Online Electronics Courses at Accredited Schools

Penn Foster Career School, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its electronics courses to be successful electronic workers, electricians, electronic technologists, electronics engineers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 193,570 people employed as electrical and electronic equipment assemblers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $30,690. Electrical and electronic engineering technicians make on average $55,410 per year and there are about 154,050 of them employed today.

Electronics Organizations Electronics Common Job Tasks
  • fixing malfunctioning electrical gadgets and appliances
  • wiring of car and vehicle electrical systems
  • listing parts for electrical purchase
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Ranked by Excellence

Electronics Courses at Penn Foster Career School

Program Name: Electronics

Program description:

Program Name: Electronics Technician
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies Introduction to Electronics


Instruction Set 2

Nature of Electricity Practical Exercise 1 Learning Aid: Component Color Code Wheel


Instruction Set 3

Conductors, Insulators, and Batteries Circuit Analysis and Ohms Law Multimeter Usage Manual Practical Exercise 2 Learning Aids : • Multimeter • Circuit Formulas (quick reference card)


Instruction Set 4

Basic Measuring Instruments Electronics Hardware Switches Practical Exercise 3 Learning Aids: • Soldering Iron • Desoldering Pump


Instruction Set 5

Magnetism and Electromagnetism Capacitors and Inductors Basic Semiconductor Components: Diodes Basic Semiconductor Components: Transistors Practical Exercise: 4


Instruction Set 6

Alternating Current Capacitors in AC Circuits Inductors in AC Circuits Transformers Practical Exercise 5


Instruction Set 7

Reactance and Impedance Resonant Circuits Applications of Resonant Circuits Practical Exercise 6


Instruction Set 8

Rectifiers and Power Supplies Amplifiers Oscillators Fiber Optic and Optoelectronic Components Practical Exercise 7


Instruction Set 9

Electronic Sensors Modulation and Detection Circuits Electronic Devices and Amplifiers Using Basic Oscilloscopes Practical Exercise 8


Instruction Set 10

Audio and RF Circuits Oscillator and Feedback Waveforms Electronic Power Supplies Practical Exercise 9


Instruction Set 11

Resonant Circuits Applications of Resonant Circuits Pulse Generators and Techniques Waveshaping Circuits Timing and Synchronization Pulse Circuit Applications Troubleshooting Pulse Circuits


Instruction Set 12

Logic Circuit Fundamentals Introduction to Number Systems Logic Devices and Diagrams Logic Families Applications of Logic Circuits Troubleshooting Logic Circuits Reference Lessons: • Personal Safety, Parts 1 and 2 • Safe Use of Hand Tools


Instruction Set 13

Linear and Digital Integrated Circuits Integrated Circuit Techniques Linear Integrated Circuits Digital Integrated Circuits Linear and Digital Principles Integrated Circuit Logic Systems Troubleshooting Linear and Digital IC Systems Exam Booklet


Instruction Set 14

Experiments with Pulse Circuits Experiments with Logic Circuits Experiments with Linear Integrated Circuits Exam Booklet Equipment: • Digital Trainer • Parts Kit for Experiments 1-3


Instruction Set 15

Industrial Computer Fundamentals Digital and Analog Systems Software and Programming Systems Computer Aided Control Interfacing Principles Exam Booklet


Program description: The Penn Foster Electronics Technician program is recognized by the Electronics Technicians Association International (ETAI) who states "Penn Foster continues to convey the attendees of this program the necessary skills and knowledge which are validated by the ETA-1 Certifications of Certified Student Electronics Technician, Associate Certified Electronics Technician, and Electronic Module 5 Certification".

Electronics Courses at Penn Foster College

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Electronics Technology
Physical Science
Course Number SCI 167
Credits 3.0

Principles that define and govern the physical universe as we know it; chemistry; physics, earth and space sciences.


Electrical/Electronic Measurements and Instruments
Course Number EET 105
Credits 3.0

Transformer fundamentals; checking simple circuits; troubleshooting with basic meters; how a voltmeter works; how an ammeter works; AC measuring instruments; multi-purpose test instruments; oscilloscopes; component testers; digital test equipment.


