices of the various accounting disciplines. Case studies will be used extensively to reinforce key concepts. This course is the capstone of the bachelor degree in accounting program.


Fundamentals of Design
Course Number AT 301
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to the basic elements and principles of design, design technology, concepts of space, form, color, texture, and visual techniques necessary for design conceptualization creation and presentation. Fundamental aspects of architecture design methodology and techniques for conceptualization and presentation will also be introduced.


Architectural History I
Course Number AT 311A
Credits 4.0

Studies the history and philosophy of architecture in a context of related arts, crafts, and design settings, in significant periods of the western worlds - from Prehistoric and Ancient times, through the Middle Ages (including Byzantine and Islamic extension), up to the Gothic era.


Architectural History II
Course Number AT 312
Credits 4.0

Studies the history and philosophy of architecture in a context of related arts, crafts, and design settings, in significant periods of the western worlds from Renaissance and Baroque eras, through the 18th century and into the modern world.


Structural Design I
Course Number AT 321
Credits 4.0

Studies The Fundamental Concepts/principles Of Mechanics And Strength Of Materials In Dealing With The State Of Rest Of Bodies Under The Action Of Forces. Applies The Equilibrium Conditions To The Analysis Of Concrete Structures Formed By Connected Members, Including Reinforced Beams, Columns, Floors, Walls, And Footings. The Design Process Is Studied In Depth, Utilizing Aisc And Aci Standards. A Brief Review Of Trigonometry And Algebra Is To Be Included.


Structural Design II
Course Number AT 322
Credits 4.0

Continues the study of material strength, basic design, and calculations of structural systems utilizing lumber and structural steel. Includes the strength, stiffness, and stability of various materials. Discusses the stresses caused by bending moments, shear forces, vertical and horizontal loadings, and how to size load supporting structural members under those influences. The design process is studied in depth, utilizing AISC and AF&PA.


Architectural Design I
Course Number AT 401
Credits 4.0

Begins the development of architectural design principles, theories, and processes, emphasizing the programming phase of project development and preliminary design creation. Students will learn the techniques and skills to research, develop, and create a simple project, including: plot plan, floor plan, main building sections, and elevations with enough detail to generate a conceptual estimate.


Architectural Design II
Course Number AT 402
Credits 4.0

Continues the development of architectural design principles, theories and processes, emphasizing the programming phase of project development and preliminary design creation. Students will learn the techniques and skills to research, develop, and create a moderate size project, including: plot plan, floor plan, main building sections, and elevations with enough detail to generate a conceptual estimate.


Architectural Design III
Course Number AT 403
Credits 4.0

Continues the development of architectural design principles, theories, and processes, emphasizing the programming phase of project development, leading to the creation of design development phase. Students will learn the techniques and skills to research, develop, and create a multiple floor project, including: plot plan, floor plan, main building sections, elevations, interior design, and MEP with enough detail to generate a preliminary estimate.


Architectural Design IV
Course Number AT 404
Credits 6.0

Continues The Development Of Architectural Design Principles, Theories, And Processes, Emphasizing The Programming Phase Of Project Development, In Conjunction With Site Planning Principles And Construction Documents. Critical Construction Details And Csi Format Based Specification For The Architectural Portion Will Be Developed To Perform A Detailed Cost Estimate In The Next Term. Performance Based Mep Drawing And Specifications Will Also Be Required. 40 Hours Of Lecture And 40 Hours Of Lab Are Required.


Architectural Design V
Course Number AT 405
Credits 6.0

Continues the development of proficiency in construction document execution to complete the project started in Architectural Design IV. This is a capstone course to complete a portfolio of a project as a tool to gain employment in a professional office. The portfolio will demonstrate skills, knowledge, and competency of students having a thorough understanding of architectural project development and documentation. 40 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required.


Advanced Code Analysis
Course Number AT 411
Credits 4.0

Studies the International Building Code (IBC) to have in-depth knowledge of its required design intent, as well as the utilization of its application to specific buildings in terms of building planning, accessibility, fire protection, and life safety.


Building Systems (MEP)
Course Number AT 421
Credits 4.0

Studies The Various Hvac, Plumbing, Fire Protection, Electrical Power, Lighting,auxiliary, And Building Operation Systems And Design Coordination Issues Among Themselves As They Relate To The Preparation Of Construction Documents Of A Light Commercial Building. Study Includes: Lighting, Power Distribution, Hvac, Ventilation Systems, Controls, Fire Protection, Plumbing, Sewage Systems, Etc. Develops The In-depth Knowledge Of Initial Systems’ Costs And Life-cycle Consideration.


Fundamentals of Accounting I
Course Number ACC 121
Credits 4.0

Fundamentals of Accounting II
Course Number ACC 122
Credits 4.0

Continues the study of accounting concepts begun in Fundamentals of Accounting I, emphasizing financial statement analysis. Annual reports will be utilized extensively to reinforce key concepts. Managerial accounting and its role in decision making will also be examined. Prerequisite(s): ACC 121.


Computerized Accounting
Course Number ACC 231
Credits 4.0

Accounting Concepts
Course Number ACC 241
Credits 4.0

Payroll Accounting
Course Number ACC 251
Credits 4.0

Bookkeeper Certification Prep
Course Number ACC 295
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACC 301
Credits 4.0

Begins An In-depth Study Of The Theory And Conceptual Issues Relevant To Presentation Of Financial Information For Use In External Decision-making Processes.emphasis Is Placed On Reporting And Disclosure Requirements For A Complex,classified Balance Sheet. Other Topics Include A Review Of The Accounting Cycle,preparation Of Financial Statements, The Conceptual Framework, Gaap, And Account Reconciliation. Prerequisite(s): Acc 241 Or Acc 291.


Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACC 302
Credits 4.0

Continues the in-depth study of the theory and conceptual issues begun in Intermediate Accounting I. Emphasis is placed on reporting and disclosure requirements for multi-step income statement. Other topics include reinforcement of the accounting cycle and the interrelatedness of the financial statements and how various accounts affect them. Prerequisite(s): ACC 301.


