Online Computer Security Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its computer security courses to be successful computer security specialists, computer and information scientists, computer support specialists, information systems security analysts, etc. and connect them to future employers. Computer support specialists make on average $47,360 per year and there are about 540,560 of them employed today.

Computer Security Organizations Computer Security Common Job Tasks
  • using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternatives solutions conclusions or approaches to problems
  • determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job
  • using mathematics to solve problems
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Computer Security Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: BSIT - Information Security and Forensics
Project Managment I
Course Number IT 301
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Human Computer Interaction
Course Number IT 302
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Technology Infrastructure
Course Number IT 331
Credits 6.0

This course explores the concepts and purpose of information technology infrastructure. Emphasis is placed on expanding the student’s knowledge of computer networks and data transmissions and applying those concepts to an organization’s technology requirements.


Internet Business Fundamentals
Course Number IT 337
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Database Design
Course Number IT 354
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


IT Consulting Skills
Course Number IT 402
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


System Analysis and Design
Course Number IT 460
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Bachelor's Capstone in Information Technology
Course Number IT 499
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Networking Concepts
Course Number IT 273
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the concepts behind today's networks. It outlines current network design, explaining the OSI Model and the methods of carrying data over wired and wireless media. Other topics include fundamental network design components such as topologies and access methods, basic administration of network operating systems, and troubleshooting methods for data transmission and recovery.


Network Administration
Course Number IT 278
Credits 5.0

This course introduces students to the features and functions of common network operating systems and shared data management concepts. Students examine and compare both local and network operating system features, and practice basic installation and administration of network operating systems including administrator tasks, server organization, user management and permissions, security features, and shared printing.


Introduction to Network Security
Course Number IT 286
Credits 5.0

Th is course covers current topics in network security such as threat detection and response methods. Introductory topics, such as proxy servers, firewalls, and other threat detection and protection methods, will be discussed. This course is designed, among other things, to provide the student with the requisite knowledge to sit for the Comp TIA Security+ certification examination. While the course may provide the student with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee the student’s eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.


Computer Forensics
Course Number CJ 317
Credits 6.0

Topics In The Course Will Include An Overview Of Computer Forensics, Computer Forensic Software,and Techniques For Capturing And Analyzing Data From Various Digital Storage Media Such As Apple Ipods, Gps (global Positioning System) Devices, And Portable Usb (universal Serial Bus) Memory Sticks.


Intrusion Detection and Incidence Response
Course Number IT 390
Credits 6.0

This course provides an introduction to the intrusion detection systems available to protect networks from cybercriminals. Students explore various security concepts and the basics of security attacks. Students install and configure various intrusion detection system tools. Topics include principles and classifications of intrusion detection systems, the incident response process, and response types. Additionally, the course presents insight into intrusion detection and forensics and incident response strategies required to protect critical assets.


Digital Forensics
Course Number IT 411
Credits 6.0

In this course, students learn about computer forensics and techniques used to perform computer forensics examinations. Students learn how to gather and protect evidence used in prosecuting computer crimes. Students practice forensic analysis using EnCase Forensics sotware. Students complete hands-on labs and projects that address real-world forensic scenarios. Topics in this course include acquiring digital evidence, bookmarking data, file signature analysis, hash analysis, and other forensic techniques. This course is designed, among other things, to provide the student with the requisite knowledge to sit for the EnCase Certified examiner (EnCE) exam. While the course may provide the student with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee the student™s eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.


Information Systems Security
Course Number IT 412
Credits 6.0

Businesses must be able to protect their networks and infrastructures from security attacks. In this course, students learn to investigate system vulnerabilities and implement security solutions. Topics in this course include: access control, application security, business continuity and disaster recovery planning, cryptography, information security and risk management, compliance and investigations, operations security, physical security, security architecture and design, telecommunications, and network security. This course is designed, among other things, to provide the student with the requisite knowledge to sit for the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) exam. While the course may provide the student with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee the student™s eligibility either to take


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a career focus area in Information Security and Forensics program at Kaplan University is designed to help prepare students for careers in information technology, networking, and computer security.* The program combines general education requirements, major courses, and courses in the information security and forensics emphasis area. Students have the opportunity to study the foundations of information technology, systems design and analysis, operating system concepts, and project management. Courses in the emphasis area give students the chance to learn about how computer networks work, how to protect networks, and how to respond to intrusions and attacks. The information technology curriculum is placed within a larger general education context, which allows students the chance to develop knowledge of physical and social sciences, mathematics, the humanities, and more.

Program Name: BSIT/Information Security and Forensics
Academic Strategies For The It Professional
Course Number CS 114
Credits 5.0

Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces students to the purposes and processes of university education. An emphasis is placed on study, communication, and thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation. Choose either CS114 or CS121.


Technology Infrastructure
Course Number IT 331
Credits 6.0

This course explores the concepts and purpose of information technology infrastructure. Emphasis is placed on expanding the student’s knowledge of computer networks and data transmissions and applying those concepts to an organization’s technology requirements.


Introduction To Website Development
Course Number IT 117
Credits 5.0

Learning The Value Of Self-promotion Equips Students To Demonstrate Their Skills To An Audience. This Course Investigates The World Wide Web And The Internet. Students Learn The Basic Concepts Of Web Development And E-commerce Along With Basic Web Page Design. By Creating An Individual Online Portfolio Or Biography Using Html, Xhtml, And Css (cascading Style Sheets), Students Will Develop Skills For Today And Tomorrow.


Database Concepts Using Microsoft Access
Course Number IT 163
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to relational database management systems. Students will use a relational database management system to create and maintain a database. Students will create filters, sorts, queries, forms, and reports. Emphasis will be placed on the skills needed to meet user requirements.


Data Modeling For Health Informatics
Course Number IT 238
Credits 5.0

This course covers data modeling for health care systems. Students will be introduced to the following topics: entity-relationship modeling, normal forms, database creation, and data manipulation using SQL. Students will complete hands-on assignments and case studies related to the health care industry.


Foundations In Information Technology
Course Number IT 190
Credits 5.0

Students will explore the basic concepts of information technology including hardware, software, and networks. The student will gain a practical understanding of how computer hardware and operating systems work. Topics include personal computer configuration and maintenance, along with the fundamentals of system software installation and administration.


Foundations Of Programming Using Visual Basic
Course Number IT 193
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of programming using Visual Basic. Basic concepts and syntax used to write programs, including variables, input, output, looping, and program flow, are introduced. Students will design and develop simple, graphical user interface-based applications using the Visual Studio development environment.


Foundations Of Programming Using Java
Course Number IT 258
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming in Java, where students learn analysis and design techniques of software engineering. Projects and assignments cover numerous aspects of program development. Students successfully completing the course will have the necessary background to analyze, design, and implement basic software solutions in Java.


Networking Concepts
Course Number IT 273
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the concepts behind today's networks. It outlines current network design, explaining the OSI Model and the methods of carrying data over wired and wireless media. Other topics include fundamental network design components such as topologies and access methods, basic administration of network operating systems, and troubleshooting methods for data transmission and recovery.


Introduction To Management
Course Number MT 140
Credits 5.0

This course will give students an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to real-world management problems and scenarios.


Mathematics Course
Course Number 200 level
Credits 5.0

Project Managment I
Course Number IT 301
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Human Computer Interaction
Course Number IT 302
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Internet Business Fundamentals
Course Number IT 337
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Structured Query language
Course Number IT 350
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Database Design
Course Number IT 354
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


IT Consulting Skills
Course Number IT 402
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Information Technology Externship
Course Number IT 489
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


System Analysis and Design
Course Number IT 460
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Bachelor's Capstone in Information Technology
Course Number IT 499
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Foundations Of Programming Using Java
Course Number IT 258
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming in Java, where students learn analysis and design techniques of software engineering. Projects and assignments cover numerous aspects of program development. Students successfully completing the course will have the necessary background to analyze, design, and implement basic software solutions in Java.


Project Managment I
Course Number IT 301
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


IT Consulting Skills
Course Number IT 402
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Management of Information Systems
Course Number MT 300
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Managing Technological Innovation
Course Number MT 451
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a career focus area in Information Security and Forensics program at Kaplan University is designed to help prepare students for careers in information technology, networking, and computer security.* The program combines general education requirements, major courses, and courses in the information security and forensics emphasis area. Students have the opportunity to study the foundations of information technology, systems design and analysis, operating system concepts, and project management. Courses in the emphasis area give students the chance to learn about how computer networks work, how to protect networks, and how to respond to intrusions and attacks. The information technology curriculum is placed within a larger general education context, which allows students the chance to develop knowledge of physical and social sciences, mathematics, the humanities, and more.

Computer Security Courses at Western Governors University

Program Name: B.S. Information Technology - Security
Education Without Boundaries
Course Number EWB2
Credits 2.0

Foundations of College Mathematics
Course Number BAC1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer‐based objective exam.


Communications Foundations
Course Number BBC1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer‐based objective exam


Reasoning and Problem Solving
Course Number CLC1
Credits 3.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


IT Fundamentals II
Course Number AXV1
Credits 4.0

n/a


IT Fundamentals III
Course Number TTV1
Credits 3.0

Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer based CompTIA A+ Practical Application


IT Fundamentals I
Course Number WFV1
Credits 3.0

It Fundamentals Content Includes Computing Fundamentals And Programming Concepts. It Fundamentals I (wfv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric/pearson Vue Testing Center, Computer-based Ciw Foundations Exam It Fundamentals Ii (axv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric/pearson Vue Testing Center, Computer-based Comptia A+ Essentials Exam It Fundamentals Iii (ttv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric/pearson Vue Testing Center, Computer-based Comptia A+ Practical Application Exam Sample Learning Resources: Ciw V5 Foundations Self Study Kit • Network Technology Foundations • Internet Business Foundations • Site Development Foundations Comptia A+ Certification: Essentials, 2009 Edition + Certblaster Instructor Guide


Language and Communication: Essay
Course Number LAE1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer-based essay exam.


Integrated Natural Sciences
Course Number INC1
Credits 4.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


Language and Communication: Research
Course Number LAT1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment that includes writing a research paper.


Web Technologies
Course Number WSV1
Credits 6.0

Web Development This Subdomain Covers Skills And Concepts Students Need To Know To Plan For And Implement Web-based Technologies. Scripting Languages Are Covered. Web Programming (bov1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric Testing Center, Computer-based Ciw Javascript Specialist Exam Web Technologies (wsv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric Testing Center, Computer-based Ciw Web Design Specialist Exam Sample Learning Resources: Javascript Self Study Bundle By Computerprep: Includes Online Virtual Labs And Practice Questions. Learnkey Video Expert Series: • Javascript For Developers Part 1 • Javascript For Developers Part 2 Ciw Web Design Specialist Self Study By Computerpr Skillsoft Modules: Javascript Client—side Scripting; Javascript: Language Basics; Javascript: Scripting; Atomic Learning • Front Page • Dreamweaver


Integrated Natural Sciences Applications
Course Number INT1
Credits 4.0

Performance assessment that utilizes scientific inquiry and analysis of evidence.


Language and Communication: Presentation
Course Number LUT1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment that includes an oral presentation.


Finite Mathematics
Course Number GAC1
Credits 2.0

Finite Mathematics This sub-domain focuses on the real number system, symbolic logic, number theory, set theory, graph theory and their applications. Finite Mathematics (GAC1) Proctored, computer-based objective assessment


General Education Social Sciences
Course Number SSC1
Credits 1.0

General Education Social Science.


General Education Social Sciences: Analysis and Applications
Course Number SST1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment that includes analysis and application of social science theories and methods


Networks I
Course Number TNV1
Credits 6.0

Network I This Subdomain Covers Skills And Concepts To Include Features And Functions Of Networking Components, Knowledge And Skills Needed To Install, Configure, And Troubleshoot Basic Networking Hardware Protocols And Services. Additionally, Concepts Including Media And Topologies, Protocols, Standards, Network Implementation, And Network Support Are Covered. Networks I (tnv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric Testing Center, Computer-based Comptia Network+ Exam. Sample Learning Resources: Testout - Labsim For Networks+ 2009


Finite Mathematics Applications
Course Number HHT1
Credits 2.0

Finite Mathematics This sub-domain focuses on the real number system, symbolic logic, number theory, set theory, graph theory and their applications. Finite Mathematics Applications (HHT1) Performance assessment


Quantitative Literacy: Quantitative Problem Solving and Applications
Course Number QLT1
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment that utilizes quantitative problem solving strategies.


Security I
Course Number TSV1
Credits 6.0

Security I This Subdomain Covers Industry-wide Topics To Include General Security Concepts, Network Infrastructure Security, Access Control, Assessments And Audits, Cryptography, And Organizational Security. Security I (tsv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric Testing Center, Computer-based Comptia Security+ Exam. Sample Learning Resources: Testout - Labsim For Security+ 2008.


Web Programming
Course Number BOV1
Credits 4.0

Web Development This Subdomain Covers Skills And Concepts Students Need To Know To Plan For And Implement Web-based Technologies. Scripting Languages Are Covered. Web Programming (bov1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric Testing Center, Computer-based Ciw Javascript Specialist Exam Web Technologies (wsv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric Testing Center, Computer-based Ciw Web Design Specialist Exam Sample Learning Resources: Javascript Self Study Bundle By Computerprep: Includes Online Virtual Labs And Practice Questions. Learnkey Video Expert Series: • Javascript For Developers Part 1 • Javascript For Developers Part 2 Ciw Web Design Specialist Self Study By Computerprep:includes Online Virtual Labs, Software Simulations And Practice Questions Skillsoft Modules: Javascript Client—side Scripting; Javascript: Language Basics; Javascript: Scripting; Atomic Learning • Front Page • Dreamweaver


Leadership Concepts and Applications
Course Number LET1
Credits 4.0

Organizational Behavior And Management Domain Understanding How To Lead And Manage In The Business Environment Is Critical To A Business Graduate’s Success In The Workplace. This Domain Includes Two Objective Assessments: Principles Of Management And Fundamentals Of Organizational Behavior And Management. Students Are Asked To Demonstrate The Ability To Apply These Concepts In A Series Of Scenariobased Problems In The Leadership Concepts And Applications Tasks. Prior Coursework Does Not Transfer To Meet The Requirements Of This Domain. Organizational Behavior And Management Focuses On Management And Leadership Concepts And Applications. Fundamentals Of Organizational Behavior And Leadership (orc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Principles Of Management (mgc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Leadership Concepts And Applications (let1) Performance Assessment Sample Learning Resources: Skillsoft Modules On Leadership, Management, Human Resource Management, And Organizational Behavior Bateman, T. S., & Snell, S. A. (2007). Leading And Collaborating In The Competitive World (7th Ed.). New York, Ny: Mcgraw-hill/irwin. Robbins, S. P., & Judge, T. A. (2006) Organizational Behavior (12th Ed.) Upper Saddle River, Nj: Pearson Prentice-hall.


Fundamentals of Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Course Number ORC1
Credits 4.0

Organizational Behavior And Management Domain Understanding How To Lead And Manage In The Business Environment Is Critical To A Business Graduate’s Success In The Workplace. This Domain Includes Two Objective Assessments: Principles Of Management And Fundamentals Of Organizational Behavior And Management. Students Are Asked To Demonstrate The Ability To Apply These Concepts In A Series Of Scenariobased Problems In The Leadership Concepts And Applications Tasks. Prior Coursework Does Not Transfer To Meet The Requirements Of This Domain. Organizational Behavior And Management Focuses On Management And Leadership Concepts And Applications. Fundamentals Of Organizational Behavior And Leadership (orc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Principles Of Management (mgc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Leadership Concepts And Applications (let1) Performance Assessment Sample Learning Resources: Skillsoft Modules On Leadership, Management, Human Resource Management, And Organizational Behavior Bateman, T. S., & Snell, S. A. (2007). Leading And Collaborating In The Competitive World (7th Ed.). New York, Ny: Mcgraw-hill/irwin. Robbins, S. P., & Judge, T. A. (2006) Organizational Behavior (12th Ed.) Upper Saddle River, Nj: Pearson Prentice-hall.