Electronic Circuits
Course Number EET 182
Credits 3.0

Electronic systems; electronic devices and amplifications; audio and r-f circuits; oscillators; feedback; electronic power supply systems; industrial receivers, transmitters and video systems; servo and control systems; pulse and logic circuits; troubleshooting electronic equipment and systems; logical troubleshooting methods; measuring techniques; interpreting data and results.


Basic Drafting
Course Number MET 101
Credits 3.0

Recognizing and interpreting various types of drawings; using drafting equipment; drawing techniques; creating projections; adding dimensions, sections, auxiliary views, and breaks to drawings; geometric drawing systems.


Quality Control Systems
Course Number MET 221
Credits 3.0

Establishing quality systems; interpreting conventional and GD&T system drawings; setting up and using inspection tools and equipment; developing part acceptance procedures; statistical process control (SPC) fundamentals and practical applications.


Basic Industrial Computer Systems
Course Number EET 218
Credits 3.0

Programmable controllers found in motor-control and other industrial systems; hexadecimal and binary number systems; basic commands for PLCs; the role of computers in telecommunications systems; an introduction to common computer network installations, their key components and the role they play.


Pulse Circuits
Course Number EET 221
Credits 3.0

Pulse Circuits; pulse techniques; pulse generators; timing and synchronization; troubleshooting pulse circuits.


Logic Circuits
Course Number EET 222
Credits 3.0

Logic devices and diagrams; logic families; troubleshooting logic circuits.


Electro/Mechanical Control Technology
Course Number MET 240
Credits 3.0

Recognizing control system types; various types of feedback loops, designing digital and analog systems; operation of controlled and sensing devices; system evaluation and troubleshooting.


Drafting with AutoCAD®
Course Number MET 202
Credits 3.0

Computer-aided drafting and design systems; AutoCAD® menus and features; file and entity creation; drawing organization; displaying modifying, and annotating drawings; data exchange and output methods.


Technical Elective
Credits 3.0

Technology Orientation
Course Number MET 100
Credits 1.0

The development of engineering and engineering technology; technical mathematics; use of a scientific calculator.


Fundamentals of Electricity
Course Number EET101
Credits 3.0

DC principles; nature of electricity; electric cells and batteries; electrical language and hardware; DC generators; AC principles and components; alternating current; AC currents; types of electric circuits.


Technical Mathematics 1
Course Number MAT 110
Credits 2.0

Use of formulas; algebraic operations; use of determinants; use of exponents; logarithms. PREREQ: None


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Fundamentals of Electronics
Course Number EET103
Credits 3.0

Electronic components; semiconductor switching devices; switching and connection devices; basic electronic circuits; amplifiers; oscillators; modulation and detection circuits; logic circuits; pulse digital circuits.


Information Literacy
Course Number ENG 103
Credits 1.0

Teaches students to become effective in finding and utilizing information at libraries and other information centers, and through electronic resources available in libraries and on the World Wide Web. PREREQ: None


English Composition
Course Number ENG 100
Credits 3.0

This course teaches the skills and techniques of effectively developing, drafting, and revising college-level essays toward a specific purpose and audience: active reading, prewriting strategies, sentence and paragraph structure, thesis statements, varied patterns of development (e.g., illustration, comparison/contrast, classification), critical reading toward revision of structure and organization, editing for the standard written conventions, use and documentation of outside sources. Students submit three essays (process analysis, causal analysis, argumentation) and a course journal. PREREQ: None


Technical Mathematics 2
Course Number MAT 122
Credits 2.0

Practical geometry; plane trigonometry; polygons and solids; angles; trigonometric functions. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Readings in World Civilization
Course Number SSC 105
Credits 3.0

Importance of the study of history; major events of the sixteenth through twentieth centuries; causal relationships between events and trends. PREREQ: None


Business and Technical Writing
Course Number ENG 121
Credits 3.0

Writing Styles; Abc Method Of Organizing Material; Grammar (parts Of Speech, Active And Passive Voice, Complete Sentences Vs. Sentence Fragments; Parallel Construction); Using Action Verbs; Constructing Paragraphs; Writing Memos, Business Letters, And Emails; Organizing Material; Conducting Research; Documenting Sources; Outlining; Providing Illustrations; Writing Reports, Proposals, Descriptions, Instructions, Articles, And Manuals. Prereq: None


