Online Computer Courses at Accredited Schools

American Intercontinental University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its computer courses to be successful computer programmers, computer engineers, software engineers, network engineers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 367,880 people employed as computer programmers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $74,690. Computer software engineers, applications make on average $90,170 per year and there are about 495,500 of them employed today.

Computer Organizations Computer Common Job Tasks
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Ranked by Excellence

Computer Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Bachelor's (BIT) - Computer Forensics
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Discovering Information Technology
Course Number ITCO 101
Credits 4.5

From entry-level technicians to computer scientists to chief information officers, there are limitless career possibilities in today's Information Technology. In this course, students may explore hands-on projects such as building websites, databases, and wireless networks, as well as installing computer components and investigating digital evidence and discuss future trends in information technology. This course also introduces the student to the various career elements of IT.


Introduction to Computer and Network Hardware
Course Number ITCO 103
Credits 4.5

This course provides the student with the experience and knowledge necessary to properly install, configure, upgrade, and troubleshoot microcomputers and basic network hardware. Included will be a discussion of desktop and portable systems, printers, input devices, and fundamental networking components.


Introduction to Operating Systems
Course Number ITCO 211
Credits 4.5

In this introduction to operating systems, students will be exposed to contemporary operating systems; examples may include Windows and Linux. Topics may include supporting the operating system, network considerations for operating systems, the desktop interface, manual and automatic package installation and update, virtualization, and basic maintenance.


Fundamentals of Programming and Logic
Course Number ITCO 221
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will be introduced to topics such as variables and scope, data types, control structures, and development environments. Students will create algorithms using basic problem solving techniques.


Introduction to Databases
Course Number ITCO 231
Credits 4.5

In This Course Students Will Review The Fundamental Concepts Of Database Systems, Leading To The Rationale For Today's Dominance Of The Relational Model. Students Will Learn How To Enter Data And Query Them Using Simple Database Applications Including Microsoft Access And Mysql. Additional Topics For This Course Include Design- By-normalization, Thoughtful Declaration Of Indices, The Functionality Of Odbc And Other Apis, And The Difference Between Transactional And Analytic Systems.


Introduction to Programming Using Alice
Course Number ITCO 222
Credits 4.5

In this course students will examine programming concepts and apply constructs such as control structures, arrays, functions, and procedures, using the Alice programming environment.


Network Infrastructure Basics
Course Number ITCO 251
Credits 4.5

This Course Provides Students With A Conceptual Overview Of Network Infrastructure. Topics May Include Network Configurations, Networking Hardware, Network Operating Systems, Segmentation Through Subnetting, And Network Management Issues. Network Communication Is Presented At The Conceptual Level Via Osi Reference Model, And Then At A Practical Level With Tcp/ip.


Comprehensive IT Project
Course Number ITCO 299
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will explore the integration of information technology skills and knowledge from areas of information technology such as computer hardware, networking, database systems, and programming with emphasis on the forensics aspect of digital information systems.


Relational Database Management Systems
Course Number ITCO 331
Credits 4.5

This course discusses the installation and configuration of an enterprise-level relational database management system. Students will learn how to configure the system for multiple users, grant access privileges, distribute the database over the filesystem, and ensure the integrity of the data content captured by the database.


Computer Networks
Course Number ITCO 351
Credits 4.5

In This Course, Students Will Review The Design And Components Of Lan And Wan Systems And Demonstrate The Ability To Implement And Deploy Network Topologies Using The Necessary Network Hardware And Software Systems. Topics In This Course Include Network Configurations, Networking Hardware, Network Operating Systems, Segmentation Through Subnetting, And Network Management Issues. Network Communication Is Presented At The Conceptual Level Via Osi Reference Model, And Then At A Practical Level With Tcp/ip.


Data Structures and Implementation
Course Number ITCO 321
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with an intermediate approach to organizing and storing data for efficient use by computers. The course builds on students' existing knowledge of mathematics and programming to illustrate the data structure abstractions and their manifestation in computer applications.


IT Project and Team Management
Course Number ITCO 311
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with the opportunity to experience project and team management in a realistic setting. Students form groups that undertake specific projects, while learning about group dynamics, communications, project scoping, resource allocations, and timeline planning.


Data Modeling and Design
Course Number ITCO 333
Credits 4.5

This course examines relational database concepts and implementation of database systems. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual modeling and in particular the entity- relationship diagram. Students will learn to distinguish between conceptual and physical schemas, appreciate the role of the 1-m relationship, and will be able to translate a conceptual schema into a full-fledged database.


Human/Computer Interfaces and Interactions
Course Number ITCO 391
Credits 4.5

The course examines human factors and performance vis- à-vis technology applications, components of technology, and methods and techniques used in design and evaluation of system and application interfaces.


Planning and Implementing a Network
Course Number ITCO 451
Credits 4.5

This advanced course brings together a variety of critical topics including network configuration, management, and monitoring through various tools. Students will advance their understanding of networks by learning how to use various management protocols and how to resolve critical (but predictable) problems in scalable network topologies.


Data Mining and Warehousing
Course Number ITCO 435
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will focus on the concepts, methods and skills for developing and mining data warehouses for the best competitive business strategy. It also develops analytical thinking to identify such appropriate business strategies. The course will focus on the programmatic interface between databases and analytical tools, the statistical foundation of datamining, dimensional modeling, and the extraction-transformation- loading staging of a data warehouse.


Program Capstone
Course Number ITCO 499
Credits 4.5

An internship or senior project that satisfies the concentration outcomes and meets the approval of the University Program Committee.


Advanced Digital Forensic Investigations
Course Number ITCF 473
Credits 4.5

During this course, students will examine digital investigation techniques for applications running for network operating systems.


Electronic Discovery
Course Number ITCF 475
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to provide students with the essential information related to electronic discovery. Discussions will focus on organizational electronic discovery needs and how digital investigators can fulfill those needs. Topics may include finding data collection, media restoration, file and email conversion, keyword and metadata searching, filtering, and classification and presentation of data.


Network Forensics
Course Number ITCF 477
Credits 4.5

This course covers the evaluation of policies, procedures, and tools for the collection, examination, analysis, and reporting a variety of network devices. Students will examine forensic techniques for collection, preservation, analysis, and reporting of digital network evidence. Topics may include cellular telephones, mobile computing platforms, network traffic analysis, electronic mail, and Internet investigations.


Global Forensics
Course Number ITCF 479
Credits 4.5

This course discusses advanced topics in digital forensics related to the interconnectedness and globalization of the discovery information space. International organization regulations, language barrier, rogue providers, and other topics will be covered in this course.


Program description: If you are seeking a BIT with a concentration in Computer Forensics completion degree online, AIU Online can help you with your education needs.

This BIT degree completion program features a concentration in Computer Forensics that allows students to focus their education on this fascinating and rapidly changing field of study, which combines technical skills and knowledge with an interest in the detection and prevention of computer crime.

Students who successfully complete the online BIT degree completion program with a concentration in Computer Forensics should be able to:

* Use operating systems and networking knowledge.
* Apply the principles of programming to develop applications and websites.
* Program for database connectivity.
* Define data modeling, data definition language, and data manipulation language.
* Define concepts of computer systems, hardware, programming languages, and databases.
* Research career opportunities in information technology.
* Identify issues and practices in information technology management.
* Collect electronic evidence without altering or damaging the original data.
* Analyze the legal considerations for investigating and prosecuting computer crimes to develop a forensic process that is defensible in court.
* Use information technology security tools and practices to plan for, detect, respond to, and recover from incidences that require network forensic activity.

Program Name: Bachelor's (BIT) - Networks (lower division concentration)
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Discovering Information Technology
Course Number ITCO 101
Credits 4.5

From entry-level technicians to computer scientists to chief information officers, there are limitless career possibilities in today's Information Technology. In this course, students may explore hands-on projects such as building websites, databases, and wireless networks, as well as installing computer components and investigating digital evidence and discuss future trends in information technology. This course also introduces the student to the various career elements of IT.


Introduction to Computer and Network Hardware
Course Number ITCO 103
Credits 4.5

This course provides the student with the experience and knowledge necessary to properly install, configure, upgrade, and troubleshoot microcomputers and basic network hardware. Included will be a discussion of desktop and portable systems, printers, input devices, and fundamental networking components.


Introduction to Operating Systems
Course Number ITCO 211
Credits 4.5

In this introduction to operating systems, students will be exposed to contemporary operating systems; examples may include Windows and Linux. Topics may include supporting the operating system, network considerations for operating systems, the desktop interface, manual and automatic package installation and update, virtualization, and basic maintenance.


Fundamentals of Programming and Logic
Course Number ITCO 221
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will be introduced to topics such as variables and scope, data types, control structures, and development environments. Students will create algorithms using basic problem solving techniques.


Introduction to Databases
Course Number ITCO 231
Credits 4.5

In This Course Students Will Review The Fundamental Concepts Of Database Systems, Leading To The Rationale For Today's Dominance Of The Relational Model. Students Will Learn How To Enter Data And Query Them Using Simple Database Applications Including Microsoft Access And Mysql. Additional Topics For This Course Include Design- By-normalization, Thoughtful Declaration Of Indices, The Functionality Of Odbc And Other Apis, And The Difference Between Transactional And Analytic Systems.


Introduction to Programming Using Alice
Course Number ITCO 222
Credits 4.5

In this course students will examine programming concepts and apply constructs such as control structures, arrays, functions, and procedures, using the Alice programming environment.


Network Infrastructure Basics
Course Number ITCO 251
Credits 4.5

This Course Provides Students With A Conceptual Overview Of Network Infrastructure. Topics May Include Network Configurations, Networking Hardware, Network Operating Systems, Segmentation Through Subnetting, And Network Management Issues. Network Communication Is Presented At The Conceptual Level Via Osi Reference Model, And Then At A Practical Level With Tcp/ip.


Comprehensive IT Project
Course Number ITCO 299
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will explore the integration of information technology skills and knowledge from areas of information technology such as computer hardware, networking, database systems, and programming with emphasis on the forensics aspect of digital information systems.


Relational Database Management Systems
Course Number ITCO 331
Credits 4.5

This course discusses the installation and configuration of an enterprise-level relational database management system. Students will learn how to configure the system for multiple users, grant access privileges, distribute the database over the filesystem, and ensure the integrity of the data content captured by the database.


Computer Networks
Course Number ITCO 351
Credits 4.5

In This Course, Students Will Review The Design And Components Of Lan And Wan Systems And Demonstrate The Ability To Implement And Deploy Network Topologies Using The Necessary Network Hardware And Software Systems. Topics In This Course Include Network Configurations, Networking Hardware, Network Operating Systems, Segmentation Through Subnetting, And Network Management Issues. Network Communication Is Presented At The Conceptual Level Via Osi Reference Model, And Then At A Practical Level With Tcp/ip.