Literature, Arts and the Humanities
Course Number HVC1
Credits 3.0

Distribution Domain The Distribution Domain Focuses On Three General Education Content Areas That Are Typically Included In Associate Level Programs: Humanities, Science, And Social Science. The Social Science Requirement Is Fulfilled When You Complete The Lower Division Core Domain. Evaluation Of Your Previous College Transcripts May Clear Assessment Requirements For Some Areas Of The Distribution Domain, Which Could Shorten Your Program Of Study By Removing Assessments. To Waive Or Clear A Subdomain, The Transcript Must Show That You Have Taken Equivalent Classes In The Subdomain Content Areas And Passed With A C Grade Or Higher At An Accredited Institution Of Higher Education. Literature, Arts, And The Humanities Content Focuses On Content, Concepts, Terminology, Methodology, Models, And Issues Within And Across The Disciplines Of The Humanities. Literature, Arts, And The Humanities (iwc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Literature, Arts, And The Humanities: Analysis And Interpretation (iwt1) Performance Assessment That Includes Subjective And Objective Analysis And Interpretation In The Humanities Sample Learning Resources: Mindedge Humanities Learning Resource. An Online Interactive Module System. Janaro, R. P., & Altshuler, T. C. (2009). The Art Of Being Human (9th Ed.). New York: Longman. Isbn-10: 0205605427.


Literature, Arts and the Humanities: Analysis and Interpretation
Course Number HVT1
Credits 3.0

Distribution Domain The Distribution Domain Focuses On Three General Education Content Areas That Are Typically Included In Associate Level Programs: Humanities, Science, And Social Science. The Social Science Requirement Is Fulfilled When You Complete The Lower Division Core Domain. Evaluation Of Your Previous College Transcripts May Clear Assessment Requirements For Some Areas Of The Distribution Domain, Which Could Shorten Your Program Of Study By Removing Assessments. To Waive Or Clear A Subdomain, The Transcript Must Show That You Have Taken Equivalent Classes In The Subdomain Content Areas And Passed With A C Grade Or Higher At An Accredited Institution Of Higher Education. Literature, Arts, And The Humanities Content Focuses On Content, Concepts, Terminology, Methodology, Models, And Issues Within And Across The Disciplines Of The Humanities. Literature, Arts, And The Humanities (iwc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Literature, Arts, And The Humanities: Analysis And Interpretation (iwt1) Performance Assessment That Includes Subjective And Objective Analysis And Interpretation In The Humanities Sample Learning Resources: Mindedge Humanities Learning Resource. An Online Interactive Module System. Janaro, R. P., & Altshuler, T. C. (2009). The Art Of Being Human (9th Ed.). New York: Longman. Isbn-10: 0205605427.


Introduction to Programming
Course Number KET1
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Programming This Subdomain Covers Skills And Concepts Students Need To Know To Understand The Basic Syntax And Structure Of The Java Programming Language. Introduction To Programming (ket1) This Is A Performance Assessment In Which Students Develop A Portfolio Of Java Applications. Object Oriented Design And Development (kft1) This Is A Culminating Activity That Results In The Student Developing One Or More Java Applications With Documentation. Sample Learning Resources: Wileyplus: Hortsmann, C. Java For Everyone With Wileyplus. Isbn: 978-0471791911 Skillsoft 24x7books: Horstmann, C. Big Java. Isbn: 9780470105542.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGC1
Credits 4.0

Organizational Behavior And Management Domain Understanding How To Lead And Manage In The Business Environment Is Critical To A Business Graduate’s Success In The Workplace. This Domain Includes Two Objective Assessments: Principles Of Management And Fundamentals Of Organizational Behavior And Management. Students Are Asked To Demonstrate The Ability To Apply These Concepts In A Series Of Scenariobased Problems In The Leadership Concepts And Applications Tasks. Prior Coursework Does Not Transfer To Meet The Requirements Of This Domain. Organizational Behavior And Management Focuses On Management And Leadership Concepts And Applications. Fundamentals Of Organizational Behavior And Leadership (orc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Principles Of Management (mgc1) Proctored, Computer-based Objective Exam Leadership Concepts And Applications (let1) Performance Assessment Sample Learning Resources: Skillsoft Modules On Leadership, Management, Human Resource Management, And Organizational Behavior Bateman, T. S., & Snell, S. A. (2007). Leading And Collaborating In The Competitive World (7th Ed.). New York, Ny: Mcgraw-hill/irwin. Robbins, S. P., & Judge, T. A. (2006) Organizational Behavior (12th Ed.) Upper Saddle River, Nj: Pearson Prentice-hall.


Database II
Course Number BPV1
Credits 6.0

Project Management
Course Number TPV1
Credits 6.0

Project Management This Subdomain Covers Skills And Concepts Students Need To Know To Plan And Implement Projects. The Project Initiation And Planning Process Is Covered In-depth, Culminating In The Creation Of A Project Schedule. Learning How To Manage Business Concerns Such As Cost And Risk Is Balanced By Thorough The Coverage Of Best Practices In Managing People And Resources. Students Will Also Learn How To Manage Change And The Steps Necessary In Closing A Project. Project Management (tpv1) Proctored At An Authorized Prometric Testing Center, Computer-based Comptia Project+ Exam Sample Learning Resources: Comptia Project+ Certification Ilt Series By Computerprep Skillsoft Modules: Initiating A Project; Project Scope And Schedule; Resources, Risks, And Quality; Communication, Procurement, And Cost; Executing The Project; Monitoring, Controlling, And Closing Projects


Object Oriented Design and Development
Course Number KFT1
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Programming This Subdomain Covers Skills And Concepts Students Need To Know To Understand The Basic Syntax And Structure Of The Java Programming Language. Introduction To Programming (ket1) This Is A Performance Assessment In Which Students Develop A Portfolio Of Java Applications. Object Oriented Design And Development (kft1) This Is A Culminating Activity That Results In The Student Developing One Or More Java Applications With Documentation. Sample Learning Resources: Wileyplus: Hortsmann, C. Java For Everyone With Wileyplus. Isbn: 978-0471791911 Skillsoft 24x7books: Horstmann, C. Big Java. Isbn: 9780470105542.


Operating Systems
Course Number ABV1
Credits 6.0

Operating Systems This subdomain covers skills and concepts in relation to implementing, administering and troubleshooting information systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows Vista. Operating Systems (ABV1) Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based Microsoft 70-680 exam Sample Learning Resources: TestOut - LabSim for Configuring and Maintaining Windows 7 (70-680)


Technical Writing
Course Number TWA1
Credits 4.0

Technical Writing The technical writing requirement draws from the evidence students have accumulated in improved proficiency in research and professional written communication; the ability to think about and write for different audiences; and improved style, grammar and syntax. Technical Writing (TWA1) Performance assessment Sample Learning Resources: Requirements and instructions for completing the technical writing assessment can be obtained from the student’s mentor or the IT Upper-Division Technical Writing & Capstone Community.


Designing Customized Security
Course Number BLV1
Credits 6.0

Students Pursuing A Bachelor Of Science In Information Technology May Elect This Emphasis Area. It Enables Them To Obtain An Additional Certification While They Earn Their Bachelor’s Degree. Students Who Have Taken And Passed The Cisco Ccna Security (iins 640-553) Exam Prior To Enrollment Will Have This Assessment Waived. The Domain Cannot Be Cleared Through Previous College Work Or Professional Experience. Proctored At An Authorized Pearson Vue Testing Center, Computer-based Cisco Ccna Security (iins 640-553) Exam.


IT-Security Capstone Project
Course Number CPW4
Credits 9.0

The Capstone Project is the culmination of the student’s WGU degree program. It requires the student to demonstrate the integration and synthesis of competencies in all domains required for the degree, particularly in the area of emphasis. It includes a work product specified in consultation with and with the approval of the mentor. It may be a project, a set of policy recommendations, a business plan, a marketing plan, action research, a strategic plan, a product, or a service. The capstone project consists of a technical work product and a report that details various aspects of the product. The final product will also include a journal that contemporaneously describes the candidate’s experience in developing the capstone. The topic of the capstone must be presented and approved by the student’s mentor.


Program description: Our online IT security degree will set your security career in motion. The B.S. in Information Technology—Security will help you develop the latest security management skills and provide you with eight recognized industry certifications including Cisco’s CCNA® Certification that give you a tremendous professional advantage. You will become an expert security manager.

Computer Security Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice: Computer Security and Forensics
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the components and operations of the criminal justice system. It examines the three main components of that system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Issues and challenges within the criminal justice system and the system's future are also explored.


Social Psychology
Course Number PSY 110
Credits 4.0

Focuses on major theories in social psychology and the most recent research in the field. Topics include gender, interpersonal attraction, aggression, and prosocial behavior.


Information Technology in Criminal Justice
Course Number CIS 170
Credits 4.0

This course examines how information technology is used within the criminal justice system, Homeland Security, and private security. Topics covered include information systems and communication technologies used to prevent and investigate crime and manage security. Students will develop fundamental technical and research skills applicable to criminal justice.


Ethics and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 220
Credits 4.0

This course exposes students to the various philosophical approaches for developing appropriate ethical decision-making tools for the criminal justice professional. Ethical decision-making tools are illustrated in actual application in police, courts, corrections, criminal justice policy, and criminal justice research scenarios. Emphasis is placed on professional integrity and leadership skills that support laws, policies, and procedures in criminal justice.


Criminal Law
Course Number LEG 220
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with the origins of criminal law and explores its historical development into modern American crimes codes. Each lesson introduces the student to substantive criminal law and associated legal principles and terminology. This course contrasts elements of crimes against persons, crimes against property, cyber-crime, white collar crime, and other types of crime. Early and modern approaches to identifying, deterring, preventing, detecting, prosecuting, and punishing criminal behavior are also examined.


Society, Law and Government
Course Number SOC 205
Credits 4.0

This course examines the function of the American court system in its operational role within the government, the rule of law, and society. The criminal court process and the role of the judiciary are explained from a policy making perspective that reveals the impact of the courts on society and the rule of law in the evolution of social change.


Networking Security Fundamentals
Course Number CIS 333
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare students for an entry-level information security position in the IT field. The student learns basic security principles and then gains network security practice using lab exercises. This course should be considered a first step toward becoming a security professional.


Computer Forensics
Course Number CIS 417
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in computer forensics. It discusses ethics, professional responsibility, and chain of command when a computer crime is investigated. In addition, the course provides steps to processing a crime scene, investigative procedures, and techniques for preserving original evidence to ensure the integrity of an investigation. Disk structures are discussed including how they can affect retrieval of data. A variety of computer forensics tools are discussed and used.


Security Strategy and Policy
Course Number CIS 462
Credits 4.0

This course provides the knowledge necessary to implement network security policy based on established security strategy. It explores security procedures to protect the network. Investigates physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security, and database security.


Senior Seminar in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 499
Credits 4.0

This course enables the student to complete an information systems project in, their concentration. The project will be monitored by a supervising faculty member and must be defended by the student as the final examination. This course represents the last course or next to last course in the Information Systems curriculum. Students may not fulfill the senior seminar requirement by completing another course. Based on the student's concentration, the project requirements will require students to develop an operational program or database, a detailed network/internetwork design, or a network security plan demonstrating mastery and comprehensive knowledge of the learning outcomes in a student's curriculum.


Computer Security
Course Number SEC 305
Credits 4.0

This course provides a solid theoretical foundation, as well as real-world examples, for understanding computer security. Fundamental theoretical results, foundational models, and salient examples will be covered. Topics covered include: log files, the auditing process; log-on credentials and the authentication process; security and threat models; risk analysis; auditing, access control/protection mechanisms; security architecture; and security evaluation.


Computer CSI
Course Number SEC405
Credits 4.0

This course provides the investigator information on how to assemble the evidence and the correct procedures to employ when investigating computer crime and misuse. The student will learn detailed, legally sound procedures and techniques for dealing with computer forensic investigation and intrusions. Different types of computer threats and crimes, and investigate computer crime prevention techniques are explored, as well as proper procedures for initial response, collection of evidence and chain of custody.


The Origins of Western Culture
Course Number HUM 101
Credits 4.0

Studies civilizations and cultures such as ancient Egypt, Crete, Greece, and Rome which have given root to Western culture. Analyzes the artistic, intellectual, religious, political, and socioeconomic aspects of each culture and traces their development in Western civilization.


Logic
Course Number HUM 200
Credits 4.0

Enables students to develop analytical, inductive and deductive reasoning through the study of syllogistic, symbolic, and informal logic. Provides methods of constructing arguments, evaluating statements, and recognizing fallacies in theory as well as in practice.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI 110
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Physical Sciences introduces the student to basic concepts from the physical sciences such as motion, force, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism and the atomic theory of matter. Discusses the scientific principles that underlie everyday phenomena, modern technologies and planetary processes. Examines how the various branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, astronomy, relate to each other. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Introduction to Biology
Course Number SCI 115
Credits 4.0

Provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biology, as well as the process of biological inquiry using the scientific method. Covers the properties and characteristics of living cells, organisms, and ecosystems, and the relevance of this knowledge for contemporary issues in medicine, agriculture and the environment. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Statistics
Course Number MAT 300
Credits 4.0

This course examines the principles of probability and of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include probability concepts, measures of central tendency, normal distributions, and sampling techniques. The application of these principles to simple hypothesis testing methods and to confidence intervals is also covered. The application of these topics in solving problems encountered in personal and professional settings is also discussed.


Economic Problems and Issues
Course Number ECO 405
Credits 4.0

Applies conventional economic theory to national and international economic issues and events. Utilizes the policy ideas and stances of contemporary economists to provoke discussion of prevailing economic issues. Applies economic tools to the business decision making process.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a critical survey of contemporary social, political, and economic problems facing American society. Emphasizes the urban crisis, military-industrial complex, racism, and distribution of income.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Introduction to Information Systems
Course Number CIS 105
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microcomputer applications including a brief introduction to computer concepts, computer operating systems, software and hardware. It introduces the student to word processing, spreadsheets, the Internet, graphics, and database software. Included is the creation of web pages, integration of the applications, and hands-on introduction to Microsoft Windows commands, files, features and functions.


English Composition
Course Number ENG 115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics
Course Number MAT105
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Crime and Criminal Behavior
Course Number CRJ105
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers The Historical Development Of Social And Behavior Explanations Of Adult Crime, As Well As Juvenile Crime And New Evolutions In Crime, Including Cyber Crimes. Crime Causation Theories Are Explained In Relation To Policies Developed From These Theories And The Real And Intended Impact Of These Policies Are Discussed To Demonstrate Their Impact On Society In Regard To Crime Prevention And Criminal Rehabilitation. Prerequisites: Crj 100, Psy 100, Or Psy 105


Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
Course Number CRJ180
Credits 4.0

This course examines the criminal activity of juveniles and includes the study of gangs, status offenses, and the problems facing juveniles today. An overview of American juvenile justice is also provided, in terms of both system and practice. The causes of juvenile crime, the juvenile court system, and the institutionalization, rehabilitation, and treatment of juveniles are explored. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Research and Writing
Course Number ENG 215
Credits 4.0

This course examines and implements the principles of argumentation. An argumentative paper is researched and developed based on the concept of writing as a process. The course focuses on the logical organization of ideas patterned on established structures of argument. The course reinforces the importance of the research process and critical evaluation of sources. Acknowledging the intellectual property of others through the proper documentation of sources is stressed.


Communication for Business and the Professions
Course Number ENG 240
Credits 4.0

This course will enable students to communicate effectively in their professions. Students will learn to write a variety of documents characteristic of the business world including letters, memos, short reports, and formal reports. The course will focus on techniques for writing clearly, concisely, and persuasively. The course will also help students develop skills in oral presentations.


Introduction to Art, Music, and Literature
Course Number HUM 100
Credits 4.0

Focuses on the interplay between art, music, and literature. Shows how different epochs exhibit unique cultural values and lifestyles, which are mirrored in the various art forms. Critically examines representative art throughout the world and history from cultural, social, and esthetic perspectives.