Music Appreciation
Course Number HUM 104
Credits 3.0

Appreciating music; roles of composer and listener; principles of music theory and instrumentation; historical periods; varying styles of music. PREREQ: None


Resident Laboratory Training
Course Number CET 249
Credits 3.0

Students will be required to complete a series of comprehensive, practical experiments using various measuring instruments. Experiments are designed to provide familiarization with instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data, and laboratory reporting techniques. Students may earn credit for this by completing the course at an approved school or by submitting a life/work experience portfolio demonstrating completion of similar skills to those emphasized in the laboratory training. PREREQ: Semester 3


Program description: Associate's Degree in Electronics Technology at Penn Foster College
Program Overview
Earn your Associate Degree in Electronics Technology —
at home, at your own pace, with Penn Foster College.

There are certain skills you need to begin a career in Electronics Technology. With Penn Foster College distance learning, you can earn your Associate Degree in Electronics Technology quickly and conveniently.

Learn valuable skills with these courses and more:

* Fundamentals of Electronics
* Electrical/Electronic Measurement and Instruments
* Electronic Circuits
* Basic Industrial Computer Systems

And you’ll earn your Associate Degree in Electronics Technology at home — no classroom needed!

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology
Technology Orientation
Course Number MET100
Credits 1.0

The development of engineering and engineering technology; technical mathematics; use of a scientific calculator.


Fundamentals of Electricity
Course Number EET101
Credits 3.0

DC principles; nature of electricity; electric cells and batteries; electrical language and hardware; DC generators; AC principles and components; alternating current; AC currents; types of electric circuits.


Fundamentals of Electronics
Course Number EET103
Credits 3.0

Electronic components; semiconductor switching devices; switching and connection devices; basic electronic circuits; amplifiers; oscillators; modulation and detection circuits; logic circuits; pulse digital circuits.


Physical Science
Course Number SCI167
Credits 3.0

Principles that define and govern the physical universe as we know it; chemistry; physics, earth and space sciences.


Technical Mathematics 2
Course Number MAT122
Credits 2.0

Practical geometry; plane trigonometry; polygons and solids; angles; trigonometric functions.


Electrical/Electronic Measurements and Instruments
Course Number EET105
Credits 3.0

Transformer fundamentals; checking simple circuits; troubleshooting with basic meters; how a voltmeter works; how an ammeter works; AC measuring instruments; multi-purpose test instruments; oscilloscopes; component testers; digital test equipment.


Electric Motors and Controls
Course Number EET210
Credits 3.0

Principles of generator and motor operation; principles of induction motors and synchronous motors; performance and speed control; principles of motor control systems; solid-state drive systems; SCRs as AC to DC converters; installation and maintenance of drive systems.


Basic Drafting
Course Number MET101
Credits 3.0

Recognizing and interpreting various types of drawings; using drafting equipment; drawing techniques; creating projections; adding dimensions, sections, auxiliary views, and breaks to drawings; geometric drawing systems.


Quality Control Systems
Course Number MET221
Credits 3.0

Establishing quality systems; interpreting conventional and GD&T system drawings; setting up and using inspection tools and equipment; developing part acceptance procedures; statistical process control (SPC) fundamentals and practical applications.


Electrical Equipment
Course Number EET212
Credits 3.0

Sizing and selecting conductors, raceways,devices, and controls incorporated in electrical systems; identifying key characteristics of electrical equipment including circuit protection, outlet; control devices; creating ladder logic relay diagrams.


Interpreting the National Electric Code®
Course Number EET214
Credits 3.0

Locating the applicable code section to identify specific electrical installation requirements; interpreting and applying code specifications during the electrical-system design process; evaluating sample installations to ensure code compliance.


Electrical Installations
Course Number EET216
Credits 3.0

How electricity is generated and distributed; interpreting blueprints that represent various types of electrical systems; evaluating industrial electrical system requirements; specifying the correctequipment and conductor type and capacity for electrical systems; the role of each major component in a utility’s electrical distribution system; the basic design characteristics of underground distribution systems.


Electro/Mechanical Control Technology
Course Number MET240
Credits 3.0

Recognizing control system types; various types of feedback loops, designing digital and analog systems; operation of controlled and sensing devices; system evaluation and troubleshooting.