Intermediate Accounting III
Course Number ACC 303
Credits 4.0

A continuation of the Intermediate series, this course expands on competencies gained through previous study while addressing the reporting and disclosure requirements for the Statement of Cash Flows. In addition, pensions and other unique transactions, events, and disclosures will be addressed. Prerequisite(s): ACC 302.


Business Entities Taxation
Course Number ACC 312B
Credits 4.0

Provides in-depth coverage of the fundamentals of taxation related to business entities including C and S corporations, partnerships and exempt organizations. Emphasis is placed on the application of tax law to the preparation of Federal Income Tax and informational returns for these entities. Prerequisite(s): ACC 121.


Cost Accounting
Course Number ACC 331A
Credits 4.0

Analyzes costs for decision making, capital investment decisions, quantitative models for planning and control, and performance evaluation. Strategic control systems, using accounting data for internal decision making, and cost control are also emphasized. Prerequisite(s): ACC 241.


Individual Taxation
Course Number ACC 341B
Credits 4.0

Auditing, Systems, and Controls I
Course Number ACC 411
Credits 4.0

Introduces the student to the discipline of auditing, accounting systems, and controls in public and private sectors. This course examines the basic accounting and internal control systems before moving into the auditing cycle. Professional standards and responsibilities will also be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): ACC 303.


Auditing, Systems, and Controls II
Course Number ACC 412
Credits 4.0

A continuation of Auditing, Systems, and Controls I, this course emphasizes the auditing process. Emphasis is placed on professional ethics and auditor’s legal liability to clients and third parties as well as the use of specific techniques and procedures for auditing various transaction cycles. Prerequisite(s): ACC 411.


Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting
Course Number ACC 431B
Credits 4.0

Addresses the fundamental principles of accounting for governmental units, colleges, hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will compare and contrast non-profit accounting processes with those of for-profit enterprises by evaluating the differing regulations for recording transactions, financial reporting, and revenue recognition as well as funding options and budgeting. Prerequisite(s): ACC 302.


Advanced Accounting
Course Number ACC 441
Credits 4.0

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform accounting functions related to the acquisition of a business, consolidated financial statements, and disclosure requirements for industry segments. Prerequisite(s): ACC 303.


Program description: This program is designed to provide the graduate with the skills to operate and troubleshoot the microcomputer or personal business computer. It also enables students to gain substantial knowledge of the most widely used software applications. Students will be able to find positions in large and small businesses using microcomputers to do word processing, planning, accounting, reporting, and designing, just to name a few of the most common microcomputer uses.

Program Name: Bachelor of Computer Information Systems
System Modeling and Design
Course Number CIS 351
Credits 4.0

Develops The Knowledge And Skills Required To Design Databases And Information Systems For The Web. Includes The Development Of Data Models Including How To Organize The Modeling Task, Manage Compromises, Design For Flexibility, Achieve Basic And Advanced Normalization, And Develop And Use Generic Models. Explains How To Model A Problem Domain By Abstracting Objects, Attributes, And Relationships. Describes Object-oriented Approaches To Model The Dynamic Behavior Of A System In Terms Of State And Process Models. Students Will Construct Data And Object Models Using Entity-relationship (er), Unified Modeling Language (uml), And Other Techniques. Prerequisite(s): Cis 302a Or Cis 331.


Database Administration I
Course Number CIS 421B
Credits 4.0

Exposes Students To Database Administration And The Duties Of A Database Administrator (dba) To Include Database Monitoring, Backup And Recovery, Troubleshooting, And Tuning For Reliability And Performance. Students Will Install, Configure, And Maintain An Rdbms Including Security, Backup And Recovery Operations, And Performance Tuning.


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number CIS 431
Credits 4.0

Addresses the alignment between business and technology with an emphasis on the use of technology by different organizational units. Decision support systems, enterprise systems, business process reengineering, and knowledge management will be discussed. The advantages and challenges of each system will be evaluated along with system development and implementation strategies.


IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition
Course Number CIS 441
Credits 4.0

Addresses the strategic function of an enterprise and the role information systems plays in it. It develops the ability to analyze situations and develop appropriate technology solutions to deal with a variety of business situations. It examines how technology and telecommunications systems enable businesses to succeed in a global marketplace.


Special Topics in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 495
Credits 4.0

Selected topics of current interest in information systems. Recent development in systems, initiatives and technology related to the information systems field will be discussed.


Senior Project in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 499
Credits 4.0

Examines the systems development process as a whole for the Information Systems field. As part of this course, students will complete a capstone project that examines the use and application of an information system for an organization.


Database Programming I
Course Number CS 422A
Credits 4.0

Provides students the ability to create and maintain database objects to store, retrieve, and manipulate data. In addition, students will write queries to retrieve, summarize, and modify data using joins and subqueries. Students will learn how to create and execute stored procedures and functions. This course also introduces participants to database triggers.


Introduction to Network Security
Course Number CSS 211
Credits 4.0

Provides students with a strong foundation in network security concepts along with analysis and design of these systems. It is a preparatory course in network security methodologies. May lead to the CCSA Security certification in conjunction with Checkpoint Software Technology’s Academic Partnership program.



Networking Essentials I
Course Number NET 101
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to the field of computing. Topics include occupations within the field, terminology, basic computer and networking concepts and database concepts.


Networking Essentials II
Course Number NET 102
Credits 4.0

Focuses On The Basic Issues Related To Data Communications And Networking Technologies. Topics Include The Osi Model, Network Topologies, Protocols, And The Fundamentals Of Internetworking. Tcp/ip Addressing Is Also Covered.


Project Management
Course Number PPM 301
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to the five processes of project management: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing. Topics include an overview of the evolution of project management, tools and techniques, and the project life cycle. Students will gain experience with the basic techniques of project planning, scheduling, execution, and closure.


Project Planning
Course Number PPM 311
Credits 4.0

Expands on student’s knowledge of project planning. Topics include project and scope definition, feasibility studies, activity sequencing, and identification of measures of success. Students will learn how to create, plan and effectively use planning tools, including project management software to work with subtasks, assign resources, and resolve time and resource conflicts.


