Online Criminology Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its criminology courses to be successful criminologists, crime scene forensics specialists, criminal scientists, crime scene technicians, etc. and connect them to future employers. Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists make on average $50,500 per year and there are about 92,910 of them employed today.

Criminology Organizations Criminology Common Job Tasks
  • identifying suspects
  • filing documents
  • investigating crime
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Criminology Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: BSBA - Criminal Justice
academic strategies for the business professional
Course Number CS 113
Credits 5.0

Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces the student to the purposes and processes of the university.An emphasis is placed on study, communication and thinking skills that support academic achievement.


Accounting For Nonaccounting Majors
Course Number AC 113
Credits 5.0

h is course emphasizes the use of accounting by managers in a business environment. Topics covered include accounting concepts, internal control, current assets, noncurrent assets, liabilities, and equity. h e course is specii cally designed for nonaccounting majors, and emphasis is placed on accounting areas affecting business owners and managers.


Accounting 1
Course Number AC 114

This course reviews the complete accounting cycle and the creation and management of accounting information for business entities.


Macroeconomics
Course Number Bu 204

This course includes analysis and study of macroeconomic theory, principles and practice.


Business math
Course Number MM 255

Business math presents math skills and knowledge that students can apply to solve financial problems


Introduction To Management
Course Number MT 140
Credits 5.0

This course will give students an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to real-world management problems and scenarios.


Human Resource Mangement
Course Number MT 203

Finance
Course Number MT 217
Credits 5.0

Marketing
Course Number MT 219
Credits 5.0

Managerial Accounting for Business Professionals
Course Number AC 330
Credits 6.0

This course emphasizes how accounting information can be used to aid management in planning business activities, controlling operations, and making decisions that promote profitability and sustainability. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, budgeting, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, variance analysis, balanced scorecard, and relevant cost analysis in the decision-making process.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number MT 302
Credits 6.0

This course explores human behavior in organizations. Students examine individual behavior, attitudes, personality, values, perception, and emotions and how these affect organization outcomes. The course also looks at the theories, concepts, and application of motivation, as well as the importance of stress management and professional ethics and etiquette. Students gain an understanding and appreciation for communication processes, channels, and styles. They also gain a set of organizational design tools.


Business Law
Course Number MT 311
Credits 6.0

Marketing Research
Course Number MT 355
Credits 6.0

This course explores how an organization collects and interprets information about the marketplace to develop effective strategies. It covers the use of statistical and analytical techniques used to measure and predict consumer behavior, assist product and service developers, guide sales or service management decisions, and evaluate marketing initiatives. The use of the Internet in marketing research is an integral part of the course.


Business Process Management
Course Number MT 400
Credits 6.0

This Course Studies Business Process Analysis Through The Business Process Management (bpm) Model. Topics Include Bpm Phase Steps, Outputs In Relation To The Model As A Whole, And The Roles Of The Essential Elements That Define The Model Universe: Leadership, Project Management, And People Change Management. Common Risks And Mitigation Strategies Will Be Assessed Throughout The Course Of Study.


Managerial Economics
Course Number MT 445
Credits 6.0

This course examines the major economic factors that affect business decision making. This course will focus on microeconomics, macroeconomics, and international trade. Students will learn applications of economic principles.


Management Capstone Externship
Course Number MT 490
Credits 6.0

This course gives students practical job experience in the field of business. Students will arrange an externship working in a management position with a cooperating employer. The externship provides students an opportunity to learn about a business management career field through practical, real-world experiences and mentoring from a business professional. This experience will enrich their business and management skills and provide a better understanding of the level of expertise needed to be successful in their career. Externships must be preapproved by the Dean prior to the start of the term. Students who fail this course on the first attempt may not reenroll in this course without approval of the Dean.


Supervisory Practices in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJ345
Credits 5.0

The Kaplan University Correction Certificate Program is intended to prepare students to pursue entry-level and supervisory position in today's complex correction environment


Organizational Behavior in Criminal Justice Organizations
Course Number CJ 421
Credits 6.0

This course explores human behavior in criminal justice organizations. Students examine individual behaviors, attitudes, personalities, values, perceptions, and emotions and how these affect organization outcomes. The course also looks at the theories, concepts, and application of motivation as well as the importance of stress management and professional ethics in criminal justice organizations.


Human Resource Development for the
Course Number CJ 422
Credits 6.0

This course is aimed at criminal justice professionals looking to increase their knowledge and potential within the field of human resource development. Th e course will blend human resource development with sociology, psychology, and ethics based within the criminal justice context. Th e course will look in detail at leadership development and management. Students will study the importance of effective communication as well as the impact of diversity on individual and group behavior. Students will read case studies examining race, gender, and power dynamics within a criminal justice framework. Topics will include managing authority and power, racial profiling, controlling disciplinary problems within the workforce,following issues and topics: basic management and organizational theory; individual roles of security management personnel; policy and procedure; current computer applications that can help all aspects of security function; the importance of security statistics; and how to sell security to the organization. One of the course’s major themes is the importance of security within the organization and within the community.


Application of Management Theory toCriminal Justice Organizations
Course Number CJ 424
Credits 6.0

This course takes a look into police management and supervision. The course will investigate the application of management techniques and strategies with regard to the criminal justice system. Information about law enforcement supervision at the local, state, and federal levels will be investigated. Issues regarding the internal and external dealings of law enforcement agencies, such as budgeting, training, communication, decision making, developmental growth, and motivation of employees, will be explored.


Program description: If you think business and law have nothing in common, just see how fast your answer changes when your company is facing a lawsuit. The business world and legal world are very much tied up in each other--from copyright laws to depositions. If you plan to advance in the business world, having legal knowledge can only serve to make you better informed--a true asset at any company.
Business administration covers the basics of running an organization. With a legal specialization, you can prepare to be a more ethical executive-or you can use the degree as a jumping-off point to kick-start your law degree.

Criminology Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Administration - Management
Criminology
Course Number CJA 314
Credits 3.0

Criminology is an introductory course in the study of crime and criminal behavior, focusing on the various theories of crime causation. This course highlights the causes of crime, criminal behavior systems, societal reaction to crime, and criminological methods of inquiry. (3 credits) Prerequisite: CJA 304


Criminal Justice Management Theory and Practice
Course Number CJA 454
Credits 3.0

This Course Applies Management And Financial Principles To Criminal Justice Organizations. Emphasis Is Placed On Budgets, Financial Accounting Principles And Assessing The Effectiveness Of The Activities Of Criminal Justice Organizations. Constitutional Requirements, Court Decisions, And Legislation (such As Eeoc Requirements) As They Impact Management In Criminal Justice Organizations Are Discussed. Basic Accounting And Financial Terminology, And Purposes And Formats Of Financial Statements Are Introduced: Depreciation Of Assets, Capital Budgeting, Cash Management, Lease Versus Purchase, And Inventory Management. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Cja 304, Cja 314, Cja 324, Cja 334, Cja 344, Cja 354, Cja 364, Cja 374, Cja 384, And Cja 394 .


Foundations for General Education and Professional Success
Course Number GEN200
Credits 3.0

This general education course is designed to introduce the intentional learner to communication, collaboration, information utilization, critical thinking, problem solving and professional competence and values. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach for the learner to develop personal, academic strategies in order to reach desired goals and achieve academic success.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA204
Credits 3.0

jurisdictions of local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial and corrections agencies, and processes involved in the criminal justice systems. It examines the historical aspects of the police, the courts, and the correctional system, as well as the philosophy. Additionally, career opportunities and qualifying requirements, terminology and constitutional limitations of the system will also be covered. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 200.


Introduction to Police Theory and Practices
Course Number CJA214
Credits 3.0

This course is an introductory overview which provides students with the opportunity to gain an understanding of policing in the United States. It surveys the basics of police functions, from individual and organizational roles to the issues faced on a daily basis. This course also examines the procedures and methods of operation of police and critical issues in law enforcement. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 200.


Introduction to Criminal Court Systems
Course Number CJA224
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction and overview of the legal system, the participants, the courtroom process, and post conviction process of the court system. It demonstrates the connection among all participants and how they relate to each other. Additionally, the course covers the history of the court system and the different types of court at the state and federal levels. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 200.


Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CJA234
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the various components of the corrections system within the criminal justice system. It provides an overview of corrections, including corrections history, the persons, agencies, and organizations that manage convicted offenders. Other topics that are covered include policy and procedure, sentencing, probation, and rehabilitations of prisoners. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 200.


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number SEC360
Credits 3.0

This Course Prepares The Student To Communicate Effectively In Written And Verbal Form. It Provides Principles For Effective Investigative Reporting And Incident Documentation As Well As Techniques For Interviewing And Understanding Verbal And Non-verbal Communication. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Comm 215, Mth 209, Sec 310, Sec 320, And Sec 340.


Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA413

This course explores the standards and codes of professional responsibility in criminal justice professions (e.g., Law Enforcement Code of Ethics, ABA Standards of Professional Responsibility, American Jail Association Code of Ethics for Jail Officers, and the American Correctional Association Code of Ethics). It also explores analysis and evaluation of ethical dilemmas, roles of professional organizations and agencies, ethics and community relations, ethics in criminal justice laws and procedures and civil liability in law enforcement and correctional environments. Topics and Objectives Ethics and the Criminal Justice Practitioner * Explain the importance of ethics as applied to the criminal justice practitioner. * Discuss the goals of the study of ethics. * Distinguish between morality, ethics, duties and values. * Explain deontological and teleological ethical systems including ethical formalism, utilitarianism, religion, natural law, ethics of virtue and ethics of care. * Understand how to analyze ethical dilemmas. * Explore the origins and components of the concept of justice. * Explore the paradigms of law. Ethics in Policing * Understand the dual roles of law enforcement and law enforcement subculture. * Explore the limits of discretion and corresponding duties for law enforcement. * Identify and discuss the primary forms of corrupt law enforcement practices. * Identify and discuss ethical issues involved in police procedures. * Explore methods to reduce corruption and unethical police procedures including training, supervision, protection for whistle blowers and citizen review boards. Ethics of Courts * Explain the roles of criminal defense attorney and prosecutors from an ethical perspective. * Discuss the codes of professional ethics that lawyers are bound to by the various statutes and regulations. * Identify and discuss the duties of the criminal defense attorney. * Identify and discuss the duties of the prosecutor. * Compare and contrast the duties and roles of the defense attorney and prosecutor. Ethics of Prosecutors and Defense * Determine what judicial ethics are imposed upon members of the judiciary and why. * Identify situations where judges should recuse themselves from proceedings. * Understand judicial use of discretion and its abuses. Ethics of Corrections * Explore the roles of probation, parole, and correctional officers from an ethical perspective. * Identify the code of ethical behavior for probation, parole, and correctional officers. * Understand the correctional subculture. * Understand the conflicting duties between having to protect society and protecting the interests of offenders. * Analyze the problems of and possible solutions to the victimization of offenders. * Identify and discuss ethical issues in the punishment of offenders. * Define and explain cruel and unusual. * Determine whether the death penalty is defensible in view of established ethical frameworks established by the law or religious or social contract theory. Ethics of Criminal Justice Policy and the Future * Assess the ethical arguments for and against personal revenge. * Identify the rights of victims. * Determine whether victim participation in criminal court proceedings supplants the need for personal revenge. * Examine enforcement of laws and their relationship to ethics in criminal justice. * Evaluate the level ...show more »


Research Methods in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA433

Students learn and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology within the criminal justice system and become acquainted with the range and scope of quantitative and qualitative tools available to the criminal justice researcher. Topics and Objectives The Research Enterprise in Criminal Justice and Criminology * Explore the research enterprise and its major components. * Differentiate between pure and applied research. * Distinguish between qualitative and quantitative research. * Specify the various functions of the research process. * Identify assumptions made by researchers about the phenomena they study. * Describe the differences between primary and secondary research. * Summarize the meaning of research ethics and examine the codes of ethics in criminal justice research. * Assess the nature and diversity of ethical dilemmas in criminological research. * Describe the rights of human subjects and the nature of informed consent. Theory, Research, Problem Formulation and Research Question * Identify how frames of reference influence research choices. * List the components and functions of theory (theoretical and practical). * Contrast ideal and real research. * Distinguish between deductive and inductive theory. * Explain the role of variables in hypothesis testing. * Describe how hypotheses are derived and constructed so that theories may be tested. * Explore the purposes of null hypotheses and hypothesis formulation. * Identify the functions, strengths and weaknesses of different hypotheses. * Assess the relationship between theory verification and hypothesis testing. Research Designs and Data Collection Methods * Differentiate between types and functions of research designs. * Explore surveys, case studies, and the classical experimental design. * Distinguish between probability and non-probability sampling plans. * Differentiate between populations and their parameters and samples. * Identify the criteria used to make the decision to sample. * Explore the assumptions underlying certain statistical tests. * Examine features, functions, construction, and administration of questionnaires and their strengths and weaknesses. * Evaluate features, functions, construction and administration of interviews and their strengths and weaknesses. * Assess features and functions of observation and its strengths and weaknesses as a data-gathering tool. * Analyze secondary sources. Data Coding, Measurement, Validity, Presentation and Descriptive Techniques * Describe the purposes of scientific measurement. * Determine the relationship between measurement and theory verification. * Distinguish between nominal and operational definitions. * Discuss graphic presentation and its value as a descriptive tool in criminological research. * Explore scales and their applications, strengths and weaknesses. * Examine the determination and measurement of validity. * Describe validity checks. * Define reliability and the different kinds of reliability checks. Conclusions, Results and Recommendations * Discuss the importance of project replication. * Classify common errors in presentation and interpretation of research findings. * Detail the importance of anonymity and confidentiality in research. * Address the functions, strengths and weaknesses of research conclusions.


Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA423

This course offers a comprehensive, critical and balanced examination of the issues of crime and justice with respect to race and ethnicity. Procedures and policy in a pluralistic and multicultural society are examined relative to law enforcement, courts and corrections environments. Topics and Objectives Race, Ethnicity, Social Structure and Crime * Define race, ethnicity, disparities and discrimination. * Examine racial and ethnic categories in the statistical data reported by criminal justice agencies in the United States. * Understand explanations for disparity and causes of discrimination. * Analyze the relationship between race, ethnicity, social structure and crime. Victims and Offenders * Compare victimization and offender rates for racial and ethic minorities to the rates for whites. * Examine the role of ethnic youth gangs and the occurrence of hate crimes in the United States. * Examine the relationship between the police and racial and ethnic minority youth. The Police and Racial and Ethnic Minorities * Examine public opinion about the police, comparing the attitudes of Whites, African Americans and Hispanics. * Identify specific concerns relative to policing particular ethnic communities. * Examine racial and ethnic disparity and discrimination in police use of force, detentions, searches and seizures. * Understand officer attitudes, police corruption and citizen complaints relative to race and ethnicity. * Discuss police employment practices and the law of employment discrimination. Race, Ethnicity and the Courts * Understand considerations of race and ethnicity by prosecutors in pretrial decision making and plea bargaining practices. * Examine disparity and discrimination in bail proceedings and appointment of counsel. * Explore issues of race and ethnicity in jury selection, trial arguments to the jury and jury nullification. * Identify explanations for racial disparities in sentencing and effects of sentencing discrimination. Race, Ethnicity and Corrections * Understand the issue of racial discrimination in the application of the death penalty. * Examine ethnic, racial and gender overrepresentation of American correctional populations. Contemporary Cultural Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice * Debate the efficacy of jury nullification when premised on race and ethnicity considerations. * Debate whether the Criminal Justice System discriminates against racial and ethnic minorities. * Examine contemporary issues raising disparity and discrimination of racial and ethnic minorities in the Criminal Justice System.


Criminal Law
Course Number CJA343

This is an introductory course in the study of criminal law, general legal principles, and how the criminal law functions in and affects modern society. This course highlights a variety of key topics, including the concept of crime and the development of criminal law, defenses to criminal charges, and a number of specific types of crimes, including personal crimes, property crimes, public order crimes, and offenses against public morality. Legal issues affecting punishment will also be discussed, as will ways the criminal law impacts victims of crime. Topics and Objectives Criminal Law, the Concept of Crime, and Criminal Liability * Explore the sources and purposes of criminal law. * Explain jurisdiction to create and enforce criminal law. * Discuss the adversarial system and standards of proof in criminal cases. * Discuss the concept of criminal liability. * Define accomplice liability. * Define inchoate offenses: Solicitation, conspiracy and attempt. * Analyze essential elements of selected criminal offenses. Criminal Responsibility and Defenses * Explain the nature of and types of defenses to criminal liability. * Distinguish justification from excuse. * Explore the concept of criminal capacity. * Discuss the differences between legal and medical perspectives on mental illness and insanity. Personal, Property, and Computer Crimes * Define the different types of homicide. * Distinguish Assault, Battery, and Mayhem. * Explain the differences between Rape and Statutory Rape. * Define Kidnapping and False Imprisonment. * Differentiate Robbery, Burglary, and Theft. * Explore computer and high-technology crimes. Public Order Crimes * Define crimes against public order. * Define DWI crimes. * Identify crimes against the administration of government. * Discuss prostitution, obscenity and lewdness. * Analyze federal and state anti-drug legislation and asset forfeiture. Crime Victims and Crime Punishment * Understand the concept of “victim”. * Explain victims’ assistance programs. * Evaluate “Problem Solving Courts” and restorative justice. * Define plea bargaining and intermediate sanctions. * Analyze forms of sentencing and their rationale. * Discuss the Eighth Amendment and its relationship to capital punishment.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJA353

This course explores the basic core knowledge of constitutional criminal procedure. Emphasis is placed on the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments, searches and seizures, interrogations and confessions, identifications, pre-trial and trial processes. In addition, the United States Constitution as interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court is examined along with philosophical policy considerations. Application of core knowledge is developed through simulation exercises and examination of homeland security issues. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Criminal Procedure * Review Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments of the United States Constitution. * Discuss the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. * Analyze the applicability of The Bill of Rights to the states via the Fourteenth Amendment. * Examine the competing Due Process and Crime Control Models of the criminal justice system and their impact on Criminal Procedure. The Fourth Amendment and the Exclusionary Rule * Explore the common law background of the Fourth Amendment. * Analyze the rationale and purpose of the Exclusionary Rule. * Discuss exceptions to the Exclusionary Rule. * Examine alternative remedies to the Exclusionary Rule. * Identify the costs and benefits of the Exclusionary Rule. Essential Fourth Amendment Concepts * Define Search, Seizure, Arrest, and Reasonableness. * Examine the expectation of privacy. * Analyze the requirement that search and arrest warrants be based on probable cause. * Discuss exceptions to warrant requirements. * Re-examine automobile search rules. * Explore the concept of “Stop and Frisk”. * Understand border and regulatory searches. Right to Council * Define the role of lawyers in the criminal justice system. * Analyze the development of the right to counsel. * Identify when the right to counsel attaches. * Explore the right to self-representation. Interrogation and Identification * Discuss the concept of self-incrimination. * Explore the Miranda decision. * Examine eyewitness identification procedures. * Distinguish Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights during interrogation and identification procedures Pretrial Procedures * Explain the pretrial process. * Discuss pretrial detention and the concept of bail. * Explore the right to a preliminary examination and the role of the grand jury. * Analyze the prosecutor’s duty to disclose exculpatory information. * Discuss prosecutorial misconduct. The Trial Process * Discuss the steps in a jury trial. * Analyze constitutional trial rights. * Discuss the selection of a fair and unbiased jury


Juvenile Justice Systems and Processes
Course Number CJA403

This course is a general orientation to the field of juvenile justice, including causation theories and the development of system responses to delinquent behavior. The problems facing juveniles today are addressed, and adult and juvenile justice systems are compared, including initial apprehension, referral, and preventive techniques. Specific issues examined include chemical dependency, mental illness, and compulsive and habitual offenders. Special attention is given to the problems inherent in the police handling of juveniles and the function of juvenile courts. Topics and Objectives Overview of Juvenile Justice in the United States * Review and discuss the history and development of the juvenile court system. * Compare and contrast the roles of the juvenile and adult courts. * Assess the impact of national initiatives, case law, and legislation on state juvenile justice systems. * Critically examine and assess methods and information sources used in the measurement of delinquency. * Explore and be able to discuss the various theories of delinquency causation. Police and the Community * Review and describe the role of the police in the juvenile justice system. * Explore the use of prevention and intervention strategies in the community. Juvenile Court Process * Review and describe the juvenile court process in the handling of juvenile offenders. * Discuss the role and authority of the judge, prosecuting attorney, Court Appointed Special Advocate, public defender, and probation officers. * Examine and critically analyze the action of remanding juveniles to adult court. * Review and be able to describe various models of risk-needs assessment tools in assessment and classification of juvenile offenders. * Explore and be able to articulate the effectiveness and appropriateness of a variety of dispositional alternatives. Juvenile Corrections * Compare and contrast correctional objectives for juvenile treatment and public safety. * Explore the types of institutions, programs, and services available to juveniles. * Examine the role and effectiveness of juvenile aftercare. * Evaluate the dual standards that may be applied by the juvenile justice system. Future Trends * Explore the ramifications of US Department of Justice involvement in state juvenile correctional facilities. * Discuss the potential for national accreditation and standards for the juvenile justice system. * Critically analyze the role of privatization in the juvenile justice system. * Explore the role of existing and new research in determining the future of the juvenile justice system.


Criminal Organizations
Course Number CJA393

This course is a survey of the origins and development of organized crime in the United States. It examines the structure and activities of organized criminal enterprises, considers different models that have been employed to describe organized crime groups, and explores theories that have been advanced to explain the phenomenon. Major investigations of organized crime and legal strategies that have been developed to combat it are also considered. Topics and Objectives Understanding Organized Crime * Define organized crime. * Compare the various models that explain the structure of organized crime groups. * Describe the attributes of organized crime and its common behavior categories. Theories of Organized Criminal Behavior * Evaluate empirical and speculative theories that have been used to explain organized criminal behavior. * Explain the perspective of organized crime as a social institution. The Evolution of Organized Crime and the Drug Business * Analyze the social disorganization in mid-19th-century American history that created the climate for certain types of organized crime. * Explain the evolution of organized crime. * Describe the history, structure, and multi-national operating methods of the drug business. * Analyze the relationship between organized crime, prohibition, and early drug syndicates. * Identify changes in the various business interests of organized crime over the last 150 years. * Explain the role of corrupt political machines in fostering organized crime. A Comparative Perspective on Organized Crime * Analyze the scope of domestic organized crime groups and identify their interrelationships. * Explain the relationship between early ethnic or racially organized crime and contemporary youth gangs. * Compare and contrast the political, ideological, and religious origins of organized crime groups. * Analyze the relationship between organized crime and terrorist activity. * Identify the prominent terrorist organizations worldwide. * Explain the political, social, and financial motivations of terrorist groups. Organized Crime's Political and Corporate Alliances * Explain the relationship of organized crime to politics, business, and the law. * Describe the legal limitations of law enforcement and intelligence agencies in dealing with organized crime. * Critique major federal laws and strategies that have been developed to combat organized crime. * Assess the effectiveness of organized crime prosecutions. * Hypothesize possible future trends in organized crime at national and international levels.


Contemporary Issues and Futures in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA394
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines Both The Principle Issues In Contemporary Criminal Justice As Well As The Extrapolation Of Such Issues Toward Possible Futures Within The Criminal Justice Field. Students Will Focus Upon Relevant Research In Policing, Courts, And Corrections That Reflect Key Elements Of Current Conditions And What May Be Expected In The Years To Come. Students Will Apply Critical Review And Engage In In-depth Discussion Of These Concepts As A Basis For Comprehensive Understanding At Local, State, National, And Global Levels Of Criminal Justice Administration. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Cja 304, Cja 314, Cja 324 , And Cja 334.


Organizational Behavior and Management
Course Number SEC390
Credits 3.0

This Course Encompasses The Study Of Individual And Group Behavior In Organizational Settings, With Special Emphasis On Those That Are Securityoriented. Management Methods For Organizational Processes And Change Are Presented Along With Leadership Applications. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Comm 215, Mth 209, Sec 310, Sec 320, And Sec 340.


Criminal Justice Policy Analysis
Course Number CJA463

This course examines the history of federal- and state-level crime control initiatives and explores the development of effective anticrime policies. The analysis of contemporary crime control policies is included. Topics and Objectives Public Policy Foundations and Views in Criminal Justice * Evaluate the role of the United States constitution in relationship to the development of contemporary criminal justice policy. * Differentiate between the roles of federal and state government in the development and implementation of criminal justice policy. * Distinguish between legislatively based policy and administrative regulatory policy as they relate to crime and criminal justice. * Compare and contrast the rights of the accused with the policy mission of protecting the public from criminal behavior. * Differentiate between factors that affect criminal justice policy making. Policy Differences in Approach for Policing, Judicial Action, and Correctional Practices * Differentiate between policy perspectives among the police, courts, and corrections at the federal and state level. * Analyze the historical evolution of criminal justice policy relating to policing, the courts, and corrections over the past 50 years. * Identify opportunities for cooperation between elements of the criminal justice system in the implementation of criminal justice policy. Effective and Ineffective Policy Making in Response to Crime * Analyze effective and ineffective criminal justice initiatives at the local, state, and federal levels that have had historical significance. * Describe goals in the criminal justice system that policy attempts to achieve. Political Impact upon Criminal Justice Policy * Determine the impact of politics on the budgetary process. * Evaluate the relationship between fiscal resources and the development and implementation of criminal justice policy. Globalization of Criminal Justice Policy * Explain the globalization of criminal justice policy in relationship to contemporary issues. * Predict the effects of globalization on the development of criminal justice policy in the future.


Managing Criminal Justice Personnel
Course Number CJA473

This course is a survey of important personnel issues inherent to organizations and, especially, to criminal justice organizations. Problems, procedures and solutions to common personnel issues will be explored. Topics and Objectives Values * Explain the nature and importance of human values in the workplace. * Describe how people acquire and change values. * Identify your core values. * Explain what values do for and to us. Motivation and Empowerment * Define motivation and empowerment and understand the similarities and differences between the two. * Apply theories of motivation to managing criminal justice personnel. * Define the components of empowerment. * Analyze the implications of empowerment and delegation in a criminal justice organization. * Analyze the role of trust in personnel issues. Organizational Effectiveness * Define Organizational Effectiveness. * Apply theories of Organizational Effectiveness to the management of criminal justice personnel. * Review several methods for exerting control in an organizational setting. * Explore the differences between bureaucratic and agile organizations. * Identify the elements of managing by objective (MBO). Occupational Socialization * Define occupational socialization. * Define organizational culture. * Identify the socialization process - stages and models of influence. * Discuss problems in the socialization process. * Identify socialization issues in police and correctional agencies and in community expectations. * Examine strategies for socialization. Personnel Supervision and Evaluation * Define models of employee supervision. * Apply guidelines for supervision and evaluation to managing criminal justice personnel. * Review types of problem employees. * Consider various disciplinary actions. * Differentiate between problem employees and problem situations.