Drafting with AutoCAD®
Course Number MET202
Credits 3.0

Computer-aided drafting and design systems; AutoCAD® menus and features; file and entity creation; drawing organization; displaying modifying, and annotating drawings; data exchange and output methods.


Resident Laboratory Training
Course Number EET249
Credits 3.0

This two-week session includes the use of various measuring instruments for performing a series of comprehensive experiments. The experiments are designed to provide familiarization with instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data, and laboratory reporting techniques.


Technical Mathematics 1
Course Number MAT 110
Credits 2.0

Use of formulas; algebraic operations; use of determinants; use of exponents; logarithms. PREREQ: None


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Information Literacy
Course Number ENG 103
Credits 1.0

Teaches students to become effective in finding and utilizing information at libraries and other information centers, and through electronic resources available in libraries and on the World Wide Web. PREREQ: None


English Composition
Course Number ENG100
Credits 3.0

1)The Basics; The Writing Process; Descriptive Writing; 2)Narrative Writing; Reflective and Persuasive Writing. 3)Textbooks included


Readings in World Civilization
Course Number SSC105
Credits 3.0

Importance of the study of history; major events of the sixteenth through twentieth centuries; causal relationships between events and trends.


Essentials of Psychology
Course Number SSC130
Credits 3.0

Biology and behavior; consciousness; memory; thought and language; intelligence; personality and gender; stress; community influences.


Foundations of Political Science
Course Number SSC 150
Credits 3.0

The normative questions of politics; logical and empirical analysis of political questions. PREREQ: None


Business and Technical Writing
Course Number ENG121
Credits 3.0

Writing styles; ABC method of organizing material; grammar (parts of speech, active and passive voice, complete sentences vs. sentence fragments; parallel construction); using action verbs; constructing paragraphs; writing memos, business letters, and emails; organizing material; conducting research; documenting sources; outlining; providing illustrations; writing reports, proposals, descriptions, instructions, articles, and manuals.


Art Appreciation
Course Number HUM 102
Credits 3.0

Artistic media; historical periods and artistic movements; roles of the artist and the viewer; art criticism. PREREQ: None


Music Appreciation
Course Number HUM 104
Credits 3.0

Appreciating music; roles of composer and listener; principles of music theory and instrumentation; historical periods; varying styles of music. PREREQ: None


Introduction to Literature
Course Number ENG115
Credits 3.0

Reading and analysis of the main genres of literature; poetry, fiction, and drama; themes and forms of literature.


Program description: The Electrical Engineering
Technology Program is designed to
meet the needs of the electrical and
electronics industries for men and
women trained as engineering
technicians. Such trained personnel
will be qualified to assist engineers and
scientists in the various branches of the
electrical and electronics professions.

Electronics Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Associate in Electronics and Computer Technology
Technical Communication
Course Number ENGL-206
Credits 3.0

Students in this course apply writing skills to common business and technical correspondence such as memos, letters and brief reports. They also adapt written materials for oral presentation and explore the research process. The highlight of the course is a brief research project presented in both written and oral forms. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Basic Algebra
Course Number MATH-102
Credits 4.0

This Course First Addresses Polynomials, Then Moves To Factoring Skills And Applying Technology To Solve Various Types Of Mathematical Problems. Coursework Also Introduces Graphing, Number Bases And Elementary Statistical Techniques. Students Apply Their Skills To A Variety Of Application Problems. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results Or Successful Completion Of Math-032. / 4-4 Note: Students In Selected Programs Take Basic Algebra Under This Course Number For Graduation Credit. In Other Programs The Course Is Taken As A Prerequisite Skills Course, Math-092, And Does Not Carry Graduation Credit.