Project Cost and Budget Management
Course Number PPM 401
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to accounting concepts and principles necessary for developing project budgets and monitoring budget costs. This course also covers cost estimation techniques. Students will practice developing a project budget, tracking costs, and reporting financial cost information. Also addresses issues related to risk analysis, risk minimization, risk control, and risk management.


Java Programming
Course Number CS 241
Credits 4.0

Introduces Students To Using The Java Programming Language For Developing Applications. This Is The First Of Two Java Programming Courses. The Use Of Java In Web-based Client And Server Programming Is Also Covered.


Object Oriented Programming With C++
Course Number CS 218A
Credits 4.0

Continues the development of C++ programming skills. Students will practice designing and developing C++ programs, modifying and debugging existing C++ programs, and developing complex object-oriented applications. Additional exposure to the Microsoft Visual development environment will also be gained.


Advanced Java Programming
Course Number CS 242
Credits 4.0

Continues the use of the Java programming language for developing applications.


Computer Operating Systems and Maintenance I
Course Number CIS 106B
Credits 4.0

Provides An Introduction To Computer Operating Systems And Maintenance Concepts. Students Will Study The Microsoft Windows Family Of Operating Systems And Will Receive A Brief Introduction To Linux. This Course Will Assist Students In Their Preparation For The Comptia A+ Essentials Exam. Prerequisite(s): Wpg 098 Or High School Typing/proficiency, Eng 098b Or Satisfies Developmental Reading Or Placement Exam, Inf 111 Or Inf 121 Or Net 101.


Database Management Using SQL
Course Number CIS 331
Credits 4.0

Expands On The Concepts Learned In The Introductory Course In Database Creation By Introducing Students To Higher Levels Of Database Development And Computer Science Concepts. Students Learn Sql In Order To Study The Manipulation Of A Relational Database. This Course Also Includes A Survey Of Database Platforms. Prerequisite(s): Inf 114a Or Net 101.


Introduction to Programming
Course Number CS 111
Credits 4.0

Introduces Students To Programming Concepts Such As Logic And Flow Charting As Well As Some Basic Programming Techniques. Prerequisite(s): Any Inf Course Or Net 101. Corequisite(s): Mth 111.


Statistical Methods
Course Number MTH 401
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to various statistical methods and their applications. Methods covered include measures of central tendency, probability distributions, sampling, and regression analysis. Prerequisite(s): MTH 112.


Professional Career Strategies
Course Number WRK 291B
Credits 1.0

C++ Programming
Course Number CS 217A
Credits 4.0

Introduces program design and development using C++ language. Uses Microsoft Visual C++ to provide students with experience working with the visual development tools. Students will demonstrate the ability to use C++ to design solutions to problems. Prerequisite(s): CS 111, MTH 112.


Internship
Course Number WRK 201
Credits 2.0

Cooperative Education I
Course Number WRK 211
Credits 1.0

Program description: This program prepares graduates for career opportunities in information technology and security with a concentration in cyber defense.
Protection of multiple platform hardware, software, networking, and
operating systems is considered an integral part of any business’
information technology topology. Information technology specialists
work in health care, business, information systems, technical, and
engineering fields. Cyber defense technologists’ possess the necessary skills to identify, correct, and defend against internal and external threats as well as other problematic issues relative to an
organizations computing and networking infrastructure on a multiple platform topology.

Program Name: Bachelor of Computer Information Systems - Project Management & Planning
Negotiation Strategies
Course Number PPM 321
Credits 4.0

Provides students with complete coverage of the knowledge, attitude, and skills necessary for success in negotiation. Topics include strategies and techniques for negotiation, different forms of negotiation, ethical and unethical behavior, conflict resolution, and mediation. Students will practice these principles to increase their negotiating ability. Prerequisite(s): Junior status.


Leading Project Teams.
Course Number PPM 411
Credits 4.0

Addresses effective utilization of human resources in project management. Provides an understanding of project leadership techniques, authority and power, motivation, team development, as well as problem solving, decision making, and interpersonal skills. Students will develop an understanding of effective communication techniques for communicating project status as well as recruitment of project team members. Prerequisite(s): Junior status.


Contracting and Procurement for Project Managers .
Course Number PPM 421
Credits 4.0

Explains the contracting and procurement process and the roles and responsi- bilities of the project manager in successful contracting to meet a project’s objec- tives. Topics include procurement planning and management, preparing statements of work, proposal requests, contractor selection, and types of con- tracts. Introduces principles of contract and subcontract administration and reviews the differences between government and private purchasing processes. Prerequisite(s): Junior status.


Senior Design Project in Project Management .
Course Number PPM 499 S
Credits 4.0

Provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the nine areas of the project management body of knowledge: scope, quality, time, cost, risk, human resources, procurement, communications, and integration manage- ment. This is a capstone course that integrates the content of the other project management and planning courses. Taught in a guided self-study format, stu- dents will complete a comprehensive project and prepare for certification tests by taking a practice test. Prerequisite(s): Dean’s approval.


Project Management
Course Number PPM 301
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to the five processes of project management: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing. Topics include an overview of the evolution of project management, tools and techniques, and the project life cycle. Students will gain experience with the basic techniques of project planning, scheduling, execution, and closure.


Project Planning
Course Number PPM 311
Credits 4.0

Expands on student’s knowledge of project planning. Topics include project and scope definition, feasibility studies, activity sequencing, and identification of measures of success. Students will learn how to create, plan and effectively use planning tools, including project management software to work with subtasks, assign resources, and resolve time and resource conflicts.


Project Cost and Budget Management
Course Number PPM 401
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to accounting concepts and principles necessary for developing project budgets and monitoring budget costs. This course also covers cost estimation techniques. Students will practice developing a project budget, tracking costs, and reporting financial cost information. Also addresses issues related to risk analysis, risk minimization, risk control, and risk management.