Criminal Justice Administration Capstone
Course Number CJA484
Credits 3.0

This Capstone Course For The Criminal Justice Administration Undergraduate Degree Program Provides Students With An Integration Of Acquired Knowledge Of Theory To Practical Applications. Particular Attention Is Given To Integrating Core Content Of Criminal Justice Administration With Specialized Content From Students’ Selected Concentration Area. Students Will Assess The Impact Of Their Educational Experiences On Their Professional Competence And Values, Critical Thinking And Problem Solving, Communication, Information Utilization, And Collaboration Skills. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Hcs 310, Hcs 330, Hcs 430, And Hcs 455.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Administration is to equip adult learners with a fundamental understanding of the nature of delinquency and crime, criminal law and procedure, the goals and essential components of the American criminal justice system, and to teach basic management and administrative skills to run organizations in this area. The program also strives to familiarize students with current trends, research techniques, and technological advances in the discipline.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Criminology Courses at Everest University

Program Name: Criminal Investigations
Criminal Law
Course Number CCJ 2002
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CCJ 1017
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1024
Credits 4.0

Criminal Evidence
Course Number CJL 2130
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure and the Constitution
Course Number CJL 2134
Credits 4.0

Criminal Investigations
Course Number CCJ 1610
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Communications
Course Number CCJ 2358
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CCJ 2306
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations
Course Number CJD 2250
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Terrorism
Course Number DSC 2002
Credits 4.0

Juvenile Justice
Course Number CCJ 2501
Credits 4.0

Graphics & Documentation I
Course Number CJE 2673
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Management
Course Number CCJ 3450
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice in the Community
Course Number CCJ 4127
Credits 4.0

Gang Activity and Drug Operations
Course Number CCJ 4656
Credits 4.0

Constitutional Law for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CCJ 2250
Credits 4.0

Alternatives to Incarceration
Course Number CCJ 3334
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Senior Capstone Experience
Course Number CCJ 4400
Credits 4.0

Catastrophic Event Response Planning
Course Number HSS 3500
Credits 4.0

Policing in America
Course Number CJE 2100
Credits 4.0

Spanish for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CCJ CCJ
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Victims Advocacy
Course Number CCJ 2679
Credits 4.0

Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 2943
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Forensics
Course Number CJE 2670
Credits 4.0

Program description: The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level
career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice enhances the study of the criminal justice system and expands into areas such as
gang activity, drug operations, and criminal justice management. Graduates are prepared for entry-level and middle management positions
in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The Criminal justice programs are not training programs for law
enforcement officers.

Program Name: Criminal Justice (Associates's)
Criminal Justice Capstone Course
Course Number CCJ 2929
Credits 4.0

Career Choices in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1910
Credits 4.0

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Criminal Law
Course Number CCJ 2002
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CCJ 1017
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1024
Credits 4.0

Criminal Evidence
Course Number CJL 2130
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure and the Constitution
Course Number CJL 2134
Credits 4.0

Criminal Investigations
Course Number CCJ 1610
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Communications
Course Number CCJ 2358
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CCJ 2306
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations
Course Number CJD 2250
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Terrorism
Course Number DSC 2002
Credits 4.0

Policing in America
Course Number CJE 2100
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Victims Advocacy
Course Number CCJ 2679
Credits 4.0

Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 2943
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Forensics
Course Number CJE 2670
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

American National Government
Course Number POS 2041
Credits 4.0

Principles of Sociology
Course Number SYG 2000
Credits 4.0

College Algebra
Course Number MAT 1033
Credits 4.0

General Psychology
Course Number PSY 2012
Credits 4.0

Basic Critical Thinking
Course Number SLS 1505
Credits 2.0

Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Environmental Science
Course Number EVS 1001
Credits 4.0

Program description: The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level
career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security.

Program Name: Criminal Justice (Bachelor's)
Computer Crime
Course Number CJE 4668
Credits 4.0

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Criminal Law
Course Number CCJ 2002
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CCJ 1017
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1024
Credits 4.0

Criminal Evidence
Course Number CJL 2130
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure and the Constitution
Course Number CJL 2134
Credits 4.0

Criminal Investigations
Course Number CCJ 1610
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Communications
Course Number CCJ 2358
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CCJ 2306
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations
Course Number CJD 2250
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Terrorism
Course Number DSC 2002
Credits 4.0

Juvenile Justice
Course Number CCJ 2501
Credits 4.0

Graphics & Documentation I
Course Number CJE 2673
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Management
Course Number CCJ 3450
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice in the Community
Course Number CCJ 4127
Credits 4.0

Gang Activity and Drug Operations
Course Number CCJ 4656
Credits 4.0

Constitutional Law for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CCJ 2250
Credits 4.0

Alternatives to Incarceration
Course Number CCJ 3334
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Senior Capstone Experience
Course Number CCJ 4400
Credits 4.0

Catastrophic Event Response Planning
Course Number HSS 3500
Credits 4.0

Policing in America
Course Number CJE 2100
Credits 4.0

Spanish for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CCJ CCJ
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Victims Advocacy
Course Number CCJ 2679
Credits 4.0

Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 2943
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Forensics
Course Number CJE 2670
Credits 4.0

Career Choices in Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 1910
Credits 4.0

Cultural Diversity for Criminal Justice Professionals
Course Number CCJ 4129
Credits 4.0

Concepts of Criminal Law
Course Number CJL 3215
Credits 4.0

Theoretical Aspects of Conspiracy Investigations
Course Number INV 3100
Credits 4.0

Private Investigations I
Course Number INV 3500
Credits 4.0

Methodology of Economic Crime
Course Number INV 3300
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

American National Government
Course Number POS 2041
Credits 4.0

Report Writing
Course Number ENC 3211
Credits 4.0

Basic Critical Thinking
Course Number SLS 1505
Credits 2.0

Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ 3675
Credits 4.0

Victimology
Course Number CCJ 3666
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Ethics and Liability
Course Number CCJ 4054
Credits 4.0

20 th Century American History
Course Number AMH 2030
Credits 4.0

Social Psychology
Course Number SOP 4005
Credits 4.0

Global Politics
Course Number CPO 4004
Credits 4.0

Principles and Applications of Adult Learning
Course Number SLS 3130
Credits 4.0

College Algebra
Course Number MAT 1033
Credits 4.0

Statistics
Course Number STA 3014
Credits 4.0

Environmental Science
Course Number EVS 1001
Credits 4.0

Program description: The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level
career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice enhances the study of the criminal justice system and expands into areas such as
gang activity, drug operations, and criminal justice management. Graduates are prepared for entry-level and middle management positions
in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The Criminal justice programs are not training programs for law
enforcement officers.

Criminology Courses at Capella University

Program Name: BS - Criminal Justice
Statistical Literacy
Course Number MAT2050
Credits 3.0

This course emphasizes the learner as a consumer of statistics rather than a producer of statistical calculations. Learners apply critical-thinking skills to arguments involving statistics and interpret and evaluate statistics used in real-world situations.


Communication Strategies for the Public Safety Professional
Course Number PS3004
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners build and strengthen the skills needed to succeed in their program and the workplace. Learners engage in interactive activities that help them develop a public safety perspective and expand their organizational, research, critical-thinking, and problem-solving skills. Learners also participate in building a learning community, share talents and resources with courseroom peers, and prepare professional written communications. Other topics include teamwork, ethics, and project creation. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number PS3100
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system and its evolution in response to the continually changing forces that influence crime control. Learners gain an understanding of criminal justice theory and its relation to criminality, the criminal justice system, and the principles of the adjudication process.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number PS3200
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the growing field of emergency management. Learners study various hazard threats and examine strategies for determining and reducing vulnerability. Learners also analyze disaster response and recovery behaviors and activities. Course topics include local, state, and federal emergency management organizations and the impact of various stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, on the emergency management process.


Principles of Security Management
Course Number PS3300
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Course topics include security department management and operations, emergency and disaster management, the role of security in risk management, and integrating security with local law enforcement organizations and the role of security management in the business environment.


Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Number PS3400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the essential concepts of the emerging field of homeland security. Learners study a range of threats to U.S. security, including specialty weapons, cyber attacks, and smuggling. Learners also examine current issues related to large-scale refugee flow and civil liberties, and evaluate homeland security domains, including strategy, fear management, and crisis communications. This course helps learners build a foundational vernacular upon which to critically analyze homeland security.


Applied Public Safety Theory
Course Number PS3500
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major theoretical approaches to threats to public safety from the eighteenth century and the Enlightenment period through the present. Learners study the work of experts associated with the historical, international body of criminology knowledge. Learners explore a range of issues and apply public safety theory and research to analyze them, further developing their critical thinking and writing skills.


Principles of Public Safety Investigation
Course Number PS3600
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing breaches in physical, information, or personnel security. Learners examine the principles and procedures used for crime scene investigation and protection from security and law enforcement perspectives. Learners also study methods of collecting and preserving evidence; interviewing and interrogating complainants, witnesses, suspects, and victims; and employing scientific applications in criminal justice and private security investigations.


Justice, Crime, and Ethics
Course Number PS3700
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ethical dimension of law enforcement practice and acquire the critical knowledge and skills that support ethical, on-the-job decision making. Learners examine major ethical problems such as discrimination, corruption, deception, racial profiling, and excessive force using material drawn from commissions of inquiry, internal affairs investigations, published literature, human rights documentation, and observed police-community relations. Learners explore the bases for developing personal and professional ethics, guided by professional codes of practice and human rights standards.


Applied Public Safety Research Methods
Course Number PS3800
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners are introduced to the principles of social research in the field of public safety. Learners use the scientific method to collect data and analyze research questions specific to crime prevention, emergency planning, information security, and hazard assessment. Learners also explore the ethics of public safety research techniques and practical applications of research.


History of Violence in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS3900
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners review the history of violence in U.S. society, focusing on war, terrorism, hostility, and conquest. Course content emphasizes the roles of local, state, and federal public safety agencies in addressing violence issues in the post-9/11 era.


Introductory Public Safety Statistical Research
Course Number PS3950
Credits 6.0

This course introduces learners to basic statistical language and procedures related to crime phenomena data. Learners practice basic skills such as reading and calculating formulas and analyze the effects of measurement techniques, distribution shapes,and other factors of the statistic-selection process. Learners also examine two-variable relationships, including correlation and prediction measures. Prerequisite(s): MAT2050, PS3800.


White Collar and Organized Crime Investigations
Course Number PS4105
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners focus on the principles, parameters, and procedures of white collar and organized crime investigations. Learners study ways to apply best practice techniques of criminal investigation pursuant to current statutes and legal precedents. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Corrections, Probation, and Parole
Course Number PS4110
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to the fields of penology and corrections. Learners analyze the evolution of corrections, probation, and parole processes and the effects associated with corrections and reform movements. Learners also examine criminal behavior assessments that help determine offender placement and incarceration alternatives. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Juvenile Justice Practice
Course Number PS4115
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the philosophy of the juvenile justice system. Learners examine the principles of juvenile law and current juvenile justice system practices and processes. Learners also analyze methods of dealing with youthful offenders. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Police-Community Relations
Course Number PS4120
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study the philosophies, responsibilities, and limitations of police forces. Learners analyze formal social control processes in the U.S. and examine the effects of police training, education, and career development on community relations. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Policing in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS4125
Credits 4.0

This course provides a broad overview of the historical development, organizational structure, responsibilities, and work performed in U.S. law enforcement agencies at the municipal, county, state, and federal levels. Learners analyze the relationships between local police agencies and the various levels of government charged with law enforcement responsibilities. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Race, Crime, and Criminal Justice
Course Number PS4135
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners analyze the relationship between criminological theory and practice and study the history, evolution, and operation of the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on race. Learners examine criminal justice ethics and the implications of race on definitions of crime, criminological theory, and crime victimization. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.



Criminal Law
Course Number PS4145
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the historical development of criminal law and the rules of criminal procedure that govern its application. Learners distinguish between the social and legal definitions of crime and dissect the various elements of crimes. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


History of Drug Control
Course Number PS4150
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course focus on the origin, history, and impact of drug control. Learners examine drug law enforcement, drug regulation trends and developments, and the evolution of drug treatment. Learners also analyze the local, state, and federal laws governing drug treatment. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Police Administration
Course Number PS4155
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate police administration concepts. Learners examine communication principles and decision-making, leadership, and human resource management skills used in contemporary law enforcement environments. Learners also analyze individual and group behavior and ethics within police organizations. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Course Number PS4160
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an understanding of the formal rules for obtaining, qualifying, and admitting evidence for criminal investigation and prosecution. Learners examine case studies to analyze and apply the rules of criminal procedure. Prerequisite(s): PS3100.


Public Safety Capstone Project
Course Number PS4990
Credits 6.0

The capstone project is the culmination of the bachelor’s degree program in Public Safety and is intended to demonstrate the technical and applied public safety knowledge and the critical-thinking and communication skills learners gain during their program. Learners formulate ideas for a new public safety approach, create a vision, and develop a strategic plan that describes how to implement their concept. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Elective Courses CJ
Credits 37.0

Choose 37 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


General Education Classes
Credits 45.0

General Education Requirements are 45 quarter credits with a minimum of 6 quarter credits from each category: Communications, Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, Social Science.