Religion and Philosophy
Course Number HUM400
Credits 4.0

Offers an integrative approach to philosophical and religious world views in relation to such questions as the origin of all things, the limits of knowledge, and the role and responsibilities of the individual. Also examines the philosophical and religious views of the great thinkers throughout history.


Contemporary International Problems
Course Number POL300
Credits 4.0

Analyzes the origins and recent developments of major international problems in the Middle East, Central America, and Southern Africa, and their multi-dimensional impact on world events.


The Individual and Society
Course Number PSY100
Credits 4.0

Presents the various ways in which the individual constructs his self-awareness. Studies how social institutions, such as the family and religion, influence the psychological makeup of the individual.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

Introduces psychology as a human and scientific endeavor. Includes examination of concepts and methods in learning, motivation, development, personality, and social behavior.


Sociology of Developing Countries
Course Number SOC 300
Credits 4.0

Analyzes the main cultural strata in selected societies of the Third World. Emphasizes their unique historical background and development, their traditional ethos, national characteristics, family structures and religious beliefs, as well as their political, economic, and foreign policy views.


Program description: Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Computer Security and Forensics program have the chance to understand human reasonings behind adult and juvenile crimes. They also have the opportunity to examine court and correctional procedures. What's more, the program is intended to cover foundational topics in information systems and security issues related to operating systems, networks, databases, and software programs. It is also designed to teach students how to process a computer-related crime scene. Other covered topics include data retrieval, risk analysis, security auditing, access control mechanisms, and threat models. The program culminates with a final information systems project related to computer forensics and security.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Systems: Computer Security Concentration
Accounting I
Course Number ACC 100
Credits 4.0

Provides an understanding of accounting concepts, assumptions, and principles. Covers analysis and recording of business transactions; the adjusting process; and the procedures to complete the accounting cycle.� Progresses to illustrating merchandising operations and merchandise inventory accounting; covers internal control and cash; and explains accounting procedures for receivables.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Computer Programming Design
Course Number CIS 110
Credits 4.0

This course involves extensive work in the development of the logic required in the development of application programs. The course applies the methods of program design and development, using a structured approach. Included in the course will be the learning of the following concepts: proper documentation techniques, sequence, selection, iteration, modules, and arrays. The student will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of these concepts by writing pseudocode and drawing flowcharts as a precursor to the writing of the programs. The demonstration will be made in examinations and in laboratory work. 4.5 Credit Hours


English Composition
Course Number ENG 115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics
Course Number MAT105
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Introduction to Relational Database Management Systems
Course Number CIS 111
Credits 4.0

This course provides fundamental database concepts to develop students’ knowledge of database management. It also addresses the most current database issues such as database design, data integrity, concurrent updates, and data security. Special features include detailed coverage of the relational model, Structured Query Language ( SQL ), and views, database design, database administration and management. Finally, the course introduces advanced topics including distributed databases, data warehouses, stored procedures, and triggers fostering an introductory understanding of database management.


Operating System
Course Number CIS 155
Credits 4.0

Covers the development and execution of structured shell programs including scripts, menus, I/O redirection, pipes, variables, and other UNIX and Windows commands. Operating systems administration techniques also are covered including electronic mail, editors, online help, and file and directory techniques.


Introduction to Networking
Course Number CIS 175
Credits 4.0

Introduces the basic concepts of computer networks. Covers basic topologies, protocols, performance issues, and software for LANS/WANS. Assumes student has basic computer knowledge.


Systems Analysis and Development
Course Number CIS 210
Credits 4.0

Provides an understanding of the methodology and scope of business information systems analysis and design, and their relationship to the management process. The systems approach and its techniques of problem-solving are emphasized.


Computer Ethics
Course Number CIS 222
Credits 4.0

This course provides critical ethical and legal information that any computer security professional must take into account when developing security policies, plans, and procedures. This course focuses on ethical and legal issues, civil rights, and privacy considerations that organizations must take into account.


System Modeling Theory
Course Number CIS 212
Credits 4.0

Covers the principles and theory of discrete event system modeling and simulation. Topics include when to use modeling, advantages and disadvantages of modeling, areas of application, models to use in simulation, analysis of data, and verification and validation of models.


Administering Desktop Clients
Course Number CIS293
Credits 4.0

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform administration tasks in a peer to peer network or server centric network. Administration topics include installation, configuration, user management, resource management, and security.


Networking Security Fundamentals
Course Number CIS 333
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare students for an entry-level information security position in the IT field. The student learns basic security principles and then gains network security practice using lab exercises. This course should be considered a first step toward becoming a security professional.


Computer Forensics
Course Number CIS 417
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in computer forensics. It discusses ethics, professional responsibility, and chain of command when a computer crime is investigated. In addition, the course provides steps to processing a crime scene, investigative procedures, and techniques for preserving original evidence to ensure the integrity of an investigation. Disk structures are discussed including how they can affect retrieval of data. A variety of computer forensics tools are discussed and used.


Security Strategy and Policy
Course Number CIS462
Credits 4.0

This course provides the knowledge necessary to implement network security policy based on established security strategy. It explores security procedures to protect the network. Investigates physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security, and database security


Senior Seminar in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 499
Credits 4.0

This course enables the student to complete an information systems project in, their concentration. The project will be monitored by a supervising faculty member and must be defended by the student as the final examination. This course represents the last course or next to last course in the Information Systems curriculum. Students may not fulfill the senior seminar requirement by completing another course. Based on the student's concentration, the project requirements will require students to develop an operational program or database, a detailed network/internetwork design, or a network security plan demonstrating mastery and comprehensive knowledge of the learning outcomes in a student's curriculum.


Computer Security
Course Number SEC 305
Credits 4.0

This course provides a solid theoretical foundation, as well as real-world examples, for understanding computer security. Fundamental theoretical results, foundational models, and salient examples will be covered. Topics covered include: log files, the auditing process; log-on credentials and the authentication process; security and threat models; risk analysis; auditing, access control/protection mechanisms; security architecture; and security evaluation.


Computer CSI
Course Number SEC405
Credits 4.0

This course provides the investigator information on how to assemble the evidence and the correct procedures to employ when investigating computer crime and misuse. The student will learn detailed, legally sound procedures and techniques for dealing with computer forensic investigation and intrusions. Different types of computer threats and crimes, and investigate computer crime prevention techniques are explored, as well as proper procedures for initial response, collection of evidence and chain of custody.


Program description: Strayer University Online
Bachelor of Science in Information Systems
The principle objective of the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems program is to teach students state of the art computer concepts. This will prepare them for programmer/analyst, database management, web development, networking, internetworking and security positions.

Students are expected to demonstrate basic computer skills in order to succeed in Bachelor of Science in Information Systems program. Therefore, CIS 105: Introduction to Computer Information Systems is a prerequisite to the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems. Students may fulfill this requirement through several different options: successful completion of the course, transfer credit or successful completion of a challenge examination.

Also available: a Master of Science in Information Systems, an Executive Graduate Certificate, a Diploma in Information Systems, an Undergraduate Certificate in Information Systems and Associate in Arts in Information Systems.

The average time to complete this undergraduate program attending on a part-time basis, 9.0 credit hours per quarter, is 60 months.

Within this curriculum, students have the option of choosing a concentration in:

Computer Security
Database Developer
Database Management
Homeland Security and Information Systems
Internetworking Technology
Networking
Programming
Security Administration
Web Development.

Program Name: Diploma in Information Systems: Computer Security Emphasis
Administering Desktop Clients
Course Number CIS293
Credits 4.0

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform administration tasks in a peer to peer network or server centric network. Administration topics include installation, configuration, user management, resource management, and security.


Networking Security Fundamentals
Course Number CIS 333
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare students for an entry-level information security position in the IT field. The student learns basic security principles and then gains network security practice using lab exercises. This course should be considered a first step toward becoming a security professional.


Computer Forensics
Course Number CIS 417
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in computer forensics. It discusses ethics, professional responsibility, and chain of command when a computer crime is investigated. In addition, the course provides steps to processing a crime scene, investigative procedures, and techniques for preserving original evidence to ensure the integrity of an investigation. Disk structures are discussed including how they can affect retrieval of data. A variety of computer forensics tools are discussed and used.


Security Strategy and Policy
Course Number CIS462
Credits 4.0

This course provides the knowledge necessary to implement network security policy based on established security strategy. It explores security procedures to protect the network. Investigates physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security, and database security


Computer Security
Course Number SEC 305
Credits 4.0

This course provides a solid theoretical foundation, as well as real-world examples, for understanding computer security. Fundamental theoretical results, foundational models, and salient examples will be covered. Topics covered include: log files, the auditing process; log-on credentials and the authentication process; security and threat models; risk analysis; auditing, access control/protection mechanisms; security architecture; and security evaluation.


Computer Programming Design
Course Number CIS 110
Credits 4.0

This course involves extensive work in the development of the logic required in the development of application programs. The course applies the methods of program design and development, using a structured approach. Included in the course will be the learning of the following concepts: proper documentation techniques, sequence, selection, iteration, modules, and arrays. The student will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of these concepts by writing pseudocode and drawing flowcharts as a precursor to the writing of the programs. The demonstration will be made in examinations and in laboratory work. 4.5 Credit Hours


Introduction to Relational Database Management Systems
Course Number CIS 111
Credits 4.0

This course provides fundamental database concepts to develop students’ knowledge of database management. It also addresses the most current database issues such as database design, data integrity, concurrent updates, and data security. Special features include detailed coverage of the relational model, Structured Query Language ( SQL ), and views, database design, database administration and management. Finally, the course introduces advanced topics including distributed databases, data warehouses, stored procedures, and triggers fostering an introductory understanding of database management.


Operating System
Course Number CIS 155
Credits 4.0

Covers the development and execution of structured shell programs including scripts, menus, I/O redirection, pipes, variables, and other UNIX and Windows commands. Operating systems administration techniques also are covered including electronic mail, editors, online help, and file and directory techniques.


Introduction to Networking
Course Number CIS 175
Credits 4.0

Introduces the basic concepts of computer networks. Covers basic topologies, protocols, performance issues, and software for LANS/WANS. Assumes student has basic computer knowledge.


Systems Analysis and Development
Course Number CIS 210
Credits 4.0

Provides an understanding of the methodology and scope of business information systems analysis and design, and their relationship to the management process. The systems approach and its techniques of problem-solving are emphasized.


System Modeling Theory
Course Number CIS 212
Credits 4.0

Covers the principles and theory of discrete event system modeling and simulation. Topics include when to use modeling, advantages and disadvantages of modeling, areas of application, models to use in simulation, analysis of data, and verification and validation of models.


Computer Ethics
Course Number CIS 222
Credits 4.0

This course provides critical ethical and legal information that any computer security professional must take into account when developing security policies, plans, and procedures. This course focuses on ethical and legal issues, civil rights, and privacy considerations that organizations must take into account.


Program description: This course provides a solid theoretical foundation, as well as real-world examples, for understanding computer security. Fundamental theoretical results, foundational models, and salient examples will be covered. Topics covered include: log files, the auditing process; log-on credentials and the authentication process; security and threat models; risk analysis; auditing, access control/protection mechanisms; security architecture; and security evaluation.

Program Name: Master of Science in Information Systems: Computer Security Management Concentration
Theories of Security Management
Course Number CIS 502
Credits 4.0

This course presents current and emerging theories in security management. This course addresses the policies, guidance, technologies, and organizational concerns that security managers must be aware of and take into account to provide a secure computing environment.


Security in Distributed Computing
Course Number CIS 523
Credits 4.0

This course provides the theory and technologies used to provide security in a distributed computing environment. Describes firewall, intrusion detection, defense-in-depth operating system, and database security in an enterprise networking environment.


Case Studies in the Management of Information Security
Course Number CIS 550
Credits 4.0

Provides an analysis and study of current issues in computer and network security. Students will analyze security case studies and articles and provide a detailed analysis of the issues, possible remedies, and policies, procedures, and guidance affecting the outcome from a management perspective.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC 557
Credits 4.0

This course provides a framework for financial accounting concepts and practices used by internal and external users in businesses. Topics presented include the accounting cycle, financial reporting, financial statements analysis, ratio calculation and interpretation, and management decision making based on financial results.


Information Systems for Decision-Making
Course Number CIS500
Credits 4.0

This course examines the information requirements of an organization. It emphasizes the difference in the kinds of information needed at the operational, administrative, strategic, and organizational levels. It discusses planning and implementing a comprehensive information system and methods to measure its effectiveness.


Managerial Economics and Globalization
Course Number ECO 550
Credits 4.0

Applies relevant economic theory to develop a framework of analysis and techniques that business managers can use in deciding how to allocate a firm’s scarce resources to achieve its objectives. Uses economic analysis to support business strategy decisions that promote competitiveness in an environment of changing domestic and international market conditions, government regulations, trade policies, and resource availability. Systematically analyzes how global economic integration affects the production, input sourcing, and pricing decisions of firms operating in different market structures.


Quantitative Methods
Course Number MAT540
Credits 4.0

Applies quantitative methods to systems management (Decision Theory), and/or methods of decision-making with respect to sampling, organizing, and analyzing empirical data.


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number CIS512
Credits 4.0

This course covers the concepts of corporate data models and strategies for transforming the models into physical designs. It provides a foundation for implementing the physical designs onto various computer architectures


IT Project Management
Course Number CIS517
Credits 4.0

This course provides a practical and theoretical foundation for applying project management activities to Information Technology projects. Emphasis is placed on how the systems development life cycle, prototyping, rapid application development, and acquiring and maintaining systems are managed and used in Enterprise System solutions. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Network Architecture and Analysis
Course Number CIS532
Credits 4.0

his course focuses on network architecture development concepts and components including architecture functions and use. It provides the student with the skills required developing, managing, and sizing architectures in large organizations. Topics include topologies, protocols, connectivity, transactions, and performance. Prerequisites CIS 175 Introduction to Networking


Directed Research Project
Course Number EDU 590
Credits 4.0

Enables student to complete a research project in the field of major concentration. The research project will be monitored by a supervising faculty member and must be defended by the student in an oral examination. The oral defense may be conducted in a conference-style meeting of student, instructor, and second reader or technical advisor. A second type of defense allows students to present a synopsis of their project during one of the last two scheduled class meetings. Students are encouraged to discuss the project with an instructor or academic officer early in their program. Students may not fulfill the directed research requirement by completing another course.


Research Methods
Course Number RES 531
Credits 4.0

This course covers research methodology and strategic communications in business and the professions. It discusses research planning and design including the research proposal, identification of appropriate measurement instruments, and evaluation of alternative methodologies and their validity. Students are required to complete a minimum of a 20-page research proposal consistent with standards of the University's Directed Research Project (DRP). Students also acquire oral and written communication skills necessary to perform effectively as managers. All phases of the communications process - interpersonal, group, and public speaking - are illuminated throughout the course as are current challenges presented by new technology, the global marketplace, and workforce diversity.


Program description: The Master of Science in Information Systems (MSIS) is a professional degree program that stresses the technical, managerial, and policy issues associated with building computer based systems that support modern organizations. The program addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of specifying, designing, implementing, and managing systems that possess qualities such as portability, scalability, and interoperability (open systems).

The Master of Science in Information Systems program treats information as an organizational resource that is subject to managerial planning and control. It focuses on integration of data and distribution of information in helping organizations to be more competitive. In addition, the program offers graduates most of the academic background necessary to pursue certification as a Certified Computer Professional (CCP).

Program Name: Undergraduate Certificate in Information Systems: Computer Security Emphasis
Administering Desktop Clients
Course Number CIS293
Credits 4.0

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform administration tasks in a peer to peer network or server centric network. Administration topics include installation, configuration, user management, resource management, and security.


Networking Security Fundamentals
Course Number CIS 333
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare students for an entry-level information security position in the IT field. The student learns basic security principles and then gains network security practice using lab exercises. This course should be considered a first step toward becoming a security professional.