System Modeling and Design
Course Number CIS 351
Credits 4.0

Develops The Knowledge And Skills Required To Design Databases And Information Systems For The Web. Includes The Development Of Data Models Including How To Organize The Modeling Task, Manage Compromises, Design For Flexibility, Achieve Basic And Advanced Normalization, And Develop And Use Generic Models. Explains How To Model A Problem Domain By Abstracting Objects, Attributes, And Relationships. Describes Object-oriented Approaches To Model The Dynamic Behavior Of A System In Terms Of State And Process Models. Students Will Construct Data And Object Models Using Entity-relationship (er), Unified Modeling Language (uml), And Other Techniques. Prerequisite(s): Cis 302a Or Cis 331.


Database Administration I
Course Number CIS 421B
Credits 4.0

Exposes Students To Database Administration And The Duties Of A Database Administrator (dba) To Include Database Monitoring, Backup And Recovery, Troubleshooting, And Tuning For Reliability And Performance. Students Will Install, Configure, And Maintain An Rdbms Including Security, Backup And Recovery Operations, And Performance Tuning.


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number CIS 431
Credits 4.0

Addresses the alignment between business and technology with an emphasis on the use of technology by different organizational units. Decision support systems, enterprise systems, business process reengineering, and knowledge management will be discussed. The advantages and challenges of each system will be evaluated along with system development and implementation strategies.


IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition
Course Number CIS 441
Credits 4.0

Addresses the strategic function of an enterprise and the role information systems plays in it. It develops the ability to analyze situations and develop appropriate technology solutions to deal with a variety of business situations. It examines how technology and telecommunications systems enable businesses to succeed in a global marketplace.


Special Topics in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 495
Credits 4.0

Selected topics of current interest in information systems. Recent development in systems, initiatives and technology related to the information systems field will be discussed.


Senior Project in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 499
Credits 4.0

Examines the systems development process as a whole for the Information Systems field. As part of this course, students will complete a capstone project that examines the use and application of an information system for an organization.


Database Programming I
Course Number CS 422A
Credits 4.0

Provides students the ability to create and maintain database objects to store, retrieve, and manipulate data. In addition, students will write queries to retrieve, summarize, and modify data using joins and subqueries. Students will learn how to create and execute stored procedures and functions. This course also introduces participants to database triggers.


Introduction to Network Security
Course Number CSS 211
Credits 4.0

Provides students with a strong foundation in network security concepts along with analysis and design of these systems. It is a preparatory course in network security methodologies. May lead to the CCSA Security certification in conjunction with Checkpoint Software Technology’s Academic Partnership program.



Networking Essentials I
Course Number NET 101
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to the field of computing. Topics include occupations within the field, terminology, basic computer and networking concepts and database concepts.


Networking Essentials II
Course Number NET 102
Credits 4.0

Focuses On The Basic Issues Related To Data Communications And Networking Technologies. Topics Include The Osi Model, Network Topologies, Protocols, And The Fundamentals Of Internetworking. Tcp/ip Addressing Is Also Covered.


Project Management
Course Number PPM 301
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to the five processes of project management: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing. Topics include an overview of the evolution of project management, tools and techniques, and the project life cycle. Students will gain experience with the basic techniques of project planning, scheduling, execution, and closure.


Project Planning
Course Number PPM 311
Credits 4.0

Expands on student’s knowledge of project planning. Topics include project and scope definition, feasibility studies, activity sequencing, and identification of measures of success. Students will learn how to create, plan and effectively use planning tools, including project management software to work with subtasks, assign resources, and resolve time and resource conflicts.


Project Cost and Budget Management
Course Number PPM 401
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to accounting concepts and principles necessary for developing project budgets and monitoring budget costs. This course also covers cost estimation techniques. Students will practice developing a project budget, tracking costs, and reporting financial cost information. Also addresses issues related to risk analysis, risk minimization, risk control, and risk management.


Java Programming
Course Number CS 241
Credits 4.0

Introduces Students To Using The Java Programming Language For Developing Applications. This Is The First Of Two Java Programming Courses. The Use Of Java In Web-based Client And Server Programming Is Also Covered.


Object Oriented Programming With C++
Course Number CS 218A
Credits 4.0

Continues the development of C++ programming skills. Students will practice designing and developing C++ programs, modifying and debugging existing C++ programs, and developing complex object-oriented applications. Additional exposure to the Microsoft Visual development environment will also be gained.


Advanced Java Programming
Course Number CS 242
Credits 4.0

Continues the use of the Java programming language for developing applications.


Computer Operating Systems and Maintenance I
Course Number CIS 106B
Credits 4.0

Provides An Introduction To Computer Operating Systems And Maintenance Concepts. Students Will Study The Microsoft Windows Family Of Operating Systems And Will Receive A Brief Introduction To Linux. This Course Will Assist Students In Their Preparation For The Comptia A+ Essentials Exam. Prerequisite(s): Wpg 098 Or High School Typing/proficiency, Eng 098b Or Satisfies Developmental Reading Or Placement Exam, Inf 111 Or Inf 121 Or Net 101.


Database Management Using SQL
Course Number CIS 331
Credits 4.0

Expands On The Concepts Learned In The Introductory Course In Database Creation By Introducing Students To Higher Levels Of Database Development And Computer Science Concepts. Students Learn Sql In Order To Study The Manipulation Of A Relational Database. This Course Also Includes A Survey Of Database Platforms. Prerequisite(s): Inf 114a Or Net 101.


Introduction to Programming
Course Number CS 111
Credits 4.0

Introduces Students To Programming Concepts Such As Logic And Flow Charting As Well As Some Basic Programming Techniques. Prerequisite(s): Any Inf Course Or Net 101. Corequisite(s): Mth 111.


Statistical Methods
Course Number MTH 401
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to various statistical methods and their applications. Methods covered include measures of central tendency, probability distributions, sampling, and regression analysis. Prerequisite(s): MTH 112.