Program description: The Criminal Justice specialization provides undergraduate learners with knowledge of the processes and procedures related to the criminal justice profession. Learners examine the criminal justice system and the relationships among private, local, state, and federal law enforcement organizations. Learners also analyze crime investigation techniques and law enforcement principles. Upon successful completion of this specialization, learners are prepared for entry-level public safety careers such as U.S. Postal Service Inspectors and U.S. marshals; agents of the Drug Enforcement Administration; Internal Revenue Service; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms; United States Customs Service; Immigration and Naturalization Service; Department of the Treasury; Bureau of Engraving and Printing; and other local and state law enforcement agencies.

Criminology Courses at South University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
Biology II
Course Number BIO1021
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Bio1020 With A Grade Of C Or Better Co Or Pre Requisite: Eng1001 Biology Ii Is The Second Course In A Twocourse Sequence In Biology. This Course Continues The Study Of Human Biology With The Role Of Endocrine And Nervous Systems In Homeostatic Regulation. Other Topics Covered Are Human Reproduction, Development, Evolution, And Advanced Genetics. Ecological Concepts Are Also Discussed. The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Increase Knowledge Of The Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hour.


Statistics
Course Number MAT2058
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat1001 Or Mat1002 Statistics Introduces The Student To The Terminology And Techniques Of Statistics Including Levels Of Measurement, Measures Of Central Tendency And Variance, Random Variables, Linear Correlation And Regression, Normal Probability Distributions, Sampling Distributions, The Central Limit Theorem, And Hypothesis Testing.4 Quarter Hours.


History of Art
Course Number HUM1001
Credits 4.0

Co or Pre requisite: ENG1001 This course surveys the history of art beginning with the Prehistoric/Tribal period and continuing through the Middle Ages. The concepts,artists, motifs, works, and styles of the periods will be studied. The course introduces students to elements of art and design, and fosters an appreciation for the world of art. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement
Course Number CRJ1101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the criminal justice system and contemporary policing in the United States. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Courts and Corrections
Course Number CRJ1102
Credits 4.0

This course provides a comprehensive look at the criminal court system in the United States and the American correctional system.The course looks at the roles of prosecutors,judges, defense attorneys and the dynamics of their interactions as well as an overview on all aspects of corrections, including probation and parole. 4 quarter hours


Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ2004
Credits 4.0

This course examines ethical issues faced by actors in the criminal justice system. The focus will be placed on the philosophical and practical approaches to solve ethical dilemmas within the complicated criminal justice system.4 quarter hours


Criminal Procedures
Course Number CRJ2006
Credits 4.0

This course will cover the legal aspects of police investigatory practices, criminal procedure law, and constitutional cases as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Focus will be on U.S. Supreme court cases and lower court cases setting out the requirements for arrest,search and seizure, confessions, and pretrial identifications. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the legal rights,duties, and liabilities of criminal justice professionals.4 quarter hours


Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ3004
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on theoretical foundations and current research on theories of racial,ethnic, class and gender discrimination within America’s criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on the most recent research on patterns of criminal behavior and victimization,police practices, court processing and sentencing,the death penalty, and correctional programs as they relate to minority groups. 4 quarter hours


Criminal Justice Management and Administration
Course Number CRJ3005
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Covers Modern Management Theory And The Application Of Management Techniques Appropriate To Each Area Of The Criminal Justice System. 4 Quarter Hours


Theories of Crime/Justice
Course Number CRJ3009
Credits 4.0

An overview of a variety of criminological theories. Attention will be directed toward the study of the major theoretical schools of thought which have influenced the American system of crime and justice. The basic goal of this course is to help the student develop an understanding of and appreciation for the insights gained by examining crime and criminals through different theoretical frameworks.4 quarter hours


Victimology
Course Number CRJ4001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3011 The course is a comprehensive look at the theories of victimology and the interaction of crime victims with others in the criminal justice system. 4 quarter hours


Alcohol, Drugs and Criminal Justice Policy
Course Number CRJ4007
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Examines The Pharmacological Effects And Medical Uses Of Drugs And Alcohol And The Role They Play In The U.s. Criminal Justice System. Topics Covered Include The History Of Alcohol And Drug Prohibition In The U.s.; The Types Of Illegal Drugs Currently Available In The United States; Patterns, Trends, And Scope Of Illicit Drug Use; Consideration Of The Relationship Between Drugs And Crime; And Manifestations And Consequences Of The Criminal Justice System Response. 4 Quarter Hours


Senior Seminar (Capstone)
Course Number CRJ4999
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: All core required CRJ courses The senior capstone course is designed to ensure that graduates of the criminal justice program are equipped with the skills necessary to pursue further study in their discipline or obtain responsible positions within criminal justice agencies or related professional organization.4 quarter hours


Intermediate Algebra
Course Number MAT1001
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Algebra is a continuation of MAT0099 exploring the arithmetic of polynomials, factoring, systems of linear equations, solving quadratic equations, and applying algebra techniques to problem solving and applications.


Biology I
Course Number BIO1020
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: Mat0099 Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 This Is The First Of A Two-course Sequence In Biology. This Course Introduces Biology, Scientific Methods, Biological Chemistry, And Energy For Life. This Course Also Exposes Students To The Organization Of Humans And Plants, Basic Genetics, And Evolutionary Concepts. In Addition, The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Introduce Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hours


College Math
Course Number MAT1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat0099 Or Exemption Thereof. Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 College Math Is A Survey Course Emphasizing Inductive And Deductive Reasoning, Concepts From Set Theory, Applications Of Venn Diagrams, Elements Of Formal Logic, Common Formulas And Relationships From Geometry, And An Introduction To Probability And Statistics. 4 Quarter Hours


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
Course Number PSY2007
Credits 4.0

An investigation of the methodological principles regarding behavioral science research, descriptive and inferential techniques, and the process of using these techniques for psychological experimentation and data analysis


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences Lab
Course Number PSY2008
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the statistical principles associated with the study of behavioral science research through application and computerized data analysis (i.e., SPSS).


Composition I
Course Number ENG1001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites:ENG0099 or exemption thereof. In this course students develop their writing skills through the reading and construction of expository essays. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition II/Literature
Course Number ENG1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: ENG1001 In this course students write analytical and critical essays about plays, short stories, and poetry. Emphasis is placed on literal and figurative interpretations, structural analysis, and variations in thematic approach. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition III
Course Number ENG2001
Credits 4.0

Focusing on the construction of effective written argument, this course refines composition techniques, develops abstract thought processes, and promotes critical thinking. A library paper is included. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.


Public Speaking
Course Number SPC1026
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare the student to develop and improve the ability to communicate. Self-expression, preparation of effective speeches, and development of speaking and listening skills will be emphasized. 4 quarter hours


Strategies for Success
Course Number UVC1000
Credits 4.0

Designed to help entering students develop a more effective approach to college success, this course emphasizes positive self-evaluation, goal setting and motivation; practical skills of successful students; effective use of the library and the many sources of information available; and the concepts and tools of critical thinking, and their applications. 4 quarter hours


General Psychology
Course Number PSY1001
Credits 4.0

In this course a study is made of human behavior with special reference to perception, learning, memory, thinking, emotional life, and individual differences in intelligence, aptitude, and personality. Emphasis is placed on the scientific nature of psychological investigations. Research methods are analyzed, and results are related to daily life and everyday problems.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC1001
Credits 4.0

This course serves as an introduction to the study of human social development, its organizations, and its institutions. It teaches the student to look at our society and others from a sociological perspective. Specific areas covered are group dynamics, social deviance, gender equality, racial and ethnic relations, the family, religion, and education


American Government
Course Number POL2076
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to general principles and problems of modern government. It shows the forms of government, the place of government in the social process, and theories of the state. The American system is analyzed. Studying political science provides accurate understanding of how and why political systems work as they do


Criminal Law
Course Number LGS2004
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with substantive criminal law and criminal procedures. It enables the student, under the supervision of a lawyer, to prepare pretrial pleadings, interview witnesses, and conduct trial and post trial proceedings


Research Methods
Course Number PSY2060
Credits 2.0

Research design and methodology. An analysis of the approaches to developing, understanding, and interpreting psychological phenomena. Topics include experimental vs. non-experimental research such as survey, observation, case study, and archival data. An understanding of reliability, validity, and experimental control issues.


Research Methods Lab
Course Number PSY2061
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the methodological principles associated with behavioral science research through an application of the theoretical, conceptual, and practical principles


Program description: With the influence of new technologies, the face of crime is constantly changing. As a result, the need for criminal justice specialists continues to grow at a steady rate. Our Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice online program can enable you to meet this need and propel your career in the broad field of criminal justice.The Criminal Justice education that our program offers is for law enforcement practitioners seeking to enhance their career potential, for those in other occupations looking to make a change, and for high school graduates preparing for a future in the criminal justice field. Our Criminal Justice classes are designed to offer comprehensive, relevant, practitioner-oriented preparation for this dynamic, rapidly growing profession.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Corrections Specialization
Biology II
Course Number BIO1021
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Bio1020 With A Grade Of C Or Better Co Or Pre Requisite: Eng1001 Biology Ii Is The Second Course In A Twocourse Sequence In Biology. This Course Continues The Study Of Human Biology With The Role Of Endocrine And Nervous Systems In Homeostatic Regulation. Other Topics Covered Are Human Reproduction, Development, Evolution, And Advanced Genetics. Ecological Concepts Are Also Discussed. The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Increase Knowledge Of The Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hour.


Statistics
Course Number MAT2058
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat1001 Or Mat1002 Statistics Introduces The Student To The Terminology And Techniques Of Statistics Including Levels Of Measurement, Measures Of Central Tendency And Variance, Random Variables, Linear Correlation And Regression, Normal Probability Distributions, Sampling Distributions, The Central Limit Theorem, And Hypothesis Testing.4 Quarter Hours.


History of Art
Course Number HUM1001
Credits 4.0

Co or Pre requisite: ENG1001 This course surveys the history of art beginning with the Prehistoric/Tribal period and continuing through the Middle Ages. The concepts,artists, motifs, works, and styles of the periods will be studied. The course introduces students to elements of art and design, and fosters an appreciation for the world of art. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement
Course Number CRJ1101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the criminal justice system and contemporary policing in the United States. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Courts and Corrections
Course Number CRJ1102
Credits 4.0

This course provides a comprehensive look at the criminal court system in the United States and the American correctional system.The course looks at the roles of prosecutors,judges, defense attorneys and the dynamics of their interactions as well as an overview on all aspects of corrections, including probation and parole. 4 quarter hours


Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ2004
Credits 4.0

This course examines ethical issues faced by actors in the criminal justice system. The focus will be placed on the philosophical and practical approaches to solve ethical dilemmas within the complicated criminal justice system.4 quarter hours


Criminal Procedures
Course Number CRJ2006
Credits 4.0

This course will cover the legal aspects of police investigatory practices, criminal procedure law, and constitutional cases as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Focus will be on U.S. Supreme court cases and lower court cases setting out the requirements for arrest,search and seizure, confessions, and pretrial identifications. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the legal rights,duties, and liabilities of criminal justice professionals.4 quarter hours


Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ3004
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on theoretical foundations and current research on theories of racial,ethnic, class and gender discrimination within America’s criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on the most recent research on patterns of criminal behavior and victimization,police practices, court processing and sentencing,the death penalty, and correctional programs as they relate to minority groups. 4 quarter hours


Criminal Justice Management and Administration
Course Number CRJ3005
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Covers Modern Management Theory And The Application Of Management Techniques Appropriate To Each Area Of The Criminal Justice System. 4 Quarter Hours


Theories of Crime/Justice
Course Number CRJ3009
Credits 4.0

An overview of a variety of criminological theories. Attention will be directed toward the study of the major theoretical schools of thought which have influenced the American system of crime and justice. The basic goal of this course is to help the student develop an understanding of and appreciation for the insights gained by examining crime and criminals through different theoretical frameworks.4 quarter hours


Victimology
Course Number CRJ4001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3011 The course is a comprehensive look at the theories of victimology and the interaction of crime victims with others in the criminal justice system. 4 quarter hours


Alcohol, Drugs and Criminal Justice Policy
Course Number CRJ4007
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Examines The Pharmacological Effects And Medical Uses Of Drugs And Alcohol And The Role They Play In The U.s. Criminal Justice System. Topics Covered Include The History Of Alcohol And Drug Prohibition In The U.s.; The Types Of Illegal Drugs Currently Available In The United States; Patterns, Trends, And Scope Of Illicit Drug Use; Consideration Of The Relationship Between Drugs And Crime; And Manifestations And Consequences Of The Criminal Justice System Response. 4 Quarter Hours


Senior Seminar (Capstone)
Course Number CRJ4999
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: All core required CRJ courses The senior capstone course is designed to ensure that graduates of the criminal justice program are equipped with the skills necessary to pursue further study in their discipline or obtain responsible positions within criminal justice agencies or related professional organization.4 quarter hours


Intermediate Algebra
Course Number MAT1001
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Algebra is a continuation of MAT0099 exploring the arithmetic of polynomials, factoring, systems of linear equations, solving quadratic equations, and applying algebra techniques to problem solving and applications.