Computer Forensics
Course Number CIS 417
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in computer forensics. It discusses ethics, professional responsibility, and chain of command when a computer crime is investigated. In addition, the course provides steps to processing a crime scene, investigative procedures, and techniques for preserving original evidence to ensure the integrity of an investigation. Disk structures are discussed including how they can affect retrieval of data. A variety of computer forensics tools are discussed and used.


Security Strategy and Policy
Course Number CIS 462
Credits 4.0

This course provides the knowledge necessary to implement network security policy based on established security strategy. It explores security procedures to protect the network. Investigates physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security, and database security.


Computer Security
Course Number SEC 305
Credits 4.0

This course provides a solid theoretical foundation, as well as real-world examples, for understanding computer security. Fundamental theoretical results, foundational models, and salient examples will be covered. Topics covered include: log files, the auditing process; log-on credentials and the authentication process; security and threat models; risk analysis; auditing, access control/protection mechanisms; security architecture; and security evaluation.


Computer CSI
Course Number SEC405
Credits 4.0

This course provides the investigator information on how to assemble the evidence and the correct procedures to employ when investigating computer crime and misuse. The student will learn detailed, legally sound procedures and techniques for dealing with computer forensic investigation and intrusions. Different types of computer threats and crimes, and investigate computer crime prevention techniques are explored, as well as proper procedures for initial response, collection of evidence and chain of custody.


Program description: As information systems evolve, continuing education remains as a critical part of technology. It is essential for information technology professionals to enhance their efficiency capability by gaining skills in areas such as: programming, database technology, database administration, database technology application development, web development, networking, internetworking, security administration, computer security and homeland security and information systems.

Strayer University’s Undergraduate Certificate prepares today’s information technology professionals to meet the ever changing needs in the information technology profession. The program is designed for students who already have experience in the information systems field who are seeking additional knowledge and skills in specific areas of information systems. Students are expected to demonstrate basic computer skills in order to succeed in this program.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Systems: Homeland Security and Information Sys. Concentration
Case Studies in Current Homeland Security Issues
Course Number SEC460
Credits 4.0

This course analyzes current case studies in homeland security. The case studies analyzed focus on the current threats and vulnerabilities to homeland security and the controls implemented to reduce the associated risk. Prerequisites CIS 333 Networking Security Fundamentals


Accounting I
Course Number ACC 100
Credits 4.0

Provides an understanding of accounting concepts, assumptions, and principles. Covers analysis and recording of business transactions; the adjusting process; and the procedures to complete the accounting cycle.� Progresses to illustrating merchandising operations and merchandise inventory accounting; covers internal control and cash; and explains accounting procedures for receivables.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Computer Programming Design
Course Number CIS 110
Credits 4.0

This course involves extensive work in the development of the logic required in the development of application programs. The course applies the methods of program design and development, using a structured approach. Included in the course will be the learning of the following concepts: proper documentation techniques, sequence, selection, iteration, modules, and arrays. The student will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of these concepts by writing pseudocode and drawing flowcharts as a precursor to the writing of the programs. The demonstration will be made in examinations and in laboratory work. 4.5 Credit Hours


English Composition
Course Number ENG 115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics
Course Number MAT105
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Introduction to Relational Database Management Systems
Course Number CIS 111
Credits 4.0

This course provides fundamental database concepts to develop students’ knowledge of database management. It also addresses the most current database issues such as database design, data integrity, concurrent updates, and data security. Special features include detailed coverage of the relational model, Structured Query Language ( SQL ), and views, database design, database administration and management. Finally, the course introduces advanced topics including distributed databases, data warehouses, stored procedures, and triggers fostering an introductory understanding of database management.


Operating System
Course Number CIS 155
Credits 4.0

Covers the development and execution of structured shell programs including scripts, menus, I/O redirection, pipes, variables, and other UNIX and Windows commands. Operating systems administration techniques also are covered including electronic mail, editors, online help, and file and directory techniques.


Introduction to Networking
Course Number CIS 175
Credits 4.0

Introduces the basic concepts of computer networks. Covers basic topologies, protocols, performance issues, and software for LANS/WANS. Assumes student has basic computer knowledge.


Systems Analysis and Development
Course Number CIS 210
Credits 4.0

Provides an understanding of the methodology and scope of business information systems analysis and design, and their relationship to the management process. The systems approach and its techniques of problem-solving are emphasized.


System Modeling Theory
Course Number CIS 212
Credits 4.0

Covers the principles and theory of discrete event system modeling and simulation. Topics include when to use modeling, advantages and disadvantages of modeling, areas of application, models to use in simulation, analysis of data, and verification and validation of models.


Computer Ethics
Course Number CIS 222
Credits 4.0

This course provides critical ethical and legal information that any computer security professional must take into account when developing security policies, plans, and procedures. This course focuses on ethical and legal issues, civil rights, and privacy considerations that organizations must take into account.


Research and Writing
Course Number ENG215
Credits 4.0

This course examines and implements the principles of argumentation. An argumentative paper is researched and developed based on the concept of writing as a process. The course focuses on the logical organization of ideas patterned on established structures of argument. The course reinforces the importance of the research process and critical evaluation of sources. Acknowledging the intellectual property of others through the proper documentation of sources is stressed.


Communication for Business and the Professions
Course Number ENG240
Credits 4.0

This course will enable students to communicate effectively in their professions. Students will learn to write a variety of documents characteristic of the business world including letters, memos, short reports, and formal reports. The course will focus on techniques for writing clearly, concisely, and persuasively. The course will also help students develop skills in oral presentations. Prerequisites ENG 215 Research and Writing


Introduction to Art, Music, and Literature
Course Number HUM100
Credits 4.0

Focuses on the interplay between art, music, and literature. Shows how different epochs exhibit unique cultural values and lifestyles, which are mirrored in the various art forms. Critically examines representative art throughout the world and history from cultural, social, and esthetic perspectives.


The Origins of Western Culture
Course Number HUM101
Credits 4.0

Studies civilizations and cultures such as ancient Egypt, Crete, Greece, and Rome which have given root to Western culture. Analyzes the artistic, intellectual, religious, political, and socioeconomic aspects of each culture and traces their development in Western civilization.


Logic
Course Number HUM200
Credits 4.0

Enables students to develop analytical, inductive and deductive reasoning through the study of syllogistic, symbolic, and informal logic. Provides methods of constructing arguments, evaluating statements, and recognizing fallacies in theory as well as in practice.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI110
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Physical Sciences introduces the student to basic concepts from the physical sciences such as motion, force, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism and the atomic theory of matter. Discusses the scientific principles that underlie everyday phenomena, modern technologies and planetary processes. Examines how the various branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, astronomy, relate to each other. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Introduction to Biology
Course Number SCI115
Credits 4.0

Provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biology, as well as the process of biological inquiry using the scientific method. Covers the properties and characteristics of living cells, organisms, and ecosystems, and the relevance of this knowledge for contemporary issues in medicine, agriculture and the environment. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Religion and Philosophy
Course Number HUM400
Credits 4.0

Offers an integrative approach to philosophical and religious world views in relation to such questions as the origin of all things, the limits of knowledge, and the role and responsibilities of the individual. Also examines the philosophical and religious views of the great thinkers throughout history.


Statistics
Course Number MAT300
Credits 4.0

This course examines the principles of probability and of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include probability concepts, measures of central tendency, normal distributions, and sampling techniques. The application of these principles to simple hypothesis testing methods and to confidence intervals is also covered. The application of these topics in solving problems encountered in personal and professional settings is also discussed. Prerequisites MAT 105 Introduction to College Mathematics


Economic Problems and Issues
Course Number ECO405
Credits 4.0

Applies conventional economic theory to national and international economic issues and events. Utilizes the policy ideas and stances of contemporary economists to provoke discussion of prevailing economic issues. Applies economic tools to the business decision making process.


Contemporary International Problems
Course Number POL300
Credits 4.0

Analyzes the origins and recent developments of major international problems in the Middle East, Central America, and Southern Africa, and their multi-dimensional impact on world events.


The Individual and Society
Course Number PSY100
Credits 4.0

Presents the various ways in which the individual constructs his self-awareness. Studies how social institutions, such as the family and religion, influence the psychological makeup of the individual.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

Introduces psychology as a human and scientific endeavor. Includes examination of concepts and methods in learning, motivation, development, personality, and social behavior.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC100
Credits 4.0

Provides a critical survey of contemporary social, political, and economic problems facing American society. Emphasizes the urban crisis, military-industrial complex, racism, and distribution of income.


Sociology of Developing Countries
Course Number SOC 300
Credits 4.0

Analyzes the main cultural strata in selected societies of the Third World. Emphasizes their unique historical background and development, their traditional ethos, national characteristics, family structures and religious beliefs, as well as their political, economic, and foreign policy views.


Networking Security Fundamentals
Course Number CIS 333
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare students for an entry-level information security position in the IT field. The student learns basic security principles and then gains network security practice using lab exercises. This course should be considered a first step toward becoming a security professional.


Disaster Recovery
Course Number CIS359
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in disaster recovery principles including preparation of a disaster recovery plan, assessment of the risks in the enterprise, development of the policies and procedures, understanding the roles and relationships of the various players in an organization, implementation of the plan, testing and rehearsal of the plan, and actually recovering from a disaster


Security Strategy and Policy
Course Number CIS462
Credits 4.0

This course provides the knowledge necessary to implement network security policy based on established security strategy. It explores security procedures to protect the network. Investigates physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security, and database security


Senior Seminar in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 499
Credits 4.0

This course enables the student to complete an information systems project in, their concentration. The project will be monitored by a supervising faculty member and must be defended by the student as the final examination. This course represents the last course or next to last course in the Information Systems curriculum. Students may not fulfill the senior seminar requirement by completing another course. Based on the student's concentration, the project requirements will require students to develop an operational program or database, a detailed network/internetwork design, or a network security plan demonstrating mastery and comprehensive knowledge of the learning outcomes in a student's curriculum.


Homeland Security Organization and Administration
Course Number SEC310
Credits 4.0

This course covers the structure of a homeland security organization at the local, regional, and national level. This course provides an explanation of the homeland security administration functions that must be performed at the different levels.


Information Warfare and Homeland Security
Course Number SEC402
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the threats and vulnerabilities to homeland security through information technology. The course focuses on the controls necessary to mitigate homeland security risks from IT


Program description: This course covers the structure of a homeland security organization at the local, regional, and national level. This course provides an explanation of the homeland security administration functions that must be performed at the different levels.

Program Name: Diploma in Information Systems: Security Administration Emphasis
Networking Security Fundamentals
Course Number CIS 333
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare students for an entry-level information security position in the IT field. The student learns basic security principles and then gains network security practice using lab exercises. This course should be considered a first step toward becoming a security professional.


Implementing Internet / Intranet Firewalls
Course Number CIS 343
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides Students With An In-depth Look At Firewall Technologies And How These Technologies Are Incorporated Into The Information Security Policy Of An Organization. It Introduces The Student To Different Varieties Of Firewall Configurations And Describes Popular Firewall Tools By Check Point, Cisco, And Other Vendors. It Takes The Student Through The Steps Involved In Installation, Configuration, And Administration Of Firewalls On A Network System. The Course Culminates With A Project In Which The Student Constructs And Implements A Sophisticated Firewall. Students Must Come To The Course With A Basic Understanding Of The Internet And Networking Concepts Such As Tcp/ip, Gateways, Routers, And Ethernet. This Course Helps Students Prepare For Checkpoint’s Ccsa Certification.


Disaster Recovery
Course Number CIS359
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in disaster recovery principles including preparation of a disaster recovery plan, assessment of the risks in the enterprise, development of the policies and procedures, understanding the roles and relationships of the various players in an organization, implementation of the plan, testing and rehearsal of the plan, and actually recovering from a disaster


Computer Forensics
Course Number CIS 417
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in computer forensics. It discusses ethics, professional responsibility, and chain of command when a computer crime is investigated. In addition, the course provides steps to processing a crime scene, investigative procedures, and techniques for preserving original evidence to ensure the integrity of an investigation. Disk structures are discussed including how they can affect retrieval of data. A variety of computer forensics tools are discussed and used.


Database Security
Course Number CIS 419
Credits 4.0

This course provides the essential concepts and methods for providing security in common database management systems. Topics covered include common database threats and vulnerabilities, methods used to attack database management systems, and methods of securing database management systems.


Computer Programming Design
Course Number CIS 110
Credits 4.0

This course involves extensive work in the development of the logic required in the development of application programs. The course applies the methods of program design and development, using a structured approach. Included in the course will be the learning of the following concepts: proper documentation techniques, sequence, selection, iteration, modules, and arrays. The student will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of these concepts by writing pseudocode and drawing flowcharts as a precursor to the writing of the programs. The demonstration will be made in examinations and in laboratory work. 4.5 Credit Hours


Introduction to Relational Database Management Systems
Course Number CIS 111
Credits 4.0

This course provides fundamental database concepts to develop students’ knowledge of database management. It also addresses the most current database issues such as database design, data integrity, concurrent updates, and data security. Special features include detailed coverage of the relational model, Structured Query Language ( SQL ), and views, database design, database administration and management. Finally, the course introduces advanced topics including distributed databases, data warehouses, stored procedures, and triggers fostering an introductory understanding of database management.


Operating System
Course Number CIS 155
Credits 4.0

Covers the development and execution of structured shell programs including scripts, menus, I/O redirection, pipes, variables, and other UNIX and Windows commands. Operating systems administration techniques also are covered including electronic mail, editors, online help, and file and directory techniques.


Introduction to Networking
Course Number CIS 175
Credits 4.0

Introduces the basic concepts of computer networks. Covers basic topologies, protocols, performance issues, and software for LANS/WANS. Assumes student has basic computer knowledge.


Systems Analysis and Development
Course Number CIS 210
Credits 4.0

Provides an understanding of the methodology and scope of business information systems analysis and design, and their relationship to the management process. The systems approach and its techniques of problem-solving are emphasized.


System Modeling Theory
Course Number CIS 212
Credits 4.0

Covers the principles and theory of discrete event system modeling and simulation. Topics include when to use modeling, advantages and disadvantages of modeling, areas of application, models to use in simulation, analysis of data, and verification and validation of models.


Computer Ethics
Course Number CIS 222
Credits 4.0

This course provides critical ethical and legal information that any computer security professional must take into account when developing security policies, plans, and procedures. This course focuses on ethical and legal issues, civil rights, and privacy considerations that organizations must take into account.


Program description: This course of study focuses on the acquisition of information systems knowledge and skills. The program is designed for individuals seeking computer skills to increase their job opportunities in their current careers or to pursue new careers. The diploma program also is advantageous to students desiring early entry into the job market, preparing students for entry-level computer positions.

Computer Security Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Information Systems Security
Skills for Professional Development
Course Number GEN300
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Skills Necessary For Successful Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Research, And Communication. The Course Is Designed To Aid Adult Learners In Acquiring And Improving The Core Competencies That Are Necessary At University Of Phoenix. Students Examine Their Reasons For Returning To School And Develop Strategies For Achieving Educational Goals In School, Work, And Personal Settings. Students Are Also Introduced To The University Library And Learn How To Access Its Resources Successfully. (3 Credits) *for Flexibility In Scheduling, Campuses Are Permitted To Schedule Gen/200 To Satisfy Gen/300 Requirements.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECO 212
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the fundamental theories of microeconomics and macroeconomics. The economic principles studied in this course apply to everyday life as students research an industry, debate issues with trade agreements, discuss the effects of a shift in labor supply and demand, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Consumer Price Index calculation. In particular, students research an industry affected by the economy and perform an economic analysis of the chosen industry. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 300


Business Information Systems
Course Number XBIS219

This course provides an overview of Business Information Systems. This includes a broad foundation for both technical and non-technical business professionals. Special emphasis is placed on how information is used by different types of businesses across different industries. Topics and Objectives Overview of Information Systems Identify information systems used in organizational departments. Explain how information resources are managed. Describe roles of the information systems department. Data Gathering, Storage, and Uses Recognize data management issues. Identify components of a database. Describe the relationship between data, information, and knowledge. E-Business and E-Commerce Compare e-business and e-commerce. Differentiate among business-to-business (B2B), business-to-consumer (B2C), and government-to-citizen (G2C). Explain how online auctions work. How Businesses Use Information Describe organizational information systems. Explain how functional areas use information systems. Identify supply chain components. How Managers Use Information Explain how managers use information systems. Identify information tools for managers. Project Development Methodologies Explain information technology project development methodologies. Identify the phases of Systems Development Life Cycle. Ethical and Legal Issues Recognize ethical and legal issues in information technology. Identify threats to information security. Trends Identify communication technologies used in business. Explain the impact of Web 2.0 on business. Describe advantages and disadvantages of mobile commerce (m-commerce). Technology Solutions Identify technology solutions for business problems. Develop a proposal for technology solutions that address business problems.