Professional Career Strategies
Course Number WRK 291B
Credits 1.0

C++ Programming
Course Number CS 217A
Credits 4.0

Introduces program design and development using C++ language. Uses Microsoft Visual C++ to provide students with experience working with the visual development tools. Students will demonstrate the ability to use C++ to design solutions to problems. Prerequisite(s): CS 111, MTH 112.


Internship
Course Number WRK 201
Credits 2.0

Cooperative Education I
Course Number WRK 211
Credits 1.0

Program description: This program emphasizes the application of computer systems to solve business problems. Graduates of this program can be expected to pursue careers as programmers, programmer/analysts, and system analysts. This major prepares an individual for immediate application of the knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques that are utilized in the practice of project management. The philosophy as well as the set of methods learned in this program will enable graduates to lead projects, complete them on time and within budget. This program will help prepare the student for certification as a project manager

Computer Information Systems Courses at Jones International University

Program Name: BBA in Technology Services Management
Technical Services Management
Course Number TM400
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to management skills associated with technical services and organizational planning, and optimal methods for combining these two areas of management. The course covers two key areas and how they intertwine: (1) technical planning (hardware, software, and network topics) and (2) human resources. The course project, Information Technology Infrastructure Plan: Developing a Complete Strategy for Technical Services, gives students an opportunity to create a comprehensive technical services unit. Students will consider the structure of the IT department including recommendations for staffing levels and tactics for managing projects, hardware, software, and the company's network and computer security. A training design for staff along with a special IT staff training and retention strategy is also included.


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving
Course Number CRT100
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth.This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree. .


The Writing Process
Course Number ENG100
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Art Appreciation
Course Number ART101
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Composition
Course Number ENG101
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


English Literature
Course Number ENG102
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Computer Information Systems
Course Number IT102
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


College Mathematics
Course Number MATH101 C
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Science and Technology
Course Number SCI201
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Physics of Modern Technology I
Course Number SCI202
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Physics of Modern Technology II
Course Number SCI203

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Course Number SPCH101 F

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BBA101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


History of Business
Course Number BBA110

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.



Financial Flow - Follow the Money
Course Number BBA210

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Management
Course Number BBA211

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Technical Writing
Course Number BBA212

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


The Global Marketplace
Course Number BBA301
Credits 3.0

This course examines how to compete in the global electronic marketplace with an enduring product or service. Students learn how to scan the competitive environment and develop a viable marketing mix that is globally competitive.


Marketing Management
Course Number BBA304
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental concepts and issues in marketing. Students will learn to analyze an organization’s marketing environment and its potential customers. Based on these insights, students will discuss the key functions of marketing, which consist primarily of decisions related to product, price, place (distribution), and promotion.


Introductory Economic Theory
Course Number BBA305
Credits 3.0

This foundational course in economic theory provides students with a unified framework for understanding local and global economies. Beginning with a study of the macroeconomic environment, the course presents a coherent world view of how the world works, with the adaptation of the “circular flow of income” to accommodate the participants, institutions, products and services, and prices that form the full “circular flow of the economy.” In addition to the introduction of key concepts, this class enables students to critically evaluate theoretical models and to survey methods and data for an economic analysis that can serve, for example, as the basis of an organization’s economic strategy.


Financial Accounting
Course Number BBA306
Credits 3.0

This course explores the topic of using financial data to make business decisions and to evaluate performance in the fast-moving information age. Students will learn to use the balance sheet, the income statement, the statement of cash flows, and the statement of retained earnings as tools for evaluation and analysis.


Finance
Course Number BBA307
Credits 3.0

This course addresses financial management from the perspective of a financial manager at a medium to large company. Students will examine topics such as the financial environment, interest rates, financial statements, the time value of money, and risk and return. These concepts will be applied through the study of bond and stock valuation, the cost of capital, and capital budgeting.


Management
Course Number BBA310
Credits 3.0

This course examines the fundamental tasks that comprise the manager's job in organizations today. It explores strategies managers utilize in their role: decision-making, planning, organizing, controlling, and innovating.


Marketing Research
Course Number BBA431
Credits 3.0

This course examines commonly used marketing research methods and their application in real-world marketing contexts. Marketing research is the process of obtaining appropriate information about a company’s markets and analyzing and interpreting such information to make better marketing decisions.


Global Strategies
Course Number BBA484
Credits 3.0

This course grounds students in a field-tested framework for the design and implementation of successful global strategies for business. Globalism is a 21st century fact of business, and this course helps students to master its risks and to profit.


Organizational Communication
Course Number BC345

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Fundamentals of Business Writing
Course Number BC352

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Making Ethical Management Decisions
Course Number ETH401
Credits 4.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Human and Cultural Geography
Course Number GEOG201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


History of World Literature
Course Number HIST201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Peace and Conflict Studies
Course Number HUM201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Intermediate Algebra
Course Number MATH201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Psychology of the Organization
Course Number PSY201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Using the Internet in Business
Course Number BBA311

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Business Communication Contexts
Course Number BC355

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Intercultural Communication
Course Number BC372

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Team Communication
Course Number BC380

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Negotiation and Conflict Management
Course Number BC465
Credits 3.0

This course presents a comprehensive process for conflict management, from needs assessment to final program evaluation. Students will explore topics such as: Assessment of various dimensions of conflict, including structural, psychological, and interactional Conflict intervention strategies, including negotiation, conversation, problem solving, dialogue, mediation, and arbitration Evaluation of conflict management programs and strategies The course project, Conflict Assessment Report: Analyzing and Managing Organizational Conflict, engages students in identifying an organizational conflict, assessing its dimensions, analyzing it from three theoretical perspectives, determining what interventions strategies have been attempted, recommending strategies for managing the conflict, and proposing options for evaluating the success of their conflict management plan.


Collaboration Technology Systems
Course Number BC470
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on collaborative technology systems’ influence on the content, context, and processes of professionals and organizations. Current developments in collaborative technologies and research about applying them to create measurable value and affect society at large are highlighted. The course project, Collaborative Technology Analysis: Evaluating Key Factors Contributing to Collaboration in Organizations, is a report of benchmarked assessments of collaboration in an organization. Students evaluate the factors of technology, culture,economics, and politics to obtain scores reflecting the perceived level of collaboration. The final report includes the results of these assessments along with a project for improving the collaboration capability of an organization.