Applied Physics with Lab
Course Number PHYS-204
Credits 4.0

In Addition To Providing A Foundation In Mechanisms, This Course Introduces Physics Concepts Needed To Support Advanced Coursework In Electronics. Topics Include Force And Motion, Energy And Energy Conversion, Magnetism, Heat And Light. Use Of Transducers For Performing Physical Measurements Associated With These Concepts Is Also Incorporated. Students Measure Physical Parameters And Apply Concepts Through Lab Assignments. Prerequisites: Ect-125 And Math-102


Electronic Systems I with Lab
Course Number ECT-122
Credits 4.0

This course introduces basic electricity and electrical circuit concepts. Topics include calculation of current, voltage, resistance and power in series, parallel and combination circuits. Lab exercises develop skills in areas such as reading schematic diagrams, using electronics components to fabricate basic circuits, measuring circuit parameters and troubleshooting. Students operate lab equipment and learn basic lab safety. Corequisite: MATH-102


Electronic Systems II with Lab
Course Number ECT-125
Credits 4.0

The Nature Of Alternating Current Is Explored Through Study Of Reactance, Transformers, Resonant Circuits And Passive Filters. Mathematical Concepts Such As Logarithms And Trigonometry Are Studied And Applied For Analyzing Ac Circuits. In Addition, Students Use Computer Simulation To Predict Circuit Behavior And Develop Proficiency In Using Lab Equipment Such As Oscilloscopes, Function Generators, Counters And Multimeters To Enhance Their Troubleshooting Skills. Prerequisites: Ect-122 And Math-102


Electronic Systems III with Lab
Course Number ECT-246
Credits 4.0

Building on previous coursework, this course introduces solid-state devices such as diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers, as well as their use in signal processing applications such as amplification and filtering. Adders/subtractors, comparators and oscillators are included. Students gain proficiency in working with integrated circuits, and in building and troubleshooting power supplies and operational amplifier applications, while increasing their expertise in using circuit simulators and standard lab equipment. Prerequisite: ECT-125


Achievement Assessment
Course Number ECT-253
Credits 1.0

Exercises In This Course Help Assess Students’ Knowledge And Reinforce Core Principles And Technologies Addressed In Early Terms Of The Electronics & Computer Technology Program. Topics Include Analog Circuits, Digital Systems, Devices, Information Technology, And Basic Science And Mathematical Concepts And Principles. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned. Prerequisites: Ect-114, Ect-246, Netw-202 And Phys-204


Applied Project Lab
Course Number ECT-295L
Credits 1.0

Students Select A Pre-designed Solution From A Given List Of Realworld Engineering Problems For Implementation And Evaluation. A Written Report And An Oral Presentation Are Required. Prerequisites: Ect-253 And Ect-284


PC Hardware and Software with Lab
Course Number COMP-129
Credits 3.0

This course explores the PC system from software, hardware and operating system points of view. Hardware topics include system boards, processors, memory, power supplies, input/output (I/O) ports, internal adapters, printers and basic networking devices. Software topics include client/server operating systems and installation, as well as licensing software applications.


Programming Concepts with Lab
Course Number ECT-108
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes students with programming logic, including basic control structures, modularization and systems programming. Using high-level languages such as flowchart-based languages, students apply programming concepts to technical problems in practical situations. Prerequisite: COMP-129


Digital Fundamentals with Lab
Course Number ECT-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basic Digital Logic And Methods Used In Troubleshooting Digital Systems. Operation Of Basic Logic Gates, Boolean Expressions And Combination Logic In Fixed-function And Programmable Forms Is Explained. Through In-class Activities, Students Create, Simulate And Download Digital Circuit Configurations To Complex Programmable Logic Devices (cplds) Using Cpld-based Software. Prerequisite: Ect-108


Communications Systems with Lab
Course Number ECT-263
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Basic Communications Systems At The Circuit And Subsystem Levels. Topics Include Signal Analysis And Troubleshooting For Analog And Digital Communications Systems. The Effects Of Noise Are Presented. Through Lab Exercises, Students Analyze Signals And Troubleshoot Communications Systems’ Performance. Electronic Design Automation (eda) Software Is Used To Predict System Performance. Prerequisite: Ect-246


Automation and Control Systems with Lab
Course Number ECT-284
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Process Controls And Automation That Employ Programmable Logic Controllers (plcs). Applications Include Selecting Hardware, Such As Processor Architecture; Input/output (i/o) Module Wiring; Programming; Installing Controllers And System Troubleshooting. Proportional Integral Derivative (pid) Principles, Software Implementation Of Pid Controls And Tuning For Optimizing Automation Applications Are Explored. Plant Floor Communication Architectures Such As Ethernet, Data Highway And Devicenet Are Also Included. Lab Exercises Provide Experience With Various Controllers And Interfaces. Prerequisites: Ect-246 And Phys-204


Introduction to Networking with Lab
Course Number NETW-202
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Underlying Technology Of Local Area Networks (lans), Wide Area Networks (wans) And The Internet. Topics Include Networking Media, The Open System Interconnection (osi) Model, Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip), An Overview Of Routing And Switching, And Small Network Configuration And Troubleshooting. Students Prepare And Test Cabling And Become Familiar With Protocol Analyzers.