Organizational Ethics and Social Responsibility
Course Number XMGT216

This course provides a foundational perspective for socially responsible management practices in business. Special emphasis is placed on the interrelated nature of ethics, moral, legal, and social issues in managing individuals, groups, and the organization within a business environment. Topics and Objectives Fundamentals of Business Ethics Describe business ethics. Identify moral issues within today’s business environment. Compare major ethical theories. Describe social responsibility. Moral Perspectives Describe the relationship among virtue, values, and moral concepts in an individual and business context. Explain ways in which external social pressures have influenced business ethics. Summarize how personal values influence ethical decision-making. Ethics and the Individual Explain how individuals respond to moral issues in business. Recommend solutions to individual moral dilemmas using ethical principles. Ethics in Business and Management Describe moral and ethical issues faced by managers. Explain the relationship between social issues and ethically responsible management practices. Managing for Ethical Conduct Explain management practices for creating and managing an ethical environment within an organization. Apply ethical principles to managerial issues. Ethics in Business and the Organization Describe current moral and ethical issues faced by organizations. Apply ethical principles to organizational issues. Ethical Culture and Leadership Describe ways to improve the ethical culture within an organization. Explain the relationship among ethics, morality, and social issues within the legal environment. Examine the effects of leader’s morals on an organization’s ethical culture. Business Ethics Across Cultures Describe ethical issues that arise as a result of globalization. Compare ethical perspectives across cultures. Determine the risks and consequences associated with global business. Business Ethics Reflection Apply ethical principles to ethical dilemmas in business. Explain ways individuals, managers, and organizations can improve business ethics.


Principles of Accounting
Course Number ACC 280
Credits 3.0

This Course Covers The Fundamentals Of Financial Accounting As Well As The Identification, Measurement, And Reporting Of The Financial Effects Of Economic Events On The Enterprise. Financial Information Is Examined From The Perspective Of Effective Management Decision Making With Special Emphasis On The Planning And Controlling Responsibilities Of Practicing Managers. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300 And Mth 209


Introduction to Business Communication
Course Number COM285
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to the foundations of communication in a business setting. Students are exposed to various topics related to interpersonal and group communication within the context of applications in an office or virtual office setting. Students will develop skills in the forms of written communication, including memos, emails, business letters, and reports. Communication ethics and cross-cultural communications are also explored. Upon completing the course, students will have an awareness of their personal communication style and be able to identify areas for further exploration of communication as a business skill. Topics and Objectives Business Communication Concepts Describe the managerial functions of communication. Identify various message types. Analyze the characteristics of effective messages. Explain the audience’s impact on communication. Interpersonal and Group Communication Identify ways to foster positive group communication. Identify strategies to increase positive cross cultural communication. Compare and contrast individual and group communication. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of using technology for communication. Business Writing Describe the steps in various business writing. Compare and contrast business and academic writing. Create documents in various business formats. Laws and Ethics in Communication Identify laws relating to employees and communication privacy. Analyze workplace communication policies regarding privacy and ethics. Apply appropriate email etiquette. Create documents to deliver difficult messages. Reports and Presentations Identify skills needed to deliver effective oral presentations. Create a written report.


Management: Theory, Practice, and Application
Course Number MGT330
Credits 3.0

This course explores the rich field of management in theory and practice, and as both a science and an art. The course also addresses the role of managers in the current world of rapid change, increased competitive forces, and increased expectations for the successful performance of employees and organizations. The focus is on some of the ways and means of achieving desired goals. The student will leave this course with a solid background in the nature and work of management and managers. Applications of concepts to current workplace issues will be stressed. (3 credits)


Organizational Behavior and Group Dynamics
Course Number MGT 307
Credits 3.0

This course in organizational behavior encompasses the study of individual and group behavior in organizational settings. Emphasis is placed on strategic elements of organizational behavior, workforce diversity, managing change, effective communication, and performance systems. A comprehensive review of these processes, as well as others, will allow students to examine their role in organizations. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 300.


Critical Thinking: Strategies in Decision Making
Course Number MGT350
Credits 3.0

This course provides students opportunities for analysis, synthesis, prescription, and application of critical thinking and decision making within the organization. Emphasis is placed on preparing managers who can deal clearly, rationally, and creatively with a diverse workforce and dynamic workplace. This course equips students with concrete skills in critical thinking and decision making that will allow them to identify and solve organizational problems, as well as provide strategic direction. (3 credits)


College Mathematics II
Course Number MTH209
Credits 3.0

This Course Continues The Demonstration And Examination Of Various Basic Algebra Concepts That Was Begun In Mth 208: College Mathematics I. It Assists In Building Skills For Performing More Complex Mathematical Operations And Problem Solving Than In Earlier Courses. These Concepts And Skills Should Serve As A Foundation For Subsequent Quantitative Business Coursework. Applications To Real-world Problems Are Emphasized Throughout The Course. Specific Applications To Disciplines Such As Statistics, Accounting, Finance, And Economics Are Demonstrated And Discussed. A Variety Of Other Applications, Such As Geometry, Personal Finance, Science, And Engineering, Are Also Demonstrated And Discussed. (3 Credits) Prerequisite: Mth 208.


Research and Evaluation II
Course Number RES 342
Credits 3.0

This Course Integrates Applied Business Research And Descriptive Statistics. Examination Of The Role Of Statistics In Research, Statistical Terminology, The Appropriate Use Of Statistical Techniques And Interpretation Of Statistical Findings In Business And Research Will Be The Primary Focus. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Mth 209, And Res 341.


Finance for Business
Course Number FIN 370
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Student To The Essential Elements Of Finance For Business. Emphasis Is Placed On Financial Management, Financial Markets, And The Tools, Techniques, And Methodologies Used In Making Financial Decisions. Topics Include: Financial Planning, Working Capital Management, Capital Budgeting, Long Term Financing, And International Finance. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Mth 209, And Acc 280.


Business Law
Course Number LAW531

This course prepares students to evaluate the legal risks associated with business activity. Students will create proposals to manage an organization’s legal exposure. Other topics include the legal system, alternative dispute resolution, enterprise liability, product liability, international law, business risks, intellectual property, legal forms of business, and governance. Topics and Objectives Legal Systems of Business Explain traditional litigation and its application to business transactions. Create an alternative dispute resolution best suited to a common business issue. Describe how the legal system functions to resolve business problems. Tort and Regulatory Risk Propose actions a company can take to avoid tort liability and litigation. Propose actions a company can take to avoid product liability risk. Assess methods for managing legal risk arising out of domestic and international regulatory matters. Contract Risk and Opportunities Analyze legal risk issues arising out of contract formation, performance, and remedies. Evaluate measures business leaders can take to avoid risk in transactions. Explain transaction risk arising in unique environments. Risk in the Employment Relationship Analyze legal risk arising out of wrongful discharge. Evaluate legal risk associated with employment discrimination and harassment. Evaluate the regulatory and compliance requirements related to employment and benefits. Risk Arising in Tangible Property and Intellectual Property Propose methods for managing legal risk involving tangible property. Design plans for protecting business intellectual property. Propose methods to avoid liability arising from violating the property rights of others. Business Forms and Governance Compare and contrast the legal forms of business. Analyze who Sarbanes-Oxley applies to and how it applies. Design plans for managing the legal liability of officers and directors.


Marketing
Course Number MKT421
Credits 3.0

This course involves an integrated analysis of the role of marketing within the total organization. Specific attention is given to the analysis of factors affecting consumer behavior, the identification of marketing variables, the development and use of marketing strategies, and the discussion of international marketing issues. (3 credits) Prerequisite: COMM 215.


Integrated Business Topics
Course Number BUS 475
Credits 3.0

The Integrated Business Topics Course Examines Strategic Business Management While Integrating Topics From Previously Completed Business Foundation Coursework. This Allows Students To Demonstrate A Comprehensive Understanding Of The Undergraduate Business Curricula With A Significant Emphasis Placed On The Assessment Of Individual Outcomes To Determine Content Mastery. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Mth 209, Comm 215, Mgt 330, Mgt 350, Mgt 307, Res 341, Res 342, Fin 370, Mkt 421, Eco 212, Bis 219, Mgt 216, Com 285, Acc 280, And Bus 415.


Management Information Technology in the Hospitality Industry
Course Number BIS303

This course provides a managerial overview of information technology in the hospitality industry. Special emphasis is placed in utilizing information technology systems such as Point-of-Sale, inventory tracking, and reservation networks to make managerial and strategic decisions for the organization.


Technology in Retail Management
Course Number BIS318

This course addresses how technology is used in retail management. Emphasis is placed on applying technology and data collected from POS systems, customer tracking, and inventory management systems to make informed business decisions.


Accounting Information Systems I
Course Number ACC340

Course Description This course is designed to provide accounting students with the proper mix of technical information and real-world applications. Areas of study include fundamental concepts and technologies (what computers can do for business), the Internet, intranets, electronic commerce, information systems development, basic project management principles, decision support systems, and the benefits of computer and human synergy. Topics and Objectives Changing Dynamics of Accounting Identify the five accounting cycles. Describe the impact of information systems on the accounting profession. Demonstrate the flow of accounting information through an organization. Analyze the limitations and risks of using the Internet in business activities. Differentiate among the various types of information systems (IS). Information Systems Infrastructure Identify major hardware components. Identify internal control procedures for accounting information systems. Examine accounting software applications. Data Management and Integration Define terminology used in databases. Create a tool illustrating the flow of accounting information. Develop a database using an accounting cycle. Business Modeling Processes and System Design Describe the systems development life cycle. Explain the development of accounting information system requirements. Information Systems and Auditing Identify methods for auditing information systems. Examine the impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act on internal control.


Supply Chain Information Management in Online Environments
Course Number BIS375

Course Description This Course Introduces Students To The Theory And Practice Of Conducting Supply Chain Functions Over The Internet. It Addresses Various Business Strategies For Buying, Selling, Or Exchanging Products, Services, And Information Via Computer Networks. Legal And Ethical Requirements For Handling Supply Chain Business Over The Internet Are Addressed. Topics And Objectives Evolution Of E-business Explain The Evolution Of E-business. Analyze E-business Web Sites As They Relate To Supply Chain Management. Compare And Contrast E-business And E-commerce As They Relate To Supply Chain Management. Explain Legal, Ethical, And Regulatory Issues Of E-business. Impact Of E-business On Supply Chain Management Assess The Effect Of E-business Scm Initiatives On An Organization. Compare And Contrast The Demands And Expectations Of Different Types Of Customers. Compare And Contrast Traditional And E-business Procurement Processes. E-commerce Strategies: Supplier And Customers Differentiate Between The Customer And The Supplier. Analyze The Effects Of Customer Demands On Suppliers. Compare And Contrast Business-to-business (b2b) And Business-to-consumer (b2c) Electronic Commerce. Implementation And Measurement Formulate Security Measures For Protection Of The Intellectual Property Protection Aspect Of E-business. Explain Aspects Of E-business Risk Management. Compare And Contrast E-business Related Supply Chain Performance Monitoring Tools. Trends And Opportunities In E-business And Scm Evaluate The Impact Of Emerging Technologies And Trends On E-business And Scm. Describe Business Opportunities Based Upon E-business And Scm Principles.


ELEC420
Course Number ELEC420

ELEC421
Course Number ELEC421

Program description: The University of Phoenix offers a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology/Information System Security (BSIT/ISS) program for students who are seeking the knowledge and skills they need to achieve success in this growing field. Students will the use the innovative and convenient online format to gain the knowledge necessary to successfully apply information technology and information system security theory and principles to address actual business challenges and opportunities. With the guidance of the University of Phoenix practitioner faculty, who are leaders in the field, the student will learn to use unique digital materials to develop skills in a variety of Information Technology and Information System Security areas.

The focuses of study includes Systems Analysis and Design, Database Development, Computer Programming, Information Systems Security, Network Technologies, Web Technologies and Project Management and Planning. With a special emphasis on the growing field of Information Systems Security, this program has a heavy emphasis on mastering the concepts and principles of providing superior security and protection for an organization informational assets. The state of the art curriculum has been specially designed to produce graduates who are ready to take leadership positions in a variety information technology positions with the competencies, skills, and attitudes necessary for success in the workplace. This program provides a solid foundation for students with a variety of goals, whether they be life-long learning as an IT professional, continued career growth, or admission to a future graduate program.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Computer Security Courses at Capella University

Program Name: PhD - General Information Technology
Survey of Research Literature in Information Technology Management Infrastructure
Course Number OM8301
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners review information technology management research literature associated with managing the process of selecting, deploying, and operating information technology within organizations. Learners also practice applying methods for efficiently and effectively reading, evaluating, and annotating a large number of research articles. Other course topics include the components of information technology and the human resources that support them. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Survey of Research Literature in Information Technology Planning and Delivery
Course Number OM8302
Credits 4.0

Learners in this doctoral seminar review information technology management research literature associated with applying information technology to support organizational goals. Topics include organizational alignment, strategic system planning, and the application system delivery process. Learners also strengthen their proficiency in effective, credible, academic writing and critical thinking and reading. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Information Technology Technical Foundations
Course Number OM8303
Credits 4.0

Learners in this doctoral seminar focus on theory and research that address the technical foundations of the information technology management discipline. Learners explore a wide range of current and emerging IT management technologies, processes, and methods. Learners also strengthen their proficiency in effective, credible, academic writing and critical thinking and reading. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Information Technology Delivery
Course Number OM8304
Credits 4.0

Learners in this doctoral seminar concentrate on the behavioral aspects of deploying information technology in organizations. During the course, learners examine and evaluate IT deployment literature from both academic and practitioner sources, survey both achievements and failures in the field, and identify various research frontiers associated with IT delivery. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Information Technology Strategy and Management
Course Number OM8305
Credits 4.0

Learners in this doctoral seminar course focus on organizational issues related to developing information technology strategy and managing IT staff and functions. Learners examine the research frontiers of topics such as IT strategy formulation and business alignment; IT organization, structure, and governance; implementation and change management; organizational learning and knowledge management; and evaluation of IT impacts on the organization. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Advanced Qualitative Research
Course Number OM8025
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course investigate qualitative inquiry and various qualitative research designs based on social constructivist, interpretive, and critical-theory/transformative traditions appropriate for research in organization and management. Course topics include strategies for data collection and bounding, data analysis and coding, visual mapping and portrayal, drawing and verification of conclusions from data, and qualitative research presentation. Learners also gain hands-on experience using qualitative software. This course is recommended for learners who intend to conduct either a qualitative or mixed-methods dissertation. Prerequisite(s): OM8022. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Applied Multivariate Modeling
Course Number OM8026
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Review, Critique, And Apply Multivariate Models Appropriate To Organizational And Information Technology Research Designs. Topics Include Exploratory Data Analysis, Multiple Regression, Logistic Regression, Correlation, Multivariate Analysis Of Variance (manova), Factorial Analysis Of Variance (anova), Factor Analysis And Principal Components, Discriminant Analysis, Structural Equation Modeling, And Emerging Data Analysis Techniques. Learners Also Examine Nonparametric Alternatives. This Course Requires The Use Of Analytical Software. Prerequisite(s): Om7080 Or Om8020. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Survey Research Methodology
Course Number OM8027
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course concentrate on the competencies, skills, and techniques required to conduct successful data gathering and analysis. The course provides learners with the opportunity to learn and apply the skills required to construct survey questions and items, structure questionnaires and interview schedules, understand and utilize scaling techniques, develop and select the most effective administration techniques, develop the most appropriate sampling frames, and apply the most powerful statistical analysis. Upon completion of this course, learners are prepared to utilize this methodology to conduct scholarly and organizational research. Prerequisite(s): OM8022. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Design Science Research Methods
Course Number OM8031
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on design science as a research method with a specific set of guidelines and outcomes. Learners examine the distinguishing characteristics, research guidelines, and ethical implications of design science. This course is recommended for learners who intend to use a design science-based research method in their dissertations. Prerequisite(s): OM8020. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Information Technology Research and Practice
Course Number TS8004
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course focus on the technical foundations of information technology research and practice. Learners examine current and emerging research and practice technologies, processes, and methods; compare quantitative and qualitative methodologies; and identify the research methodologies commonly used in IT research. This course prepares PhD learners for doctoral research related to IT literature and theory. TS8004 must be taken by PhD learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Advances in Information Technology
Course Number TS8306
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to advances in areas of information technology, including enterprise-wide systems, data warehouses, and network-based applications. Learners may choose to focus on one of the following areas of concentration: decision support systems, human-computer interaction, information security, computer networking, and database systems. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Special Topics in Information Technology
Course Number TS8998
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with the opportunity to engage in an in-depth study of a specialized information technology area. Theory, research, and practice are constructed to focus on specific subject matter using the special topics course format. Appropriate course topics address an area of study that complement learners’ past experience and learning objectives. The results of the study must exhibit a graduate-level mastery of the topic area. Course may be repeated for credit with a different topic only. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Quantitative Research Techniques
Course Number OM8020
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore fundamental concepts needed to conduct graduate-level quantitative research. Learners examine the foundations, methods, and applications of quantitative research; dependencies among research design, measurement, and analysis; variable types and levels of measurement; sampling; and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and hypothesis testing.