Organizational Training and Development
Course Number BC475
Credits 3.0

This course examines the role of training and development in organizations to support business strategy. Course content focuses on the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of training programs from a global perspective. The course project, Training Proposal: Developing Employee Orientation Training for a Global Audience, is a proposal prepared for senior management in a company that has employees in several international locations. The focus of the training is on helping new employees become aligned with a newly formulated mission, vision statement, and business goals. The proposal addresses the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the new employee orientation training course.


Business Mathematics
Course Number MATH301

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Leadership
Course Number BC403
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the study of leadership both in theory and in practice. Students will consider what it means to be a leader,and how to carry out the tasks of leadership from a variety of perspectives. Along the way, students will assess their own leadership strengths and limitations, and develop a Personal Leadership Profile. They will examine such topics as: The personal traits and qualities of an effective leader Leadership skills, strategies, and styles Leading with vision and inspiration Leading in a global, multicultural society For the course project, Personal Leadership Profile: A Self-reflective Case Study, students will conduct a case study of a leader of their choice whom they admire and about whom they can gather substantial research. Each week, they will analyze a different dimension of the selected leader's strengths and limitations (such as personal traits, behavioral styles, situational responsiveness,communication skills, relationship-building, and more). They will also evaluate their own strengths and limitations on these same leadership dimensions. Prerequisites: At least 80% of the student's coursework must be completed.


Workplace Management
Course Number MGT400
Credits 3.0

This Course Addresses The Critical Legal And Ethical Issues Faced By Business Managers. With The Significant Impact That Federal And Other Laws Have On Business Operations, Topics Such As Employment Decisions, Americans With Disabilities (ada), Family Medical Leave Act (fmla), Occupational Safety And Health Administration (osha) Compliance, And Employee Performance Management And Conflict Are Considered. The Course Project, Business And The Law Analysis: Examining The Impact Of Legal Issues In An Organization, Is An Evaluation Of The Impact That Certain Laws Have On A Business. Students Will Review Various Policies Within A Selected Business Organization In Order To Assess How Laws Have Impacted The Course Of Business


Quality Assurance
Course Number MGT401
Credits 3.0

This Course Offers A Broad Overview Of How A Quality Assurance Program Can Be Implemented In An Organization. Stepping Through The Phases Of Two Quality Assurance Methodologies, Six Sigma And Dmaic (define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, And Control), Students Gain An Understanding Of The Quality Assurance Methods That Can Position A Company To Achieve Its Quality Objectives. The Course Project, Quality Improvement Project: Using The Dmaic Methodology For Quality Assurance, Uses The Structured Dmaic Approach For Improving A Target Organization’s Service Quality. Students Will Select A Company, Review Its Key Processes, And Identify Improvement Areas With Respect To Customers’ Quality Requirements. Using The Dmaic Methodology, Students Will Create A Final Report That Makes Recommendations For Improved Quality Assurance


BBA Capstone
Course Number BBA490
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the demonstration of knowledge, skills, and abilities required for graduation from the Jones International University BBA program. Students will gain experience in designing a career goal statement, developing a professional development plan, and building a résumé.


Program description: If you have attained a technical certificate or associate’s degree in a technical area and you now want to expand your horizons
and move into management in your chosen field, this program is for you. This degree specialization will build on your existing
knowledge by developing key managerial skills, including basic accounting and finance, interpersonal- and technology-based
communications, ethical leadership, project management, and quality control.

Computer Information Systems Courses at Florida Tech University Online

Program Name: Associate of Science in Computer Information Systems
Fundamentals Of Information System
Course Number CIS 5000
Credits 3.0

Introduces problem-solving techniques for information systems. Includes alternative methods, logic problems and methods specifically for component-based systems with integration issues. Also includes new technologies, products, tools, hardware architectures and languages. Encourages think-tank and out-of-the-box discussion formats.


Projects In Computer Information System
Course Number CIS 5080
Credits 3.0

A capstone course that entails the student designing and implementing a significant project within the purview of information systems. Students propose a project and have it approved by the instructor. Required for CIS majors.


Data Structures And Programming
Course Number CIS 5100
Credits 3.0

Introduces programming in an object-oriented language. Includes data structures. Aims to turn students with little or no programming experience into comfortable programmers. Also includes algorithms for use with stacks, queues and lists. Required for CIS majors


Advanced Programming
Course Number CIS 5200
Credits 3.0

Follows Cis 5100 And Covers Advanced Programming Techniques And Methodologies For Engineering The Same. Encourages Algorithm Exploration And Comparison, And Demonstration Of A Superior Level Of Programming Expertise In An Object-oriented Language. Covers Advanced Data Structures. Required For Cis Majors


Integration Of Database Systems
Course Number CIS 5210
Credits 3.0

Studies database systems as an essential organization resource. Includes data architecture components and data storage configurations, and compares normalized and denormalized methods. Covers relational databases and the use of SQL for information retrieval. Also covers object databases.


Computer Organization
Course Number CIS 5220
Credits 3.0

Introduces System Architecture Including The Specifics Of Computer Arithmetic, Memories, The Cpu, Input/ Output And Peripherals. Includes Hardware Elements And How They Fit Into A Complete Computer System Along With Combination Logic, Gates And Boolean Algebra. Required For Cis Majors.


Operating Systems
Course Number CIS 5230
Credits 3.0

Explores The Algorithms, Protocols And Mechanisms Representing Traditional Single Processor And Multi-user Operating Systems. Emphasizes Process Management And Synchronization, Threads, Memory Management, Virtual Memory And Process Scheduling. May Require A Research Paper And/or Programming Assignments. Required For Cis Majors. Prerequisites: Cis 5200, Cis 5220


Modeling And Simulation
Course Number CIS 5300
Credits 3.0

Introduces modeling and simulation (M&S). Includes verification, validation, construction and implementation for engineering and business, use of stochastics and probability distribution. Compares event-driven and continuous M&S to distributed M&S. Requires proficiency in a programming language (Java, C++, Perl) and a semester project.