Data Structures and Implementation
Course Number ITCO 321
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with an intermediate approach to organizing and storing data for efficient use by computers. The course builds on students' existing knowledge of mathematics and programming to illustrate the data structure abstractions and their manifestation in computer applications.


IT Project and Team Management
Course Number ITCO 311
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with the opportunity to experience project and team management in a realistic setting. Students form groups that undertake specific projects, while learning about group dynamics, communications, project scoping, resource allocations, and timeline planning.


Data Modeling and Design
Course Number ITCO 333
Credits 4.5

This course examines relational database concepts and implementation of database systems. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual modeling and in particular the entity- relationship diagram. Students will learn to distinguish between conceptual and physical schemas, appreciate the role of the 1-m relationship, and will be able to translate a conceptual schema into a full-fledged database.


Human/Computer Interfaces and Interactions
Course Number ITCO 391
Credits 4.5

The course examines human factors and performance vis- à-vis technology applications, components of technology, and methods and techniques used in design and evaluation of system and application interfaces.


Planning and Implementing a Network
Course Number ITCO 451
Credits 4.5

This advanced course brings together a variety of critical topics including network configuration, management, and monitoring through various tools. Students will advance their understanding of networks by learning how to use various management protocols and how to resolve critical (but predictable) problems in scalable network topologies.


Data Mining and Warehousing
Course Number ITCO 435
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will focus on the concepts, methods and skills for developing and mining data warehouses for the best competitive business strategy. It also develops analytical thinking to identify such appropriate business strategies. The course will focus on the programmatic interface between databases and analytical tools, the statistical foundation of datamining, dimensional modeling, and the extraction-transformation- loading staging of a data warehouse.


Program Capstone
Course Number ITCO 499
Credits 4.5

An internship or senior project that satisfies the concentration outcomes and meets the approval of the University Program Committee.


Server Infrastructure
Course Number ITNE 252
Credits 4.5

This Course Covers The Implementation Of Client/server Based Networks. Topics Include Tcp/ip Architecture, Configuring Dhcp, Dns Strategy And Its Application, Troubleshooting Methodologies, And Best Practices In Infrastructure Maintenance.


Specialized Server Administration
Course Number ITNE 253
Credits 4.5

This course covers enterprise Web server administration. Topics may include installing and configuring a Web server for intranet and internet access, with or without security layers, dynamic Web service technologies, Web server monitoring and troubleshooting, and best practices for Web server administration.


Introduction to Switching and Routing Principles and Practices
Course Number ITNE 255
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with an overview of how bridging and switching is achieved in a network infrastructure. Switch implementation is presented in the context of minimizing collision effects through domain segmentation. The course also provides students with a functional understanding of the routing process. It introduces the commands needed to configure, operate, and manage a network router locally and remotely. Topics may include switch configurations, switching hardware, switch operating systems, switch management issues, the implementation of Layer-3 segmentation and the use of routing tables.


Protocols and Transport in Networks
Course Number ITNE 256
Credits 4.5

This Course Provides Students With A Thorough And Broad Understanding Of Frame Relay, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (atm), And Multi-protocol Label Switching (mpls). Other Transport And Switching Methods May Also Be Discussed. Students Will Discuss The Advantages And Complexities Of Each Method, In Context With Industry Best-practices And Future Trends.


Program description: From mission-critical business systems to e-commerce
and the Internet, IT is not only an industry in its own right
but also a fundamental building block of all other
industries. American InterContinental University offers a
Bachelor’s degree program which is designed to equip
students with the technical and commercial understanding
to commence a successful career in a high-tech field or in
any organization which relies on IT. With a dynamic
curriculum focused on current technology trends and
applications, students can acquire not only high-quality
technical knowledge and hands-on abilities, but also key
career skills in areas which include leadership, behavioral
understanding, implementation of change and project
management. We can also provide students with the
industry insights, contacts and work experience to make
an early impact in their career.

Computer Courses at Everest University

Program Name: Computer Information Science (Associate's)
Project Development
Course Number CEN 1056C
Credits 2.0

Computer Networking Fundamentals
Course Number CEN 1509C
Credits 4.0

Computer Operating Systems
Course Number CGS 1763C
Credits 4.0

Computer Hardware Concepts
Course Number CGS 1280C
Credits 4.0

Programming Concepts
Course Number COP 2010C
Credits 4.0

Fundamental Programming Techniques
Course Number CGS 2461C
Credits 4.0

Introduction to the Systems Development Life Cycle
Course Number CIS 2325
Credits 4.0

Computer Programming – Visual Basic I
Course Number COP 2170C

Computer Programming – Visual Basic II
Course Number COP 2171C

Computer Programming – C++ I
Course Number COP 2224C

Computer Programming – C++ II
Course Number COP 2228C

Programming Languages – Java I
Course Number COP 2250C

Programming Languages– Java II
Course Number COP 2805C

Database Concepts I
Course Number CIS 3345

Structured Query Language
Course Number COP 3764C
Credits 4.0

Database Application Development
Course Number COP 4724C
Credits 4.0

Designing Secure Software
Course Number CIS 3615
Credits 4.0

Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS 3303C
Credits 4.0

Survey of Operating Systems
Course Number CGS 4763
Credits 4.0

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Let’s Talk Business
Course Number MAN 2031
Credits 2.0

Principles of Accounting II
Course Number APA 2121
Credits 4.0

Applied Business Law
Course Number BUL 2131
Credits 4.0

Program description: The Bachelor of Science degree offers graduates special training in the analysis, design, implementation, maintenance, and use of
computer information systems and database systems. The program focuses on the concepts, principles, goals, functions, and
management of information-driven organizations, stressing the development of computer-based applications through the use of
programming languages. To ensure graduation with the minimum number of courses, students should choose the CIS Programming
concentration for their lower division studies.

Program Name: Computer Information Science (Bachelor's)
Senior Project: Systems Implementation and Integration
Course Number CIS 4328C
Credits 4.0

Principles of Sociology
Course Number SYG 2000
Credits 4.0

Global Politics
Course Number CPO 4004
Credits 4.0

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Project Development
Course Number CEN 1056C
Credits 2.0

Let’s Talk Business
Course Number MAN 2031
Credits 2.0

Principles of Accounting I
Course Number APA 2111
Credits 4.0

Principles of Accounting II
Course Number APA 2121
Credits 4.0

Applied Business Law
Course Number BUL 2131
Credits 4.0

Computer Networking Fundamentals
Course Number CEN 1509C
Credits 4.0

Computer Operating Systems
Course Number CGS 1763C
Credits 4.0

Computer Hardware Concepts
Course Number CGS 1280C
Credits 4.0

Programming Concepts
Course Number COP 2010C
Credits 4.0

Fundamental Programming Techniques
Course Number CGS 2461C
Credits 4.0

Introduction to the Systems Development Life Cycle
Course Number CIS 2325
Credits 4.0

Computer Programming – Visual Basic I
Course Number COP 2170C

Computer Programming – Visual Basic II
Course Number COP 2171C

Computer Programming – C++ I
Course Number COP 2224C

Computer Programming – C++ II
Course Number COP 2228C

Programming Languages – Java I
Course Number COP 2250C

Programming Languages– Java II
Course Number COP 2805C

Database Concepts I
Course Number CIS 3345

Structured Query Language
Course Number COP 3764C
Credits 4.0

Designing Secure Software
Course Number CIS 3615
Credits 4.0

Survey of Operating Systems
Course Number CGS 4763
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Program description: Do you like the idea of working with computers? Does developing and managing business computer applications, management information systems, databases, and computer networks interest you? As technology advances, the need for competent computer professionals will also increase. The Computer Information Systems program will equip you with the valuable skills to complete essential operating and programming tasks.

The comprehensive computer courses are built around real-world experience, with classes providing current and relevant instruction on computer applications. The curriculum is designed to enhance job skills and improve opportunities for career advancement.

The Computer Information Science program includes instruction on the following:
• Principles of accounting
• Computer applications
• Database concepts and applications
• Spreadsheets
• Microcomputer operating systems
• Systems administration
• Desktop publishing
• Computer programming

You will learn skills that enable you to oversee the operation of computer hardware systems, including mainframes, minicomputers, or networks of personal computers. You will also be educated to anticipate problems and take preventive action, as well as solve problems that occur during operations.

Opportunities will be best for graduates with a formal computer-related education, a familiarity with a variety of operating systems, and up-to-date knowledge of the latest technology. The areas of network operation, user support and database management provide excellent prospects for employment.

Some career opportunities include:
• Computer operator
• Computer programmer
• Network administrator

The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Science also offers graduates special training in the development, analysis, and design of computer information systems and database management systems. The program focuses on concepts, principles, goals, functions, and management of information driven business organizations, stressing the development of business applications through the use of computer languages.
Advanced courses in programming languages provide students with better insight into computer programming. Employment in this field is expected to grow much faster than average in the next several years.

Computer Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Associate in Electronics and Computer Technology
Technical Communication
Course Number ENGL-206
Credits 3.0

Students in this course apply writing skills to common business and technical correspondence such as memos, letters and brief reports. They also adapt written materials for oral presentation and explore the research process. The highlight of the course is a brief research project presented in both written and oral forms. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Basic Algebra
Course Number MATH-102
Credits 4.0

This Course First Addresses Polynomials, Then Moves To Factoring Skills And Applying Technology To Solve Various Types Of Mathematical Problems. Coursework Also Introduces Graphing, Number Bases And Elementary Statistical Techniques. Students Apply Their Skills To A Variety Of Application Problems. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results Or Successful Completion Of Math-032. / 4-4 Note: Students In Selected Programs Take Basic Algebra Under This Course Number For Graduation Credit. In Other Programs The Course Is Taken As A Prerequisite Skills Course, Math-092, And Does Not Carry Graduation Credit.