Survey of Applied Research Methods
Course Number OM8022
Credits 4.0

. This course focuses on research designs for qualitative, quantitative, mixedmethods, and applied research in organization and management. Learners move beyond conducting reviews of literature at the methodological level, focusing on research design in order to evaluate specific design features related to reliability and threats to validity, and to craft their own research prospectus. Learners explore the meaning of content and process gaps, problems, and opportunities uncovered through a review of the literature. They also examine issues related to management science research ethics and the role of the Institutional Review Board (IRB)


Advanced Research: Mixed-Methods Research Designs
Course Number PHB8024
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using mixed-methods research designs in applied business and organizational research. Learners examine the philosophic foundations and practical implications of merging numerical and non-numerical data to gain a comprehensive perspective of complex business and organizational phenomena than that gained by using either quantitative or qualitative methods alone. Learners also focus on using evidencebased practice to create actionable knowledge in local contexts; connect theory with practice to address core performance and quality metrics; and develop a comprehensive mixed-methods research prospectus


Information Technology Consulting Practice Seminar
Course Number TS8940
Credits 4.0

In this seminar, learners examine the project management and contracting skills necessary to become an effective information technology consultant. Course topics include organizational assessment, planning, execution, and measurement. Prerequisite(s): Completion of program core courses. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Teaching Practice Seminar in Information Technology Education
Course Number TS8950
Credits 4.0

This seminar covers the practice fundamentals learners need to prepare themselves for a career in information technology education. Learners examine syllabus and course development, online and classroom instruction, and the fundamentals of human development in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): Completion of program core courses. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number ED9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number ED9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number ED9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number ED9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Program description: Learners in the doctoral General Information Technology specialization may select courses from one or more specializations, provided that they meet all general specialization requirements and any course prerequisites. Learners are expected to choose electives that provide a coherent foundation for research in one or more areas of information technology. Successfully completing the General Information Technology specialization prepares learners to lead, consult, or teach in the field of IT. Learn about completion rates, affordability, and more at www.capellaresults.com.

Computer Security Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Information Systems Security
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Business Continuity
Course Number SEC-340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on preparing for, reacting to and recovering from events that threaten the security of information and information resources, or that threaten to disrupt critical business functions. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s information assets and critical business functions, as well as develop policies, procedures and plans to address them. Technology specific to thwarting disruption and to supporting recovery is also covered.


Data Privacy and Security
Course Number SEC-360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on legal, ethical and security issues involving data and information assets organizations must address to ensure operational continuity as well as compliance with standards, policies and laws. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s data and develop standards, policies, procedures and plans to combat them. Security technology specific to safeguarding data and information assets is also covered.


Web Security
Course Number SEC-370
Credits 4.0

This course examines issues involved in protecting web-based applications from external threats while safeguarding customer privacy and accessibility. Students examine external threats to an organization’s systems and develop strategies that support systems and business goals.


Information Systems Security Planning and Audit
Course Number SEC-440
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth look at risk factor analysis that must be performed in order to design a flexible and comprehensive security plan. Topics include assessing threats, developing countermeasures, protecting information and security designs processes. Auditing practices used to verify compliance with policies and procedures, as well as for building a case for presentation in private and public settings, are also covered.


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Graduate Certificate in Information Security
Principles of Information Security and Privacy
Course Number SE571
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of security in information systems. Covered are various aspects of security in computing, including security threats and controls; basic cryptography and its applications; network intrusion detection and prevention; security administration and planning; anonymity and privacy; legal issues; protection; and ethics. Coursework also examines controls in information systems, and addresses security issues surrounding information systems and computer-generated data. No prerequisite


Network Security
Course Number SE572
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Practices for Administration of Physical and Operations Security
Course Number SE578
Credits 3.0

This course examines security management, management tools, and physical and operations security in an organization's environment. Security management addresses identifying information assets and developing, documenting and implementing policies, standards, procedures and guidelines for asset protection. Management tools such as data classification and risk assessment/analysis are used to identify system vulnerabilities and implement controls. Physical and operations security addresses control mechanisms and protection techniques for the entire facility, resources and overall system in operation


Security in Systems Architecture and Applications
Course Number SE579
Credits 3.0

This course addresses concepts, principles, structures and standards used to design, monitor and secure operating systems, equipment, networks, databases, applications and controls that enforce various levels of availability, integrity and confidentiality. Coursework also focuses on security concepts that apply to application software development, addressing the software design and development environment and explaining software's critical role in providing information system security.


Disaster Recovery/Forensics and Security
Course Number SE591
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on preserving and recovering business operations in the event of outages, disasters or work force interruptions. Measures and technologies used for forensics, as well as computer crime and security investigation, are addressed.


IT Governance
Course Number SE592
Credits 3.0

This course introduces principles of information technology governance, focusing on IT control objectives (COBIT) and related internal controls. Coursework explores best practices for managing IT processes; meeting multiple needs of enterprise management by bridging gaps between business risks; technical issues; control needs; and performance measurement requirements. Students explore IT industry standards, and develop governance skills relating to creating and maintaining corporate information systems policy.


Program description: Gain the skills to build a career in managing the one of the most important aspect of any business: information security. Earn your graduate certificate by completing coursework in risk mitigation and contingency planning, cryptography and security mechanisms, information security and privacy, and network, e-business and database security. Program availability varies by location.

Computer Security Courses at University of Maryland University College

Program Name: MS in Cybersecurity
Cyberspace and Cybersecurity
Course Number CSEC 610
Credits 6.0

A study of the fundamentals of cyberspace and cybersecurity. Topics include cyber architecture, cyber services, protocols, algorithms, hardware components, software components, programming languages, various cybersecurity mechanisms, business continuity planning, security management practices, security architecture, operations security, physical security, cyber terrorism, and national security



Prevention and Protection Strategies in Cybersecurity
Course Number CSEC 630
Credits 6.0

Prerequisite: CSEC 620. An in-depth study of the theory and practice of preventing cyber attacks. Countermeasures discussed include training; encryption; virtual private networks; policies; practices; access controls; secure systems development; software assurance arguments; verification and validation; firewall architectures; and anti-virus, patching, personnel security, and physical security practices. Topics also include business continuity and disaster recovery plans. Strategies for large-scale prevention, such as critical infrastructure protection, international collaboration, and law enforcement, are examined.


Monitoring, Auditing, Intrusion Detection, Intrusion Prevention, and Penetration Testing
Course Number CSEC 640
Credits 6.0

Prerequisite: CSEC 630. An in-depth study of the theory and practice of intrusion detection and prevention in cyberspace. Topics include network security, monitoring, auditing, intrusion detection, intrusion prevention, and ethical penetration testing. Emphasis is on methods to identify system vulnerabilities and threats and prevent attacks.


Cyber Crime Investigation and Digital Forensics
Course Number CSEC 650
Credits 6.0

Prerequisite: CSEC 640. An in-depth study of the theory and practice of digital forensics. Topics include computer forensics, network forensics, cell phone forensics, and other types of digital forensics. Discussion also covers identification, collection, acquisition, authentication, preservation, examination, analysis, and presentation of evidence for prosecution purposes.


Cybersecurity Capstone
Course Number CSEC 670
Credits 6.0

Prerequisite: Csec 650 Or Csec 655. A Study Of And Exercise In Developing, Leading, And Implementing Effective Enterprise- And National-level Cybersecurity Programs. Focus Is On Establishing Programs That Combine Technology, Policy, Training, Auditing, Personnel, And Physical Elements. Challenges Within Specific Industries (such As Health, Banking, Finance, And Manufacturing) Are Discussed. Topics Include Enterprise Architecture, Risk Management, Vulnerability Assessment, Threat Analysis, Crisis Management, Security Architecture, Security Models, Security Policy Development And Implementation, Security Compliance, Information Privacy, Identity Management, Incident Response, Disaster Recovery, And Business Continuity Planning, Assignments Include A Project Reflecting Integration And Application Of Cybersecurity Knowledge And Skills.


Program description: Our physical world is increasingly supported by a cyberspace infrastructure. This infrastructure enables new business models, enhances communications, makes our personal lives more convenient, and contributes to our national defense. The flip side of this increased reliance, however, is that we are vulnerable to threats to our cyberspace infrastructure. Network outages, data compromised by hackers, propagating viruses, and other incidents affect our lives in ways that range from inconvenient to life-threatening. The Master of Science in Cybersecurity provides practitioners with the framework and knowledge to protect an organization’s cyber assets. The program focuses on prevention, detection, countering, and recovery from cyber incidents. Students learn about technical tools and organizational practices such as training, access control, evidence collection, and disaster recovery and business continuity planning.

The Master of Science in Cybersecurity is designed for midcareer professionals who wish to help meet the challenges posed by increasing cyber-threats. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the program is designed to provide students with a broad analytical framework for evaluating and solving cybersecurity problems.

Computer Security Courses at Utica College

Program Name: Bachelor's in Cybersecurity - Cybercrime investigation
Introduction to Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Number CRJ 101
Credits 1.0

Basic research/writing principles that should be applied to criminal justice as a field of study.


Introduction To Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 103
Credits 3.0

History, theory, and structure of the criminal justice system emphasizing substantive and procedural criminal law; police, prosecution, defense, courts, institutional and community corrections; juvenile justice subsystem.


Modern Techniques in Crime Investigation
Course Number CRJ 314
Credits 3.0

Theory and practice of modern investigation methods for public and private sector agencies. Techniques and procedures for evidence collection, preservation, and presentation. Reviews investigation resources, including crime laboratory and databases. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 103 or equivalent.


Security Administration
Course Number CRJ 328
Credits 3.0

Principles of administration of physical, human, and asset security. Risk assessment, training, emergency management, disaster recovery, and the global aspects of security administration.


Cyber Crime Law And Investigations
Course Number CRJ335
Credits 3.0

Cyber crimes, including computer crimes, Internet fraud, e-commerce, and threats to the national infrastructure. Policies, legal issues, and investigative techniques and strategies, and implications for investigation and enforcement on a global scale.


Cyber Crime Investigations And Forensics I
Course Number CRJ355
Credits 3.0

Intrusion detection methodologies, tools and approaches to incident response. Computer forensic principles, including operating system concepts, registry structures, file system concepts, boot process, and file operations. Introduction to forensic tools.


Cyber Crime Investigation And Forensics Ii
Course Number CRJ356
Credits 3.0

Digital information retrieval methods. Exercises for search, recovery, imaging, analysis, and preservation of evidence on disk drives and other storage media. Advanced topics such as disk geometry and analysis of UNIX systems.


Information System Threats, Attacks and Defenses
Course Number CRJ 362
Credits 3.0

Overview of methods and motives of cybersecurity incident perpetrators, and the countermeasures employed to organizations and agencies to prevent and detect those incidences. Discussion of ethical obligations of security professionals.


System Vulnerability Assessments
Course Number CRJ 438
Credits 3.0

Threats to information systems and process for performance of audits, assessments, penetration tests, and architecture reviews. Use of tools for such studies and practical experience in conducting assessments and preparing reports.


Cyber Crime Investigation And Forensics Iii
Course Number CRJ455
Credits 3.0

Theory and techniques for tracking attackers across the Internet. Practical exercises from case studies of Internet based crimes.


Senior Seminar
Course Number CRJ 461
Credits 3.0

Selected topics of current interest. Emphasizes critical analysis of current research literature and development of action projects by seminar members. Integrates previous learning as a capstone experience. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


Internship
Course Number CRJ 470
Credits 15.0

agency under co-supervision of faculty and agency personnel. Field experience, periodic conferences and seminars, written and reading assignments designed to combine theory and professional practice. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


Senior Project
Course Number CRJ 475
Credits 6.0

Senior level research project on policy issue determined after consultation with faculty supervisor.


Computer Science I
Course Number CSC 101
Credits 3.0

Overview of computer science. Introduction to algorithms, elementary data structures, program design, and programming utilizing a block structured programming language. Lecture and laboratory.


Discrete Mathematics I
Course Number CSC 201
Credits 4.0

First course in abstract mathematical structures with emphasis on material needed for applications to computer science. Introduction to different number systems, data types, computer arithmetic, Boolean algebra, direct and indirect proofs, and mathematical induction. Lecture and Recitation.


Computer Organization And Programming
Course Number CSC303
Credits 4.0

Digital logic, micro-programming, machine and assembly language programming. Boolean logic and its relationship to actual circuits such as adders, multiplexers, dimultiplexers, shifters, and flip-flops. Hypothetical computer is used to illustrate microprograms/interpreters. Lecture and Laboratory. Prerequisites: Computer Science 101 and 201.


Object-Oriented Programming
Course Number CSC 316
Credits 3.0

Introduction to the object-oriented paradigm of programming. Objects, classes, and inheritance. Prerequisite: Computer Science 101.


Introduction To Networks
Course Number CSC323
Credits 3.0

Topic Include Network Types And Communication Models, Hardware Components, Applications, Protocols, Standards, Internetworking And Routing Concepts, Osi Model, Tcp/ip, Lan And Wan Networking Technologies. Prerequisites: Computer Science 101, 102, And 303. May Be Taken Concurrently With Computer Science 303.


Computer and Network Security
Course Number CSC 432
Credits 4.0

Fundamentals Of Securing Computers And Networks. Includes Security Objectives, Threats, Vulnerabilities, Types Of Attacks, Authentication Methods, Access Control Methods, Encryption, Intrusion Detection, Vpns, Firewalls And Security As It Relates To The Www. Prerequisites Criminal Justice 333 And Computer Science 323.


Statistics
Course Number MAT 112
Credits 3.0

For non-mathematics majors. Probability theory topics, binomial distribution, normal distribution, descriptive statistics, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency, hypothesis testing. Confidence intervals, correlation, and prediction. Prerequisite: MAT 100, or satisfactory performance in Mathematics Placement Test administered by mathematics department, or permission of instructor. Students may not also take for credit Psychology 211, Economics 241 or Sociology 211


Jurisprudence of the Criminal Law
Course Number GOV 341
Credits 3.0

Criminal law as process for dispute settlement and maintenance of order by the state. Emphasis on legal reasoning, legal process, and necessity to maintain historical continuity and doctrinal consistency.