Topics In Computer Information System
Course Number CIS 5400
Credits 3.0

Current topics in computer information systems at the introductory graduate level. Topics vary and the course may be repeated for credit toward the CIS degree.


Computer Networks For Information Specialists 1
Course Number CIS 5410
Credits 3.0

Provides A Broad Set Of Fundamental Topics Related To Computer Networks Including Network Layers, Topologies, Technologies, Services And Methods Useful For The Typical Information Systems Specialists; Tcp/ip; Transmission Protocols And Clientserver Models. Introduces Management And Security Of Networks. Prerequisites: Cis 5100


Computer Networks For Information Specialists 2
Course Number CIS 5420
Credits 3.0

Continues Cis 5410. Focuses On The More Advanced Topics Of Network Security Design And Management Including Cryptography, Lans And Wans, And Application And Network Layers


Modern Computer Information Systems
Course Number CIS 5500
Credits 3.0

Defines state-of-the-art information systems and how they support key corporate functions such as telecommunications, electronic commerce, intranets and enterprisewide functionality in a group or organization. Also explores information technology at every level


Computer Information Systems Design
Course Number CIS 5510
Credits 3.0

Introduces software and system design techniques with a non-proprietary view of common design paradigms. Familiarizes users or integrators of systems with the phases of software development and some associated methodologies that may be encountered within their field. Prerequisites: CIS 5100


Knowledge And Information Representation
Course Number CIS 5520
Credits 3.0

Covers Many Of The Modern Data, Information And Knowledge Representations To Give The Cis Professional Formats, Methods And Mechanisms For Representing, Understanding And Using Data-driven Systems That May Or May Not Have A Database Component. Prerequisites: Cis 5100 Or Cis 5500


Systems Administration
Course Number CIS 5530
Credits 3.0

Explores The Administration And Maintenance Of Operating Systems Such As Windows, Linux Or Unix To Supply The Typical Cis Professional Help With System Administration. May Include Shell Programming, Command Line Programming, Common Maintenance Procedures, Network Maintenance, Backups, And Methods Of File Processing And File System Structure. Prerequisites: Cis 5100


Project And Change Control
Course Number CIS 5720
Credits 3.0

Covers managing and delivering a software project from inception to delivery. Includes initial and detail planning, the project life cycle, risk assessment, resource planning, project monitoring and timeliness, cost and customer management, change control, configuration control and version control. Uses project and configuration management software.


Web Programming
Course Number CIS 5740
Credits 3.0

Studies Html And Java Features That Facilitate Web-based Programming. Covers Web Servers, Web-based Systems And Xml. May Include Other Scripting And Interface Languages. Explores Characteristics Of Good Web Site Design And Organization. Requires Creation Of Web Pages And Knowledge Of The Java Programming Language. Prerequisites: Cis 5200


Advanced Information Structuring Techniques
Course Number CIS 5810
Credits 3.0

. Explores Multilevel Data-driven Systems And Techniques Such As Data Warehousing, Metadata And Object-oriented Databases. Integrates Physical Media And The Architecture Of Complex Data-driven Systems For Maximum Simplicity And Efficiency Of Design. Prerequisites: Cis 5100 Or Cis 5500


Independent Study In Computer Information Systems
Course Number CIS 5890
Credits 1.0

. Individual projects under the direction of a member of the computer information systems faculty. May require deliverables such as a software system or product, or a comprehensive paper. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. (Requirement: Instructor approval.)


Program description: Modern business demands effective, reliable technology. And as business and technology goals increasingly go hand in hand, demand for computer information systems professionals will only continue to rise. Florida Tech's Associate of Science in Computer Information Systems offers a broad base of technical knowledge combined with a strong liberal arts foundation - in as little as 20 months - from the university known for educating many NASA scientists.

Program Name: Bachelor of Business Administration - Computer Information Systems
Mastering eLearning
Course Number ASC 1006
Credits 1.0

Basic Computer Skills
Course Number CIS 1130
Credits 3.0

Business Computer Skills
Course Number CIS 1140

Composition and Rhetoric
Course Number COM 1101
Credits 3.0

Writing About Literature
Course Number COM 1102
Credits 3.0

Principles of Accounting 2
Course Number EAC 2212
Credits 3.0

Essential Business Skills
Course Number EBA 3321
Credits 3.0

Applied Decision Methods for Business
Course Number EBA 3334
Credits 3.0

Strategic Management
Course Number BUS 5480
Credits 3.0

In-depth analysis of industries and competitors, and how to build and defend competitive advantages in forming a successful competitive strategy. Case analysis and management simulation convey the multifunctional nature of decision making at the top management level. Augmented by live-case analyses. Must be taken in the final semester prior to graduation.


Introduction to Microeconomics
Course Number EEC 2304
Credits 3.0

Law 1
Course Number ELA 2601
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Finance for Managers
Course Number EMG 3225
Credits 3.0

Principles of Management
Course Number EMG
Credits 3.0

Management Information Systems
Course Number BUS 54603
Credits 3.0

Research 1
Course Number EMG 4000
Credits 1.0

Research 2
Course Number EMG 4001
Credits 1.0

Research 3
Course Number EMG 4002
Credits 1.0

Organizational Behavior and Development
Course Number EMG 4412
Credits 3.0

Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKT 100
Credits 4.5

Statistics
Course Number CRM 2203
Credits 3.0

n/a


Civilization 1: Ancient Through Medieval
Course Number CRM 2244
Credits 3.0

n/a


Civilization 2: Renaissance Through Modern
Course Number CRM 2702
Credits 3.0

n/a


College Algebra (Requirement: Passing score on placement exam or prerequisite course.)
Course Number MTH 1701
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Mythology (HU)
Course Number HUM 1015
Credits 3.0