Introduction to Routing with Lab
Course Number NETW-204
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Router Configuration, Maintenance And Troubleshooting; Routing Protocols; And Use Of Access Control Lists (acls) As A Traffic Management Tool. Students Gain Commandline- Interface (cli) Knowledge And Configure Local And Wide Area Networks With Routers. In Addition, Students Apply The Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip) Suite Of Commands And Acls To Real Networks Under Troubleshooting And Traffic Management Scenarios. Prerequisite: Netw-202



Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Program description: As the electronic systems and equipment that power our
personal and professional lives become more pervasive
and integral to our existence, expertise of electronics and
computer technologists is increasingly vital. To this end,
DeVry based its Electronics & Computer Technology program on fundamentals of the technology driving today’s
systems, including telecommunications, networks, wireless, computers, controls and instrumentation. Graduates
have a broad knowledge base that qualifies them for challenging career-entry positions in the dynamic electronics
and computer fields.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Electronics Engineering Technology
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Analytical Methods in Engineering Technology
Course Number ECET-305
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Mathematical Methods Required To Solve Advanced Engineering Technology Problems. Topics Include Transform Methods, And Probability And Statistics. Students Use Computer Software To Analyze And Solve Problems. Prerequisites: Comp-122 And Math-270


Applied Calculus I
Course Number MATH-260
Credits 4.0

This course, the first in a two-course sequence, provides the basis for solving advanced problems in electronics and computer engineering technology, as well as in physics. Problemsolving in nature, the course covers topics such as functions, limits, differentiation and integration. Students use computer software for analysis and problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH-190


Applied Calculus II
Course Number MATH-270
Credits 4.0

This course, the second in a two-course sequence, provides further skills for solving advanced problems in electronics and computer engineering technology, as well as in physics. Problemsolving in nature, the course covers sequences and series, and introduces differential and difference equations. Students use computer software for analysis and problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH-260


College Physics II with Lab
Course Number PHYS-320
Credits 4.0

This Calculus-based Course Covers Topics Such As Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, Electromagnetic Fields, Wave Propagation, Optics, Sensors And Transducers. Students Use Computer Software To Simulate System Performance And Analyze Data Acquired Through Lab Exercises. Prerequisites: Math-260 And Phys-310


Electronic Circuits and Devices II with Lab
Course Number ECET-210
Credits 4.0

This course, the second in a three-course sequence, furthers students’ knowledge of electrical circuit analysis, and electronic circuit analysis and design. Prerequisite: ECET-110


Electronic Circuits and Devices III with Lab
Course Number ECET-220
Credits 4.0

This course, the third in a three-course sequence, expands on concepts of electrical circuit analysis, and analysis and design of electronic circuits. Prerequisite: ECET-210


Microprocessor Interfacing with Lab
Course Number ECET-340
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Microprocessor Interfacing To Peripheral Devices. Basic Input/output Operations Are Evaluated, And Specific Peripheral Devices – Including A/ds, D/as, Keyboards, Displays, And Serial And Parallel Communication Channels – Are Studied. Software (high-level And Assembly) And Hardware Aspects Of These Devices Are Developed. Polling And Interrupt-driven Software Drivers Are Compared And Contrasted. Integration And Testing Of Designs Are Emphasized. Prerequisites: Ecet-299 And Ecet-330


Mechatronics with Lab
Course Number ECET-402
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Electronic Control Of Mechanical Systems. Topics Include Sensors And Transducers, Signal Conditioning, Actuators, Controllers, System Models, System Transfer Functions And Dynamic System Response. Students Use Computer Software To Analyze, Simulate And Solve Problems. Prerequisites: Ecet-340 And Ecet-350


Technology Integration II - EET
Course Number ECET-499
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, Physics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Seven Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned. Prerequisite: Completion Of At Least 86 Credit Hours In Required Comp, Ecet, Math And Phys Courses