Basic Statistics
Course Number MAT112
Credits 3.0

For non-mathematics majors. Probability theory topics, binomial distribution, normal distribution, descriptive statistics, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency, hypothesis testing. Confidence intervals, correlation, and prediction. Prerequisite: MAT 100, or satisfactory performance in Mathematics Placement Test administered by mathematics department, or permission of instructor. Students may not also take for credit Psychology 211, Economics 241 or Sociology 211


Calculus I
Course Number MAT 201
Credits 3.0

Review of analytic geometry and trigonometric functions. Limits, derivatives, maxima and minima, related rates, graphs, differentials, mean value theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151 or satisfactory performance in mathematics placement test administered by mathematics department, or permission of instructor.


Professional Ethics
Course Number PHI 108
Credits 3.0

This course examines ethical dilemmas encountered by professionals at work. Journalism, health care, law, education, computer science/information technology and public relations all provide examples.


Statistics in the Behavioral Sciences
Course Number SOC 211
Credits 3.0

Application of statistical methods in sociological research. Descriptive statistics, tests of significance, correlation, simple analysis of variance, chi-square, and some non-parametric methods. Same as Psychology 211. Students may not also take for credit Economics 241, Mathematics 112.


Criminology
Course Number SOC 274
Credits 3.0

relation to social values and social structure, types of criminal behavior, theories of treatment and control, correctional methods, and the administration of justice.


Program description: With an innovative curriculum that incorporates foundational learning in liberal arts, critical skills development in investigation and forensic technologies, and two highly specialized concentrations, UC's bachelor of science program in cybersecurity and information assurance prepares you for professional opportunities in:

Computer Security Courses at Bryant and Stratton College

Program Name: Associates - IT-Security
Introduction to Information Literacy and Research
Course Number COMM150
Credits 3.0

Students study the evolution of information and the impact of technology on research, and learn how to access, evaluate, and synthesize acquired research. The research process and papers required, of each student include inquiry into the history of each student’s chosen career along with the assignments on how changes in technology have impacted the communication processes in the career field. Prerequisite or Corequisite: INSM180


Public Speaking and Rhetorical Persuasion
Course Number COMM201
Credits 3.0

This course is a multi-disciplinary course with the infusion of communication theory along with critical analyses of written and presented speech to include a composition/rhetoric/ textual element from the English discipline.


Research and Writing I
Course Number ENGL101
Credits 3.0

Students develop their expository and persuasive writing skills through varied writing experiences. Information literacy skills and research techniques are introduced and reinforced. Students apply their information literacy and writing skills to produce a paper which incorporates research in appropriate APA citation style.


Research and Writing II
Course Number ENGL250
Credits 3.0

This course builds on the research and writing skills developed in the previous English course. Students make critical decisions about the research necessary to produce diverse writings appropriate in content, format, and documentation. Using their research, students produce documents that will positively affect varied audiences.


History and Practice of Information Systems
Course Number INSM180
Credits 3.0

This introductory course exposes students to the theoretical basis of computing science. Students study the social, educational and career implications of computer hardware and system software, as well as emerging technologies. Learners will apply technology to develop proficiency in the productions, analysis and archiving of electronic communications common in today’s society.


Survey of Mathematics
Course Number MATH103
Credits 3.0

Students employ a wide range of problem solving strategies. This course introduces measurement, consumer math, quantitative reasoning, statistics, different numeration systems, and optional topics according to student needs.


Ecology
Course Number NSCI280
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to environmental science, and examines the human/environmental relationship, fundamental ecological principles, energy resources, human impact on ecosystems, and industry’s impact on ecosystems, natural disasters, and cutting-edge environmental issues.


Practices in Analytic Reasoning and Critical Thinking
Course Number PHIL250
Credits 3.0

Explore and analyze contemporary topics using analytic methods and metacognitive strategies. Emphasis is on the application of these strategies within the dynamic communities of college, career and life. Students complete a career based ethical controversy research paper which contributes to the student learning portfolio.


Principles of Psychology
Course Number PSYC101
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to the principles of psychological theory and research. This course surveys the sub categories of study including: cognitive, developmental, abnormal, social and biopsychology as it related to the scientific study and understanding of human thoughts, emotions and behaviors.


Principles of Sociology
Course Number SOSC102
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to sociological principles through exploring the relationship between the individual, attitudes, behavior and the community. This includes the contemplation of issues like race, gender, class, sex, and age, as well as organizational infrastructures and their tendencies towards power, authority, and status.


Business Information Systems Principles
Course Number TECH100

A foundational course that introduces information systems and its role in business. Students will learn fundamental topics on information system technologies, business applications, systems development, and IT ethics commonly used in business.


Hardware and Operating Systems
Course Number TECH130

Students learn the purpose of and demonstrate the use of common operating systems utilized in computer hardware. Hands-on experience with a contemporary operating system is emphasized throughout the course. Students also learn to troubleshoot, repair, and replace common hardware and software components.


Networking Fundamentals
Course Number TECH140

Introduces Students To Common Networks And Network Technologies Found In Business. Students Will Uncover The Technologies, Protocols, Media, And Topologies Used To Build And Maintain Local Area Networks (lans), Wide Area Networks (wans), And Wireless Networks. Hands-on Experience With The Technologies, Protocols, Media, And Concepts Covered In The Class Will Be Emphasized Through The Lab Portion Of Tech 140.


Introduction To Network Security
Course Number SECR180
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to the importance of information security systems to protect networks and the integrity of data. Learners will study the concepts, ethics and legal implications associated with risk control and policies. In addition they will design and infrastructure and physical security plan. The concept of cryptography is introduced along with standards of protocol.


Microsoft Servers
Course Number SECR210
Credits 3.0

Students Will Learn How To Plan The Server Environment And How To Configure And Manage A Windows Server System. Students Will Demonstrate A Solid Understanding Of Basic Networking And Networking Infrastructure, Including The Use Of The Osi Model, Tcp/ip, And Subnets To Create Logical Networks. Students Will Also Learn Ip Configurations, Automatic Private Ip Addressing (apipa), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (dhcp), Domain Name System (dns), Windows Internet Naming Service (wins), Ip Security (ipsec), And Remote Access. Prerequisite: Tech140


Firewalls And Vpns
Course Number SECR220
Credits 3.0

Students Will Gain In-depth Knowledge Of Designing, Setting Up, Managing, And Troubleshooting Firewalls And Virtual Private Networks (vpns) From Both A Managerial And Technical Perspective. Students Will Learn To Identify And Harden Network Vulnerabilities, And Gain An Understanding And Ability To Manage Packet Filtering, Authentication, Proxy Servers, Encryption, Bastion Hosts, Vpns, Log File Maintenance, And Intrusion Detection Systems.


Ethical Hacking
Course Number SECR240
Credits 3.0

Students will learn the art and science of ethical hacking and security testing including how to use the tools and techniques that ethical hackers and security testers use to discover and secure vulnerabilities. Students will also learn how attackers operate and think and by doing so they will be able to offer proactive measures and solutions to protect computer networks. In addition to learning fundamental security testing concepts, students will gain practical knowledge in computer programming, documentation of security testing, and the ethical and legal of both ethical and unethical hacking. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: TECH140


Networking Security
Course Number SECR242
Credits 3.0

Students Will Learn To Plan, Implement, And Manage Network And Computer Security Using The Most Up-to-date Attack And Defense Techniques And Technologies. Students Will Learn To Identify And Analyze Different Types Of Types Of Attacks And How To Defend Against Them As Well As How To Harden Networks To Resist Attacks, Protect Bask And Advanced Communication, And Use Cryptography And Public Key Infrastructure (pki) To Thwart Attackers. Prerequisite: Tech140


Computer Forensics
Course Number SECR250
Credits 3.0

Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to become a computer forensics investigator including; how to conduct hightech computer and network investigations, the techniques and tools used to acquire digital evidence, and how to reporting their findings. Students will also learn how to set up forensics labs, how to acquire and work with forensic tools, and digitally analyze evidence. Note: This course will only be offered online


Internship/Capstone
Course Number SECR260
Credits 3.0

Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan. Prerequisites: Minimum 45 Earned Credits


Program description: The Associates degree in Security Technology offers students a foundation of coursework and hands-on experiences with business technology systems, and the security procedures and technologies used to secure those systems. In this program, students will discover how information systems are integral to organizational success. Security students will then move on to discover the technologies that comprise network infrastructures that allow for the successful transfer and use of mission critical business information. After discovering the makeup of Technology systems, Security students will move on to experience the technologies and procedures Technology professionals use to secure business systems and assets. Students will learn how to assess businesses for risk, develop effective policies and procedures to secure systems and respond to incidents and disasters. Students will also interact with the technologies used to secure and harden servers, network operating systems, and systems in general. Some typical jobs for security technology include (national salary averages from salary.com): Help Desk Support ($38,844 - $50,094), Database Analyst I ($30,325 - $63,951), Business Systems Analyst I ($38,682 - $55,719).

Computer Security Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Network Administrator
Phase 3 Integration Project (for NA)
Course Number NA3E
Credits 15.0

The Phase 3 Integration Project for the Network Administrator (NA) program is a hands-on test of a variety of concepts presented throughout the previous courses which focuses on implementing and administering networks using Cisco devices and Windows Server-based computer systems.


Managing and Maintaining PCs (A+)
Course Number AP3E
Credits 90.0

This course focuses on the hardware and software operating systems that run today’s personal computers. Emphasis will be placed on commands, functions, and terminology through practical instruction in the installation, configuration, and upgrade of Windows operating systems. Students will also be given an in-depth look at the variety of computer hardware components and their related functions. Other topics to be discussed include installing, troubleshooting, and repairing PC hardware and operating systems


Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices
Course Number CCN260
Credits 6.0

This Hands–on Program Is Designed To Provide The Students With The Knowledge And Experience They Need To Successfully Challenge The Ccna Exam. During The Course Of The Program The Students Will Learn Use 2500 Series Routers And 1900 Series Switches. They Will Use Simulation Equipment That Will Allow The Routers To Connect From Different Cities And Time Zones. The Program Includes Assembling And Cabling Cisco Devices, Operating And Configuring Cisco Los Devices, Managing Your Network Environment, Interconnecting Catalyst Switches 142 Catalyst, 900 Switch Operations, Extending Switched Networks – Virtual Lans, Interconnecting Networks With Tcp/ip, Ip Traffic Management With Access Lists, Configuring Novell Ipx, Establishing Serial Ppp Connections, Completing An Isdn Bri Call, And Establishing A Frame Relay Pvc Connection.


Career and Employment Strategies
Course Number CESE
Credits 25.0

his course looks at the planning, preparation, execution, and follow-up stages of an interview.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number INTE
Credits 50.0

This course covers working with the Windows operating system to manage files and folders and customize the desktop, creating documents, and using the Internet for communication and research.


Introduction to Internetworking
Course Number ITIE
Credits 60.0

This course is a study of the theoretical fundamentals, protocols and standards on which computer networks are based and an introduction to the practical implementation of common types of networks, including the hardware used for their functionality and the configuration procedures used for setting them up.


Linux
Course Number LUXE
Credits 75.0

This course enables students to gain an understanding of the Linux operating system. Based upon the UNIX operating system, Linux has found a place among computer professionals as a stable and flexible platform for a variety of networking applications. Students learn about desktop environments that make it easy for them to configure Linux features and programs.


Phase 2 Integration Project
Course Number PP2E
Credits 30.0

This Course Requires The Student To Re-invest All Learning Acquired In The Courses Sd2e, Dbce, Sqae, Sqde And Prie To Produce A Functional Application.


Phase 1 Integration Project
Course Number PP1E
Credits 30.0

This Course Requires The Student To Re-invest All Learning Acquired In The Courses Sd1e, Plde, Prfe, And Prte Or Ptce To Produce A Functional Application.


Network+
Course Number NPSE
Credits 75.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of The Field Of Local Area Networking And Internetworking. Students Are Introduced To The Terminology, Operating Systems, Hardware, And Administration Of Various Components Of A Computer Network, Including Network Topology, Tcp/ip, The Osi Reference Model, And Network Security, Among Others. Students Also Learn And Perform Basic End-user Functions And Introductory Administration Operations Of A Network


Practicum
Course Number PRAC
Credits 100.0

This program includes a practicum component consisting of a specified number of weeks of work at a job site. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the business organization does not pay for the services of the student during the practicum. The number of practicum hours varies between programs. To learn more about the specific practicum hours for a specific program, speak with an Admissions Representative.


Professional Skills
Course Number PSKE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to equip students with interpersonal skills identified by employers as essential for success in the professional world. Using a variety of instructional methods including case studies, group exercises, and discussion, students learn and practice key communication skills.


Student Success Strategies
Course Number SSSE
Credits 25.0

This course will introduce students to skills and concepts that will help them achieve personal, academic, and career success.


Implementing Windows 2003 Network Infrastructure
Course Number WNIE
Credits 75.0

This course covers the topics necessary for students to be able to deliver secure and reliable networking services to organizations utilizing Microsoft network operating systems. Working via lessons and hands on labs, students learn how to install, manage, and troubleshoot the network protocols and services utilized in the network operating system.


Windows Server 2003
Course Number WSRE
Credits 75.0

This course covers the essential topics necessary to enable students to set up and support the server side of a network operating system. Students build real world support skills by working via lessons and hands-on labs to gain practical experience with installing, administering and troubleshooting a network server.


Windows XP Professional
Course Number XPPE
Credits 75.0

This course covers the essential topics necessary to enable students to set up and support the client side of a network operating system. Students build real world support skills by working via lessons and hands-on labs to gain practical experience with installing, administering, and troubleshooting a network operating system desktop environment


Program description: The Network Administrator program focuses on preparing students to manage and maintain computers and network installations. You will develop technical skills in network installation, maintenance and management as well as implementation, and operating computer services. In addition to developing a solid foundation in Information Technology skills, you will participate in a 200-hour work placement program. CDI’s program also prepares you to write exams for Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) A+ and Network+ certifications, Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA), Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP), and Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA).

Computer Security Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Master of Science in Computer Science - Computer Systems Security
Computer Networking
Course Number CS635
Credits 4.0

This Course Surveys Both The Foundational Concepts And Current State Of The Practice In Computer Networking. The Lower Four Layers Of The Osi Reference Model Are Investigated Along With A Comprehensive Treatment Of The Tcp/ip Protocol Suite. Network Issues, Such As Addressing And Routing, And Transport Issues, And Connections And Reliability Are Discussed. Major Network Applications Are Also Surveyed, Including Examination Of Their Use In Current Practice.


Computer Systems Security Foundations
Course Number CS651
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the overall foundations required for the understanding of, and further study in, information systems security. It reviews the history of security and computer systems security in particular to develop a set of models to guide the approach to realizing computer systems security. An overview of current security technologies is presented. A project is required.


Database Systems
Course Number CS660
Credits 4.0

This course explores the current state of the practice in database systems and provides a foundation for future study. Topics include the database life cycle, database models, relational algebra, SQL and an overview of the analysis, design, and implementation of relational databases. Concepts and issues in transaction processing, concurrency, security, data warehouses and data marts, distributed databases and web-based database systems are discussed.


Systems Engineering Methods
Course Number CS672
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Methods provides an overview of the techniques and approaches used in systems engineering. The topics include the models, evaluation methods, decision-making processes, system quality, system design, integration, logistics, maintenance, and system disposal.


Software Design or any 600 Level Course
Course Number CS649 or ELE
Credits 4.0

Software Design provides the knowledge to transition from smaller programming efforts to large software development projects. It addresses a variety of design processes, principles, notations and design methods.


Operating Systems Security
Course Number CS652
Credits 4.0

Operating Systems Security provides an in-depth analysis of the security components at the operating system level. The focus is on the development of a security policy and the basic elements that provide identification and authentication, access control and security auditing. In addition to general concepts, both the UNIX/Linux and Windows operating systems are studied. Students participate in hands-on lab assignments to reinforce the material as well as to gain familiarity with a number of available operating system security products and tools (both freeware and commercially available).


Network Security
Course Number CS653
Credits 4.0

Students are provided with a brief overview of the basic elements of networking concepts, topologies and protocols necessary to understand network security issues. An in-depth analysis of privacy, integrity, availability and non-repudiation within a network environment is included. Mechanisms for secure authentication, confidentiality and access control are discussed. The course includes concepts applied to electronic commerce scenarios (e-commerce). A project is required.