Mythology (hu) Is A Humanities Program (choose One) Hum 1015 Mythology (hu) Hum 1020 Art Appreciation (hu) Hum 1021 Integrated Arts (hu) Hum 1023 Philosophy Of Human Nature (hu) Hum 1024 Religions Of The World 1: Western Religions (hu) Hum 1025 Religions Of The World 2: Eastern Religions (hu) Hum 2233 Modern Middle East (hu) (prerequisite: Hum 2051) Hum 3275 Contemporary Literature (hu) (prerequisites: Hum 2051, Hum 2052)


Art Appreciation (HU)
Course Number HUM 1020
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes HUM 1020


Integrated Arts
Course Number HUM 1021
Credits 6.0

General Physical Science
Course Number EDS 1021
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


General Biological Science
Course Number EDS 1022

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRM 1000
Credits 3.0

n/a


Introduction to Visual Basic
Course Number CIS 1501
Credits 3.0

n/a


Advanced Visual Basic
Course Number CIS 2501
Credits 3.0

n/a


Program description: Keiser University’s Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration prepares students for a career in business. Students are offered a well-rounded business education with management, marketing, finance, accounting, statistics and law courses.
In addition, students select one of five concentrations: Management, Human Resource Management, International Business, Marketing, or Finance. These concentrations allow students to specialize in a business discipline and enhance their career opportunities within that field.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems
Mastering eLearning
Course Number ASC 1006
Credits 1.0

Basic Computer Skills
Course Number CIS 1130
Credits 3.0

Business Computer Skills
Course Number CIS 1140

Composition and Rhetoric
Course Number COM 1101
Credits 3.0

Writing About Literature
Course Number COM 1102
Credits 3.0

Principles of Accounting 2
Course Number EAC 2212
Credits 3.0

Essential Business Skills
Course Number EBA 3321
Credits 3.0

Applied Decision Methods for Business
Course Number EBA 3334
Credits 3.0

Strategic Management
Course Number BUS 5480
Credits 3.0

In-depth analysis of industries and competitors, and how to build and defend competitive advantages in forming a successful competitive strategy. Case analysis and management simulation convey the multifunctional nature of decision making at the top management level. Augmented by live-case analyses. Must be taken in the final semester prior to graduation.


Introduction to Microeconomics
Course Number EEC 2304
Credits 3.0

Law 1
Course Number ELA 2601
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Finance for Managers
Course Number EMG 3225
Credits 3.0

Principles of Management
Course Number EMG
Credits 3.0

Management Information Systems
Course Number BUS 54603
Credits 3.0

Research 1
Course Number EMG 4000
Credits 1.0

Research 2
Course Number EMG 4001
Credits 1.0

Research 3
Course Number EMG 4002
Credits 1.0

Organizational Behavior and Development
Course Number EMG 4412
Credits 3.0

Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKT 100
Credits 4.5

Statistics
Course Number CRM 2203
Credits 3.0

n/a


Civilization 1: Ancient Through Medieval
Course Number CRM 2244
Credits 3.0

n/a


Civilization 2: Renaissance Through Modern
Course Number CRM 2702
Credits 3.0

n/a


College Algebra (Requirement: Passing score on placement exam or prerequisite course.)
Course Number MTH 1701
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Mythology (HU)
Course Number HUM 1015
Credits 3.0

Mythology (hu) Is A Humanities Program (choose One) Hum 1015 Mythology (hu) Hum 1020 Art Appreciation (hu) Hum 1021 Integrated Arts (hu) Hum 1023 Philosophy Of Human Nature (hu) Hum 1024 Religions Of The World 1: Western Religions (hu) Hum 1025 Religions Of The World 2: Eastern Religions (hu) Hum 2233 Modern Middle East (hu) (prerequisite: Hum 2051) Hum 3275 Contemporary Literature (hu) (prerequisites: Hum 2051, Hum 2052)


Art Appreciation (HU)
Course Number HUM 1020
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes HUM 1020


Integrated Arts
Course Number HUM 1021
Credits 6.0

General Physical Science
Course Number EDS 1021
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


General Biological Science
Course Number EDS 1022

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRM 1000
Credits 3.0

n/a


Introduction to Visual Basic
Course Number CIS 1501
Credits 3.0

n/a


Advanced Visual Basic
Course Number CIS 2501
Credits 3.0

n/a


Program description: Keiser University’s Bachelor of Science degree in Information Technology Management is a completion program for graduates of associate of science programs in computer-related fields. It prepares computer technicians as information technology professionals, supervisors or managers.

Computer Information Systems Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Computer Information Systems Schools (campus and online)

University of Central Florida
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 71st
University of Vermont
Total Programs 141
Number of Subjects 127
Rank in USA 113th
University of Denver
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 121
Rank in USA 148th
Howard University
Total Programs 140
Number of Subjects 131
Rank in USA 168th
Valparaiso University
Total Programs 117
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 188th
Seattle Pacific University
Total Programs 95
Number of Subjects 94
Rank in USA 195th
Goshen College
Total Programs 54
Number of Subjects 65
Rank in USA 213th
Central Michigan University
Total Programs 186
Number of Subjects 145
Rank in USA 239th
Baldwin-Wallace College
Total Programs 86
Number of Subjects 86
Rank in USA 253rd
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Total Programs 73
Number of Subjects 73
Rank in USA 262nd
Eastern Mennonite University
Total Programs 66
Number of Subjects 79
Rank in USA 300th
Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 65
Number of Subjects 69
Rank in USA 319th
The University of Montana
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 125
Rank in USA 331st
Florida Atlantic University
Total Programs 104
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 333rd
Mercyhurst College
Total Programs 87
Number of Subjects 87
Rank in USA 352nd
Robert Morris University
Total Programs 4
Number of Subjects 46
Rank in USA 440th
Boise State University
Total Programs 171
Number of Subjects 149
Rank in USA 448th
University of Alaska Anchorage
Total Programs 151
Number of Subjects 134
Rank in USA 511th
Hannibal Career and Technical Center
Total Programs 22
Number of Subjects 20
Rank in USA 572nd
Nichols Career Center
Total Programs 16
Number of Subjects 13
Rank in USA 675th