Applied Physics with Lab
Course Number PHYS-204
Credits 4.0

In Addition To Providing A Foundation In Mechanisms, This Course Introduces Physics Concepts Needed To Support Advanced Coursework In Electronics. Topics Include Force And Motion, Energy And Energy Conversion, Magnetism, Heat And Light. Use Of Transducers For Performing Physical Measurements Associated With These Concepts Is Also Incorporated. Students Measure Physical Parameters And Apply Concepts Through Lab Assignments. Prerequisites: Ect-125 And Math-102


Electronic Systems I with Lab
Course Number ECT-122
Credits 4.0

This course introduces basic electricity and electrical circuit concepts. Topics include calculation of current, voltage, resistance and power in series, parallel and combination circuits. Lab exercises develop skills in areas such as reading schematic diagrams, using electronics components to fabricate basic circuits, measuring circuit parameters and troubleshooting. Students operate lab equipment and learn basic lab safety. Corequisite: MATH-102


Electronic Systems II with Lab
Course Number ECT-125
Credits 4.0

The Nature Of Alternating Current Is Explored Through Study Of Reactance, Transformers, Resonant Circuits And Passive Filters. Mathematical Concepts Such As Logarithms And Trigonometry Are Studied And Applied For Analyzing Ac Circuits. In Addition, Students Use Computer Simulation To Predict Circuit Behavior And Develop Proficiency In Using Lab Equipment Such As Oscilloscopes, Function Generators, Counters And Multimeters To Enhance Their Troubleshooting Skills. Prerequisites: Ect-122 And Math-102


Electronic Systems III with Lab
Course Number ECT-246
Credits 4.0

Building on previous coursework, this course introduces solid-state devices such as diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers, as well as their use in signal processing applications such as amplification and filtering. Adders/subtractors, comparators and oscillators are included. Students gain proficiency in working with integrated circuits, and in building and troubleshooting power supplies and operational amplifier applications, while increasing their expertise in using circuit simulators and standard lab equipment. Prerequisite: ECT-125


Achievement Assessment
Course Number ECT-253
Credits 1.0

Exercises In This Course Help Assess Students’ Knowledge And Reinforce Core Principles And Technologies Addressed In Early Terms Of The Electronics & Computer Technology Program. Topics Include Analog Circuits, Digital Systems, Devices, Information Technology, And Basic Science And Mathematical Concepts And Principles. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned. Prerequisites: Ect-114, Ect-246, Netw-202 And Phys-204


Applied Project Lab
Course Number ECT-295L
Credits 1.0

Students Select A Pre-designed Solution From A Given List Of Realworld Engineering Problems For Implementation And Evaluation. A Written Report And An Oral Presentation Are Required. Prerequisites: Ect-253 And Ect-284


PC Hardware and Software with Lab
Course Number COMP-129
Credits 3.0

This course explores the PC system from software, hardware and operating system points of view. Hardware topics include system boards, processors, memory, power supplies, input/output (I/O) ports, internal adapters, printers and basic networking devices. Software topics include client/server operating systems and installation, as well as licensing software applications.


Programming Concepts with Lab
Course Number ECT-108
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes students with programming logic, including basic control structures, modularization and systems programming. Using high-level languages such as flowchart-based languages, students apply programming concepts to technical problems in practical situations. Prerequisite: COMP-129


Digital Fundamentals with Lab
Course Number ECT-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basic Digital Logic And Methods Used In Troubleshooting Digital Systems. Operation Of Basic Logic Gates, Boolean Expressions And Combination Logic In Fixed-function And Programmable Forms Is Explained. Through In-class Activities, Students Create, Simulate And Download Digital Circuit Configurations To Complex Programmable Logic Devices (cplds) Using Cpld-based Software. Prerequisite: Ect-108


Communications Systems with Lab
Course Number ECT-263
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Basic Communications Systems At The Circuit And Subsystem Levels. Topics Include Signal Analysis And Troubleshooting For Analog And Digital Communications Systems. The Effects Of Noise Are Presented. Through Lab Exercises, Students Analyze Signals And Troubleshoot Communications Systems’ Performance. Electronic Design Automation (eda) Software Is Used To Predict System Performance. Prerequisite: Ect-246


Automation and Control Systems with Lab
Course Number ECT-284
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Process Controls And Automation That Employ Programmable Logic Controllers (plcs). Applications Include Selecting Hardware, Such As Processor Architecture; Input/output (i/o) Module Wiring; Programming; Installing Controllers And System Troubleshooting. Proportional Integral Derivative (pid) Principles, Software Implementation Of Pid Controls And Tuning For Optimizing Automation Applications Are Explored. Plant Floor Communication Architectures Such As Ethernet, Data Highway And Devicenet Are Also Included. Lab Exercises Provide Experience With Various Controllers And Interfaces. Prerequisites: Ect-246 And Phys-204


Introduction to Networking with Lab
Course Number NETW-202
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Underlying Technology Of Local Area Networks (lans), Wide Area Networks (wans) And The Internet. Topics Include Networking Media, The Open System Interconnection (osi) Model, Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip), An Overview Of Routing And Switching, And Small Network Configuration And Troubleshooting. Students Prepare And Test Cabling And Become Familiar With Protocol Analyzers.


Introduction to Routing with Lab
Course Number NETW-204
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Router Configuration, Maintenance And Troubleshooting; Routing Protocols; And Use Of Access Control Lists (acls) As A Traffic Management Tool. Students Gain Commandline- Interface (cli) Knowledge And Configure Local And Wide Area Networks With Routers. In Addition, Students Apply The Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip) Suite Of Commands And Acls To Real Networks Under Troubleshooting And Traffic Management Scenarios. Prerequisite: Netw-202



Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Program description: As the electronic systems and equipment that power our
personal and professional lives become more pervasive
and integral to our existence, expertise of electronics and
computer technologists is increasingly vital. To this end,
DeVry based its Electronics & Computer Technology program on fundamentals of the technology driving today’s
systems, including telecommunications, networks, wireless, computers, controls and instrumentation. Graduates
have a broad knowledge base that qualifies them for challenging career-entry positions in the dynamic electronics
and computer fields.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Engineering Technology
Signal Processing with Lab
Course Number ECET-350
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Analog Signal Processing (asp) And Digital Signal Processing (dsp), With Emphasis On Dsp. Students Program Asp And Dsp Chips For Applications In Communications,control Systems, Digital Audio Processing And Digital Image Processing. They Also Use Computer Software To Simulate Asp And Dsp Circuit Performance, And To Analyze Data Acquired In The Lab.


Data Communications and Networking with Lab
Course Number ECET-375
Credits 4.0

This course introduces principles of data communications,including noise effects, multiplexing and transmission methods.Coursework also covers protocols, architecture, and performance analysis of local and wide area networks.Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-360
Credits 4.0

This course introduces basic operating system concepts such as process states and synchronization, multiprocessing, multiprogramming,processor scheduling, resource management, static and dynamic relocation, virtual memory, logical and physical input/output, device allocation, disk scheduling and file management.Also introduced are techniques required to develop device drivers. Computer software is used throughout the course.Prerequisite: ECET-370 / 5-4


Data Structures and Algorithms with Lab
Course Number ECET-370
Credits 4.0

This course introduces data structures (lists, strings, stacks,queues, trees), data encapsulation, as well as algorithms for recursion, sorting and searching. A high-level language such as C++ or Java is used. Prerequisite: COMP-328 / 5-4


Database System Design with Lab
Course Number ECET-450
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Structured Query Language (sql) For Implementing And Accessing A Relational Database. Also Covered Is How To Embed Sql Into A High-level Language Such As C++ Or Java. Prerequisites: Ecet-305 And Ecet-370 / 5-4


Structured Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-122
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Structured Design And Programming Techniques,as Well As Common Tools To Write, Compile, Run And Debug Programs Written In A High-level Programming Language To Solve A Variety Of Engineering Problems. Corequisite: Math-190; Prerequisite:ecet-100 / 5-4


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-220
Credits 4.0

This course introduces concepts of object-oriented programming,such as objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance, which are used to solve problems related to electronics and computer engineering technology using a high level language such as C++. Prerequisite: COMP-122 / 5-4


Programming Environments and Java with Lab
Course Number COMP-328
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Alternate Programming Environments Such As Command-line-oriented Unix Or Linux And Eclipse Ide. Also Introduced Are The Java Programming Language And Advanced Programming Concepts Such As Exception Handling And The Event-driven Model For Graphical User Interfaces. Prerequisite: Comp-220 / 4-3


Product Development
Course Number ECET-390
Credits 2.0

This course examines the product development cycle from initial concept through manufacturing. Coursework addresses project management, total quality management, codes and standards,prototype development, reliability, software engineering and product testing. Each student team prepares a written proposal for a senior project and makes an oral presentation of the proposal to the class. The approved proposal forms the basis for the capstone project, which is developed and completed in the subsequent series of lab courses. Prerequisite: ECET-330 / 3-2


Senior Project Development Lab I
Course Number ECET-492L
Credits 1.0

Working In Teams, Students In This First Course In A Three-course Sequence Initiate Development Of The Senior Project Approved In Ecet-390. Teams Submit Written Progress Reports And Make Oral Presentations Describing The Project To The Class. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisite: Ecet-390 / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab II
Course Number ECET-493L
Credits 1.0

This course, the second in a three-course sequence, requires student teams to complete prototype development of their senior project. Teams submit written progress reports and make oral presentations describing project progress. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-492L / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab III
Course Number ECET-494L
Credits 1.0

In this final course of the three-course project development lab sequence, student teams complete development of the senior project. Teams submit written progress reports, make oral presentations describing project progress, and provide concluding written and oral presentations. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-493L / 2-1


Technology Integration I
Course Number ECET-299
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Four Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned.prerequisite: Completion Of At Least 40 Credit Hours In Required Comp, Ecet And Math Courses,including Comp-328, Ecet-220,ecet-230 And Math-270 / 2-1


Technology Integration II - CET
Course Number ECET-498
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, Physics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Seven Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned. Prerequisite:completion Of At Least 86 Credit Hours In Required Comp,ecet, Math And Phys Courses / 1-1


Real-Time Operating System Design with Lab
Course Number ECET-420
Credits 4.0

This course introduces characteristics of operating systems required to support embedded microprocessor systems and how these systems differ from conventional operating systems.Coursework covers “hard” and “soft” real-time operating systems and includes topics such as threads, scheduling, priority and inter-process communication. Students use computer software such as assemblers and compilers in the course. Prerequisite:ECET-365 / 5-4


Pre-Calculus
Course Number MATH-190
Credits 4.0

This Course Emphasizes Topics That Form The Foundation For Study Of Electronics, Engineering Technology, Game And Simulation Programming, And Calculus. Topics Include Analyzing And Graphing Quadratic, Polynomial, Rational, Exponential,logarithmic And Trigonometric Functions; And Developing Complex Solutions To Problems In Rectangular, Trigonometric And Euler Form. Students Use Computer Software And Technology To Assist In Problem Solving And Analysis. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-104 Or Math-114. / 4-4


College Physics I with Lab
Course Number PHYS-310
Credits 4.0

This calculus-based course emphasizes fundamental laws of mechanics – the basis of most electronic control systems.Students use computer software packages to simulate system performance and analyze data acquired through lab exercises.Prerequisite: MATH-260 / 5-4


Electronic Circuits and Devices I with Lab
Course Number ECET-110
Credits 4.0

This Course, The First In A Three-course Sequence, Introduces Concepts Of Electrical Circuit Analysis, And Electronic Circuit Analysis And Design. The Sequence Integrates Study Of Both Passive Electrical Circuits (resistors, Capacitors And Inductors) And Active Electronic Circuits (diodes, Transistors And Analog Integrated Circuits Such As Operational Amplifiers). Lab Exercises Provide Experience With Passive And Active Electronic Components,and Their Design, Integration, Testing And Troubleshooting In Practical Circuits Of Moderate Complexity. Corequisite:math-190; Prerequisite: Ecet-100 / 5-4


