Online Criminal Justice Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its criminal justice courses to be successful criminal justice administrators, public prosecutors, public defenders, judges, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 12,610 people employed as criminal justice and law enforcement teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $62,750. Police and sheriff's patrol officers make on average $55,180 per year and there are about 641,590 of them employed today.

Criminal Justice Organizations Criminal Justice Common Job Tasks
  • determining the details of intrusions into computer systems
  • investigating drug use in the workplace
  • connecting clues to uncover facts about legal issues
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Ranked by Excellence

Criminal Justice Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Associate's (AABA) - Criminal Justice Administration
English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: None In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN 105
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed, and controlled.



Principles of Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 205
Credits 4.5

"This course introduces students to financial accounting. Students can learn the fundamentals of the accounting cycle."


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON 220
Credits 4.5

"This course focuses on Economic theory of the firm, resource allocation and price determination, the free market supply/demand mechanism, and pure and imperfect competition models are analyzed."


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON 224
Credits 4.5

"Presents basic economic concepts emphasizing the part the United States plays in a global economy. Foundations of economic theory are presented, using topics from television news and mass media. Topics introduced are GDP, National Income Accounting, United States fiscal policy and economic growth."


Business Management and Leadership
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

"Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix."


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix.


Lower Division Capstone
Course Number BUSN 300
Credits 4.5

This course requires students completing their AABA degree to demonstrate knowledge learned throughout the program and apply the theories to real world issues. Students are expected to synthesize and integrate learning experiences acquired throughout their program and to evaluate research and current topics relative to their area of concentration.


Foundations of Criminal Justice Systems
Course Number CRJS 101
Credits 4.5

This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be on crime in America, the criminal justice process, law enforcement, adjudication, punishment, corrections, and prisons. Students will also learn about crime, law and justice, as well as special issues in the criminal justice system.


Theories of Crime Causation
Course Number CRJS 105
Credits 4.5

This course is an overview of theoretical perspectives in criminology. This entails the nature, causation and etiology of criminal behaviors in offenders.


Introduction to Criminal Law
Course Number CRJS 205
Credits 4.5

This course furnishes a concise but comprehensive introduction to the substantive criminal law. It offers an understanding of the legal environment in which criminal justice professionals must function and helps students to gain a clear understanding of the principles of the law that will be vital to success in the field of criminal justice.


Proseminar in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 300
Credits 4.5

This course provides a comprehensive review of the criminal justice system focusing on how the system functions in theory and practice. Analyses of specific policies relevant to crime and the administration of justice is used to explore the process of forming public policy and the impact criminal justice professionals have upon the policy implementation. It is an in-depth study of the American criminal justice system including the history, theories, responsibilities, and functions of primary parts of the system.


Program description: The Associate of Arts in Business Administration (AABA) program with a concentration in Criminal Justice allows students to develop essential critical thinking and communication skills. Coursework is structured to assist them in the development of their goals as they acquire focused knowledge and skills common to many entry-level criminal justice professionals.

Program Name: Bachelor's (BSCJ) - Corrections
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Comparative Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJS 305
Credits 4.5

This course gives students a rationale for understanding and appreciating the different ways justice is conceived and administered internationally. This course serves as a basis for comparing various justice systems as they relate to the American justice system. Students will explore how various countries organize their law enforcement, judicial systems and corrections agencies, and compare them with the American criminal justice system.


Crime Victim Studies
Course Number CRJS 310
Credits 4.5

This course presents the scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to victims and their situations. It also looks at the different types of victimizations, how victimization rates are measured, and what attempts the government has made to increase the involvement of victims’ role in the criminal justice system.


Constitutional Law
Course Number CRJS 400
Credits 4.5

This course examines the United States Constitution, its history, evolution and influence on the criminal justice system, including the structure of government and our system of checks and balances. Additionally, students will analyze doctrinal shifts in the court’s decisions, and critique the role of individual jurisprudential viewpoints in judicial decision making.


Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 410
Credits 4.5

This course offers a social historical overview of issues of race, class, gender, crime, and justice. The impact of the criminal justice system on culturally diverse groups is the primary theme of all class activities.


Ethics and Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 420
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of ethical conduct in the administration of justice. This course explores moral choices associated with individuals in the criminal justice field, and examines consequences associated with various choice options.


Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Number CRJS 430
Credits 4.5

This course teaches students the theoretical aspects of conducting and investigating research problems in criminology and criminal justice. It explores the entire research process from beginning to end including the following techniques: problem identification, data collection, measurement, reliability, and validity issues. Students will also examine the ethical issues in the research process and how to analyze and document the research findings in a written assignment.


Applied Statistics
Course Number CRJS 440
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to teach students basic inferential statistical computations and analyses. The course focuses on practical applications rather than advanced statistical analysis. Students will develop skills in statistical application related to criminal justice policies and this course prepares students for the work place or those who are interested in pursuing graduate studies involving research.


Advanced Topics in Corrections
Course Number CRJS 450
Credits 4.5

This course examines the theories and practices involved in probation and parole processes and decision-making. Topics include pre-sentence and pre-parole investigations, probation and parole supervision, the administration of corrections services including treatment and release decision making processes. Finally this course examines juvenile corrections and the use of intermediate methods of treatment including electronic monitoring, community service, and the use of restitution.


Senior Capstone in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 499
Credits 4.5

This course offers a comprehensive and systematic analysis of key contemporary criminal justice issues through a close review of the theories and policies guiding many crime fighting strategies. By applying critical thinking and analytical skills, oral and written communication skills, and information systems skills, students will learn of the complex nature of crime and society’s response to criminality. This course serves as the CJ capstone class and involves the student preparing a project agreed upon between the student and the instructor. Each project will require research, report writing, oral presentation, and interactive teamwork.


Penology
Course Number CRJS 335
Credits 4.0

This course examines the history of criminal punishment beginning with early developments in Europe. Special attention is given to theories of punishment and the development of prisons, correctional institutions, and other forms of punishment to the wider system of social control. Modern penal systems are then examined both from sociological and legal viewpoints.


Prison Law
Course Number CRJS 435
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the historical context in which prisoners’ rights were established in the United States. Students will examine landmark court decisions which established these rights and learn how they changed the administration of corrections.


Offender Rehabilitation
Course Number CRJS 445
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the various factors utilized to develop personalized sentencing and treatment plans for individual offenders. This course examines the personality of the offender who may be diagnosed as a psychopath, sociopath, drug addict or mentally ill person. Students will learn how to develop treatment plans that will assist in the rehabilitation of the offender.


Administration of Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 345
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on the challenges administrators face in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will examine the various organizational frameworks in the criminal justice system and the concepts, organizational principles, and models associated with these criminal justice agencies.


Program description: The online Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice degree completion program can provide students with a solid foundation in some of the most interesting aspects of the industry, from law enforcement to corrections. Building on this foundation, the concentration in Special Populations focuses on the philosophies and processes of the juvenile justice system; the impact of diversity on the criminal justice system as a whole; and the policies and enforcement of drug-related crimes. Best of all, courses are taught by experienced instructors who bring expertise and knowledge of the criminal justice field to every class they teach.

Criminal Justice Courses at Everest University

Program Name: Criminal Justice (Associates's)
Criminal Justice Capstone Course
Course Number CCJ 2929
Credits 4.0

Career Choices in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1910
Credits 4.0

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Criminal Law
Course Number CCJ 2002
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CCJ 1017
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1024
Credits 4.0

Criminal Evidence
Course Number CJL 2130
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure and the Constitution
Course Number CJL 2134
Credits 4.0

Criminal Investigations
Course Number CCJ 1610
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Communications
Course Number CCJ 2358
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CCJ 2306
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations
Course Number CJD 2250
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Terrorism
Course Number DSC 2002
Credits 4.0

Policing in America
Course Number CJE 2100
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Victims Advocacy
Course Number CCJ 2679
Credits 4.0

Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 2943
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Forensics
Course Number CJE 2670
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

American National Government
Course Number POS 2041
Credits 4.0

Principles of Sociology
Course Number SYG 2000
Credits 4.0

College Algebra
Course Number MAT 1033
Credits 4.0

General Psychology
Course Number PSY 2012
Credits 4.0

Basic Critical Thinking
Course Number SLS 1505
Credits 2.0

Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Environmental Science
Course Number EVS 1001
Credits 4.0

Program description: The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level
career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security.