Biology I
Course Number BIO1020
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: Mat0099 Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 This Is The First Of A Two-course Sequence In Biology. This Course Introduces Biology, Scientific Methods, Biological Chemistry, And Energy For Life. This Course Also Exposes Students To The Organization Of Humans And Plants, Basic Genetics, And Evolutionary Concepts. In Addition, The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Introduce Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hours


College Math
Course Number MAT1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat0099 Or Exemption Thereof. Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 College Math Is A Survey Course Emphasizing Inductive And Deductive Reasoning, Concepts From Set Theory, Applications Of Venn Diagrams, Elements Of Formal Logic, Common Formulas And Relationships From Geometry, And An Introduction To Probability And Statistics. 4 Quarter Hours


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
Course Number PSY2007
Credits 4.0

An investigation of the methodological principles regarding behavioral science research, descriptive and inferential techniques, and the process of using these techniques for psychological experimentation and data analysis


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences Lab
Course Number PSY2008
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the statistical principles associated with the study of behavioral science research through application and computerized data analysis (i.e., SPSS).


Composition I
Course Number ENG1001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites:ENG0099 or exemption thereof. In this course students develop their writing skills through the reading and construction of expository essays. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition II/Literature
Course Number ENG1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: ENG1001 In this course students write analytical and critical essays about plays, short stories, and poetry. Emphasis is placed on literal and figurative interpretations, structural analysis, and variations in thematic approach. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition III
Course Number ENG2001
Credits 4.0

Focusing on the construction of effective written argument, this course refines composition techniques, develops abstract thought processes, and promotes critical thinking. A library paper is included. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.


Public Speaking
Course Number SPC1026
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare the student to develop and improve the ability to communicate. Self-expression, preparation of effective speeches, and development of speaking and listening skills will be emphasized. 4 quarter hours


Strategies for Success
Course Number UVC1000
Credits 4.0

Designed to help entering students develop a more effective approach to college success, this course emphasizes positive self-evaluation, goal setting and motivation; practical skills of successful students; effective use of the library and the many sources of information available; and the concepts and tools of critical thinking, and their applications. 4 quarter hours


General Psychology
Course Number PSY1001
Credits 4.0

In this course a study is made of human behavior with special reference to perception, learning, memory, thinking, emotional life, and individual differences in intelligence, aptitude, and personality. Emphasis is placed on the scientific nature of psychological investigations. Research methods are analyzed, and results are related to daily life and everyday problems.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC1001
Credits 4.0

This course serves as an introduction to the study of human social development, its organizations, and its institutions. It teaches the student to look at our society and others from a sociological perspective. Specific areas covered are group dynamics, social deviance, gender equality, racial and ethnic relations, the family, religion, and education


American Government
Course Number POL2076
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to general principles and problems of modern government. It shows the forms of government, the place of government in the social process, and theories of the state. The American system is analyzed. Studying political science provides accurate understanding of how and why political systems work as they do


Criminal Law
Course Number LGS2004
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with substantive criminal law and criminal procedures. It enables the student, under the supervision of a lawyer, to prepare pretrial pleadings, interview witnesses, and conduct trial and post trial proceedings


Research Methods
Course Number PSY2060
Credits 2.0

Research design and methodology. An analysis of the approaches to developing, understanding, and interpreting psychological phenomena. Topics include experimental vs. non-experimental research such as survey, observation, case study, and archival data. An understanding of reliability, validity, and experimental control issues.


Research Methods Lab
Course Number PSY2061
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the methodological principles associated with behavioral science research through an application of the theoretical, conceptual, and practical principles


Probation and Parole
Course Number CRJ3021
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Examines The Theory And History Of Probation And Parole And Their Operation In The Criminal Justice System. 4 Quarter Hours


Family Violence
Course Number CRJ4004
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Explores The Causes, Consequences, And Prevalence Of Domestic Violence And The Law Enforcement Response. 4 Quarter Hours


Administration of Correctional Facilities
Course Number CRJ4008
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ1102 This course covers the management and organization of correctional facilities. The course focuses on how organizational culture is related to effective correctional leadership. It highlights the importance of changing trends in corrections, specifically institutional corrections. 4 quarter hours


Illegal Immigration and the Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJ4009
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 An Overview Of The Political And Legal Aspects Of Illegal Immigration In A Nation Of Immigrants. Emphasis On The Operational And Bureaucratic Impediments Of The Enforcement Of Immigrant Laws. 4 Quarter Hours


Program description: The South University Criminal Justice program offers a course of study
leading to a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. This course of study
is designed to give students broad perspectives on the causes of crime
and critical insights to the functions of the components of the criminal
justice system. Courses in the program deal with crime, violence, and
other forms of deviance and the responses to these problems by police,
courts, and corrections; contemporary criminal justice issues; and ethical concerns and research. Students majoring in criminal justice receive
excellent preparation for further study in graduate or professional schools
as well as for careers in the criminal justice system.

Criminology Courses at Saint Leo University

Program Name: B.S. in Criminology

Program description:

Criminology Courses at Northwestern College

Program Name: Criminal Justice AAS Degree
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRMJ.100
Credits 4.0

The course approaches the criminal justice system from a historical, developmental and philosophical perspective.Included are the independent and interdependent relationships that exist between the components of the system, as well as its connection with and impact on society.


Ethics in criminal Justice
Course Number CRMJ.126
Credits 4.0

This course provides a strong theoretical foundation for solving ethical dilemmas in the field of criminal justice. Students will gain a realistic picture not only of what ethical questions arise, but also hoe sound moral decisions are made in response to them.


Criminal Law
Course Number CRMJ.230
Credits 4.0

The Primary focus of this course is devoleping an understanding of the types of conduct that are defined as criminal by both statutory and common law


Corrections
Course Number CRMJ.130
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with an overview of the corrections system including historical devolepment, philosophy,and a variety of correctional methods.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CRMJ.240
Credits 4.0

This course covers constitutional and statutory guidelines for arrest, detention,use of force, search and seizure,warrant requirements, lineups and identification procedure,confessions,admissions,and interrogations.


Juvenile Justice Administration
Course Number CRMJ.140
Credits 4.0

This course reviews the nature and extent of juvenile delinguency in our society,focusing on the progressive development of the juvenile justice system and its interaction with other components of the criminal justice system.


Criminal Investigations
Course Number CRMJ.250
Credits 4.0

This course covers the fundamentals and procedure,investigations,applications of deductive and inductive reasoning in the investigative process, collection, marking in preservation of evidence, and the techniques and procedure of follow-up investigations.


Police Operations
Course Number CRMJ.150
Credits 4.0

An introduction to the aspects of policing as a functional component of the criminal justice system.


Criminology
Course Number CRMJ.260
Credits 4.0

This course covers the nature of crime and delinquency based on historical and conventional theories of causation.


Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRMJ.215
Credits 4.0

The purpose of this course is to engage the student in intensive research and discussion of contemporary and future issues affecting the criminal justice system.


Drugs Incidence and Abuse
Course Number CRMJ.270
Credits 4.0

Thid is an elective course for criminal justice majors. The course provides an examination of the social meaning of drug abuse, its history, pharmacology, sociological, and psychological explonation for its existence,the medical vie of drug abuse, efforts at prevention and treatment, the business of illegal drug llaw enforcement efforts, and policy issues associated with drug use.


Crisis and Conflict Intervention
Course Number CRMJ.220
Credits 4.0

This course presents the social and psychological factors found in crisis situations such as family violence,homicide,chemical and sexual abuse, suicide, physical illness injuries and other forms of interpersonal conflict and violence.


Criminal Justice Externship
Course Number CRMJ.290
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe the criminal justice system in a structured practical setting, and attain knowledge which will be helpful in making educational and career decisions.


Program description: The Criminal Justice program is intended for students who are seeking careers in law enforcement and will prepare students for a variety of positions in the criminal justice system. This program is appropriate for individuals who are interested in a career as a corrections officer, security guard, telecommunications officer, or police officer.

Criminology Courses at Bryant and Stratton College

Program Name: BS - Criminal Justice
Community Corrections
Course Number CRJU120
Credits 3.0

This course will review probation, parole, and community corrections. Students will learn about their histories and organizational structures, the nature and effects of the process by which offenders are handled, and the dynamics and trends toward change in the fields of probation, parole, and communitybased corrections. Prerequisite: CRJU101


Interviewing Theories And Practices
Course Number CRJU130
Credits 3.0

This course provides a practical interviewing guide for persons who work in the Criminal Justice system. Specific topics include: Interview preparation, nonverbal communication, types of interviewees, multicultural interviewing, the basic skills model for interviewing, communication of empathy, use of speed and pacing, and immediacy, concreteness, confrontation and assertion skills. Prerequisite: CRJU100


Correctional Administration
Course Number CRJU215
Credits 3.0

This course provides students an overview of the management and administration of correctional agencies. Included topics are the link of theory and management, leadership, strategic management, implementing correctional goals, managing offender risk, staff organization and functions, controlling violent inmates, creating a safe and secure prison environment, supervising employees, human resource management, and controlling correctional costs. Students will have the opportunity to compare general public management challenges to the growing correctional populations. Prerequisite: CRJU105


Police Management
Course Number CRJU220
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the history of policing, police culture, basic organizational concepts of law enforcement agencies, operational considerations and managing of the police organization. Specific topics include: management styles and principles, characteristics of police culture, the purposes of police organizations, operating principles, the art of proactive police leadership, communication management, police technology, patrol operations and community policing, non-management functions, administrative functions, fiscal policies, collective bargaining, and training. Prerequisite: CRJU102


Security Administration
Course Number CRJU225
Credits 3.0

This course explores current critical issues concerning the efficient and effective delivery of security services. In particular, it focuses on three key areas: the administration of security by the public and private sectors and the need for greater cooperation between the two; the policies for the administration of security as set forth in the myriad of new and revised domestic security laws, especially the USA Patriot Act; and the need for security administrators to use technology to protect critical assets..


Ethical Dilemmas And Challenges In Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJU300
Credits 3.0

This course looks at the ethical dilemmas and professional problems faced by criminal justice personnel. Students will discuss the practical applicability of ethical ideals and organizational codes and standards. Students will study key concepts related to ethics and the impact of ethical decisions. This will include investigation of the relationship between values, morals, ethics, and critical thinking. Different philosophies related to ethics will be examined, and students will apply these theories through an analysis of the various processes associated with making ethical decisions. Finally, students will examine the specific nature of ethics in the criminal justice system and will evaluate methods used to address ethical misconduct in society


Research Methods For The Criminal Justice Profession
Course Number CRJU303
Credits 3.0

This course provides students with an overview of research processes that are common to most areas of the Criminal Justice profession. This will include discussion of topics that range from the relationship between theory and research, the notion ofcausation, specific forms of research designs and associated techniques, the process of conceptualization and measurement; operationalization, factors to consider in sampling, fundamental descriptive statistics, and information literacy skills tied specifically to the location, evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of research and data culled from the internet, electronic resources, and other data mining sources. Students also will discuss particular ethical issues that are associated with Criminal Justice-centered research. Students will study both the basics of research methods as well as their applicability within the larger Criminal Justice field.


Juvenile Delinquency
Course Number CRJU310
Credits 3.0

A theoretical look at juvenile delinquency will be covered in detail during this course. The causes of juvenile delinquency will be examined at length. There will be a strong sociological focus on the root causes of delinquency and the theme followed across the life course. The information gathered helps learners understand how delinquent behavior originates. The course follows if it either continues and evolves into adult criminality or terminates. There will be an emphasis on the important roles that gender, race, social class and place of residence play in the formative adolescent years.


Criminal Behavior
Course Number CRJU320
Credits 3.0

This course will examine knowledge gained regarding the “crime problem” and delve into the many levels of events that influence a person’s life course-from the individual to the individual’s family, peers, schools, neighborhoods, community, culture and society as a whole. Reviews of contemporary research, theory and practice concerning the psychology of crime will be presented. Descriptions of the behavioral, emotional, and cognitive aspects of crime are examined from the perspectives of the victim and offender. The causes, classification, prediction, prevention, intervention and treatment of delinquency and criminal behavior are also examined. Prerequisite: CRJU101


VICTIMOLOGY
Course Number CRJU330
Credits 3.0

This course examines the causes of victimization and looks at theories associated with violent victimization. It analyzes the offender-victim relationship and presents ideas on preventing violence and responding to victimization. Students will study the terminology related to violence and victimization, as well as the concept of victimization. This will include tracing the development of theories of victimization and differentiation between types of violence. Students will examine offender-victimrelationships and analyze injustices in the criminal justice system. Motives for terrorism will be examined, as well as an assessment of laws to combat terrorism. Finally, students will appraise ways to respond to criminal victimization. Prerequisite: CRJU101


Cyber Crime
Course Number CRJU331
Credits 3.0

This course alerts society and the criminal justice system to the expanding high-tech crime primarily though the use of computers. Explored are the high-tech crimes and techniques used by criminals. The tools and methods used by both criminals and investigators are explained. High tech crime has opened a new career field in various levels of the justice system.


White Collar Crime
Course Number CRJU333
Credits 3.0

This course provides an expanded definition of white collar crime and the victims impacted by deceitful acts. The list of this type of crime has been expanded to include conspiracy, fraud, and insider training. Corporation, notfor profit and educational leaders are now being held accountable for actions which result in a loss of money or present false results to all stakeholders. This course will delineate environmental crimes, hazardous workplaces, medical malfeasance, and unsafe products as items to add to the criminal list. In addition, there will be discussions of many other categories of white-collar crime are covered such as: embezzlement, securities fraud, political corruption and computer scams.