Introduction to Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology with Lab
Course Number ECET-100
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basic Concepts Of The Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Field, Including Electronic Components, Introductory Circuit Analysis, Digital Logic, Computer Usage And Design Of Microcontroller-based Electronic Systems, And Emphasizes Hardware And Software Development.corequisite: Math-104 Or Placement Into Math-190 / 5-4


Digital Circuits and Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-230
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Design And Analysis Of Digital Circuits –bases For All Computer Systems And Virtually All Other Electronic Systems In Use Today. Topics Include Combinational And Sequential Logic, Digital Integrated Circuit Electrical Characteristics, Programmable Logic Devices And Hardware Description Languages.students Use Development And Analysis Software And Instrumentation For Circuit Verification. Corequisite: Ecet-220; Prerequisites:comp-122, Ecet-100 And Ecet-210 / 5-4


Microprocessor Architecture with Lab
Course Number ECET-330
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Internal Architecture Of The Microprocessor– The Basic Building Block Of Current Electronic Systems.students Use Assembly Language And/or High-level Language To Program The Microprocessor And Develop Simple Algorithms.applications Of The Microprocessor As A Computing Element Used With Storage Devices And Embedded Controllers Are Covered.computer Software Tools Such As Assemblers, Compilers And Ides Are Used For Program Design, Implementation And Testing.prerequisites: Comp-328 And Ecet-230 / 5-4


Embedded Microprocessor Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-365
Credits 4.0

Students in this course use an embedded microcomputer to control electrical and/or mechanical systems. Students design and develop various applications involving data acquisition and control. System development and engineering trade offs are emphasized to demonstrate best design practices. Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Program description: Computer Engineering Technology program graduates are
prepared to join the work force as technical professionals
in a variety of industries, including information technology.
CET graduates take an applications-oriented approach to
designing and implementing software, interfaces that link
computers to other physical systems, and computer systems
or other digital subsystems. They design software systems;
create code and protocols; test and evaluate hardware and
software products and processes; and diagnose and solve
problems. Graduates should also possess appropriate
knowledge, experience and skills to function effectively
in multidisciplinary teams, adapt to changes in technical
environments throughout their careers and progress in their
professional responsibilities.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Business/Management
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them. Prerequisite: CIS-170A or the equivalent / 4-3


MAFM elective course

Choose one from the courses in the Keller academic catalog for which you meet the prerequisite(s).


Information Systems Security Planning and Audit
Course Number SEC-440
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth look at risk factor analysis that must be performed in order to design a flexible and comprehensive security plan. Topics include assessing threats, developing countermeasures, protecting information and security designs processes. Auditing practices used to verify compliance with policies and procedures, as well as for building a case for presentation in private and public settings, are also covered.


Business Continuity
Course Number SEC-340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on preparing for, reacting to and recovering from events that threaten the security of information and information resources, or that threaten to disrupt critical business functions. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s information assets and critical business functions, as well as develop policies, procedures and plans to address them. Technology specific to thwarting disruption and to supporting recovery is also covered.


Data Privacy and Security
Course Number SEC-360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on legal, ethical and security issues involving data and information assets organizations must address to ensure operational continuity as well as compliance with standards, policies and laws. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s data and develop standards, policies, procedures and plans to combat them. Security technology specific to safeguarding data and information assets is also covered.


Web Security
Course Number SEC-370
Credits 4.0

This course examines issues involved in protecting web-based applications from external threats while safeguarding customer privacy and accessibility. Students examine external threats to an organization’s systems and develop strategies that support systems and business goals.


Advanced Topics in Enterprise Analysis
Course Number SAI-440
Credits 4.0

Students in this course explore enterprise analysis tools and methodologies; capacity planning as related to information systems; enterprise architecture; and risk analysis and management. Prerequisite: CIS-339 / 4-4


Organizational Process Analysis
Course Number SAI-460
Credits 4.0

This course addresses analytical techniques used to model process flow. Process rules and process maturity are explored in the context of characterizing workflow effectiveness and identifying opportunities for process improvement. Also covered are systematic approaches for comparing existing processes to process change solutions, documenting requirements for resource proposals and change management competencies critical for successful implementation. Prerequisite: CIS-321 / 4-4


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential
roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing
hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.
The program offers tracks as shown in the following program
outline, as well as a flex option, which students may take in lieu
of a specific track. Students who have not chosen an area of
specialization may begin the program in “Undeclared” status;
however, they must select a track or the flex option by the time
they have earned 60 semester-credit hours toward their degree.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Computer Forensics
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Digital Crime: Evidence and Procedure
Course Number CCSI-330
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic legal concepts and evidentiary procedures for investigating criminal activity involving computers and computer-based systems. Students explore practical application of law and legal procedures in the digital age.


Computer Ethics
Course Number CCSI-360
Credits 3.0

This course explores the nature and social impact of computer technology, as well as the corresponding formulation and justification of governmental and organizational policies for ethical uses of such technology. Addressed are legal, ethical and sociological concerns about the ubiquity of computer software and hardware, as well as concerns about the proliferation and pervasive nature of computer networks


Digital Forensics I with Lab
Course Number CCSI-410
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the study of forensics by outlining integrative aspects of the discipline with those of other sciences. Coursework focuses on applying basic forensic techniques used to investigate illegal and unethical activity within a PC or local area network (LAN) environment and then resolving related issues.


Digital Forensics II with Lab
Course Number CCSI-460
Credits 5.0

This course builds on forensic computer techniques introduced in CCSI-410, focusing on advanced investigative techniques to track leads over local and wide area networks, including international computer crime.


Information Systems Security Planning and Audit
Course Number SEC-440
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth look at risk factor analysis that must be performed in order to design a flexible and comprehensive security plan. Topics include assessing threats, developing countermeasures, protecting information and security designs processes. Auditing practices used to verify compliance with policies and procedures, as well as for building a case for presentation in private and public settings, are also covered.


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Database Management
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Advanced Database with Lab
Course Number DBM-405A
Credits 16.0

This Course Introduces Database Implications Of Efficient And Effective Transaction Processing, Including Error Handling, Data Validation, Security, Stored Procedures And Triggers, Record Locking, Commit And Rollback. Data Mining And Warehousing Are Also Explored. Oracle Is The Primary Relational Database Management System (rdbms) Used. Prerequisite: Cis-336 / 5-4


Database Administration with Lab
Course Number DBM-438
Credits 16.0

Students Are Introduced To A Variety Of Database Administration Topics, Including Capacity Planning, Database Management System (dbms) Architecture, Performance Tuning, Backup, Recovery And Disaster Planning, Archiving, Reorganization And Defragmentation. Prerequisite: Dbm-405a / 5-4


Advanced Topics in Database with Lab
Course Number DBM-449
Credits 16.0

Students In This Course Explore Database Topics Such As Dynamic Structured Query Language (sql), Complex Queries, Data Warehousing, Reporting Capability Creation, Performance Tuning, And Data Security Practices And Technologies. Prerequisite: Dbm-438 / 5-4


Program description: Computer information systems specialists and management professionals design, build, and implement software solutions that are the driving force in every business, not-for-profit, and government agency. They're also relied upon to analyze existing systems and discover new ways to optimize their performance. So, it's no surprise that significant job growth is expected in computing fields over the next several years. When you earn your bachelor's degree in Computer Information Systems (CIS) from DeVry University, choosing from nine career-specific specializations, you'll gain skills and knowledge that can be applied in nearly every industry.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Information Systems Security
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Business Continuity
Course Number SEC-340
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on preparing for, reacting to and recovering from events that threaten the security of information and information resources, or that threaten to disrupt critical business functions. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s information assets and critical business functions, as well as develop policies, procedures and plans to address them. Technology specific to thwarting disruption and to supporting recovery is also covered.


Data Privacy and Security
Course Number SEC-360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on legal, ethical and security issues involving data and information assets organizations must address to ensure operational continuity as well as compliance with standards, policies and laws. Students examine various levels of threats to an organization’s data and develop standards, policies, procedures and plans to combat them. Security technology specific to safeguarding data and information assets is also covered.


Web Security
Course Number SEC-370
Credits 4.0

This course examines issues involved in protecting web-based applications from external threats while safeguarding customer privacy and accessibility. Students examine external threats to an organization’s systems and develop strategies that support systems and business goals.


Information Systems Security Planning and Audit
Course Number SEC-440
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth look at risk factor analysis that must be performed in order to design a flexible and comprehensive security plan. Topics include assessing threats, developing countermeasures, protecting information and security designs processes. Auditing practices used to verify compliance with policies and procedures, as well as for building a case for presentation in private and public settings, are also covered.


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Systems Analysis and Integration
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


System Integration with Lab
Course Number SAI-430
Credits 5.0

This Course Integrates Previous Coursework In Information Systems Analysis And Design, Database Management, Transaction Processing And Application Development. Through A Business Case Involving Several Functional Areas, Students Examine Relationships Among Information Systems Supporting Each Area, And Explore Organizational And Technical Issues That Arise When Business Needs Require Separate Systems To Work Together. Prerequisite: Cis-355a Or Cis-355b / 5-4


Advanced Topics in Enterprise Analysis
Course Number SAI-440
Credits 4.0

Students in this course explore enterprise analysis tools and methodologies; capacity planning as related to information systems; enterprise architecture; and risk analysis and management. Prerequisite: CIS-339 / 4-4


Organizational Process Analysis
Course Number SAI-460
Credits 4.0

This course addresses analytical techniques used to model process flow. Process rules and process maturity are explored in the context of characterizing workflow effectiveness and identifying opportunities for process improvement. Also covered are systematic approaches for comparing existing processes to process change solutions, documenting requirements for resource proposals and change management competencies critical for successful implementation. Prerequisite: CIS-321 / 4-4


Program description: Computer Information Systems program graduates are prepared
to successfully join the work force as technical and management
professionals in a variety of industries. CIS graduates play essential roles on the business team, typically designing and implementing hardware and software solutions to business problems. They
are also expected to possess knowledge, experience and skills
that will enable them to adapt to change in this dynamic field
through a lifelong learning process.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Information Systems - Web Development and Administration
Logic and Design
Course Number CIS-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basics of programming logic, as well as algorithm design and development, including constants, variables, expressions, arrays, files and control structures for sequential, iterative and decision processing. Students learn to design and document program specifications using tools such as flowcharts, structure charts and pseudocode. Program specification validation through desk-checking and walk-throughs is also covered. / 3-3


Architecture and Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number CIS-206
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Operating System Concepts By Examining Various Operating Systems Such As Windows, Unix And Linux. Students Also Study Typical Desktop System Hardware, Architecture And Configuration. Prerequisite: Comp-100 / 5-4


Connectivity with Lab
Course Number CIS-246
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Fundamentals Of Data Communication And Computer Networking, Including The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Network Architecture And Configurations Such As Local Area Networks (lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans) Are Addressed. Prerequisite: Cis-206 Or Gsp-130 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092.