Program Name: Criminal Justice (Bachelor's)
Computer Crime
Course Number CJE 4668
Credits 4.0

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Criminal Law
Course Number CCJ 2002
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CCJ 1017
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1024
Credits 4.0

Criminal Evidence
Course Number CJL 2130
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure and the Constitution
Course Number CJL 2134
Credits 4.0

Criminal Investigations
Course Number CCJ 1610
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Communications
Course Number CCJ 2358
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CCJ 2306
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations
Course Number CJD 2250
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Terrorism
Course Number DSC 2002
Credits 4.0

Juvenile Justice
Course Number CCJ 2501
Credits 4.0

Graphics & Documentation I
Course Number CJE 2673
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Management
Course Number CCJ 3450
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice in the Community
Course Number CCJ 4127
Credits 4.0

Gang Activity and Drug Operations
Course Number CCJ 4656
Credits 4.0

Constitutional Law for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CCJ 2250
Credits 4.0

Alternatives to Incarceration
Course Number CCJ 3334
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Senior Capstone Experience
Course Number CCJ 4400
Credits 4.0

Catastrophic Event Response Planning
Course Number HSS 3500
Credits 4.0

Policing in America
Course Number CJE 2100
Credits 4.0

Spanish for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CCJ CCJ
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Victims Advocacy
Course Number CCJ 2679
Credits 4.0

Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 2943
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Forensics
Course Number CJE 2670
Credits 4.0

Career Choices in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1910
Credits 4.0

Cultural Diversity for Criminal Justice Professionals
Course Number CCJ 4129
Credits 4.0

Concepts of Criminal Law
Course Number CJL 3215
Credits 4.0

Theoretical Aspects of Conspiracy Investigations
Course Number INV 3100
Credits 4.0

Private Investigations I
Course Number INV 3500
Credits 4.0

Methodology of Economic Crime
Course Number INV 3300
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

American National Government
Course Number POS 2041
Credits 4.0

Report Writing
Course Number ENC 3211
Credits 4.0

Basic Critical Thinking
Course Number SLS 1505
Credits 2.0

Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 3675
Credits 4.0

Victimology
Course Number CCJ 3666
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Ethics and Liability
Course Number CCJ 4054
Credits 4.0

20 th Century American History
Course Number AMH 2030
Credits 4.0

Social Psychology
Course Number SOP 4005
Credits 4.0

Global Politics
Course Number CPO 4004
Credits 4.0

Principles and Applications of Adult Learning
Course Number SLS 3130
Credits 4.0

College Algebra
Course Number MAT 1033
Credits 4.0

Statistics
Course Number STA 3014
Credits 4.0

Environmental Science
Course Number EVS 1001
Credits 4.0

Program description: The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level
career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice enhances the study of the criminal justice system and expands into areas such as
gang activity, drug operations, and criminal justice management. Graduates are prepared for entry-level and middle management positions
in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The Criminal justice programs are not training programs for law
enforcement officers.

Program Name: Master of Science in Criminal Justice

Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 5489
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Crime and Criminology
Course Number CCJ 5019
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Applied Research Methods
Course Number CCJ 5702
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Overview of Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 5006
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJP 5450
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Statistics For Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 5704
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Writing for Research at the Graduate Level
Course Number CCJ 5781
Credits 2.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Navigating Graduate School in Justice Studies
Course Number CCJP 5000
Credits 2.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Modern Constitutional Theory
Course Number CJL 5069
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Counseling the Offender
Course Number CJC 5428
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Interpersonal Management Skills
Course Number CCJ 5408
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Women, Crime and Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 5672
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Substance Use, Crime and Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 5667
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Juvenile Justice System
Course Number CJJ 5028
Credits 4.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CCJP 6000
Credits 6.0

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections, juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.


Victimology
Course Number CCJ 3666
Credits 4.0

Program description: The Master of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to meet the needs of a highly focused but multifaceted institution of American society, the criminal justice system. The program utilizes a multi-discipline approach to serve the variety of agencies/departments within the criminal justice community. The curriculum is designed to offer a balance of theory and application that will prove to be challenging to the student and useful in the field and focuses on law enforcement administration, corrections,juvenile justice, drug abuse, and abuse counseling.

Criminal Justice Courses at Capella University

Program Name: BS - Criminal Justice
Statistical Literacy
Course Number MAT2050
Credits 3.0

This course emphasizes the learner as a consumer of statistics rather than a producer of statistical calculations. Learners apply critical-thinking skills to arguments involving statistics and interpret and evaluate statistics used in real-world situations.


Communication Strategies for the Public Safety Professional
Course Number PS3004
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners build and strengthen the skills needed to succeed in their program and the workplace. Learners engage in interactive activities that help them develop a public safety perspective and expand their organizational, research, critical-thinking, and problem-solving skills. Learners also participate in building a learning community, share talents and resources with courseroom peers, and prepare professional written communications. Other topics include teamwork, ethics, and project creation. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number PS3100
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system and its evolution in response to the continually changing forces that influence crime control. Learners gain an understanding of criminal justice theory and its relation to criminality, the criminal justice system, and the principles of the adjudication process.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number PS3200
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the growing field of emergency management. Learners study various hazard threats and examine strategies for determining and reducing vulnerability. Learners also analyze disaster response and recovery behaviors and activities. Course topics include local, state, and federal emergency management organizations and the impact of various stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, on the emergency management process.


Principles of Security Management
Course Number PS3300
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Course topics include security department management and operations, emergency and disaster management, the role of security in risk management, and integrating security with local law enforcement organizations and the role of security management in the business environment.


Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Number PS3400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the essential concepts of the emerging field of homeland security. Learners study a range of threats to U.S. security, including specialty weapons, cyber attacks, and smuggling. Learners also examine current issues related to large-scale refugee flow and civil liberties, and evaluate homeland security domains, including strategy, fear management, and crisis communications. This course helps learners build a foundational vernacular upon which to critically analyze homeland security.


Applied Public Safety Theory
Course Number PS3500
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major theoretical approaches to threats to public safety from the eighteenth century and the Enlightenment period through the present. Learners study the work of experts associated with the historical, international body of criminology knowledge. Learners explore a range of issues and apply public safety theory and research to analyze them, further developing their critical thinking and writing skills.


Principles of Public Safety Investigation
Course Number PS3600
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing breaches in physical, information, or personnel security. Learners examine the principles and procedures used for crime scene investigation and protection from security and law enforcement perspectives. Learners also study methods of collecting and preserving evidence; interviewing and interrogating complainants, witnesses, suspects, and victims; and employing scientific applications in criminal justice and private security investigations.


Justice, Crime, and Ethics
Course Number PS3700
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ethical dimension of law enforcement practice and acquire the critical knowledge and skills that support ethical, on-the-job decision making. Learners examine major ethical problems such as discrimination, corruption, deception, racial profiling, and excessive force using material drawn from commissions of inquiry, internal affairs investigations, published literature, human rights documentation, and observed police-community relations. Learners explore the bases for developing personal and professional ethics, guided by professional codes of practice and human rights standards.


Applied Public Safety Research Methods
Course Number PS3800
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners are introduced to the principles of social research in the field of public safety. Learners use the scientific method to collect data and analyze research questions specific to crime prevention, emergency planning, information security, and hazard assessment. Learners also explore the ethics of public safety research techniques and practical applications of research.


History of Violence in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS3900
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners review the history of violence in U.S. society, focusing on war, terrorism, hostility, and conquest. Course content emphasizes the roles of local, state, and federal public safety agencies in addressing violence issues in the post-9/11 era.


Introductory Public Safety Statistical Research
Course Number PS3950
Credits 6.0

This course introduces learners to basic statistical language and procedures related to crime phenomena data. Learners practice basic skills such as reading and calculating formulas and analyze the effects of measurement techniques, distribution shapes,and other factors of the statistic-selection process. Learners also examine two-variable relationships, including correlation and prediction measures. Prerequisite(s): MAT2050, PS3800.