Wireless Communications with Lab
Course Number ECET-380
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Principles And Techniques Used To Analyze And Design Wireless Communication Systems. Topics Include Electromagnetic Waves, Antennas, Propagation And Digital Modulation. Mobile And Cellular Systems Are Emphasized; Other Selected Applications Such As Wireless Local Area Network (wifi), Broadband Wireless (wimax) And Bluetooth (wireless Pan) Are Also Covered. Students Use Computer Software To Simulate, Analyze And Solve Problems. Prerequisite: Ecet-310


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 3-3


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In The Context Of A General Introduction To Psychology And The Social Sciences, This Course Explores Human Development Across The Life Span. Topics Include Physical, Cognitive, Psychological, Social And Moral Development Of Infants, Children, Adolescents And Adults. Coursework Also Addresses Developmental Theories, Motivation, Personality Development, Culture, And General Psychological Theories And Principles. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Pre-Calculus
Course Number MATH-190
Credits 4.0

This Course Emphasizes Topics That Form The Foundation For Study Of Electronics, Engineering Technology, Game And Simulation Programming, And Calculus. Topics Include Analyzing And Graphing Quadratic, Polynomial, Rational, Exponential,logarithmic And Trigonometric Functions; And Developing Complex Solutions To Problems In Rectangular, Trigonometric And Euler Form. Students Use Computer Software And Technology To Assist In Problem Solving And Analysis. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-104 Or Math-114. / 4-4


College Physics I with Lab
Course Number PHYS-310
Credits 4.0

This calculus-based course emphasizes fundamental laws of mechanics – the basis of most electronic control systems.Students use computer software packages to simulate system performance and analyze data acquired through lab exercises.Prerequisite: MATH-260 / 5-4


Electronic Circuits and Devices I with Lab
Course Number ECET-110
Credits 4.0

This Course, The First In A Three-course Sequence, Introduces Concepts Of Electrical Circuit Analysis, And Electronic Circuit Analysis And Design. The Sequence Integrates Study Of Both Passive Electrical Circuits (resistors, Capacitors And Inductors) And Active Electronic Circuits (diodes, Transistors And Analog Integrated Circuits Such As Operational Amplifiers). Lab Exercises Provide Experience With Passive And Active Electronic Components,and Their Design, Integration, Testing And Troubleshooting In Practical Circuits Of Moderate Complexity. Corequisite:math-190; Prerequisite: Ecet-100 / 5-4


Introduction to Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology with Lab
Course Number ECET-100
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basic Concepts Of The Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Field, Including Electronic Components, Introductory Circuit Analysis, Digital Logic, Computer Usage And Design Of Microcontroller-based Electronic Systems, And Emphasizes Hardware And Software Development.corequisite: Math-104 Or Placement Into Math-190 / 5-4


Digital Circuits and Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-230
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Design And Analysis Of Digital Circuits –bases For All Computer Systems And Virtually All Other Electronic Systems In Use Today. Topics Include Combinational And Sequential Logic, Digital Integrated Circuit Electrical Characteristics, Programmable Logic Devices And Hardware Description Languages.students Use Development And Analysis Software And Instrumentation For Circuit Verification. Corequisite: Ecet-220; Prerequisites:comp-122, Ecet-100 And Ecet-210 / 5-4


Microprocessor Architecture with Lab
Course Number ECET-330
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Internal Architecture Of The Microprocessor– The Basic Building Block Of Current Electronic Systems.students Use Assembly Language And/or High-level Language To Program The Microprocessor And Develop Simple Algorithms.applications Of The Microprocessor As A Computing Element Used With Storage Devices And Embedded Controllers Are Covered.computer Software Tools Such As Assemblers, Compilers And Ides Are Used For Program Design, Implementation And Testing.prerequisites: Comp-328 And Ecet-230 / 5-4


Embedded Microprocessor Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-365
Credits 4.0

Students in this course use an embedded microcomputer to control electrical and/or mechanical systems. Students design and develop various applications involving data acquisition and control. System development and engineering trade offs are emphasized to demonstrate best design practices. Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Signal Processing with Lab
Course Number ECET-350
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Analog Signal Processing (asp) And Digital Signal Processing (dsp), With Emphasis On Dsp. Students Program Asp And Dsp Chips For Applications In Communications,control Systems, Digital Audio Processing And Digital Image Processing. They Also Use Computer Software To Simulate Asp And Dsp Circuit Performance, And To Analyze Data Acquired In The Lab.