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience.


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on systems of linear equations; radical and rational expressions; and functions where linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions are emphasized using application problems and modeling. The minimum requirement to pass this course is 80 percent, and grades of C and D are not assigned.


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 5.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered.


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized.


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies.


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools


Principles of Information Systems Security
Course Number SEC-280
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of information systems security in organizations. Topics include security concepts and mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; intrusion detection and prevention; information systems assurance; and anonymity and privacy. Various types of controls used in information systems, as well as security issues surrounding the computer and computergenerated data, are also addressed.


Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-170A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces basics of coding programs from program specifications, including use of an integrated development environment (IDE), language syntax, as well as debugger tools and techniques. Students also learn to develop programs that manipulate simple data structures such as arrays, as well as different types of files. Visual Basic.Net is the primary programming language used.


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-247A
Credits 5.0

This course introduces object-oriented programming concepts including objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance. Using an object-oriented programming language, students design, code, test and document business-oriented programs. C#.Net is the primary programming language used


Business Application Programming with Lab
Course Number CIS-355A
Credits 5.0

Building on analysis, programming and database skills developed in previous courses, this course introduces fundamental principles and concepts of developing programs that support typical business processing activities and needs such as transaction processing and report generation. Students develop business-oriented programs that deal with error handling, data validation and file handling. Java is the primary programming language used.


Web Interface Design with Lab
Course Number CIS-363A
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Web Design And Basic Programming Techniques For Developing Effective And Useful Websites. Coursework Emphasizes Website Structure And Navigational Models, Practical And Legal Usability Considerations, And Performance Factors Related To Using Various Types Of Media And Tools Such As Hypertext Markup Language (html), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Dynamic Html (dhtml) And Scripting. Dreamweaver And Flash Are The Primary Software Tools Used.


Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number CIS-407A
Credits 5.0

This course builds on analysis, interface design and programming skills learned in previous courses and introduces basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. A programming language such as Visual Basic.Net, C++.Net or C#.Net is used to implement web-based applications. ASP.Net is the primary software tool use


Structured Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-321
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the systems analysis and design process using information systems methodologies and techniques to analyze business activities and solve problems. Students learn to identify, define and document business problems and then develop information system models to solve them.


Introduction to Database with Lab
Course Number CIS-336
Credits 5.0

This Course Introduces Concepts And Methods Fundamental To Database Development And Use Including Data Analysis And Modeling, As Well As Structured Query Language (sql). Students Also Explore Basic Functions And Features Of A Database Management System (dbms), With Emphasis On The Relational Model


Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS-339
Credits 4.0

Building On The Foundation Established In Cis-321, Students Explore Techniques, Tools And Methods Used In The Objectoriented Approach To Developing Applications. Students Learn How To Model And Design System Requirements Using Tools Such As Unified Modeling Language (uml), Use Cases And Scenarios, Class Diagrams And Sequence Diagrams.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project
Course Number CIS-470
Credits 3.0

Working in teams, students apply knowledge and mastered skills, including problem-solving techniques and project-management methods, to an applications-oriented project. The project provides real-world experience by integrating systems analysis, programming, testing, debugging, documentation and user interfacing techniques. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project I
Course Number CIS-474
Credits 2.0

Working in teams, students in this course, the first in a two-course sequence, apply problem-solving techniques, application design methodology and project planning/management methods to a real-world applications-oriented project. Integrating analysis and design skills, students develop requirements and design specifications to meet business needs. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Computer Information Systems Senior Project II
Course Number CIS-477
Credits 2.0

In this course, a continuation of CIS-474, students work in teams to apply application development techniques and project management methods to an applications-oriented project. Integrating development, testing, implementation and documentation skills, students deliver a product that meets approved specifications. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Principles of E-Commerce
Course Number WEB-320
Credits 4.0

This course provides comprehensive coverage of a broad spectrum of e-commerce principles, models and practices. Topics include Internet marketing and retailing; payment and order fulfillment; and various e-commerce models such as businessto- business (B2B) and consumer-to-consumer (C2C).


Web Architecture with Lab
Course Number WEB-375
Credits 5.0

Building On Networking Concepts And Principles Explored In Cis-246, This Course Introduces Students To Web Architecture And Connectivity. Topics Include Internet Protocols Such As Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip); Domain Name Server (dns); Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (smtp), Hypertext Transfer Protocol (http) And File Transfer Protocol (ftp); And Design Of An Internet Or Corporate Intranet Infrastructure To Meet Specific Needs.


Advanced Web Application Development with Lab
Course Number WEB-460
Credits 5.0

This course builds on basics of design, coding and scripting, as well as database connectivity for web-based applications. Coursework introduces concepts of data interchange, message exchange and web application components. A programming language such as Java, C++.Net or Visual Basic.Net is used to implement business-related web-based applications.


Program description: The CIS program is designed to produce graduates who are
able to:
• Analyze, design and implement solutions to business problems.
• Create and test computer information systems solutions
for business problems.
• Demonstrate project management skills.
• Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
• Apply information literacy and problem-solving skills that
support lifelong personal and professional development.
DeVry accomplishes these goals by:
• Providing a sound foundation in structured, event-driven,
object-oriented and web programming, as well as systems
analysis and design, database design and management,
and networking across multiple platforms.
• Incorporating a strong applications-oriented component with
each technical course, which reinforces learning of fundamental
concepts, principles and theory through use of computer hardware and software for problem-solving.
• Integrating general competencies such as applied research,
written and oral communication, critical thinking, problemsolving and team skills in technical and nontechnical courses.

Computer Courses at Ivy Bridge College of Tiffin University

Program Name: Associate of Business Administration in Computer and Information Technology
Operating Systems
Course Number CIT155

Provides extensive hands-on exposure to Windows and non-MS Windows environments. Topics include interface design, disk and memory management, system configurations, multitasking, data sharing, and the network environment. Multiplatform operating systems is also introduced. Prerequisite: CIT105/111/205.


Programming
Course Number CIT201

Introduces structured programming using a programming language such as Visual Basic. Students learn to design and develop Windows-based applications that are event-driven (point and click). Record structures are developed along with file storage and manipulation techniques. The course exposes students to the object-oriented programming environment. Prerequisite: CIT105.


Systems Analysis & Design
Course Number CIT212

Covers The Systems Development Life Cycle (sdlc) Using A Case Study-based Approach. All Phases Of Analysis, Design, And Implementation Are Covered Using The Top-down Approach. Case Tools Are Used As A Resource. Prerequisite: Cit155.


Internet & Web Development I
Course Number CIT255

Topics Covered Include The Internet And Its Parts Such As The World Wide Web And Web-site Development. Students Learn To Create Web Sites Using The Current Tools Such As Frontpage, Languages Such As Html And Java For The Internet, Intranets And Extranets. This Is A Writing Intensive Course. Prerequisite: Cit105.


Computer Architecture & Diagnostics
Course Number CIT320

Enables students to identify, configure, and upgrade various components of computer systems, peripherals, and software. The subsystems examined include memory, disk drives, video, I/O ports, and power supplies. Peripherals examined include printers, modems and various I/O devices. Students learn preventative maintenance and troubleshooting techniques. This course covers semiconductor theory and devices. Operation of devices such as diodes, transistors, and operation amplifiers are also examined. The lab work includes the application of semiconductor devices in practical circuits such as power supplies, voltage regulators, and amplifiers, etc. Prerequisites: CIT105, 111 or 205.


Applied Statistics I
Course Number MAT273

Examines The Descriptive And Inferential Statistical Methods That Aid Decision-making By Covering The Following Topics: Probability, Probability Distributions, Calculation Of Parameters From A Universe, Calculation Of Statistics From A Sample, Hypothesis Testing, Regression, And Correlation. A Hand-held Calculator With Scientific Functions Is Required. Prerequisites: Cit105/111/210, Mat174/181.


How Business Works
Course Number MGT121

Acquaints the student with a broad variety of topics that are fundamental to the understanding of business. Topics include the essentials of economics, finance, management, marketing, international business, strategy and ethics. The study and discussion of current issues in each of these areas is used to increase understanding.


Survey of Accounting
Course Number ACC201
Credits 3.0

Introduces the fundamentals of accounting from the user's perspective. The primary emphasis is the relationship between cash flow and accrual based income measurement. Includes financial reporting requirements and standards.


Communication (any oral or speech)
Course Number COM204
Credits 3.0

Explores visual design, graphics and presentational strategies by introducing students to digital photography and layout and design skills. Students learn digital and graphic design techniques using the leading industry software applications for desktop publishing and graphics illustration.


Principles of Macroeconomics
Course Number ECO 221
Credits 3.0

Examines macroeconomics (the whole economy), concepts and principles, and current issues in macroeconomics. Required for business and economics majors. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.


Expository and Research Writing
Course Number ENG141
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes the development, structure, and writing of abstracts, summaries, and critiques. This course in written communication teaches literary devices such as pro/con, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, persuasion/argumentation essays—plus research/synthesis skills—through the development of a research paper. Students must receive a grade of "C" or better to enroll in ENG142.


Literature and Criticism
Course Number ENG142
Credits 3.0

Presents literature—drama, short stories, novel, poetry and critical essays—from several literary critical perspectives. Through reading, discussion, and critical writing, students become familiar with representative genres in literature as well as authentic critical approaches.


College Skills
Course Number FRE110
Credits 3.0

Provides knowledge on study skills that enable success in college through an in-depth introduction to college life, college realities, college expectations, study skills and time management.


Information Technology
Course Number CIT105
Credits 3.0

Covers the basics of information technology, including common Microsoft Office applications, responsible use of software and technology, file management techniques, and sound information consumption practices. CIT105 is designed for beginners with little or no experience using Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint.Participants are required to demonstrate software proficiency in the lab and through objective written tests.


Math (above 173)
Course Number MAT174
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes business applications that involve the study of linear functions, applications using linear equations in two variables, counting methods, probability, finance applications, interpretation of date presented graphically, and computation of mean, median, standard deviation, normal distribution curve, and z scores.


One Elective from
Credits 3.0

Eco, Mgt, Pol, Psy, Soc


Spreadsheet Applications for Dec. Making
Course Number CIT355
Credits 3.0

Focuses on the use of spreadsheet applications as a tool for decision-making. Topics include design and management of worksheets and templates, and the use of built-in functions. Organizational uses in the areas of accounting, finance, marketing, human resources are discussed.


Business Law I
Course Number LAW211
Credits 3.0

A study of civil and criminal law and process and their interrelationship. The course also examines application of the Constitution to business with particular emphasis on the court system and administrative agencies, plus torts and contracts.