White Collar and Organized Crime Investigations
Course Number PS4105
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners focus on the principles, parameters, and procedures of white collar and organized crime investigations. Learners study ways to apply best practice techniques of criminal investigation pursuant to current statutes and legal precedents. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Corrections, Probation, and Parole
Course Number PS4110
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to the fields of penology and corrections. Learners analyze the evolution of corrections, probation, and parole processes and the effects associated with corrections and reform movements. Learners also examine criminal behavior assessments that help determine offender placement and incarceration alternatives. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Juvenile Justice Practice
Course Number PS4115
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the philosophy of the juvenile justice system. Learners examine the principles of juvenile law and current juvenile justice system practices and processes. Learners also analyze methods of dealing with youthful offenders. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Police-Community Relations
Course Number PS4120
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study the philosophies, responsibilities, and limitations of police forces. Learners analyze formal social control processes in the U.S. and examine the effects of police training, education, and career development on community relations. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Policing in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS4125
Credits 4.0

This course provides a broad overview of the historical development, organizational structure, responsibilities, and work performed in U.S. law enforcement agencies at the municipal, county, state, and federal levels. Learners analyze the relationships between local police agencies and the various levels of government charged with law enforcement responsibilities. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Race, Crime, and Criminal Justice
Course Number PS4135
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners analyze the relationship between criminological theory and practice and study the history, evolution, and operation of the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on race. Learners examine criminal justice ethics and the implications of race on definitions of crime, criminological theory, and crime victimization. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.



Criminal Law
Course Number PS4145
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the historical development of criminal law and the rules of criminal procedure that govern its application. Learners distinguish between the social and legal definitions of crime and dissect the various elements of crimes. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


History of Drug Control
Course Number PS4150
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course focus on the origin, history, and impact of drug control. Learners examine drug law enforcement, drug regulation trends and developments, and the evolution of drug treatment. Learners also analyze the local, state, and federal laws governing drug treatment. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Police Administration
Course Number PS4155
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate police administration concepts. Learners examine communication principles and decision-making, leadership, and human resource management skills used in contemporary law enforcement environments. Learners also analyze individual and group behavior and ethics within police organizations. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Course Number PS4160
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an understanding of the formal rules for obtaining, qualifying, and admitting evidence for criminal investigation and prosecution. Learners examine case studies to analyze and apply the rules of criminal procedure. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Public Safety Capstone Project
Course Number PS4990
Credits 6.0

The capstone project is the culmination of the bachelor’s degree program in Public Safety and is intended to demonstrate the technical and applied public safety knowledge and the critical-thinking and communication skills learners gain during their program. Learners formulate ideas for a new public safety approach, create a vision, and develop a strategic plan that describes how to implement their concept. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Elective Courses CJ
Credits 37.0

Choose 37 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


General Education Classes
Credits 45.0

General Education Requirements are 45 quarter credits with a minimum of 6 quarter credits from each category: Communications, Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, Social Science.


Program description: The Criminal Justice specialization provides undergraduate learners with knowledge of the processes and procedures related to the criminal justice profession. Learners examine the criminal justice system and the relationships among private, local, state, and federal law enforcement organizations. Learners also analyze crime investigation techniques and law enforcement principles. Upon successful completion of this specialization, learners are prepared for entry-level public safety careers such as U.S. Postal Service Inspectors and U.S. marshals; agents of the Drug Enforcement Administration; Internal Revenue Service; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms; United States Customs Service; Immigration and Naturalization Service; Department of the Treasury; Bureau of Engraving and Printing; and other local and state law enforcement agencies.

Program Name: MS - Criminal Justice
Survey of Public Safety Issues, Theories, and Concepts
Course Number PSF5002
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with foundational public safety academic content that helps them prepare for course work in their chosen Public Safety specialization. Learners analyze various public safety theories, concepts, and research from the practitioner-scholar perspective, including law, policy analysis, emergency management and business continuity, leadership, multiculturalism, criminological theory, and public safety research methodology.


Research Methodology in Public Safety
Course Number PSF5006
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of various graduate-level public safety and criminal justice research methodologies. Learners study major research methodologies and quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research design approaches to rigorous scholarly inquiry. This course also provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative research data analysis tools. This course is aimed primarily at master’s learners, although PhD learners may take it as an elective.


Public Safety Ethnic and Cultural Awareness
Course Number PSF5334
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the salience of race, ethnicity, and culture in public safety and the ways public safety addresses the diverse needs of multicultural citizens. Learners analyze cultural experiences from gender, social class, religion, and disabled-status perspectives, and study and apply theoretical approaches for addressing cross-culturalism.


Practices of Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections
Course Number PSF5371
Credits 4.0

This course is an investigation of historical and current community-based correctional practices. Learners examine trends in practice and policy that govern community supervision programs and explore issues surrounding offender rehabilitation and re-entry.


History of the Juvenile Criminal Justice System
Course Number PSF5372
Credits 4.0

This course offers an intensive study of the juvenile criminal justice system and process. Learners examine theories of causation and innovative intervention approaches such as “drug court.” Learners also review the dramatic increase of juvenile violence and crime in U.S. culture over the last quarter century and focus on the debate between root causes of juvenile violence and crime (e.g., poverty, literacy, family and community cohesion) versus the effectiveness of the juvenile court system (recidivism, youthful violent crime offenders, and incarceration).


Criminal Justice Policy Analysis and Social Change
Course Number PSF5377
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Evaluate Criminal Justice Policies And Programs, The Processes By Which They Are Developed, And Their Effects On Social Change. Topics Include Intelligence-led Policing, Immigration And Policing, The Usa Patriot Act, And Socioeconomic Correlates Of Crime. Learners Identify A Current Public Safety Problem And Formulate A Solution Using Criminal Justice And Public Safety Practices And Policies.


Law Enforcement: Intelligence-led Policing
Course Number PSF5380
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the planning, operations, and technology of law enforcement organizations. Learners study problem- and community-oriented policing, datadriven accountability, crime analysis, and crime prevention as means to enhance the effectiveness of law enforcement and intelligence gathering within the emerging National Response Framework (NRF) collaborative model. Learners also examine national and international case studies to integrate theory and best practice toward the development of a more effective policing model.


Psychopathy and Criminal Profiling
Course Number PSF5385
Credits 4.0

As an introduction to the study of criminal profiling, learners in this course explore criminal and non-criminal psychopathy and their comorbities, including compulsive and addictive behavior. Learners examine empirical research and theory that differentiate antisocial personality disorders and general criminal behavior from criminal psychopathy and determine whether there are ways to identify offenders as dangerous by analyzing their behavioral cues or crime-scene clues. Learners also study crimescene management and its connection to criminal profiling.


Integrative Project for Public Safety learners
Course Number PSF5991
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners demonstrate proficiency in their specialization area by applying learning from required and elective courses to complete an analysis of a public safety organization or system, or propose a new application in their professional field.


Program description: The master’s Criminal Justice specialization prepares learners to understand and effectively address the complex issues surrounding criminal behavior. This specialization supports learners who are currently caseworkers, probation and parole officers, juvenile specialists, law enforcement professionals, and federal government agents as they advance their careers in corrections, criminal justice, or the judicial system. The Criminal Justice curriculum emphasizes acquisition of knowledge, leadership, and research that prepares learners to facilitate positive changes in criminal justice fields.

Program Name: PhD - Criminal Justice
Advanced Research in Public Safety Issues, Theories, and Concepts
Course Number PSF8002
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with advanced public safety academic content that helps them prepare for course work in their chosen Public Safety specialization. Learners critically analyze various public safety theories, concepts, and research from the scholar-practitioner perspective, including law and legal systems, leadership and leadership theory, community corrections, terrorism, criminological theory, and public safety research methodology


Contemporary Public Safety Leadership
Course Number PSF8601
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the factors contributing to increased demands on public safety agencies and the need for effective leadership at all levels within the public safety domain, including changing demographics, new technologies, globalization, and terrorism. Learners explore emerging issues, challenges, and theoretical assumptions of leadership in the public safety field and evaluate the impact of public safety paradigms on the ability to lead in an era of rapid and constant change.


Theories of Leadership
Course Number PSF8602
Credits 4.0

Learners in this doctoral seminar course examine the leadership theories that inform public safety research and practice. Learners explore foundational tenants of leadership theory and evaluate their associated impacts on organizations, leaders, and followers.


Public Safety Incident Command Paradigm
Course Number PSF8634
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study the development and effectiveness of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) from its inception to its current state. Topics include examining integrated best practices, standards, and techniques critical to successfully managing national emergencies and leading the successful implementation of a national standard of practice for emergency response.