Security Management
Course Number CS654
Credits 4.0

This course covers a variety of issues relating to the management of information systems security. The topics covered include development of policies, standards and procedures, risk analysis methodologies, contingency planning and disaster recovery. Additional topics covered include legal and ethical issues, incident reporting, security auditing, computer crime, and security awareness and training. Implementation issues, potential conflicts and tradeoffs are also discussed. A project is required


Software Information Assurance
Course Number CS661
Credits 4.0

Attacks On Enterprise Level Systems Can Be Focused On Many Targets. Some Of The Targets, Such As Web Servers Are At The Perimeter Of The Network. Others Occur At The Applications Running On Various Operating Systems. This Course Examines Vulnerabilities Caused By Both Scripting Errors Or Poor Scripting Techniques On Web Based Applications. Further, Vulnerabilities Created In Custom Developed Applications Written In High Level Programming Languages Are Examined. Sql Problems And Architecture Design Flaws In Relational Database Systems That Contribute To Vulnerabilities Are Also Analyzed. The Need For Security Driven Life Cycle Development Models And Security Standards For Programming And Scripting Languages Are Presented.


Software Project Management
Course Number SWE440
Credits 4.0

Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Program description: Earning a Master of Science in Computer Engineering (MSCE) can be a great way to advance within your company because it integrates the additional software design and security skills training you may need to take your career to new heights.

More than ever, successful businesses demand computer engineering professionals who can motivate and lead the technical workers responsible for these advances. The MSCE degree program emphasizes effective optimization of computer systems within organizations to strengthen competitive advantage. Our Master of Science in Computer Engineering Degree program covers research, design, development and testing of computer hardware and software, along with the project management and leadership skills training necessary for increased responsibility in the engineering career field. Our Computer Engineering training gives you the chance to gain a more in-depth understanding and design ability in advanced systems, especially in the areas of digital signal processing, computer architecture and software design.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Security
Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


Professional Communications
Course Number ENG210
Credits 4.0

This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process.


Real World Writing
Course Number ENGL125
Credits 4.0

This Is One Of The Most Important Courses You Can Take—it Will Lay The Foundation For Your Entire College And Professional Career As An Educated Person. In It, We Will Address How To Write And Speak To Make A Point; How To Use Good Grammar, Vocabulary And Logical Thinking; As Well As How To Find A Suitable Topic For Your Writing Assignments. We Will Start With The Basics: Reviewing Sentences And Paragraphs, And Then Move On To The Classic Five-part College Essay Or Theme. 321 Effective November 15, 2010 For Students Starting On Or After January 2, 2011 There Are Different Rules Of The Game For Writing Academically Than Writing For Business. We Want To Teach Students The “culture” Of Being Solid College-level Communicators And Successful Professionals. This Workshop Course Is Highly Experiential, Supportive, And Collaborative, As Students Read And Critique Each Others’ Work. This Is The First In A Sequence On Composition And Writing Skills. The Second Course, Engl126, In This Series Will Build Upon This One—addressing How To Research And Use Resources Without Plagiarizing, How To Utilize The Apa Formatting For Documentation And How To Make A Persuasive Argument. Our View Of The Required Composition Sequence Is That It Is Essential For All Who Want To Become Skilled Critical Thinkers And Educated People.


Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose
Course Number ENGL126
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Workshop That Builds Upon Engl125—real World Writing. It Is A Workshop Format—highly Experiential And Hands On. Students Practice Drafting Progressively Complex Papers, Demonstrating The Capacity To Do College Level Research And Write Essays That Convey Information, Make A Point Or Provide An Opinion. They Will Study The Apa Handbook, Learn To Do Research (beyond Wikipedia!) And Cite Resources Without Plagiarizing Them. In Addition, This Course Uses Readings To Demonstrate Excellence And Eloquence In Speaking And Writing, Emphasizing The Crucial Synergy Between Learning To Write And Developing The Practice Of Intelligent Reading Of Texts. This Will Be A Highly Collaborative Course, With Students Reading And Critiquing Others’ Work, As A Means To Create A Learning Community As Well As Develop Critical Capacities.


American Culture in Transition
Course Number HIS120
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural “isms,” and America’s relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society.


World Literature
Course Number LTR215
Credits 4.0

This literature course examines a wide range of stories, poems, and plays. Students learn how to interact with and respond to literature.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Principles of Business
Course Number MGM110
Credits 4.0

This survey course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled.


Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

This course surveys major areas of psychological science, including human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, learning, memory, and biological influences.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Building Your Success Strategy Plan
Course Number UNIV101
Credits 4.0

UNIV101 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students learn effective tools and skills necessary for academic success, integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.


Career Planning and Management
Course Number UNIV201
Credits 4.0

This course provides the framework for effective career management as students gain insight into themselves and potential career fields, acquiring knowledge and skills needed to successfully plan career transitions.


Unix Fundamentals
Course Number CS126
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Students Explore End User Interaction With The Unix Operating System. This Course Examines The Basic Features Of The Unix Operating System, Unix Commands, The Unix File System, The Unix Shells, And Shell Programming. It Also Draws Comparisons Between Unix And Linux. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: It106 Or Cs106 Or Cs123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Fundamentals of Database Systems
Course Number CS251
Credits 4.0

This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems. Topics covered in this course include conceptual and logical database designs for several businesses, implementing these designs using a database management system and developing business applications that access these databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT106 Availability: Virtual Campus


Structured Query Language for Data Management
Course Number CS362
Credits 4.0

This course gives complete coverage of SQL, with an emphasis on storage, retrieval and the manipulation of data. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS250 or CS251 or IT235 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Computer Security
Course Number CSS150
Credits 4.0

This course provides the foundation for the study of computer system security. The course centers around the ten domains comprising the Information Security Common Body of Knowledge. Topics include access control systems, telecommunications and network security, cryptography, operations security and business continuity and disaster recovery planning. Students will be exposed to security management practices as well as security architecture and models security laws, investigations and ethics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Web Development I
Course Number EM208
Credits 4.0

The Fundamentals Of Web Servers, Web Sites, Html, Xhtml And Web Authoring Are Presented In The Context Of Using The Technology To Craft A Message For An Audience. Also Includes Fundamentals Of Linking, Graphics, And Other Media. The Creation Of A Web Site Project Is Required.


Introduction to Programming Logic
Course Number IT106
Credits 4.0

This course is the study of programming logic and the application of this logic to problem solving. In the course we will discuss and apply many approaches to problem solving such as step algorithms, flow charts, truth tables, and pseudo-code. Students will learn techniques to translate real life problems into forms that will enable computer programs to solve them. Students will learn and apply programming language constructs (i.e. linear, branching, iteration, subroutines, etc.) using a visual tool. These techniques and tools should allow students to create and design programming logic that will become a foundational skill for future programming courses. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Programming
Course Number IT110
Credits 4.0

The course is an introduction to Java programming and object-oriented techniques. This is designed for students just starting out in programming. Fundamental programming concepts such as string manipulation, file input and output, and error handling are incorporated in lab assignments. These concepts provide the framework for the development of a very basic Graphical User Interface (GUI) application. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments
Course Number IT140
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of operating systems and specialized networking operating system models. The fundamentals of common operating systems, client/server environments, network infrastructure, theoretic models and system architecture are discussed, including legacy operating system platforms and security processes utilized in today's enterprises. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Network Management
Course Number IT245
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Network Management Explores The Management Concepts And Processes Of Planning, Improving, Creating, Updating, And Revising The Processes Of Monitoring And Adjusting Performance Of The Network. Network Management Has A Tactical And Operational Process As Well As Strategic Implications. Additional Topics Covered In This Class Include: Network Models, Managed Objects, Configuration, Managing Agents, Network Management Software, Protocol Suites Such As Tcp/ip And Osi Seven-layer Model. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None


Information Technology Architectures
Course Number IT401
Credits 4.0

The major objective of this course is to introduce the concepts, methodology and terminology of Enterprise Architecture and integrate this knowledge with previous courses in operating systems, database management systems, networking, and programming. The course primarily focuses on the overall planning process of enterprise architecture. Issues and options involved in implementing an enterprise architecture incorporating a distributed IT system are examined from a Macro Level. An ongoing discussion is conducted on how the emergent profession of enterprise architecture fits into the duties and responsibilities of today's IT manager. Other resources and references relating to the field of enterprise architecture are introduced. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT245 or IT200 or IT242; IT110 or IT115 or IT171; CS251 or CS250 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Systems Analysis and Design
Course Number IT422
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Systems Analysis And Design Provides Instruction On The System Development Life Cycle (sdlc) Phases. This Course Looks At The Sdlc As A Structured Approach For Developing Requirements, Performing Analysis, Producing The Design, Coding Or Installation Of The Solution, Testing The Application And Installing The Final Product. The System As Defined In This Course Could Include A Network, Telecommunications, New Software Development Or Other Information Systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Availability: Virtual Campus


Systems Acquisition and Sourcing
Course Number IT424
Credits 4.0

Systems Acquisition and Sourcing explores the business and technical decision making process for “buy versus build,” in-sourcing versus outsourcing, evaluation and benchmarking and testing. In addition topics such as contracts and Request for Proposals (RFP) are explored and analyzed. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT422 Availability: Virtual Campus


System Integration and Organization Deployment
Course Number IT426
Credits 4.0

System Integration and Organization Deployment focuses on the technical and cultural integration of a system into an organization. This course explains and expands upon system support strategies, user support plans, enterprise integration approaches, standards, and best practices. Discussion of organizational culture and change management is also explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT424 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Project Management
Course Number MPM210
Credits 6.0

This Course Provides An Overview And Introduction To The Discipline Of Project Management, Coupled With An Examination Of The Techniques That Project Managers Use To Complete Their Projects On Schedule, Within Budgeted Cost, And According To Specified Scope. Using Materials Based On The Pmbok® (guide To Project Management Body Of Knowledge, Published By The Project Management Institute Or Pmi®), Students Learn The Operational Framework Of Project Management Relating To The Project Lifecycle Of Project Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling, And Closing. This Course Also Provides The Basis For The More Advanced Development Of Project Management Skills In Subsequent Project Management Courses.


Principles of Network Security
Course Number CSS200
Credits 4.0

This course identifies and explains technical issues involved in network security. It also covers the fundamentals of wireless networking protocols, their security issues and threats. Covered topics include cryptography applications; access control; firewalls; key management network security issues; application, e-mail and middleware security; wireless local area network technologies.


Security Risk Management
Course Number CSS250
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the concepts of risk management. The course explores general methodologies used to assess and manage risks to information security. The course also identifies the activities involved in the process of information security risk management for a business organization. Activities such as detection, recovery and damage control methods will be explored.


Ethical Hacking
Course Number CSS280
Credits 4.0

This course covers ways that computers and networks are attached by hackers using techniques and common utilities. Learners explore security threats and ways that system vulnerabilities are exploited to attack systems. Topics include Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), ethical hacking techniques, sniffers, protocols, social engineering, vulnerability analysis, and penetration testing to ensure infrastructure security.


Vulnerability Assessment and Management
Course Number CSS300
Credits 4.0

This course surveys tools and techniques designed to detect intrusion into an organization's computer systems. In the hands-on lab component of the course, students will use a number of public domain and commercially available security tools. The course examines common attack methods, general inadequacies in various systems to include commercial intrusion detection systems. Utilization of the risk assessment process for determining cost effective vulnerability solutions is emphasized.


Software Assurance
Course Number CSS321
Credits 4.0

Software is essential to the operation of the commercial, government and military sectors of our nation. It is estimated that 90 percent of reported security incidents result from exploits against defects in the design or code of software. Therefore, ensuring the integrity of software is imperative to protecting the infrastructure of these sectors from threats and vulnerabilities. This course uses the Security Development Model to identify and implement security activities that must be applied during each phase of a software development lifecycle model. Static analysis tools, testing strategies, and auditing processes used for verification of secure code are applied in a test environment. Management’s role in the development of techniques for the enforcement of software assurance processes is explored.


Database Security
Course Number CSS330
Credits 4.0

This course is the study of security issues related to databases. The student will learn to identify security issues in a database environment, design and implement techniques to protect the database and the user, design a database with security in mind, and resolve database security issues. Students will demonstrate their competencies by developing real world projects.


Computer Forensics I
Course Number CSS350
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the field of computer forensics. It covers the history of computer forensics and how the use of electronic evidence can support criminal investigation. The course examines procedures for investigating computer and cyber crime and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering and preserving forensic evidence.


Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security
Course Number CSS410
Credits 4.0

This course examines cloud computing: risk management; compliance and legal responsibilities of remotely stored, processed and maintained data; life cycle management; and disaster recovery planning from the perspective of the user and the cloud provider. The course also addresses handling of incidents and remediation, application security, encryption issues, storage, virtualization mechanisms and vulnerabilities, and access control in the cloud environment.


Advanced Research in IAS and IT Management
Course Number CSS430
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on research in system and software planning, delivery, management, and security. It also reviews research focused on the infrastructure components – hardware, software, data, communications technology, and specific applications – and the economics of IT. In particular, topics are chosen that reflect the current or future concerns of technology.


Security Compliance
Course Number CSS441
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers The Identification, Interpretation And Application Of Federal And State Government Regulations, Directives And Acts As They Apply To The Security Of Digital Systems. The Course Also Examines The Application Of Hardware And Software Tools In The Monitoring And Auditing Of Employee Behavior To Enforce Compliance Of An Organization’s Policies, Procedures And Guidelines. Applicable Certification And Accreditation Processes Are Researched Including Commercial Certifications, Iso 27002 And Diacap.


Security Capstone
Course Number CSS450
Credits 4.0

The capstone applies and integrates the contents of classes taken throughout the program. Projects will simulate a professional work environment.


Network Infrastructure Administration
Course Number IT326
Credits 4.0

Provides Instruction In Installing, Managing, Monitoring, Configuring And Troubleshooting, Dns, Dhcp, Remote Access, Network Protocols, Ip Routing, And Wins In A Windows Network Infrastructure. In Addition, This Course Provides Instruction In Managing, Monitoring, And Troubleshooting Network Address Translation And Certification Services.


Security Management
Course Number IT454
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on various practices that need to be established within an organization for an effective and efficient management of security. Topics such as security policies, design and implementation, risk assessment and management, and security procedures will be covered


Security Architecture
Course Number IT456
Credits 4.0

This course is an in-depth study of network security architecture. Students will examine both Internet security architectural models and web security protocols. Encryption, digital signatures, firewalls, proxy services, and virtual private networks (VPNs) will be covered. Additionally, students will examine cryptography protocols and standards.


Disaster Recovery
Course Number IT458
Credits 4.0

In this course, students learn the importance of recovery planning and the strategies for disaster recovery. This course covers the fundamental elements of disaster recovery planning, such as risk analysis, strategies for recovery and backup, plan maintenance, and testing.


Project Performance and Quality Assurance
Course Number MPM357
Credits 4.0

In this course, students will explore quality assurance concepts and principles within the total project quality management framework in manufacturing or service organizations. Students will also study benchmarking, the contractual aspects of quality, quality tools and techniques that utilize statistical process control, process improvement, yield management, quality issues of incoming material control and quality audits.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Concentration in Security degree program can help you build your credentials in the field of computer security. Along with knowledge essential to the field, it offers meaningful perspectives that you can apply to your own career objectives. The emphasis will be on analyzing security policies and evaluating risk assessment techniques. As you begin to understand security principles, concepts and techniques, you will have the opportunity to develop, implement and analyze disaster recovery plans.

Computer Security Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Computer Security Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
Brown University
Total Programs 135
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 9th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of California-San Diego
Total Programs 121
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 22nd
Tufts University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 24th
Pomona College
Total Programs 61
Number of Subjects 56
Rank in USA 25th
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Amherst College
Total Programs 50
Number of Subjects 46
Rank in USA 27th
Boston College
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 94
Rank in USA 29th
Emory University
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 30th