Management of Organizations
Course Number MGT201
Credits 3.0

An overview of the internal workings of an organization. This writing-intensive course surveys the functional areas such as finance, marketing, operations, information and decision support systems, and human resources. The course also examines the natureof a managerial job.


Program description: This concentration combines courses emphasizing the latest innovations in technology with courses addressing business theory and practice to create a curriculum as unique as the challenges facing today’s IT professionals.

As with other Ivy Bridge degrees, an ABA in Computer & Information Technology prepares you for either your next academic stop or your next job, as you’ll have the skills required to succeed in either environment.

Computer Courses at Herzing University

Program Name: Associate of Science in Computer Science
Programming Logic
Course Number IS 103
Credits 4.0

This course provides instruction in fundamental object-oriented programming concepts. Topics include problem solving and algorithm development, programming standards, variables, data types, operators, decisions, repetitive statements, modularity, methods, attributes, objects, classes, arrays, file I/O, and software testing and debugging, all within an object-oriented programming framework. Concepts may be introduced with a visual tool. Topics are demonstrated and implemented in a higher-level contemporary language such as java or C#. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Object-Oriented Programming 1
Course Number IS 109
Credits 4.0

The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the design, implementation, and maintenance of event-driven software systems using an object-oriented approach. Common ways of organizing data are discussed such as basic data structures, class design and modeling, exception handling, file I/O, and database processing techniques. In addition, object-oriented concepts such as inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism are discussed and utilized in this course. A higher level language such as Visual Basic, C#, and java are used for implementation and illustration. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: IS 103 Programming Logic.


Computer networks
Course Number IS 112
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides Instruction In Network Design And Technologies Using The Open Systems Interconnection (osi) Model. Topics Include Network Fundamentals, The Osi Model, Network Operating Systems, Tcp/ip Fundamentals And Utilities, Network Installation And Upgrades, Network Remote Access Configuration And Protocols, Network Administration And Security, Fault Tolerance And Disaster Recovery Considerations And Procedures, And Network Troubleshooting Procedures. 4.0 Credit Hours. Prerequisite: Is 102 Computers And Application Software.


Database Concepts and Applications 1
Course Number IS 180
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to fundamental principles and guidelines for designing, developing, and implementing secure relational databases. Topics include: object-oriented analysis and entity relationships as foundations of relational database design; ensuring data integrity; the use of standard SQL as a means of developing complex queries; and the creation and purpose of custom database forms and reports. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: IS 103 Programming Logic.


Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting 1
Course Number IS 185
Credits 4.0

This course provides instruction in microcomputer software and hardware concepts using the latest technology and troubleshooting techniques. Topics include: the function and purpose of hardware and software; system board components and memory management; working with floppy and hard drives; supporting input and output devices; multimedia technology; supporting operating systems, printers, and notebook computers; troubleshooting fundamentals; applying disaster-recovery techniques and developing maintenance plans; and working with networks and the Internet. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.uisit


Object-Oriented Programming 2
Course Number IS 207
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using object-oriented programming languages such as java, C#, C++, or Visual Basic in the development of modern, business applications. Topics include: object-oriented design using UML; encapsulation; object interfaces; inheritance; aggregation; abstract classes; polymorphism; user interfaces; and database access along with advanced file I/O. Using object-oriented techniques to help manage complexity, improve communication among project stakeholders, and adapt to change are explored. Current software modeling and integrated development environments are demonstrated. Project: Development of a business application. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: IS 109 Object-Oriented Programming 1.


Discrete Structures for Computer Science
Course Number IS 210
Credits 3.0

This course covers the fundamental mathematical concepts used in computer science. Topics include numbering systems, sets, relations, functions, counting, induction and recursion, trees, and logic. There is an emphasis on applications in computer science. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisites: IS 103 Programming Logic and MA 107 College Algebra.


Introduction to Computer Security
Course Number IS 272
Credits 3.0

This course is a survey of information and computer security. Topics include security standards and policies, common threats and risk management, disaster recovery planning, security architectures and design principles, access control, and network security. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: IS 112 Computer networks.


Elective Courses
Course Number n/a
Credits 4.0

A minimum of 4 semester credit hours is required. Students may take any Information Systems (IS) or networking and Security Technology (nT) course.


Personal Financial Management
Course Number PD 120
Credits 1.0

This course deals with concepts of personal financial planning and financial control. Topics center on critical self examination of student planning techniques through analysis and research of personal financial legal documents, checking accounts and banking services, income tax procedures, savings methods, investment planning, risk management and insurance, and credit records, credit law, and the cost of credit. 1.0 credit hour. Prerequisite: none


Customer Services
Course Number PD 155
Credits 1.0

This course provides a critical examination of issues embedded in the practice of providing customer service. Topics include research about best practice in customer service and communication techniques, psychologically based methods for dealing with the management of customer complaints, and the roles of a customer service employee and supervisor within ethical boundaries and common business practice. 1.0 credit hour. Prerequisite: none


Career Development Seminar
Course Number PD 200
Credits 1.0

This seminar provides an opportunity for students to critically examine their skills and develop a plan to further their career. Students will be encouraged to develop a plan for maintaining life-long learning skills. Topics include research, job searching, developing career documents, creating personal budgets, and refining interview and communication skills. 1.0 credit hour. Prerequisite: none


AS/AAS/BS Internship Preparation
Course Number PD 214
Credits 0.0

This non-credit course will assist students in finding and securing the internship experience for credit in either an associate’s or bachelor’s program. Students must pass this course in order to be cleared to start working at their internship site. Students will discover ways to approach a facility about an internship, and they will learn how to access the tools they will need to successfully get their internship approved and successfully land an internship that correlates to their field of study. 0.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Program description: This program prepares students with the necessary academic knowledge and technical competencies for entry-level positions in the computer information systems development industry. These career opportunities may be in areas such as computer programming, desktop and distributed application design and development, Web site application design and development, database application design and development, and end-user support. The potential entry-level job position titles include junior programmer, software developer, internet developer, junior database developer, junior web site developer, web page coordinator, junior programmer, analyst, and junior support, help desk professional.

Computer Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Doctor of Computer Science
Research and Writing I
Course Number CS801
Credits 3.0

This course is one of a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses) is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Current Topics in the Discipline
Course Number CS803
Credits 5.0

This course provides an overview of current topics in the disciplines of computer science, software engineering, and sub-disciplines such as security. A high-level view of where topics fit helps students to better understand how the disciplines relate to one another. Students also discuss the state of the practice for selected disciplines and sub-disciplines and narrow their area of specialization for the remainder of the degree program. Prerequisite: None


Research Methods
Course Number CS804
Credits 5.0

This course introduces experimental design and analysis of data. Topics include independent and dependent variables, how to collect data, hypothesis testing and other forms of data analysis. You will be expected to design and conduct an experiment, collect and analyze data, and then write a technical report on your effort. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing II
Course Number CS806
Credits 3.0

This course is the second in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Project Management and Process Engineering
Course Number CS807
Credits 5.0

This Course Provides An Understanding Of The Technical And Managerial Processes Involved In Planning And Conducting Projects To Develop And Maintain Complex, Software-intensive Systems. Students Prepare Project Plans And Critically Evaluate Process Models Such As The Sei Capability Maturity Models, Iso/ieee Standard 12207, And The Pmi Body Of Knowledge. Emphasis Is Placed On Project Management, System Development, Information Security, And Other Process Areas. In Addition, Trends In Software Development Methods, Tools, And Techniques That Support These Processes Are Covered. We Also Discuss How The Software Lifecycle Relates To Business Process Improvement And Why Many Process Improvement Initiatives Fail. Students Perform Research Into Current Best Practices, Prepare A Project Plan For A Realistic Software Project, Conduct An Assessment Of Selected Processes In Their Organizations, And Recommend Improvements For The Software Processes They Have Selected. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing III
Course Number CS811
Credits 3.0

This course is the third in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IV
Course Number CS816
Credits 3.0

This course is the fourth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing V
Course Number CS821
Credits 3.0

This course is the fifth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VI
Course Number CS826
Credits 3.0

This course is the sixth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VII
Course Number CS831
Credits 3.0

This course is the seventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VIII
Course Number CS836
Credits 3.0

This course is the eighth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Requirements Engineering
Course Number CS837
Credits 5.0

This course presents the state of the practice in requirements engineering for software-intensive systems, emphasizing distributed systems and information security. Topics covered include requirements elicitation, feasibility analysis; cost-benefit analysis; the operational concept document; the requirements specification; verification; preparation for validation; requirements management; reconciling requirements with development constraints; and trends in requirements methods, tools, and techniques. Students will discuss the role of requirements engineering in the system lifecycle, with emphasis on quality considerations such as security, reliability, and scalability. Students perform research into current best practices and conduct a term project that incorporates requirements for a realistic system. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IX
Course Number CS841
Credits 3.0

This course is the ninth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing X
Course Number CS846
Credits 3.0

This course is the tenth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XI
Course Number CS851
Credits 3.0

This course is the eleventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Software Architecture and Design
Course Number CS854
Credits 5.0

Architectural frameworks and patterns are often used in the design of software systems. This course teaches students to understand commonly used frameworks and patterns and how to tailor framework and combine patterns in software design. Students will also study the role of software architects in the development of software systems and the advantages of systematic development processes that include an architectural design phase. Prerequisite: None


Futuring and Innovation
Course Number CS855
Credits 5.0

Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Introduces formal methods of innovation and diffusion of innovation. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XII
Course Number CS856
Credits 3.0

This course is the final one in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members, and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Simulation and Modeling
Course Number CS810
Credits 5.0

Complex Computing Applications Are Launched System Wide Only After Simulation, Modeling And Testing Have Been Conducted And The Results Analyzed. This Course Addresses Fundamental Issues In Developing Those Processes And Prepares Students For Their Own Project Simulation Or Model. Students Will Be Able To Describe Differences In Various Methods Of Central Tendency, Effectively Use Anova And Glm For Data Analysis And Demonstrate How Different Testing Variables Can Affect Simulations Or Models. Prerequisite: None


Usability and Interaction
Course Number CS820
Credits 5.0

This course investigates what qualities of a software product make it usable. Emphasis is placed on how one includes usability concerns throughout the software life cycle, how one designs for usability, how to determine experimentally the usability of a product, and the importance of early usability testing on a simple prototype. Students will be expected to design and conduct usability experiments and then analyze the data in order to refine product design. Prerequisite: None


Advanced Topics in Database Systems
Course Number CS825
Credits 5.0

Computer Science is dynamic; Moore’s Law tells us that today’s standard could very well be obsolete in 18 months. This course addresses the top three issues of current database theory and practice, identifying current trends and near future changes in the field. As such, the course content will vary according to the evolution of the discipline. Students will research major literature sources that address issues and trends, compare and contrast centralized database systems with distributed databases and identify principles behind database warehousing and data mining. Prerequisite: None


Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Course Number CS838
Credits 5.0

This course covers the fundamentals of concurrent and distributed systems including threading, synchronization and deadlock prevention as well as logical clocks, group communication and distributed transactions. It also covers current topics such as web services and software for multiprocessors and multicore processors. Prerequisite: None


System Metrics and Risk Analysis
Course Number CS840
Credits 5.0

Software development has risks – time, resources, and change. Measuring and managing risk is essential to successful software development. In this course, students will investigate and analyze current and emerging best practices for managing risk and learn how a good metrics program can be developed. Students will also use metric data to support risk exposure, while developing a risk mitigation plan for their organization. Prerequisite: None


Networking and Security
Course Number CS850
Credits 5.0

A generation ago, business referred to the shop owner down the street. Today’s business is global; companies have offices around the world, processing data twenty-four hours a day. Keeping software synchronized, online and secure is the ongoing challenge of computer professionals. In this course, students will assess the impact on security concerns when an organization moves from a centralized system to a distributed system. This includes describing emerging security issues and risk factors and designing a secure information system. Prerequisite: None


Program description: If you are a computer science professional interested in taking your career development to the highest level and making key leadership contributions in your area of expertise, you may want to consider enrolling in the Doctor of Computer Science (DCS) degree program offered through Colorado Technical University.