Diversity Issues in Public Safety
Course Number PSF8606
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the impact of increased diversity in our communities and the heightened need to understand and address how racial, ethnic, and cultural pluralism affect human behavior. Topics include ways in which public safety organizations must reflect changes in social attitudes, practices, policies, and concepts such as transparency, diversity, and inclusion within public safety organizations.


Epistemology of Practice Knowledge
Course Number HS8106
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine theories that guide the acquisition of knowledge within human services professions. Learners critically analyze and evaluate the methods used to develop social science theory as a precursor to examining and applying the scientific method. Learners also study theory derivation, the link between research methods and theory, and the ways scholar-practitioners apply the scientific method.


Fundamentals of Social Science Research
Course Number HS8100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to social science research, particularly in the context of human services. Learners focus on becoming educated consumers of research and examine major concepts and techniques of social science research, including problem formulation, identification of variables, literature review, research design, sampling, definition and measurement of study variables, instrument construction, and data collection and analysis. Learners also critically evaluate published research, apply research findings to professional practice, and practice designing research studies in their field of interest.


Quantitative Research Methods in the Human Services
Course Number HS8111
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the research methods and designs human service professionals use to solve specific social problems. Topics include human subjects protection, measurement, development of instruments, data collection and management, and initial phases of data analysis. Learners also consider methodological adaptations when conducting research with vulnerable and diverse populations.


Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Course Number HS8112
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate qualitative research methods and designs. Learners focus on developing the skills used to synthesize information related to qualitative research methodology and examine ethical issues associated with the qualitative research process


Advanced Study in Research Methods
Course Number HS8113
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the relevance and appropriateness of specific research methodologies in preparation for using them in the dissertation. The course emphasizes conceptualizing, planning, and designing a doctoral research proposal and includes topics such as planning and sampling; measurement; statistical and qualitative analytic models; results planning, analysis, and interpretation; and ethical considerations


Sociological Theories of Crime
Course Number PSF8350
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the sociological theories that explain crime causation from the early 19th century to the present. Topics include the ways the environment contributes to criminal behavior, specifically, the effects of association, informal and formal social control mechanism, and location on crime causation. Learners also study original theorist writings to help them develop a high level of theoretical synthesis and application.


Psychological and Biological Theories of Criminal Behavior
Course Number PSF8354
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners develop an understanding of the psychological and biological factors that affect criminal behavior. Learners study the work of theorists and researchers that identify and analyze essential psychological and biological theories, empirical findings, and projections that attempt to explain criminality and further illuminate the criminal mind.



Criminal Justice Policy Analysis
Course Number PSF8362
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ways criminal justice policies are implemented, administered, and evaluated. Learners examine the actual and perceived effects of implemented policies on both the criminal justice agencies responsible for implementing them and the criminal justice system as a whole. Learners also review case study examples to analyze the ways in which political agendas, organizational initiatives, accepted operational practices, and legislation have affected the criminal justice system and administration of justice. Case study examples include the Kansas City Preventive Patrol Experiment; Broken Windows, the police and neighborhood safety study; plea bargaining; federal sentencing guidelines; mandatory sentencing and truth-in-sentencing legislation; and abolishment of parole.


Current Research on Violent Behavior
Course Number PSF8374
Credits 4.0

Through an examination of sociological and psychological perspectives in current research, learners in this course develop a coherent approach to understanding violent behavior. The course also focuses on the ways in which violence is defined by the criminal justice system. Learners practice using the vocabulary of criminal justice practitioners in writing.


Correlates of Crime
Course Number PSF8376
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners explore one of the most perplexing problems faced by any person with a basic knowledge of statistics: the confusion of correlation with cause. Learners in this course examine social class, race, sex, and gender as correlates of crime to determine if patterns exist for understanding their development.


The Penal System: Its Role in the U.S. Society
Course Number PSF8377
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the social and historical foundation of the U.S. correctional institution in depth. The course focuses primarily on issues related to structure and social processes of institutions of confinement and to problems of treatment and rehabilitation. Topics include a systemic evaluation of recidivism, general and specific deterrence, rehabilitation, incapacitation, and retribution in the U.S. correctional system. The emphasis of the course is on philosophies of punishment, sentencing strategies, the prison community, alternatives to incarceration, various reform efforts, and critical issues facing corrections.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number ED9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number ED9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number ED9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number ED9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Program description: The doctoral Criminal Justice specialization prepares learners to understand and effectively address the complex issues surrounding criminal behavior prevention, intervention programming, and development of public policy strategies at the community, state, and national levels. Designed for professionals with a master’s degree in human services, psychology, or a related social sciences field, the Criminal Justice specialization provides learners with opportunities for advanced study and research in the field that support career advancement to academic, supervisory, or administrative levels. Graduates are prepared for leadership, research, and consulting positions that have a positive impact on criminal justice systems.

Criminal Justice Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
Database Applications With Access
Course Number IT235
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basic database concepts. The course stresses the implementation of databases in the real world. Students learn about basic database design and terminology, and learn how to create a variety of databases using MS Access. During the quarter, students develop several databases and become familiar with tables, forms, queries and reports.


Criminology
Course Number CJUS343
Credits 4.0

Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS375
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendant’s Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.


The Laws of Evidence
Course Number CJUS440
Credits 4.0

In this course, the student will be provided a thorough examination of the laws of evidence for criminal justice professionals. Topics include circumstantial and opinion evidence, hearsay, character evidence, relevancy and materiality, privileged communications, expert witness testimony, objections to and exclusion of evidence, and chain of custody.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CJUS448
Credits 4.0

This course examines the skills needed to become a criminal investigator and the procedures criminal investigators use to manage a criminal investigation and prepare a case for court. The course also introduces the student to interview and interrogation techniques.


Forensic Criminology
Course Number CJUS450
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to help develop an appreciation and understanding of crime scene analysis and management. Students will document, collect, preserve, and process physical evidence correctly, analyze it thoroughly, and understand its relevance to the case with special emphasis on forensic science application and physical evidence recognition and collection.


Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

An internship in criminal justice provides the student with the opportunity to work in the criminal justice field under the supervision of a criminal justice professional. The student will synthesize the experience by completing weekly logs and assignments designed to complement the internship experience.


Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

The criminal justice capstone facilitates the integration of the knowledge gained in other courses. The student will focus on the application of skills through case study, interviewing, application of law, and report writing.


Career Planning
Course Number INTD340
Credits 4.0

During this course students will investigate career development theory, cultural aspects of professional career fields, responsibilities professionals have toward society and leadership roles of the professional in today’s society. Students learn techniques for researching and investigating potential career paths and opportunities, identifying transferable skills, preparing a resume, marketing themselves, interviewing, negotiating salary and employment packages, and entering today’s workforce. Students will develop their professional portfolios with papers, projects, and capstones from other courses and work projects to help market themselves in the work place.


Public Administration
Course Number PBAD201
Credits 4.0

Provides an introduction to the field of public administration. The course is focused on the structure, functions and processes of the executive branch; agencies of national, state and local governments; and emphasizes nonprofit organizations as co-actors with government in the policy-making/policy-implementation area.


Project Management Tools
Course Number PM220
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes a step-by-step hands-on approach by using automated project tools such as Microsoft Office Project to help effectively plan, analyze, estimate, manage, and control the resources, schedule, and costs of the project.


Abnormal Psychology
Course Number PSYC336
Credits 4.0

Students will learn to identify and describe major mental disorders and discuss different approaches to treating mental illness. Students will also explore legal issues, research methods used by psychologists, and the factors that influence the etiology and progression of mental disorders. This course will allow students to apply the principles of abnormal psychology to a forensic setting while addressing issues such as psychological /psychiatric evaluations and reports, and court testimony.


Forensic Psychology
Course Number PSYC346
Credits 4.0

This course is intended to provide students with the analysis of behavioral evidence. The course will cover topics such as offender profiling, crime scene reconstruction, applied victimology, distinguishing between modus operandi and signature aspects of a crime, as well as the use of psychological evidence in criminal litigation. This course will prepare students to understand and cope with the use of forensic psychology in law enforcement and the court room.


Licit and Illicit Drugs
Course Number SOCL325
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the use, abuse, and addictive nature of mood-altering chemicals outside of alcohol use and abuse. The student will gain a working knowledge of facts and research into the abuse of a wide variety of legal and illegal drugs, along with approaches to prevention and treatment.