Drugs And Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJU335
Credits 3.0

Determining who is impacted by drug use, misuse and abuse and how it has expanded in our society. This course emphasizes the sociological aspects of drug-taking behavior and the relationship between drugs and crime. The criminal justice system’s impact on the growth of drug use in America is discussed. How legal and illegal drugs affect the mind and the body is examined. The basic facts and major issues concerning drug taking behavior is presented in a straight forward comprehensive way


Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number CRJU343
Credits 3.0

This course will describe justice administration in a dynamic and changing world where society is adapting for future challenges. Criminal justice administration and career opportunities are addressed. A review of the “Ten Commandments” for police executives and discussions of courtroom civility and violence. Additional aspects of the justice systems suchas inappropriate prison staff-inmate relationships, administering the death penalty, probation-police partnerships, computer crime and probation, workplace loyalty, drug courts and new technologies. Ethical considerations will be explored regarding the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJU100


Comparative Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJU400
Credits 3.0

This course provides a global view of criminal justice by using different countries to demonstrate their legal systems. Comparative criminology and comparative criminal justice are distinguished. Four contemporary legal traditions are identified and their basic features are presented. Prerequisite: CRJU100


Family Violence
Course Number CRJU422
Credits 3.0

This course covers research from a sociolegal perspective with a leaning toward the criminal justice perspective. Legislation enacted is cited and the impact on improving the consequences explained. The definition of victims and offenders are expanded to include the elderly, disabled, children, males and females, heterosexuals and homosexuals, and all forms of family violence is discussed. The crimes of domestic violence are identified and the consequences understood through research.


Terrorism And Homeland Security
Course Number CRJU423
Credits 3.0

This course reviews the history of terrorism and its origins, its rapid evolution in the present and future. Terrorist events – left and right wing – are examined in various countries and regions. Discussions are presented about efforts of nations around the world to deter or discover terrorism and to find other ways to deal with the threats. Prerequisite: CRJU100


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJU100
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminology
Course Number CRJU101
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Policing
Course Number CRJU102
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Corrections
Course Number CRJU105
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminal Courts
Course Number CRJU110
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Juvenile Justice
Course Number CRJU150
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminal Law
Course Number CRJU200
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJU 210
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CRJU 222
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Internship/Capstone Experience
Course Number ACCT260
Credits 3.0

Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan. Prerequisites: Minimum 45 Earned Credits


Practicum/capstone Project
Course Number BUSS460
Credits 3.0

In this course students will design, execute and present the outcomes of a capstone project conducted during a practicum field experience. Students will be challenged to use their knowledge, skills and behaviors developed over the course of their program studies to solve real-world problems in their career discipline. Students will be evaluated from both academic and professional standards. The capstone project will be a portfolio development exhibit.


Interpersonal Relations & Group Dynamics
Course Number SOSC301
Credits 3.0

This Course Focuses On The Dynamics Of Groups And Interpersonal Relationships Within The Work Setting. Small Group Theory And Research Form The Basis For The Study Of Professional Communication And Group Decision-making Skills. Students Develop A Clearer Understanding Of Their Own Behavior And How It Affects Others In The Workplace. Prerequisite: Sosc101 Or Sosc102


Program description: The design of the Criminal Justice baccalaureate degree program enhances learning through a rigorous study of Criminal Justice. This includes the study of ethics, as well as the variety of deviant and/or criminal behavior that contribute to crime. Students study the Criminal Justice administrative structure, which includes analysis of international, federal, state, and local agencies involved directly and indirectly in Criminal Justice. Students also examine the concept of crime through the study of the varied criminal activity that occurs in today’s society. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Theprogram is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in positions that include Police/detective, First-line supervisor, Manager of police/detectives, Fish and game wardens, Border agent, Homeland Security agent, Social worker, Social/human service assistant, Counselor, Parole officer/probation officer, and Correctional Treatment Specialist

Criminology Courses at Arizona State University

Program Name: BS in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice Crime Control Policies and Practices
Course Number CRJ 201
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=201&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=26584

Introduces concepts as the application of situational crime prevention strategies, problem-oriented crime control approaches, hot spots policing, defensible space, and crime prevention through environmental design. Students work to apply academic theory to actual crime problems in the local area.


Advanced Criminological Theory
Course Number CRJ 308
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Policing
Course Number CRJ 230
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=230&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=25053

Introduces policing in the United States covering the history of police, contemporary police work, and problems in policing.


Discretionary Justice
Course Number CRJ 470
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=470&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=25059

Use/abuse, key issues/manifestations of discretion in legal system and other societal institutions. Theoretical/empirical linkages between discretion and discrimination, based on race, ethnicity, and gender.


Introduction to Criminology
Course Number CRJ 294
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=294&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=25056

Covers topics of immediate or special interest to a faculty member and students.


Imperatives of Proof
Course Number CRJ 321
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=321&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=26585

Problems and means of establishing identity and fact in relation to arrest, detention, adjudication, sentencing, and correctional case management.


Statistical Analysis
Course Number CRJ 303
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=303&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=25061

Introduces the fundamentals and application of descriptive and inferential statistics, with emphasis in the administration of justice area.


Community Corrections
Course Number CRJ 443
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=443&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=25065

Examines the probation and parole functions as well as the numerous and diverse types of community corrections programs.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 100
Credits 3.0
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=100&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=UCENT282&r=19346

Overview of the justice system. Roles of law enforcement personnel, the courts, and correctional agencies. Philosophical and theoretical views in historical perspective.


White Collar Crime

Course Number CRJ 463
Credits 3.0

Crime Analysis

Course Number CRJ 494
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Corrections

Course Number CRJ 240
More Info https://webapp4.asu.edu/catalog/course?s=CRJ&n=240&c=DTPHX&t=2111&f=INTRT&r=19432

Introduces the structure and function of the corrections system from historical and contemporary perspectives.


Homeland Security

Course Number CRJ 412

Domestic Violence

Course Number CRJ 461

Program description: The BS in Criminology and Criminal Justice degree program, offered fully online, is an exciting option that provides students with the same dynamic quality of the school’s on-campus courses and a solid background in the field of criminal justice.

Employment and government experts anticipate rapid and sustained job growth in law enforcement, corrections and private security-related fields in the next decade. Our graduates will be well equipped and competitively positioned for careers in:

Law Enforcement
Corrections
Probation
Parole
Legal offices
Court personnel
Victim/Witness advocate agencies
Private Security

Criminology Courses at Regis University

Program Name: BS in Criminology
Introduction to Criminology
Course Number CR 350
Credits 3.0

Analyzes social, political and economic forces that shape the nature, extent, and definitions of crime. Includes corporate and government crime; the relationship of racism, sexism and drugs with crime; and imprisonment.


Introduction to Forensic Science
Course Number CR 360
Credits 3.0

Uses scientific method and thought process to think critically about the evidence of crime.


Research Methods
Course Number CR 383
Credits 3.0

Introduces scientific research methodology. Includes qualitative and quantitative research methods. Focuses on interpreting research studies in a critical manner and the skills necessary to begin original research.


Crime Analysis
Course Number CR 413
Credits 3.0

Using a case study approach, examines theoretical and practical methods needed to comprehend distribution and probability tables, graphs and charts necessary to crime analysis and interpretation.


Psychology of the Criminal Mind
Course Number PY 426
Credits 3.0

Studies the psychopathology of the antisocial personality. Examines theories of antisocial behavior as well as specific psychological profiles of perpetrators who commit various types of crimes.


Decision-Making and Problem Solving in Criminology
Course Number CR 473
Credits 3.0

Examines decision-making models and their impact in criminal justice agencies, outcomes, and stakeholder satisfaction. Explores personal discretion, the role of organizational policies, political and social influences, and the implications of overly influential cohorts, and other professional organizations and citizens.


Professional Ethics in Criminology
Course Number CR 425
Credits 3.0

Investigates ethical issues concerning personal professional ethics, privileged communications, decision-making, use of statistical data, conflicting loyalties, competing social demands and other tensions specific to the criminal justice system.


Criminal Profiling
Course Number CR 427
Credits 3.0

Provides an introduction to the science of criminal investigative analysis which is the process of inferring distinctive personality characteristics of individuals responsible for committing criminal acts. Discussions include wider societal contexts and implications.


Children and Violence
Course Number CR 428
Credits 3.0

Examines children as victims and perpetrators from historical, clinical, and sociological perspectives. Discusses assessment and prevention of abuse and the effects of abuse as measured in long term psychological impairment and societal impact.


Family Violence
Course Number CR 429
Credits 3.0

Investigates issues associated with the use of aggression against household members, aggression that is against their will and detrimental to their physical, emotional, and psychological welfare. Addresses social impact of violence as well as prevention.


Sexual Homicide
Course Number CR 430
Credits 3.0

Explores the psychological mind of sex crime perpetrators and murderers including formative influences, contexts of power, patterns, and motives. Uses case studies to probe into criminal enterprise, personal cause, group cause, and sexual homicides.


Homeland Security
Course Number CR 445
Credits 3.0

Introduces and defines Homeland Security and the terminology and concepts used by professionals in the field. Identifies First Responders (i.e., FEMA, Secret Service, police departments, etc.) and the challenges and problems associated with each.


Perspectives on Terrorism
Course Number CR 446
Credits 3.0

Explores current and historical sociological, political, and religious climates, which contribute to acts of terrorism. Examines motivation, direction, funding, responses, impacts and consequences.


Senior Capstone
Course Number CR 494
Credits 3.0

Provides the culminating experience of the major, focusing on integration and application of theory. Must be completed as graded course work of Regis University.


Violene in the Workplace
Course Number CR 433
Credits 3.0

Interdisciplinary examination of and practical approaches to prevention, intervention and dealing with the aftermath of violence in the workplace.



Vulnerability and Security
Course Number CR 449
Credits 3.0

Explores theories and practices behind security and vulnerability assessments. Examines existing security practices and assessment models used in organizations. Identifies emerging security concerns and solutions, including monetary resources, to counter potential threats.


Juvenile Delinquency
Course Number CR 451
Credits 3.0

Investigates juvenile delinquency in the context of social and political authority, the operations of the criminal justice system, youth culture and youth subcultures, and related social issues. Presents various sociological theories of juvenile delinquency and examines various historical and contemporary manifestations of juvenile crime and deviance.


Oral and Written Communication
Credits 3.0

English Composition
Credits 3.0

Advanced Oral and Written Communication
Credits 3.0

Literature/Humanities
Credits 6.0

Students must take 6 hours worth of Literature/Humanities courses.


Global Issues
Credits 6.0

Students must take 6 hours worth of Global Issues courses.


Social Sciences
Credits 6.0

Students must take 6 hours worth of Social Sciences courses.


Mathematics
Credits 3.0

Students must take 3 hours of Mathematics courses.


Natural Sciences
Credits 3.0

Students must take 3 hours worth of Natural Sciences courses.


Philosophy
Credits 6.0

Students must take 6 hours of Philosophy courses.


Religious Studies
Credits 6.0

Students must take 6 hours of Religious Studies courses.


Program description: The Regis CPS classroom-based and online Criminology degree enables the adult student like you to explore the inner workings of the criminal mind through an in-depth step-by-step, course-by-course process. Our criminology degree program introduces you to the increasingly complex environment of how law enforcement, public safety, homeland security, regulatory agencies, the criminal justice system, and social support systems work towards the improvement and security of society. Regis Criminology faculty is comprised of active or recently retired practitioners who ensure that course material is contemporary, realistic, and interesting, while fostering an open exchange of real-world knowledge with their students.

Program Name: MS in Criminology
Contemporary Issues in Criminology
Course Number MSCR 604
Credits 3.0

Examines the scope of criminology based on global research and practical applications. The scope includes public safety, terrorism and organized crime, urban crime, victimology, restorative justice, crime prevention and other existing and emerging issues.


Criminal Psychopathology
Course Number MSCR 605.
Credits 3.0

Examines the criminal mind. Explores criminal behavior patterns, factors that influence criminal behavior, and the pathology of criminal behavior. Considers changing environments, demographics, and events.


Research Analysis And Application
Course Number MSCR 606.
Credits 3.0

Provides an overview of social science research methods employed by criminologists, emphasizing diagnostic and analytical tools, research design and evaluation methods and innovative thinking.


Mscr 620. Leadership I: Internal Organizational Problem Identification And Resolution
Course Number MSCR 620.
Credits 3.0

Explores leaders responsibilities with the health of organizational culture and it members.


Leadership Ii: Interorganizational Communication
Course Number MSCR 621.
Credits 3.0

Examines principles and theories of leadership associated with the positioning of an organization within its environment. Situational relationships which leaders must consider include the political arena, policy-making, industry partnerships, resource sharing and management, program development, and other collaborative efforts.


Ethical Conduct And Positions Of Power
Course Number MSCR 625.
Credits 3.0

Examines contemporary ethical standards and conduct in multiple contexts. Case studies, readings and discussion examine conflicts of interest, authoritative power and abuse, political influence, trust relationships and violation of trust, and other dilemmas faced by individuals in positions of leadership


Transnational Collaboration In Combating Crime
Course Number MSCR 640.
Credits 3.0

Surveys and evaluates dominant trends in crime, i.e. organized crime, economic crime, cyber crime, terrorism, traffi c in human beings, and drug dealing, from an economic and social-cultural context of globalization. Topics such as population migratory trends, transnational cooperation, and supranational policies will be discussed.


Contemporary Crime Policy: Current And Future Needs
Course Number MSCR 650.
Credits 3.0

Analyzes existing policies and explores policy change and development incorporating emerging crime trends, cultural diversity, resources and other infl uential factors.


Mscr 652. Strategic Planning, Implementation And Evaluation
Course Number MSCR 652.
Credits 3.0

Utilizes research methods to identify criteria for effective policy making and evaluation. Examines factors which impact successful policy development, implementation, and evaluation.