The Doctor of Computer Science degree program encourages you to think and act strategically and facilitates in developing your ability to predict future trends and make positive contributions in your area of technical expertise through mentoring, action research and practical projects. You can also perform research that advances the field of computer science and perfect your ability to effectively communicate technical material to non-technical decision makers. This Doctor of Computer Science degree program is designed by computer science professionals and academics to help you:

Develop a software process improvement plan for an organization.
Design, test and implement an experiment, reporting on the results.
Evaluate established and emerging security systems.
Predict future trends and developments based on data and research.
All three years of the Doctor of Computer Science degree program are designed to provide computer science professionals with the theoretical, research and application capabilities necessary to pursue a successful career and research in their chosen field.

Year one of this executive format Computer Science degree program focuses on research in the software engineering process: analysis, design, simulation and modeling, which should result in a broad overview of computer science and enable the use of simulation and modeling skills to produce an experimental design. Year two is designed to help you form a personal understanding of the advanced research and methods used in the specialized area of study. The focus of research is database systems, software usability, and new developments in computer science. Projects include the preparation of an industry white paper and a proposal for research to be carried out in the third year. The final year of the program involves developing metrics and risk analysis programs, exploration of high level design issues, evaluation of methods of maintaining security in distributed systems, and anticipating and planning for the future. The deliverable in year three is an applied research project to be submitted to an academic journal.

Program Name: Doctor of Computer Science in Enterprise Information Systems
Qualitative Analysis
Course Number CS802
Credits 5.0

This course presents topics on a variety of qualitative analysis methods and techniques. The methods include structured interviews, surveys, action research, and case studies. Perspectives include ethnography, grounded theory, soft systems methodology, and deductive reasoning.


Quantitative Analysis
Course Number CS812
Credits 5.0

You Will Learn Fundamental Concepts Of Parametric And Non-parametric Statistics And Develop A Thorough Understanding Of The Primary Theorems Of Statistics. This Course Covers Measures Of Central Tendency, Various Forms Of Probability, Anova And Glm. Exploration Of Multivariate Statistics Will Be Practiced Via Large Datasets In Live Research Projects. Particular Attention Is Given To Scale And Survey Development.


Foundations of Enterprise Information Systems
Course Number CS817
Credits 5.0

This course provides an overview and introduction to the breadth of research in enterprise information systems. The purpose of this overview is to ensure you are familiar with the entire discipline and to help you establish where your interest fits into the discipline.


Business Intelligence
Course Number CS842
Credits 5.0

This course presents decision making frameworks, their advantages and limitations. Topics include constructing a data warehouse and its use for data mining in order to do trend analysis; the development and protection of business intelligence; and knowledge management within an enterprise. These topics will lead a student to appreciate the value of the knowledge contained in the data gathered by an organization and its impact on the business.


Strategy, Alignment, and Portfolio Management
Course Number EIS800
Credits 5.0

This course presents techniques and methods for building a strategic plan for an enterprise with a strong emphasis on portfolio management. This includes identifying potential strategies and evaluating their alignment with business goals and visions, and approaches to bring IT into alignment with business goals. The discussions cover how to set a benchmark and its proper use; what are reasonable metrics for a business to use and the proper use of those metrics; and environmental scanning. Students evaluate current research on IT strategy and business alignment. Alignment is examined in detail and encompasses portfolio, program, project management and establishment of Project Management Office (PMO).


Enterprise Management Concepts and Databases
Course Number EIS805
Credits 5.0

This Course Examines Key Management Concepts Such As Enterprise Information Systems And E-logistics, Global/virtual E-supply Chain Management, Supplier Relationship Management (srm), Customer Relationship Management (crm), Enterprise Resource Planning (erp), Data Warehousing, Data Mining, And Relational Data Bases.


Managing, Planning and Integrating EIS
Course Number EIS810
Credits 5.0

Managing EIS includes evolution and management of enterprise leadership, computing systems, information, infrastructure, application, security architecture, technology, processes, data, and people. Enterprise information systems' designs, applications, implementation, deployment and impacts are examined in view of a need for a strong systems development process. This course covers enterprise integration, which includes integration of (legacy) enterprise applications and information, integrated systems, e-factories, integrated manufacturing systems, industrial informatics.


Enterprise Tools, Concepts and Processes
Course Number EIS815
Credits 5.0

This Course Examines Enterprise Tools And Realization Technologies For Enterprise Computing, Including Ontologies And Semantic Web Support; Middleware Standards And Systems, Such As Corba And J2ee; Modeling And Description Languages Such As Xml, Rdf, Owl, And Uml. In Addition, Enterprise Computing Concepts For Specific Domains Such As Electronic And Mobile Commerce, Vertical Domains Such As Finance, Telecommunications, Automotive, Aerospace, Command And Control, Defense, Healthcare, And Government Are Reviewed. Business Process And Workflow Modeling, Analysis, Integration, Monitoring, And Management Are Also Examined In View Of The Enterprise.


Enterprise Architecture Technology
Course Number EIS820
Credits 5.0

This Course Presents Current Approaches To The High-level Design Of Enterprise Architectures. The Emphasis Is Placed On High-level Design Issues And Opportunities For Long-term Systems Planning. Concepts Examined Are Enterprise Architecture Modeling, Model-driven Architecture (mda), Component-oriented Architecture, Service-oriented Architecture (soa), Collaborative Development And Co-operative Engineering. Software As A Service Along With Extreme Programming Is Examined As Are Technologies Such As Virtualization, Grid Computing, And Cloud Computing. Software Architecture, Software Product Lines, Methodology Overview, Agile Architecture And Modeling, Presentation Tier Architecture, Usability And User Experience Are Also Examined. This Course Also Examines Enterprise Level Security Architecture And Its Relationship With And Impact On Many Of The Above Technologies Such As Virtualization, Grid Computing, And Cloud Computing.


Information Technology Service Management
Course Number EIS825
Credits 5.0

This Course Focuses On Frameworks Such As Information Technology Infrastructure Library (itil) And The Concepts, Practices And Models That Help Manage It Services, Development And Operations. Several Organizational Models Such As Cobit And Itil Are Studied Relative To Their Impact On The Enterprise. Topics Include Service Support, Service Delivery, Security Management, And Infrastructure Management. In Addition, Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operations, And Continual Service Improvement Are Examined In Detail As They Pertain To Itil And The Enterprise.


Governance, Quality, Compliance, and Ethics
Course Number EIS830
Credits 5.0

This course presents an overview of the major structures, such as Sarbanes-Oxley regulations and their impact on the enterprise. The course also explores governance and ethics relative to policies and control within the enterprise. In addition, topics such as trust, security, and privacy issues in enterprise computing and quality assurance issues in enterprise computing are closely examined.


Research and Writing I
Course Number CS801
Credits 3.0

This course is one of a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses) is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing II
Course Number CS806
Credits 3.0

This course is the second in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing III
Course Number CS811
Credits 3.0

This course is the third in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IV
Course Number CS816
Credits 3.0

This course is the fourth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing V
Course Number CS821
Credits 3.0

This course is the fifth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VI
Course Number CS826
Credits 3.0

This course is the sixth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VII
Course Number CS831
Credits 3.0

This course is the seventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VIII
Course Number CS836
Credits 3.0

This course is the eighth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IX
Course Number CS841
Credits 3.0

This course is the ninth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing X
Course Number CS846
Credits 3.0

This course is the tenth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XI
Course Number CS851
Credits 3.0

This course is the eleventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XII
Course Number CS856
Credits 3.0

This course is the final one in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members, and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Program description: Computer science professionals specializing in large-scale information systems and interested in making key leadership contributions in their area of expertise may want to consider enrolling in the Doctor of Computer Science degree program with a concentration in Enterprise Information Systems (DCS-EIS).

The DCS-EIS program is designed to develop leaders in designing, implementing and managing very large databases and large-scale systems in organizations that can operate on a global level. Each year of the DCS-EIS program is designed to provide candidates with the theoretical, research and application capabilities necessary to:

* Attain familiarity with the body of knowledge in current enterprise information systems.
* Become a familiar with models such as CMMI and the Baldridge Process.
* Effectively communicate technical material to non-technical stakeholders and/or decision makers.
* Effectively manage IT implementation processes, testing and user training.
* Predict future trends through innovative research using qualitative and quantitative methods.

This Enterprise Information Systems concentration emphasizes action research. The first year allows you to learn about analysis and design from a user perspective, while forming the ability to think critically and creatively with the ultimate goal of developing an enterprise information system designed to improve business processes.

Once that foundation is in place, you can choose an area of specialization and gains an in-depth knowledge of four common areas: strategy, structure, requirements engineering, and decision support. This deeper level of understanding will result in an industry white paper and a proposal for research to be conducted in the third year. The final year of the program involves developing a formal implementation program, taking into consideration budget, training and testing and developing a critical path to completion, anticipating and planning for the future. The deliverable in year three is an applied research project, to be submitted to an academic journal.

The Enterprise Information Systems concentration encourages you to think and act strategically and facilitates development of your ability to predict future trends and make positive contributions in your area of technical expertise through mentoring, action research and practical projects.

The Doctor of Computer Science with a concentration in Enterprise Information Systems includes twelve 5-credit classes and twelve 3-credit research and writing courses. One research and writing course is taken each quarter in conjunction with one formal course over a three year period. Courses are taught using Colorado Technical University's Professional Learning Model™ in an executive format. Each course combines an active online component with an intensive residential session lasting four and a half days. Students are required to attend two of the quarterly residential sessions held throughout the year based on their start date.