Social Psychology
Course Number SOCL350
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study examples of individual persons interacting with the social environment. Specific topics include conformity, aggression, prejudice and interpersonal attraction.


American Diversity
Course Number SOCL356
Credits 4.0

The student will explore race, class, and gender in a global context with a special emphasis on American society and the multicultural experience. Descriptions and analysis of relevant historical context along with discussion of pertinent societal events are also included. The student will be introduced to principal terms, concepts and theories in the field.


Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.


Anatomy and Physiology
Course Number BIO122
Credits 4.0

Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


Professional Speaking
Course Number ENGL210
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations


World History and Culture I
Course Number HIST210
Credits 4.0

HIST210 covers major cultures and civilizations of the world from ancient times to the birth of western imperialism in the 16th Century. Topics include cultures and historical experiences representative of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and pre-Columbian America. Of particular interest is the evolution of world religions or philosophies that prevail and are still critical in the modern world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference for the historical events which shaped the modern world outside Indo-European civilization.


Creating Academic and Professional Success
Course Number INTD111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for academic, professional, and life related success. The course helps students acquire, develop, and utilize basic learning tools. The course also teaches critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation methods and practices which will allow them to formulate reasonable alternatives, hypotheses, and/or premises for academic, social, and professional use. A clear, precise, fair, and unbiased approach to analysis, evaluation, problem-solving, and decision-making activities is emphasized and promoted.


Information and Technology Literacy
Course Number IT105
Credits 4.0

Database Applications With Access
Course Number IT235
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basic database concepts. The course stresses the implementation of databases in the real world. Students learn about basic database design and terminology, and learn how to create a variety of databases using MS Access. During the quarter, students develop several databases and become familiar with tables, forms, queries and reports.


Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL310
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an understanding of ethical expectations and prepares the student to make decisions that are ethically correct and legal. The study of ethics includes the development of ethical standards, prima facie obligations, responsibilities, societal aims and professional codes of conduct. The course will follow the aims of normative ethics. The students should expect to participate and become involved in case studies, hypothetical situations and discussions to develop an attitude that is ethically acceptable, as well as to practice the concepts learned to aid in decision making.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSYC100
Credits 4.0

Taking this course will enable the student to have a better understanding of the basic principles of human behavior. The course also includes a foundation in the background of the field of Psychology, the workings of the human mind and senses, the disciplines and modes of treatment, and the way that Psychology affects our everyday lives. Additional emphasis will be in areas of perception, emotion, learning, motivation, and development.


Accounting I
Course Number ACCT101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces fundamental accounting concepts and explores the accounting environment. It covers the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and introduces the concept of internal accounting controls.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number BADM305
Credits 4.0

This course addresses some tools and insights necessary to understand and analyze the characteristics of human beings and organizational situations. It further explores both organization structure and human variables within that structure to contribute to the long-term survival of an enterprise and include team building.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS141
Credits 4.0

Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing
Course Number CJUS201
Credits 4.0

Homeland Security
Course Number CJUS250
Credits 4.0

American Corrections
Course Number CJUS263
Credits 4.0

Victimology
Course Number CJUS300
Credits 4.0

Juvenile Delinquency
Course Number CJUS342
Credits 4.0

Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS365
Credits 4.0

World History and Culture II
Course Number HIST310
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Human Resource Management
Course Number HRMT210
Credits 4.0

This course examines the role and function of the Human Resource Department in the organization. It is an overview of human resource activities including job analysis, performance appraisals, recruiting, selection, compensation, and career development. Additionally, employee diversity, labor relations, organization development and equal employment opportunity will be discussed.


Managing Diversity
Course Number HRMT430
Credits 4.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Art and Music Appreciation
Course Number HUMN200
Credits 4.0

Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOCL101
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the organization of social behavior and the relationship of society and social conditions. Emphasis will be placed on culture, norm, stratification, systems, structure, social institutions and social change in different cultures.


Program description: Students entering the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program can gain a solid knowledge base in the triad areas of the courts, corrections, and law enforcement in addition to the management skills needed for career advancement.
The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is a unique program in that it offers students a component of forensic study not usually available at the undergraduate level. A Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice can help prepare students for positions such as police officer, deputy sheriff, fraud investigator, highway patrol officer and more.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice - Human Services
English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


Interview and Interrogation
Course Number CJUS460
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge base of general issues regarding effective techniques which apply to both accusatory and non-accusatory intake/interviews/interrogations. The course includes information on the legal aspects of interrogations and the admissibility of confessions. In addition to methods of achieving successful outcomes, topics include physiological and psychological aspects of interviews and interrogations, detecting deception, non-verbal behavior, and persuasion. Students will train via recorded practicum of mock interviews and interrogations in an interrogation room setting.


Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

Grant Writing Basics
Course Number PBAD301
Credits 4.0

Students will learn the essential skills of researching a proposal, identifying stakeholders, incorporating the necessary drafting steps, and crafting a perfect match between a funder’s and solicitor’s needs. The course provides guidance on writing proposals for a variety of types of organizations.


Human Service Practice in the Criminal Justice Setting
Course Number CJHS300
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the work of helping professionals in the context of the criminal justice system along with identifying the theory base and skills involved in Human Services.


Study of Alcohol Use and Abuse
Course Number CJHS311
Credits 5.0

This course surveys the use, abuse, and addictive nature of ethyl alcohol, and the treatment of alcoholism. The student will gain a basic knowledge of alcohol use and abuse, alcoholism, and the broad range of current approaches to prevention and treatment.


Child Abuse
Course Number CJHS315
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth study of child abuse in the context of the criminal justice and social welfare systems. Students will learn to identify risk factors, signs and symptoms of child abuse as well as the legal requirements for interventions in child abuse cases. Students will use case studies to analyze the problems in child abuse investigations and the treatment methods and services available to abused children.


Alcohol & Drug Treatment Continuum
Course Number CJHS320
Credits 5.0

In this course, the student will gain a basic knowledge of a range of therapeutic interventions involved in alcohol and other drug abuse in society, in families and with individuals, as well as how these interventions address a variety of problems. Students will be introduced to the continuum of care covers care from prevention through rehabilitation.


Drug Use and Abuse
Course Number CJHS325
Credits 5.0

This course provides a survey of use, abuse and the addictive nature of mood altering chemicals outside the use and abuse of alcohol. Students will gain a working knowledge of factors affecting the abuse of a wide variety of legal and illegal drugs along with the influence of drug use on behaviors. Approaches to prevention and treatment and available resources will be discussed.


Ethics for the CD Counselor
Course Number CJHS337
Credits 5.0

This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they related to the practice of counseling and client/counselor relationships. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for counselors, client rights and legal implications, and what defines quality client care.


Chemical Dependency Elective - Special Topics
Course Number CJHS399
Credits 5.0

This course will be specifically devoted to addiction- related contemporary issues. Appropriate topics may include: special populations; diagnosis, assessment, advanced counseling for individuals, groups, or families; theory, research, and practice in addictions; practice or policies relating to addictions; scientifically supported models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention; continuing care for addiction and substance-related problems; dual diagnosis issues; addictions and domestic violence, violence in the workplace, criminal activity, sexual abuse, child abuse and neglect; counselor wellness, and professional development.


Foundations of Individual Counseling
Course Number CJHS411
Credits 5.0

This course serves as an introduction to a variety of counseling theories, therapeutic approaches and counseling skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of the theoretical and foundations of counseling and basic counseling skills.


Foundations of Group Counseling
Course Number CJHS421
Credits 5.0

Foundations of Group Counseling provides an introduction to the dynamics of group counseling theories, therapeutic approaches and facilitative skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of, and experience with, the theoretical foundations of group counseling and group counseling skills.


Introduction to Family Counseling
Course Number CJHS425
Credits 5.0

This course provides an introduction to family systems theories, therapeutic approaches and counseling skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of the theoretical foundations of family counseling and specific family counseling skills.


Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Course Number PSYC301
Credits 5.0

Students will explore the assessment and treatment of child and adolescent psychopathologies and discuss evidence-based treatments. Case studies will provide an opportunity to analyze case formulations and the complexities in the nature of childhood disorders.


Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Art and Music Appreciation
Course Number HUMN200
Credits 4.0

Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.