New Strategies: Crime Prediction And Prevention
Course Number MSCR 654.
Credits 3.0

Analyzes crime prediction and prevention techniques. Addresses reducing the risk of crime in private and public sectors. Identifi es safety for families, employees, and customers and the means by which business private and public property are protected.


Rapid Decision Making
Course Number MSCR 680.
Credits 3.0

Studies decision models which enable timely decision-making in time of crisis and limited knowledge. Case studies are used to refi ne organization of knowledge, critical thinking and communication of decisions.


Capstone Project
Course Number MSCR 693.
Credits 3.0

Directed research that provides experience of the student's major interests and academic work; focusing on an integration and application of appropriate theory and data that addresses a criminology topic of interest to the student.


Program description: Our online and on-campus MS in Criminology is an advanced critical analysis and exploration of criminal behavior, its causes, and its patterns. It is designed to teach you to help predict and prevent crime of all kinds, from terrorism to white-collar fraud.

The curriculum of the MS in Criminology explores the societal, political, and cultural factors that can cause or contribute to crime, as well as topics related to leadership and ethics, crime policy and prevention, and decision-making. Students are encouraged to personalize the course by using a criminological subject of special interest as an area of research and study. In both the online and on-campus programs, students take the same classes taught by the same distinguished staff of Regis professors.

Criminology Courses at National American University

Program Name: Criminal Justice A.A.S.
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJ1000
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, explaining the system structure of criminal justice and the specific functions of policing, courts, and corrections. Major topics in policing, courts and corrections are introduced.


Criminological Theory
Course Number CJ1500
Credits 4.0

This course presents the historical development of the major theoretical schools of criminological explanations for crime and criminal behavior. The major assumptions, policies, and critiques of the classical and positivist theory schools are presented. New evolutions in crime and criminological theories are discussed.


Criminal Law
Course Number CJ2100
Credits 4.0

This course presents substantive criminal law which includes definitions of law, definitions of crime, general principles of criminal responsibility, elements of the major crimes, punishments, conditions or circumstances which may excuse individuals from criminal responsibility or mitigate punishment, the court system of the United States, and the basic concepts of criminal law.


Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJ2150
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the practice of professional behavior and decision making for criminal justice practitioners. The major decision-making tools for dealing with the potential for coercion, the misuse of authority in criminal justice work and managing temptation are presented.


Policing in U.S. Society
Course Number CJ2200
Credits 4.0

This course presents the philosophy and history of law enforcement, the Constitutional controls imposed on law enforcement, the agencies and organizations of law enforcement and the role and function of law enforcement in the criminal justice process.


U.S. Courts
Course Number CJ2300
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the court process from an organizational perspective. The roles of the prosecutor, judge, and defense attorney are presented from the concept of the courtroom workgroup dynamic and how court activity isconducted by the workgroup. Various courtroom dynamic theories are presented with emphasis on court workload processing and plea bargaining.


U.S. Corrections
Course Number CJ2400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of community and institutional corrections in the United States with an analysis and evaluation of contemporary correctional systems and discussion of recent research concerning institutional correctional issues and the issues facing community corrections.


Criminal Justice Internship
Course Number CJ4800-4820
Credits 4.0

This course is a supervised work experience in an approved criminal justice or social agency setting completed during the senior year for the bachelor‘s degree and during the sophomore year for the associate degree. The experience is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply academic learning in professional situations. The work experience assignment must be approved by the department and the student must be assigned to a faculty supervisor.


Principles of Management
Course Number MT2050
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the field of management and emphasizes the knowledge and skills used by successful managers. Throughout the course, students will demonstrate specific knowledge and skills in the areas of management, history, decision-making, communication, planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling, and business ethics.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number PL2350
Credits 4.0

This course examines the constitutional foundation of criminal law and criminal procedure. Students review substantive criminal law concepts, including criminality, culpability, and the elements of particular crimes. Students also explore criminal procedure, including search and seizure, the pretrial process, trial, sentencing, and appeal.


Composition I
Course Number EN1150
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to help students gain confidence and proficiency in basic writing skills. Students are introduced to principles and strategies that will help them to write and revise clearly, concisely and coherently. Students write essays wherein organization and proper usage are stressed. Emphasis is also placed on introductory concepts of the research process.


Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

This course engages students in a continued exploration of the writing process. Students will learn how to locate research sources, utilizing electronic and print materials. Additionally, students will write and revise essays, business communications and a research paper. Emphasis is placed on expanding knowledge of the research process and improving the ability to evaluate and integrate various kinds of research in academic writing.


Speech
Course Number EN2100
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to improve skills in group discussion and extemporaneous speaking for practical application in personal, social and business situations. Techniques of audience analysis, listening behavior, and problem-solving are covered.


Strategies for Success
Course Number CS1500
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enhance the university learning experience and prepare students for personal and professional success. Concepts presented include managing change, setting and achieving goals, and thinking in ways that create success. Time management, study skills, and library research are also discussed.


Career Management
Course Number CS2080
Credits 4.0

This course prepares the student to manage his/her career through the job transitions that occur in the course of a lifetime. The course encourages students to maintain work/life balance, fostering positive feelings and values about work activities. It also helps graduating students secure professional employment. Students will prepare a resume and cover letter, learn interview techniques, develop a "skills" language, networking techniques, and the means to meet employer expectations.


Interpersonal Professional Communications
Course Number EN2150
Credits 4.0

This course provides Students with information and practice in professional communication skills. Students will write memos, develop and present information to the class, practice meeting facilitation skills, examine individual and group decision making, and practice dealing with conflict situations. Prerequisites: EN1150 Delivery: on campus and online,…Ð


Program description: The program is designed to help graduates understand the coercive nature of criminal justice decision making and the need to use logic, ethics, and critical thinking skills in order to use your authority appropriately. This program will prepare you for an entry-level position in various criminal justice agencies such as: police officers, court clerks, court bailiffs, correctional officers, probation officers, parole officers, and other federal law enforcement positions.

Program Name: Criminal Justice B.S.
Composition I
Course Number EN1150
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to help students gain confidence and proficiency in basic writing skills. Students are introduced to principles and strategies that will help them to write and revise clearly, concisely and coherently. Students write essays wherein organization and proper usage are stressed. Emphasis is also placed on introductory concepts of the research process. Prerequisite:Placement recommendation or successful completion of EN0500 or ES2030 Delivery: on campus and onlineÿ


Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

This course engages students in a continued exploration of the writing process. Students will learn how to locate research sources, utilizing electronic and print materials. Additionally, students will write and revise essays, business communications and a research paper. Emphasis is placed on expanding knowledge of the research process and improving the ability to evaluate and integrate various kinds of research in academic writing. Prerequisite: EN1150 Delivery: on campus and online


Speech
Course Number EN2100
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to improve skills in group discussion and extemporaneous speaking for practical application in personal, social and business situations. Techniques of audience analysis, listening behavior, and problem-solving are covered. Delivery: on campus


Technical Communications
Course Number EN3050

This course allows learners to apply the principles of writing and presentations used in business and industry. Various research report formats and styles are emphasized. Through written reports, learners will evaluate the design of primary and secondary research instruments. Graphic displays which depict and support technical data will be emphasized. Professional publications, abstracts, instructions, and technical documentation are also covered. Prerequisite: EN1300 Delivery: on campus and online


College Algebra
Course Number MA2050

This course is an in-depth study of the traditional topics of college algebra. These topics include solving linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, graphs of equations and inequalities, operations involving polynomials and rational expressions, exponents, radicals, and an introduction to exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MA1500 or placement recommendation Delivery: on campus and online


Business Statistics
Course Number MA3000

This course is applications-oriented with a business and economics emphasis. Topics studied include presentation and interpretation of numerical data, measure of central tendency, dispersion, probability, continuous and discrete probability distributions, and linear regression. Prerequisite: MA2050 or placement recommendation Delivery: on campus and online


Strategies for Success
Course Number CS1500
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enhance the university learning experience and prepare students for personal and professional success. Concepts presented include managing change, setting and achieving goals, and thinking in ways that create success. Time management, study skills, and library research are also discussed. Delivery: on campus and online


Career Management
Course Number CS2080
Credits 3.0

This course prepares the student to manage his/her career through the job transitions that occur in the course of a lifetime. The course encourages students to maintain work/life balance, fostering positive feelings and values about work activities. It also helps graduating students secure professional employment. Students will prepare a resume and cover letter, learn interview techniques, develop a "skills" language, networking techniques, and the means to meet employer expectations. Prerequisite: Academic advisor approval Delivery: on campus and online


Introduction to CIS or CI Elective
Course Number CI1150
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with the necessary background for further study of information systems. Students will gain an understanding of computers, computer technology, computer hardware and software, and how computers can be used to produce meaningful information. Students are exposed to practical examples of the computer as a useful tool and they learn how to create documents, workbooks, presentations, e-mail and databases suitable for professional purposes and personal use.


Criminological Theory
Course Number CJ1500
Credits 4.0

This course presents the historical development of the major theoretical schools of criminological explanations for crime and criminal behavior. The major assumptions, policies, and critiques of the classical and positivist theory schools are presented. New evolutions in crime and criminological theories are discussed.


U.S. Courts
Course Number CJ2300
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the court process from an organizational perspective. The roles of the prosecutor, judge, and defense attorney are presented from the concept of the courtroom workgroup dynamic and how court activity isconducted by the workgroup. Various courtroom dynamic theories are presented with emphasis on court workload processing and plea bargaining.


U.S. Corrections
Course Number CJ2400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of community and institutional corrections in the United States with an analysis and evaluation of contemporary correctional systems and discussion of recent research concerning institutional correctional issues and the issues facing community corrections.


Victimology
Course Number CJ3000
Credits 4.0

This course presents a survey of the literature, research and current trends concerning the victim of crime with emphasis placed on victim rights and compensation in the criminal justice process, the extent of victimization and the impact of victimization on the individual.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CJ3100
Credits 4.0

This course provides an explanation of scientific crime detection and the techniques for case management and documentation, the concept of proof, and the impact of evolving technology on the investigative process.


Police Issues and Practices
Course Number CJ3200
Credits 4.0

This course discusses contemporary issues in policing from a systems perspective. The practice of policing in a complex environment creates consequences for the community and the criminal justice system that must be addressed with analytical and appropriate solutions. Emphasis in this course is placed on those issues and the continuous evolving efforts to address the problems facing law enforcement.


Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Course Number CJ3300
Credits 4.0

This course presents the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency, the theories of juvenile offending and rehabilitation, an overview of the juvenile justice system and how it differs from the adult system, the history and unique philosophy of the juvenile court, juvenile court practices and procedures, and the relationship between juvenile offenders and policing and corrections.


Drugs and Alcohol in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJ4300
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of the description, classification, and analysis of the extent of the drug problem and the role of drugs in criminal behavior, as well as an overview of the most serious drug abuse problem, alcohol abuse, with an emphasis on the physiological and social aspects of alcohol use and abuse, social control measures and its role in criminal behavior.


Homeland Security and Terrorism
Course Number CJ4500
Credits 4.0

This course presents the various forms of terrorism and the explanations for terrorism from a theoretical and sociological perspective to be able to explain the causes of past, current and new forms of terrorist behavior. Operational responses to terrorism are discussed, with special emphasis on the role of Homeland Security.


Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number CJ4600
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the principles and practices of administration and their applications to policing, courts and corrections with an emphasis on the application of theoretical administrative concepts to practical criminal justice problems.


Applied Research Methods
Course Number CJ4700
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the criminal justice student to the applied research activities of the criminal justice professional, including how to interpret criminal justice research, how to evaluate a criminal justice policy or program, and how to design an applied study for a criminal justice organization and for grant program evaluation.


Criminal Justice Internship
Course Number CJ4800-4820
Credits 4.0

This course is a supervised work experience in an approved criminal justice or social agency setting completed during the senior year for the bachelor‘s degree and during the sophomore year for the associate degree. The experience is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply academic learning in professional situations. The work experience assignment must be approved by the department and the student must be assigned to a faculty supervisor.


Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJ4900
Credits 4.0

This course is the final application and explanation course for the criminal justice degree. In this course students will focus upon: making a connection between course content, skills learned, and applied contexts; self reflection pertaining to their individual criminal justice college experience; and criminal justice employment issues. Emphasis will be placed on using theory and case studies to explain policy, the use of research results to inform and or evaluate policy, enhanced understanding of criminal justice operations, the use of professional decision making and leadership skill, and the enhancement of communications in criminal justice work.


Principles of Management
Course Number MT2050
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the field of management and emphasizes the knowledge and skills used by successful managers. Throughout the course, students will demonstrate specific knowledge and skills in the areas of management, history, decision-making, communication, planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling, and business ethics. Delivery: on campus and online


Human Resource Management
Course Number MT3050
Credits 4.0

Human resource managers, their duties and responsibilities, are the core of this course. Beginning with recruitment of personnel, the personnel process is discussed, including training, evaluation of employees, wage and salary administration, and some basics of labor law. Conflict management and discipline programs are also included in the course work. Prerequisite: MT2050/EN1300 Delivery: on campus and online


Criminal Procedure
Course Number PL2350
Credits 4.0

This course examines the constitutional foundation of criminal law and criminal procedure. Students review substantive criminal law concepts, including criminality, culpability, and the elements of particular crimes. Students also explore criminal procedure, including search and seizure, the pretrial process, trial, sentencing, and appeal.