Program Name: Master of Science in Computer Science - Computer Systems Security
Computer Networking
Course Number CS635
Credits 4.0

This Course Surveys Both The Foundational Concepts And Current State Of The Practice In Computer Networking. The Lower Four Layers Of The Osi Reference Model Are Investigated Along With A Comprehensive Treatment Of The Tcp/ip Protocol Suite. Network Issues, Such As Addressing And Routing, And Transport Issues, And Connections And Reliability Are Discussed. Major Network Applications Are Also Surveyed, Including Examination Of Their Use In Current Practice.


Computer Systems Security Foundations
Course Number CS651
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the overall foundations required for the understanding of, and further study in, information systems security. It reviews the history of security and computer systems security in particular to develop a set of models to guide the approach to realizing computer systems security. An overview of current security technologies is presented. A project is required.


Database Systems
Course Number CS660
Credits 4.0

This course explores the current state of the practice in database systems and provides a foundation for future study. Topics include the database life cycle, database models, relational algebra, SQL and an overview of the analysis, design, and implementation of relational databases. Concepts and issues in transaction processing, concurrency, security, data warehouses and data marts, distributed databases and web-based database systems are discussed.


Systems Engineering Methods
Course Number CS672
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Methods provides an overview of the techniques and approaches used in systems engineering. The topics include the models, evaluation methods, decision-making processes, system quality, system design, integration, logistics, maintenance, and system disposal.


Software Design or any 600 Level Course
Course Number CS649 or ELE
Credits 4.0

Software Design provides the knowledge to transition from smaller programming efforts to large software development projects. It addresses a variety of design processes, principles, notations and design methods.


Operating Systems Security
Course Number CS652
Credits 4.0

Operating Systems Security provides an in-depth analysis of the security components at the operating system level. The focus is on the development of a security policy and the basic elements that provide identification and authentication, access control and security auditing. In addition to general concepts, both the UNIX/Linux and Windows operating systems are studied. Students participate in hands-on lab assignments to reinforce the material as well as to gain familiarity with a number of available operating system security products and tools (both freeware and commercially available).


Network Security
Course Number CS653
Credits 4.0

Students are provided with a brief overview of the basic elements of networking concepts, topologies and protocols necessary to understand network security issues. An in-depth analysis of privacy, integrity, availability and non-repudiation within a network environment is included. Mechanisms for secure authentication, confidentiality and access control are discussed. The course includes concepts applied to electronic commerce scenarios (e-commerce). A project is required.


Security Management
Course Number CS654
Credits 4.0

This course covers a variety of issues relating to the management of information systems security. The topics covered include development of policies, standards and procedures, risk analysis methodologies, contingency planning and disaster recovery. Additional topics covered include legal and ethical issues, incident reporting, security auditing, computer crime, and security awareness and training. Implementation issues, potential conflicts and tradeoffs are also discussed. A project is required


Software Information Assurance
Course Number CS661
Credits 4.0

Attacks On Enterprise Level Systems Can Be Focused On Many Targets. Some Of The Targets, Such As Web Servers Are At The Perimeter Of The Network. Others Occur At The Applications Running On Various Operating Systems. This Course Examines Vulnerabilities Caused By Both Scripting Errors Or Poor Scripting Techniques On Web Based Applications. Further, Vulnerabilities Created In Custom Developed Applications Written In High Level Programming Languages Are Examined. Sql Problems And Architecture Design Flaws In Relational Database Systems That Contribute To Vulnerabilities Are Also Analyzed. The Need For Security Driven Life Cycle Development Models And Security Standards For Programming And Scripting Languages Are Presented.


Software Project Management
Course Number SWE440
Credits 4.0

Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Program description: Earning a Master of Science in Computer Engineering (MSCE) can be a great way to advance within your company because it integrates the additional software design and security skills training you may need to take your career to new heights.

More than ever, successful businesses demand computer engineering professionals who can motivate and lead the technical workers responsible for these advances. The MSCE degree program emphasizes effective optimization of computer systems within organizations to strengthen competitive advantage. Our Master of Science in Computer Engineering Degree program covers research, design, development and testing of computer hardware and software, along with the project management and leadership skills training necessary for increased responsibility in the engineering career field. Our Computer Engineering training gives you the chance to gain a more in-depth understanding and design ability in advanced systems, especially in the areas of digital signal processing, computer architecture and software design.

Program Name: Master of Science in Computer Science - Database Systems
Database Design
Course Number CS681
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth study of the conceptual, logical and physical design of relational databases, data warehouses and data marts. Specific techniques for requirements elicitation, entity-relationship modeling and normalization are presented. Other topics include the integration of database design into the organization’s software system development model and database design using object-oriented and object-relational data models. Completion of a significant design project is required.


Database Administration
Course Number CS682
Credits 4.0

This course explores activities and responsibilities of a database administrator (DBA). Topics include physical database design, transaction management, query processing, concurrency control, back-up and recovery, performance monitoring and tuning and security. Techniques and implementation strategies used by open-source or commercial database management systems are studied.


Data Warehouse
Course Number CS683
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth study of data warehouses and data marts. Specific techniques for conceptual, logical, and physical design of data warehouses are presented. Other topics include extraction-transformation-load (ETL) techniques, data warehouse applications, and the relationship between data warehouses and traditional database. Completion of a significant project is required.


Distributed Databases
Course Number CS685
Credits 4.0

This course explores distributed database systems from design through operations and maintenance. Topics include design and implementation of a distributed database, distributed query processing, and database management in a distributed systems environment. Examples from open source and commercial database management systems are discussed. Completion of a significant project is required.


Computer Science Capstone or any 600 level course
Course Number CS698 or ELE
Credits 4.0

The Capstone course demonstrates mastery of the MSCS program content by completing an in-depth applied project that focuses on a major technical problem, an issue that confronts the student’s own organization or in an a desired area of study. The course provides students with the opportunity to do an in-depth analysis and study in a selected area of interest; prepare a formal technical report of the in-depth research; and deliver a formal technical oral presentation to a technical audience.


Computer Networking
Course Number CS635
Credits 4.0

This Course Surveys Both The Foundational Concepts And Current State Of The Practice In Computer Networking. The Lower Four Layers Of The Osi Reference Model Are Investigated Along With A Comprehensive Treatment Of The Tcp/ip Protocol Suite. Network Issues, Such As Addressing And Routing, And Transport Issues, And Connections And Reliability Are Discussed. Major Network Applications Are Also Surveyed, Including Examination Of Their Use In Current Practice.


Software Project Management
Course Number SWE440
Credits 4.0

Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.


Computer Systems Security Foundations
Course Number CS651
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the overall foundations required for the understanding of, and further study in, information systems security. It reviews the history of security and computer systems security in particular to develop a set of models to guide the approach to realizing computer systems security. An overview of current security technologies is presented. A project is required.


Database Systems
Course Number CS660
Credits 4.0

This course explores the current state of the practice in database systems and provides a foundation for future study. Topics include the database life cycle, database models, relational algebra, SQL and an overview of the analysis, design, and implementation of relational databases. Concepts and issues in transaction processing, concurrency, security, data warehouses and data marts, distributed databases and web-based database systems are discussed.


Systems Engineering Methods
Course Number CS672
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Methods provides an overview of the techniques and approaches used in systems engineering. The topics include the models, evaluation methods, decision-making processes, system quality, system design, integration, logistics, maintenance, and system disposal.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Program description: If you are a computer science professional, then earning a Master of Science in Computer Science with a concentration in Database Systems (MSCS-DB) degree can help you gain a competitive edge in pursuing increasing levels of responsibility in your career.

Today's successful organizations recognize the importance of high-performance database management systems, which can offer strategic advantages in the competitive marketplace. Highly specialized skills are required to design, configure, and manage these data warehouses.

Program Name: Master of Science in Computer Science - Software Engineering
Computer Systems Architecture
Course Number CS644
Credits 4.0

Computer Systems Architecture reviews the architectural paradigms for various types of software systems, including distributed and heterogeneous systems. The course includes an in-depth examination of how software quality is supported in the system architecture. It examines several architectural evaluation methods to analyze the merits of candidate architectures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Software Systems Engineering Process
Course Number CS671
Credits 4.0

This course presents the current research and application of the principles of the software process and process improvement. The in-depth analysis of the basic principles behind software process improvement provides a framework for further investigation. The concepts of software development, configuration management, quality assurance, metrics and risk management are explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Computer Science Capstone
Course Number CS698
Credits 4.0

Computer Science Capstone
Course Number CS698
Credits 4.0

or any 600 level course
Course Number ELE
Credits 4.0

Computer Networking
Course Number CS635
Credits 4.0

This Course Surveys Both The Foundational Concepts And Current State Of The Practice In Computer Networking. The Lower Four Layers Of The Osi Reference Model Are Investigated Along With A Comprehensive Treatment Of The Tcp/ip Protocol Suite. Network Issues, Such As Addressing And Routing, And Transport Issues, And Connections And Reliability Are Discussed. Major Network Applications Are Also Surveyed, Including Examination Of Their Use In Current Practice.


Software Project Management
Course Number SWE440
Credits 4.0

Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.


Database Systems
Course Number CS660
Credits 4.0

This course explores the current state of the practice in database systems and provides a foundation for future study. Topics include the database life cycle, database models, relational algebra, SQL and an overview of the analysis, design, and implementation of relational databases. Concepts and issues in transaction processing, concurrency, security, data warehouses and data marts, distributed databases and web-based database systems are discussed.


Systems Engineering Methods
Course Number CS672
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Methods provides an overview of the techniques and approaches used in systems engineering. The topics include the models, evaluation methods, decision-making processes, system quality, system design, integration, logistics, maintenance, and system disposal.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Software Requirements Engineering
Course Number CS455
Credits 4.0

Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, identification, definition, and documentation. Students will explore and practice elicitation techniques, define functional and non-functional requirements, write use-case scenarios, explore user interface alternatives, learn how to analyze and model requirements, and develop a requirements traceability matrix that spans the software development lifecycle.


Software Design
Course Number CS457
Credits 4.0

Software Design defines and describes the behavior of the software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course.


Program description: If you are a computer science engineer, then earning a Master of Science in Computer Science with a concentration in Software Engineering (MSCS-SE) can help you gain a competitive edge in pursuing increasing levels of responsibility in your career. Employment of computer software engineers is expected to grow at the national level by up to 38 percent through the year 2016 as organizations design and develop new computer software systems, and incorporate new technologies in a rapidly growing range of applications in order to maximize the efficiency of their computer systems.

The MSCS-SE degree program can give you the skills necessary for the organization and control of software development efforts using industry-current software engineering techniques to successfully deliver software systems requiring multi-person effort. You can learn to apply the principles and techniques of computer science, engineering and mathematical analysis to the design, development, testing and evaluation of the software and systems that can optimize the performance of computers in their many applications.

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