Anatomy and Physiology
Course Number BIO122
Credits 4.0

English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


Professional Speaking
Course Number ENGL210
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations


Creating Academic and Professional Success
Course Number INTD111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for academic, professional, and life related success. The course helps students acquire, develop, and utilize basic learning tools. The course also teaches critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation methods and practices which will allow them to formulate reasonable alternatives, hypotheses, and/or premises for academic, social, and professional use. A clear, precise, fair, and unbiased approach to analysis, evaluation, problem-solving, and decision-making activities is emphasized and promoted.


Information and Technology Literacy
Course Number IT105
Credits 4.0

Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSYC100
Credits 4.0

Taking this course will enable the student to have a better understanding of the basic principles of human behavior. The course also includes a foundation in the background of the field of Psychology, the workings of the human mind and senses, the disciplines and modes of treatment, and the way that Psychology affects our everyday lives. Additional emphasis will be in areas of perception, emotion, learning, motivation, and development.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOCL101
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the organization of social behavior and the relationship of society and social conditions. Emphasis will be placed on culture, norm, stratification, systems, structure, social institutions and social change in different cultures.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS141
Credits 4.0

Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing
Course Number CJUS201
Credits 4.0

Homeland Security
Course Number CJUS250
Credits 4.0

American Corrections
Course Number CJUS263
Credits 4.0

Victimology
Course Number CJUS300
Credits 4.0

Juvenile Delinquency
Course Number CJUS342
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CJUS343
Credits 4.0

Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior.


Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS365
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS375
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendant’s Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.


The Laws of Evidence
Course Number CJUS440
Credits 4.0

In this course, the student will be provided a thorough examination of the laws of evidence for criminal justice professionals. Topics include circumstantial and opinion evidence, hearsay, character evidence, relevancy and materiality, privileged communications, expert witness testimony, objections to and exclusion of evidence, and chain of custody.


Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

An internship in criminal justice provides the student with the opportunity to work in the criminal justice field under the supervision of a criminal justice professional. The student will synthesize the experience by completing weekly logs and assignments designed to complement the internship experience.


American Government
Course Number PBAD200
Credits 4.0

Provides the student with an overview of the framework and basic functions of the various branches of government, the role of politics in democracy, and the relationship of government and public policy. Students will also consider the similarities and differences between national, state, and local governments.


Public Administration
Course Number PBAD201
Credits 4.0

Provides an introduction to the field of public administration. The course is focused on the structure, functions and processes of the executive branch; agencies of national, state and local governments; and emphasizes nonprofit organizations as co-actors with government in the policy-making/policy-implementation area.


Abnormal Psychology
Course Number PSYC336
Credits 4.0

Students will learn to identify and describe major mental disorders and discuss different approaches to treating mental illness. Students will also explore legal issues, research methods used by psychologists, and the factors that influence the etiology and progression of mental disorders. This course will allow students to apply the principles of abnormal psychology to a forensic setting while addressing issues such as psychological /psychiatric evaluations and reports, and court testimony.


Social Psychology
Course Number SOCL350
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study examples of individual persons interacting with the social environment. Specific topics include conformity, aggression, prejudice and interpersonal attraction.


American Diversity
Course Number SOCL356
Credits 4.0

The student will explore race, class, and gender in a global context with a special emphasis on American society and the multicultural experience. Descriptions and analysis of relevant historical context along with discussion of pertinent societal events are also included. The student will be introduced to principal terms, concepts and theories in the field.


Program description: With this Criminal Justice program you can gain a solid knowledge base in the triad areas of the courts, corrections, and law enforcement in addition to the management skills needed for career advancement. CTU's Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice degree program is unique in that it offers a component of forensic study not usually available at the undergraduate level. It's designed to help prepare you for a wide range of careers in the criminal justice system at the local, state or federal level and can provide a strong foundation if your long-range goal is to pursue a law degree.

For students with eligible college or military experience, Colorado Technical University's Bachelor's Degree Completion Program is designed to enable completion of a Bachelor's degree in as little as 17 months.*

*The 17-month Bachelor's degree assumes that all Associate-level requirements have been met through an Associate degree or the equivalent. Program length varies by program.

Program Name: Master of Science in Management - Criminal Justice
Crime Laboratory Management
Course Number CJUS610
Credits 4.0

Taking this course the student will cover key issues related to the professional management of the crime lab in the administrative, political and operational environment. Ethical, quality and personnel issues are also examined.


Law Enforcement Management
Course Number CJUS620
Credits 44.0

This course will cover the use of effective tools for case management and process analysis in the judicial system. It includes court performance standards and explores the roles and purposes of courts, the internal and external environments in which they operate and management theory as applied to courses.


Court Services Management
Course Number CJUS630
Credits 4.0

This course will blend law enforcement theory and practice to create a proactive approach for successful management of personnel, resources, and services to the community. The student will be involved in an in-depth study of management in law enforcement including operating principles, communication and the future of law enforcement.


Corrections Management
Course Number CJUS640
Credits 4.0

This course provides comprehensive coverage of correctional administration. It focuses on problem solving with real-life applications of issues for correctional administrators. Additionally, it includes the historical perspective of correctional administration, the management of offenders, the prison setting, the correctional staff and an overview of the future in correctional administration.


Terrorism and Homeland Security Management
Course Number CJUS650
Credits 4.0

This course covers security management, including risk assessment, planning and program administration, and explores the intergovernmental system relationships in homeland security. The course will provide the student with an interdisciplinary approach in defining terrorism in analysis of counterterrorism strategies for planned responses.


Public Administration
Course Number MGMT623
Credits 4.0

This course develops the system structure overlay and develops the framework for day-to-today operations in the public sector; tracking key metrics, planning, marshalling resources, executing objectives and assessing quality.


Grants and Contracts
Course Number MGMT635
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will cover proposal and grant-writing preparation from groundwork to the final analysis of the finished product. Practical guidance is given on how to construct a realistic proposal and how to respond to a call for contracts from federal or state agencies. Developing public relations and forming relationships with media are also an important part of successful appropriations.


Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments
Course Number EMBA690
Credits 4.0

Students will master analytical and integrative tools to perform in-depth analyses of industries, firms, and competitors. Course material includes methods to predict competitive behavior and develop and implement strategic plans to achieve and sustain a competitive profile in the emerging global marketplace.


Operational Human Resource Management
Course Number HRMT645
Credits 4.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number BADM305
Credits 4.0

This course addresses some tools and insights necessary to understand and analyze the characteristics of human beings and organizational situations. It further explores both organization structure and human variables within that structure to contribute to the long-term survival of an enterprise and include team building.


Program description: Master of Science in Management - Concentration in Criminal Justice
The criminal justice field is expanding at the national level in the areas of corrections, law enforcement, law and the courts, and in many types of diversionary and ancillary programs that support the system*. As a result, there is a demand for criminal justice professionals with leadership and management skills, and for those with expertise in program evaluation, budgeting and policymaking.

Our Master of Science in Management with a concentration in Criminal Justice will challenge you to develop your management skills and gain expertise in program evaluation, budgeting and policy-making relevant to the criminal justice system. You will have the opportunity to examine how court rulings, public opinion, research and legislative actions have influenced justice-related policies – and to explore topics such as homeland security, evidence management, and dealing with challenges faced by modern public safety agencies.

The MSM in Criminal Justice Degree Concentration includes CTU Academic Certificates
CTU Academic Certificates are résumé-enhancing credentials built right into course content, so you can progressively add marketable skills to your professional qualification as you study.

Public Administration
Grant Writing
Criminal Justice
Homeland Security

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice - Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS14
Credits 4.0

This course surveys the agencies that comprise the criminal justice system which are primarily law enforcement, the courts and corrections. The student will learn the processes of these components and their relationship to one another as well as the roles of related agencies


Criminal Justice Ethic
Course Number CJUS26
Credits 4.0

This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they relate to the field of criminal justice. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for criminal justice professionals, and the student will apply ethical standards to different situations they may encounter working in the criminal justice professions


Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS29
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the general principles of criminal law. Specifically it includes both the policy and procedure of criminal law, giving students the ability to apply the essential elements of general criminal law principles to specific substantive crimes


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS375
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendant’s Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.


Terrorism: Origins, Ideologies and Goals
Course Number HLS110
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the study and history of terrorism. Students will learn the ideologies of many of the terrorist organizations that have impacted the United States and other nations. Students will also gain an understanding of the motivations and goals of many terrorist organizations.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number HLS120
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to give the student an introduction to emergency management – an all-hazards approach: definitions of important terms; types and history of hazards; and organizational responses to natural, accidental, and man-made hazards. Students will be introduced to the concepts of preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery.


Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy
Course Number HLS200
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Strategy. This is the process an organization uses to determine its direction, and make decisions to pursue this direction. Students will be introduced to resource allocation, including capital, technology, and human resources.


Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies and Applications
Course Number HLS210
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the technology and systems utilized by Homeland Security and Emergency Management organizations. This course also looks at how terrorist organizations have and do use technology to their benefit.


HR and Administrative Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS300
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the many human resource and administrative issues as they relate to Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about diversity in the Homeland Security workplace, as well as how diversity impacts how homeland security and emergency management personnel do their jobs.


Understanding Critical Infrastructures
Course Number HLS305
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the protection of critical infrastructures, one of the core functions of Homeland Security. In this course, the student will learn how to identify the different sectors of critical infrastructure, and the assets within various sectors that must be protected. The student will also be introduced to strategies utilized to protect various key assets.


Comparative Approaches to Event Management
Course Number HLS310
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the role of Emergency Management in dealing with both natural disasters and man-made attacks. In this course, the student will learn the similarities and differences in dealing with different types of catastrophes, and the challenges faced by each type. Students will also consider the implications for strategic planning presented by both natural disasters and manmade attacks.


Interagency Relationships in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS315
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the nature of the relationships that exist between the various agencies involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Federal, state, and local agencies all play a role in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and this course helps the student to understand how the various agencies interact with each other and work together to protect this nation from all types of hazards and threats. Students will also develop their leadership skills, a vital component to successful communication and coordination with other agencies.


Private Sector Role in Homeland Securit
Course Number HLS320
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the role of the private sector in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about the functions of private organizations involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, including collaboration between public and private agencies. The student will also develop a strategic plan for a private agency.


Research Methodology and Policy Analysis
Course Number HLS325
Credits 4.0

Understanding the role of research and policy analysis in homeland security and emergency management is incredibly critical. Students will learn and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology within the homeland security and emergency management system and become familiar with the range and scope of quantitative and qualitative tools available to the criminal justice researcher. This course will assess the homeland security and emergency management system including research theory, inquiry structure, and modes of observation, data interpretation, program evaluation, and policy analysis. This course is designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of statistical analysis, developing and constructing a research plan, and evaluating the results of said research in the context of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.


Advanced Application of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies
Course Number HLS330
Credits 4.0

This course takes a practical look at the limitations presented by current technology. Also, this course introduces the student to the concept of interoperability, which addresses the ability of diverse agencies and jurisdictions to communicate, to exchange data, and to use that information effectively.


Emergent Topics in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS340
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to topics on the forefront of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. This course is designed to reflect the most current state of discourse on topics relating to Homeland Security and Emergency Management.


Introduction to Intelligence
Course Number HLS350
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the principles of intelligence, the different intelligence disciplines, the intelligence cycles, and the intelligence community.


Counterintelligence
Course Number HLS360
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to counterintelligence concepts, such as counterintelligence basic principles, concepts, missions, and functions. Students will also be introduced to counterintelligence operations and techniques. Students will also learn the history and evolution of counterintelligence in the United States.


Constitutional Law and Public Policy Analysis
Course Number HLS400
Credits 44.0

In this course the student will discuss and analyze concepts of Constitutional Law and Public Policy as they apply to Homeland Security. The student will evaluate homeland security policies in terms of their effects on civil liberties, and the public’s involvement in homeland security.


The Psychology of Fear Management and Terrorism
Course Number HLS410
Credits 4.0

This course looks at the motivations of terrorist groups, and the psychological impact of terrorist attacks. It will aid the student in understanding the role of government and the media in shaping the public perception of, and response to, terrorist events.


Strategic Planning and Budgeting for Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS420
Credits 4.0

This course further develops the student’s knowledge base for strategic planning and budgeting, building on the concepts learned in HLS200, Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy, taking a more in-depth look at the strategic planning process.


Planning for Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS430
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the planning process for Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Students will be introduced to the “how-to” aspects of planning.


Local Emergency Management and Civil Preparedness
Course Number HLS450
Credits 4.0

This course develops the student’s knowledge in the area of local emergency management. Students will learn of the challenges faced by local agencies, such as communication and coordination. The student will develop strategies to implement at the local level to enhance civil preparedness.


Advanced Application of Intelligence in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS460
Credits 4.0

This course looks at the relationship between local law enforcement and the intelligence community. It introduces the student to state and local intelligence activities, and it discusses policing and actionable intelligence.


Evaluating Risk in Critical Infrastructure
Course Number HLS470
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of risk assessment. At the completion of the course, students will be able to understand the value of various risk tools, and apply those tools to any critical infrastructure to reduce the risk associated with future terrorist attacks. The aim of this course is to show how to analyze critical infrastructure systems, their weaknesses, and how to formulate strategies that allocate resources in the most efficient and effective manner.


Knowledge Into Practice: Communications and Emergency Planning
Course Number HLS480
Credits 4.0

This course integrates many of the primary areas of focus in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, such as: intelligence, strategic planning, critical infrastructure, research and analysis, technology and strategic communications. The student will develop an emergency plan in one of the four primary areas of preparedness, response, mitigation, or recovery.


Homeland Security
Course Number CJUS250
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CJUS343
Credits 4.0

Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior.


Professional Communications
Course Number ENG210
Credits 4.0

This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process.


Real World Writing
Course Number ENGL125
Credits 4.0

This Is One Of The Most Important Courses You Can Take—it Will Lay The Foundation For Your Entire College And Professional Career As An Educated Person. In It, We Will Address How To Write And Speak To Make A Point; How To Use Good Grammar, Vocabulary And Logical Thinking; As Well As How To Find A Suitable Topic For Your Writing Assignments. We Will Start With The Basics: Reviewing Sentences And Paragraphs, And Then Move On To The Classic Five-part College Essay Or Theme. 321 Effective November 15, 2010 For Students Starting On Or After January 2, 2011 There Are Different Rules Of The Game For Writing Academically Than Writing For Business. We Want To Teach Students The “culture” Of Being Solid College-level Communicators And Successful Professionals. This Workshop Course Is Highly Experiential, Supportive, And Collaborative, As Students Read And Critique Each Others’ Work. This Is The First In A Sequence On Composition And Writing Skills. The Second Course, Engl126, In This Series Will Build Upon This One—addressing How To Research And Use Resources Without Plagiarizing, How To Utilize The Apa Formatting For Documentation And How To Make A Persuasive Argument. Our View Of The Required Composition Sequence Is That It Is Essential For All Who Want To Become Skilled Critical Thinkers And Educated People.


Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose
Course Number ENGL126
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Workshop That Builds Upon Engl125—real World Writing. It Is A Workshop Format—highly Experiential And Hands On. Students Practice Drafting Progressively Complex Papers, Demonstrating The Capacity To Do College Level Research And Write Essays That Convey Information, Make A Point Or Provide An Opinion. They Will Study The Apa Handbook, Learn To Do Research (beyond Wikipedia!) And Cite Resources Without Plagiarizing Them. In Addition, This Course Uses Readings To Demonstrate Excellence And Eloquence In Speaking And Writing, Emphasizing The Crucial Synergy Between Learning To Write And Developing The Practice Of Intelligent Reading Of Texts. This Will Be A Highly Collaborative Course, With Students Reading And Critiquing Others’ Work, As A Means To Create A Learning Community As Well As Develop Critical Capacities.


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


American Culture in Transition
Course Number HIS120
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural “isms,” and America’s relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society.


World Literature
Course Number LTR215
Credits 4.0

This literature course examines a wide range of stories, poems, and plays. Students learn how to interact with and respond to literature.


Real World Math
Course Number MATH105
Credits 4.0

In this course, students explore how to survive in a number-driven world, to increase their mathematical knowledge for making logical decisions, and to begin to develop connections with mathematics in their related field of study and daily lives.


Math for Professionals
Course Number MATH140
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better understand and appreciate the study of mathematics. Specifically, this course focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope toward business applications.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Principles of Business
Course Number MGM110
Credits 4.0

This survey course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled.


Organizational Behavior Principles
Course Number MGM335
Credits 4.0

In this course students examine individual and group behavior within the context of the organizational design and culture. This course provides theoretical and practical knowledge for understanding topics such as motivation, leadership, managerial decision-making, group processes, and conflict resolution.