Evidence/Exclusionary Rule
Course Number PL3400
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the intriguing and complex rules that govern the admission of evidence at trial. Through the study of the Federal Rules of Evidence, supplemented by numerous examples, students acquire a fundamental knowledge and understanding of the purpose and procedures related to the law of evidence.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJ1000
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, explaining the system structure of criminal justice and the specific functions of policing, courts, and corrections. Major topics in policing, courts and corrections are introduced.


Criminal Law
Course Number CJ2100
Credits 4.0

This course presents substantive criminal law which includes definitions of law, definitions of crime, general principles of criminal responsibility, elements of the major crimes, punishments, conditions or circumstances which may excuse individuals from criminal responsibility or mitigate punishment, the court system of the United States, and the basic concepts of criminal law.


Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJ2150
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the practice of professional behavior and decision making for criminal justice practitioners. The major decision-making tools for dealing with the potential for coercion, the misuse of authority in criminal justice work and managing temptation are presented.


Policing in U.S. Society
Course Number CJ2200
Credits 4.0

This course presents the philosophy and history of law enforcement, the Constitutional controls imposed on law enforcement, the agencies and organizations of law enforcement and the role and function of law enforcement in the criminal justice process.


Program description: The bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice at NAU helps students learn how to analytically evaluate, synthesize information, and use critical thinking skills to develop appropriate solutions for important criminal justice issues. The program is designed to help graduates understand the coercive nature of criminal justice decision making and the need to use logic, ethics, and critical thinking skills in order to use your authority appropriately. If advancing in the criminal justice field is your goal, this program will help you achieve it!

Criminology Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
Database Applications With Access
Course Number IT235
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basic database concepts. The course stresses the implementation of databases in the real world. Students learn about basic database design and terminology, and learn how to create a variety of databases using MS Access. During the quarter, students develop several databases and become familiar with tables, forms, queries and reports.


Criminology
Course Number CJUS343
Credits 4.0

Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS375
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendant’s Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.


The Laws of Evidence
Course Number CJUS440
Credits 4.0

In this course, the student will be provided a thorough examination of the laws of evidence for criminal justice professionals. Topics include circumstantial and opinion evidence, hearsay, character evidence, relevancy and materiality, privileged communications, expert witness testimony, objections to and exclusion of evidence, and chain of custody.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CJUS448
Credits 4.0

This course examines the skills needed to become a criminal investigator and the procedures criminal investigators use to manage a criminal investigation and prepare a case for court. The course also introduces the student to interview and interrogation techniques.


Forensic Criminology
Course Number CJUS450
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to help develop an appreciation and understanding of crime scene analysis and management. Students will document, collect, preserve, and process physical evidence correctly, analyze it thoroughly, and understand its relevance to the case with special emphasis on forensic science application and physical evidence recognition and collection.


Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

An internship in criminal justice provides the student with the opportunity to work in the criminal justice field under the supervision of a criminal justice professional. The student will synthesize the experience by completing weekly logs and assignments designed to complement the internship experience.


Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

The criminal justice capstone facilitates the integration of the knowledge gained in other courses. The student will focus on the application of skills through case study, interviewing, application of law, and report writing.


Career Planning
Course Number INTD340
Credits 4.0

During this course students will investigate career development theory, cultural aspects of professional career fields, responsibilities professionals have toward society and leadership roles of the professional in today’s society. Students learn techniques for researching and investigating potential career paths and opportunities, identifying transferable skills, preparing a resume, marketing themselves, interviewing, negotiating salary and employment packages, and entering today’s workforce. Students will develop their professional portfolios with papers, projects, and capstones from other courses and work projects to help market themselves in the work place.


Public Administration
Course Number PBAD201
Credits 4.0

Provides an introduction to the field of public administration. The course is focused on the structure, functions and processes of the executive branch; agencies of national, state and local governments; and emphasizes nonprofit organizations as co-actors with government in the policy-making/policy-implementation area.


Project Management Tools
Course Number PM220
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes a step-by-step hands-on approach by using automated project tools such as Microsoft Office Project to help effectively plan, analyze, estimate, manage, and control the resources, schedule, and costs of the project.


Abnormal Psychology
Course Number PSYC336
Credits 4.0

Students will learn to identify and describe major mental disorders and discuss different approaches to treating mental illness. Students will also explore legal issues, research methods used by psychologists, and the factors that influence the etiology and progression of mental disorders. This course will allow students to apply the principles of abnormal psychology to a forensic setting while addressing issues such as psychological /psychiatric evaluations and reports, and court testimony.


Forensic Psychology
Course Number PSYC346
Credits 4.0

This course is intended to provide students with the analysis of behavioral evidence. The course will cover topics such as offender profiling, crime scene reconstruction, applied victimology, distinguishing between modus operandi and signature aspects of a crime, as well as the use of psychological evidence in criminal litigation. This course will prepare students to understand and cope with the use of forensic psychology in law enforcement and the court room.


Licit and Illicit Drugs
Course Number SOCL325
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the use, abuse, and addictive nature of mood-altering chemicals outside of alcohol use and abuse. The student will gain a working knowledge of facts and research into the abuse of a wide variety of legal and illegal drugs, along with approaches to prevention and treatment.


Social Psychology
Course Number SOCL350
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study examples of individual persons interacting with the social environment. Specific topics include conformity, aggression, prejudice and interpersonal attraction.


American Diversity
Course Number SOCL356
Credits 4.0

The student will explore race, class, and gender in a global context with a special emphasis on American society and the multicultural experience. Descriptions and analysis of relevant historical context along with discussion of pertinent societal events are also included. The student will be introduced to principal terms, concepts and theories in the field.


Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.


Anatomy and Physiology
Course Number BIO122
Credits 4.0

Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


Professional Speaking
Course Number ENGL210
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations


World History and Culture I
Course Number HIST210
Credits 4.0

HIST210 covers major cultures and civilizations of the world from ancient times to the birth of western imperialism in the 16th Century. Topics include cultures and historical experiences representative of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and pre-Columbian America. Of particular interest is the evolution of world religions or philosophies that prevail and are still critical in the modern world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference for the historical events which shaped the modern world outside Indo-European civilization.


Creating Academic and Professional Success
Course Number INTD111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for academic, professional, and life related success. The course helps students acquire, develop, and utilize basic learning tools. The course also teaches critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation methods and practices which will allow them to formulate reasonable alternatives, hypotheses, and/or premises for academic, social, and professional use. A clear, precise, fair, and unbiased approach to analysis, evaluation, problem-solving, and decision-making activities is emphasized and promoted.


Information and Technology Literacy
Course Number IT105
Credits 4.0

Database Applications With Access
Course Number IT235
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basic database concepts. The course stresses the implementation of databases in the real world. Students learn about basic database design and terminology, and learn how to create a variety of databases using MS Access. During the quarter, students develop several databases and become familiar with tables, forms, queries and reports.


Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL310
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an understanding of ethical expectations and prepares the student to make decisions that are ethically correct and legal. The study of ethics includes the development of ethical standards, prima facie obligations, responsibilities, societal aims and professional codes of conduct. The course will follow the aims of normative ethics. The students should expect to participate and become involved in case studies, hypothetical situations and discussions to develop an attitude that is ethically acceptable, as well as to practice the concepts learned to aid in decision making.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSYC100
Credits 4.0

Taking this course will enable the student to have a better understanding of the basic principles of human behavior. The course also includes a foundation in the background of the field of Psychology, the workings of the human mind and senses, the disciplines and modes of treatment, and the way that Psychology affects our everyday lives. Additional emphasis will be in areas of perception, emotion, learning, motivation, and development.


Accounting I
Course Number ACCT101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces fundamental accounting concepts and explores the accounting environment. It covers the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and introduces the concept of internal accounting controls.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number BADM305
Credits 4.0

This course addresses some tools and insights necessary to understand and analyze the characteristics of human beings and organizational situations. It further explores both organization structure and human variables within that structure to contribute to the long-term survival of an enterprise and include team building.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS141
Credits 4.0

Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing
Course Number CJUS201
Credits 4.0

Homeland Security
Course Number CJUS250
Credits 4.0

American Corrections
Course Number CJUS263
Credits 4.0

Victimology
Course Number CJUS300
Credits 4.0

Juvenile Delinquency
Course Number CJUS342
Credits 4.0

Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS365
Credits 4.0

World History and Culture II
Course Number HIST310
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Human Resource Management
Course Number HRMT210
Credits 4.0

This course examines the role and function of the Human Resource Department in the organization. It is an overview of human resource activities including job analysis, performance appraisals, recruiting, selection, compensation, and career development. Additionally, employee diversity, labor relations, organization development and equal employment opportunity will be discussed.


Managing Diversity
Course Number HRMT430
Credits 4.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Art and Music Appreciation
Course Number HUMN200
Credits 4.0

Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOCL101
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the organization of social behavior and the relationship of society and social conditions. Emphasis will be placed on culture, norm, stratification, systems, structure, social institutions and social change in different cultures.


Program description: Students entering the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program can gain a solid knowledge base in the triad areas of the courts, corrections, and law enforcement in addition to the management skills needed for career advancement.
The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is a unique program in that it offers students a component of forensic study not usually available at the undergraduate level. A Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice can help prepare students for positions such as police officer, deputy sheriff, fraud investigator, highway patrol officer and more.

Criminology Courses at Liberty University Online

Program Name: BS in Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice Research &Writing
Course Number CJUS 230
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite For All Other Cjus Courses; Recommended To Be Taken Concurrently With Cjus 200. This Course Is An Introductory Course To Research In The Social Sciences, Both In Traditional And Online Venues. It Covers Plagiarism, Apa Formatting, Case Briefing, Academic Writing, Formal Reporting, And Memoranda. A Major Research Paper Is Required.


Administration of Justice Organizations
Course Number CJUS 300
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the theoretical and practical management perspectives embraced by the America criminal justice system. This will include nature of criminal justice organizations, individual and group behavior within those organizations, processes inherent in those organizations, and areas of criminal justice reform from a Christian perspective


Juvenile Justice
Course Number CJUS 310
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the juvenile justice system in the United States. The student will study the general principles of juvenile delinquency, overview of the juvenile criminal justice system, theories of delinquency, and other issues dealing with juveniles in the justice system.


Criminal Justice Ethics
Course Number CJUS 350
Credits 3.0

This Course Is Designed To Build Upon The Biblical Foundations Students Should Have Developed From Other Courses (such As Bibl 105/110 And Theo 200/201) And Enhance Foundational Ethical Considerations Into More Developed And Practical Notions Of Right Behavior Within The Realm Of Criminal Justice Praxis.


Constitutional Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS 410
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to study the constitutional provisions and Supreme Court decisions affecting law enforcement procedure, including due process of law generally, arrest, charges, right to counsel, search and seizure, identification, bail, trial and post-trial proceedings, and post-conviction appeals. The course also investigates civil liability for acts of law enforcement personnel.


Criminal Investigations I
Course Number CJUS 420
Credits 3.0

This course will address the constitutional requirements for conducting criminal investigations, essential techniques for processing a crime scene, and methodology for collecting evidence via subpoenas and interviews


Terrorism
Course Number GOVT 480
Credits 3.0

A cross-disciplinary study of terrorism as a form of organized political violence; its intellectual, cultural, political, and religious roots; and its uses in ethnic, sectarian, and international conflicts.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS 200
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite for all other CJUS courses An introductory course covering an overview of the whole criminal justice system in America, including discussion of law enforcement generally, the court systems, correctional organizations, the history of law enforcement in the U.S. and some other nations, and the ethics and philosophy of criminal justice generally.


Corrections
Course Number CJUS 320
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the criminal correctional system in the United States. The student will review the history of corrections and procedural, statutory, and case law of American correction.


Judicial Process
Course Number CJUS 330
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to increase the understanding of the criminal judicial process in the United States. It includes a study of the functioning of courts, judges, lawyers and law enforcement agencies, including judicial decision-making and the impact of court decisions on the American Republic.


Criminology
Course Number CJUS 340
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to examine theories regarding the nature and cause of criminal behavior and society’s response. It approaches crime from a philosophical, psychological, and sociological perspective. Most importantly, this course strives to integrate a theological, perspective to crime and punishment. (Formerly CJUS 210).


Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS 400
Credits 3.0

Prerequisites: Cjus 200 And 230 Or Govt 200 And 346 This Course Is Designed Provide An Overview Of The Legal Elements That Apply To Criminal Law, Procedure, And Evidence, Including Proof, Intent, Conspiracy, Classifications Of Crimes And Related Punishments, Culpable Mental States, Defenses, Rules Of Evidence (including The Exclusionary Rule), And Rights And Procedures In The Gathering Of Evidence.


Program description: Earning this degree provides students a wide array of career options following graduation, including working as criminologists, customs service inspectors, detectives, federal agents, fraud investigators, police officers, parole officers, military service personnel and other similar professions. As an example, criminologists can work independently, with a securities company, or as part of a law enforcement agency, where they analyze crimes and criminal behavior. They attempt to dissect the patterns and data available to them in order to provide explanations, motives, and other similar information regarding crimes. These professionals usually earn between $36,000 and $48,000 annually, according to PayScale.com. Many students also become police officers. These professionals work to catch criminals, enforce the law, and maintain the peace and order of a community. This profession is projected to grow fairly steadily between 2008 and 2018, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Annually, police personnel can expect to earn around $50,000, but this depends on their rank within their department, their geographic location and their experience level.

Criminology Courses by State & City

Top 1 US Criminology Schools (campus and online)

Saint Leo University
Total Programs 11
Number of Subjects 40
Rank in USA 3188th