American Government
Course Number PBAD200
Credits 4.0

Provides the student with an overview of the framework and basic functions of the various branches of government, the role of politics in democracy, and the relationship of government and public policy. Students will also consider the similarities and differences between national, state, and local governments.


Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

This course surveys major areas of psychological science, including human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, learning, memory, and biological influences.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Sociology
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students will develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Building Your Success Strategy Plan
Course Number UNIV101
Credits 4.0

UNIV101 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students learn effective tools and skills necessary for academic success, integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.


Career Planning and Management
Course Number UNIV201
Credits 4.0

This course provides the framework for effective career management as students gain insight into themselves and potential career fields, acquiring knowledge and skills needed to successfully plan career transitions.


Program description: Homeland Security encompasses a broad range of disciplines that play vital roles in the protection of our nation. Developed with guidance provided by the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security, this program is designed to help students acquire an in-depth understanding of emergency management, technology, communications, intelligence, critical infrastructure, terrorism and other knowledge needed in a wide range of government and private organizations. Upon successful completion of this program, graduates can be prepared to apply the fundamentals of homeland security and emergency management to create plans, analyze risk and propose solutions.

Criminal Justice Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BS in Justice Studies
Introduction to Justice Studies
Course Number JUS 104
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the basic components of the criminal justice system in the United States today: corrections,courts, and law enforcement.


Crime and Criminology
Course Number JUS 110
Credits 4.0

This course provides an examination of classic and contemporary theories of crime causation, including psychological and social causes of crime and theories of punishment.


Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 250
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Examination Of Issues Relating To Justice Policies, Perspectives, Techniques, Roles, Institutional Arrangement, Management And Administration, Use Of Research, And Innovative Patterns. Prerequisite: Jus 104 And Jus 110.


The Police Function
Course Number JUS 320
Credits 4.0

This course provides an examination of the objectives, strategies,tactics, programs, roles, perspectives, public perception, and interagency relationships of the police.


The Adjudication Function
Course Number JUS 325
Credits 4.0

This is a writing-intensive course emphasizing the objectives,strategies, programs, roles, perspectives, and interagency relationships of the courts.


The Correctional Function
Course Number JUS 330
Credits 4.0

This course provides an examination of the objectives, strategies,programs, roles, perspectives, and interagency relationships of correctional agencies.


Criminal Law
Course Number JUS 430
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to criminal liability with an emphasis on the elements of a crime and governmental sanctions of individual conduct as formulated by the legislature and the court system.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number JUS 435
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the procedural process from a constitutional perspective as it relates to due process in the context of crime control.


Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
Course Number JUS 452
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of causes and responses to juvenile crime viewed through the prism of evolving societal perspectives on the criminal culpability of youth. Prerequisite: JUS 250.


Ethics in the Criminal Justice System
Course Number JUS 460
Credits 4.0

Criminal Liability With Emphasis On The Elements Of A Crime.governmental Sanctions Of Individual Conduct As Formulated By The Legislature And The Court System. Prerequisites: Jus 100 And Jus 101.


Terrorism’s Impact on Emergency Management
Course Number JUS 442
Credits 4.0

This course examines the historical and political impact of terrorism on emergency management, including examples of terrorist activity, a summary of federal government efforts, and media coverage of terrorism. Also EMM 442.


Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Science in Justice Studies prepares students to enter careers in law
enforcement, governmental and private agencies, research, social work, political science, and a variety of other
fields. Graduates will be able to describe the components of the justice system from a systems perspective,
including function, organization, issues, practices, and interrelationship of law enforcement agencies, the courts,
and the corrections system.

Program Name: MS in Criminal Justice: Law Enforcement
Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 515
Credits 4.0

This course explores contemporary law enforcement management by examining personality, values, groups, power dimensions, decision making, conflict management, change, and organization development.


Restorative Justice
Course Number JUS 520
Credits 4.0

This course compares and contrasts traditional goals of punishment (rehabilitation, incapacitation, retribution, and deterrence) with the concepts of restorative justice. Topics include community service, victim assistance, victim-offender mediation, and restitution. Restorative justice seeks a balance between the need to rehabilitate offenders while executing a duty to protect the public.


Research Methods
Course Number JUS 510
Credits 4.0

This course provides a fundamental analysis of research and a methodological evaluation of criminal justice topics. This course familiarizes students with aspects of statistical analysis and research design relevant to today’s justice environment using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Additionally, coverage is provided for use of research design in community action


Forensic Psychology
Course Number JUS 610
Credits 4.0

This course provides an objective study of the many roles psychology plays in the legal system, including expert witnesses, criminal profilers, and trial consultants for jury selection and child custody hearings.


Criminal Investigations
Course Number JUS 521
Credits 4.0

This course enhances students’ understanding of criminal investigative procedure, collection and preservation of evidence, chain of custody concerns, computer forensics, investigative jurisdiction, administration, and use of information gathering techniques.


Exploration of Law and Public Policy
Course Number JUS 620
Credits 4.0

This course explores the interrelatedness of law and socioeconomic concerns and attempts to generate a holistic perspective of society and social control for those charged with the administration of justice


Terrorism and Homeland Security
Course Number JUS 524
Credits 4.0

This course provides insight into the historical causes, strategies, and tactics of terrorism, as well as counterterrorism planning and utilization of law enforcement assets to prevent, detect, and deter acts of terrorism. Also covered are constitutional issues regarding terrorism suspects, long-term detention, financial embargoes of private funds, and other issues pertinent to the modern political climate.


Ethics and Liability for Policing and Corrections
Course Number JUS 618
Credits 4.0

This course explores the subcultures created by police and correctional officers. Topics include the need for building a subculture of mutual support and survival in a dangerous profession, dilemmas of new officers entering corrupt departments, and ways administrators can help police and correctional officers rediscover their community.


Capstone
Course Number JUS 651
Credits 4.0

This course is taken in the final term of the graduate program. It focuses on professional portfolio development and a final written proposal by the graduate. The portfolio will contain the graduate’s curriculum vitae, exemplars of writing from graduate courses, a statement of criminal justice philosophy, a 5-year plan for professional goals, and a research topic paper/written proposal. A final written proposal must focus on how the graduate will use the totality of the learning experience to examine and improve the criminal justice system at the federal, state, county, or city level. The proposal must exhibit adequate research, coordination within the extant layers of justice policy, realistic consideration of available resources, and a reasonable timeline of benchmarks.


Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 250
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Examination Of Issues Relating To Justice Policies, Perspectives, Techniques, Roles, Institutional Arrangement, Management And Administration, Use Of Research, And Innovative Patterns. Prerequisite: Jus 104 And Jus 110.


Program description: The Master of Science in Criminal Justice with an Emphasis in Law Enforcement is designed for students
seeking to expand their understanding of the law, social order, and justice. This program is particularly suited to
law enforcement personnel who wish to advance in their field, as well as corrections, probation, and parole
officers; law clerks; and other decision makers who address questions of public policy, social research, and
administration of justice in the public sphere. This program also prepares students for work in legal foundations
where in-depth issues are contended.

Criminal Justice Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Criminal Justice Schools (campus and online)

University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
University of Georgia
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 156
Rank in USA 38th
Michigan State University
Total Programs 220
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 45th
George Washington University
Total Programs 194
Number of Subjects 171
Rank in USA 52nd
Rutgers University-New Brunswick
Total Programs 152
Number of Subjects 117
Rank in USA 55th
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
Indiana University-Bloomington
Total Programs 162
Number of Subjects 121
Rank in USA 59th
North Carolina State University at Raleigh
Total Programs 175
Number of Subjects 137
Rank in USA 70th
University of Central Florida
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 71st
The College of New Jersey
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 80
Rank in USA 75th
Syracuse University
Total Programs 152
Number of Subjects 133
Rank in USA 89th
University of Richmond
Total Programs 78
Number of Subjects 70
Rank in USA 90th
American University
Total Programs 118
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 97th
Temple University
Total Programs 210
Number of Subjects 158
Rank in USA 105th
Drexel University
Total Programs 125
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 108th
Marquette University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 111th
Marist College
Total Programs 81
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 120th
Appalachian State University
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 130th
Washington State University
Total Programs 2
Number of Subjects 93
Rank in USA 131st