Communications Systems with Lab
Course Number ECT-263
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Basic Communications Systems At The Circuit And Subsystem Levels. Topics Include Signal Analysis And Troubleshooting For Analog And Digital Communications Systems. The Effects Of Noise Are Presented. Through Lab Exercises, Students Analyze Signals And Troubleshoot Communications Systems’ Performance. Electronic Design Automation (eda) Software Is Used To Predict System Performance. Prerequisite: Ect-246


Data Communications and Networking with Lab
Course Number ECET-375
Credits 4.0

This course introduces principles of data communications,including noise effects, multiplexing and transmission methods.Coursework also covers protocols, architecture, and performance analysis of local and wide area networks.Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Structured Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-122
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Structured Design And Programming Techniques,as Well As Common Tools To Write, Compile, Run And Debug Programs Written In A High-level Programming Language To Solve A Variety Of Engineering Problems. Corequisite: Math-190; Prerequisite:ecet-100 / 5-4


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-220
Credits 4.0

This course introduces concepts of object-oriented programming,such as objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance, which are used to solve problems related to electronics and computer engineering technology using a high level language such as C++. Prerequisite: COMP-122 / 5-4


Programming Environments and Java with Lab
Course Number COMP-328
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Alternate Programming Environments Such As Command-line-oriented Unix Or Linux And Eclipse Ide. Also Introduced Are The Java Programming Language And Advanced Programming Concepts Such As Exception Handling And The Event-driven Model For Graphical User Interfaces. Prerequisite: Comp-220 / 4-3


Product Development
Course Number ECET-390
Credits 2.0

This course examines the product development cycle from initial concept through manufacturing. Coursework addresses project management, total quality management, codes and standards,prototype development, reliability, software engineering and product testing. Each student team prepares a written proposal for a senior project and makes an oral presentation of the proposal to the class. The approved proposal forms the basis for the capstone project, which is developed and completed in the subsequent series of lab courses. Prerequisite: ECET-330 / 3-2


Senior Project Development Lab I
Course Number ECET-492L
Credits 1.0

Working In Teams, Students In This First Course In A Three-course Sequence Initiate Development Of The Senior Project Approved In Ecet-390. Teams Submit Written Progress Reports And Make Oral Presentations Describing The Project To The Class. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisite: Ecet-390 / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab II
Course Number ECET-493L
Credits 1.0

This course, the second in a three-course sequence, requires student teams to complete prototype development of their senior project. Teams submit written progress reports and make oral presentations describing project progress. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-492L / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab III
Course Number ECET-494L
Credits 1.0

In this final course of the three-course project development lab sequence, student teams complete development of the senior project. Teams submit written progress reports, make oral presentations describing project progress, and provide concluding written and oral presentations. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-493L / 2-1


Technology Integration I
Course Number ECET-299
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Four Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned.prerequisite: Completion Of At Least 40 Credit Hours In Required Comp, Ecet And Math Courses,including Comp-328, Ecet-220,ecet-230 And Math-270 / 2-1


Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-360
Credits 4.0

This course introduces basic operating system concepts such as process states and synchronization, multiprocessing, multiprogramming,processor scheduling, resource management, static and dynamic relocation, virtual memory, logical and physical input/output, device allocation, disk scheduling and file management.Also introduced are techniques required to develop device drivers. Computer software is used throughout the course.Prerequisite: ECET-370 / 5-4


Data Structures and Algorithms with Lab
Course Number ECET-370
Credits 4.0

This course introduces data structures (lists, strings, stacks,queues, trees), data encapsulation, as well as algorithms for recursion, sorting and searching. A high-level language such as C++ or Java is used. Prerequisite: COMP-328 / 5-4


Program description: The Electronics Engineering Technology program prepares
graduates to join the work force as technical professionals
in a variety of industries. EET graduates play essential roles
on the engineering team, typically designing and implementing
hardware and software solutions to technical problems. Graduates should also possess appropriate knowledge, experience
and skills to function effectively in multidisciplinary teams,
adapt to changes in technical environments throughout their
careers and progress in their professional responsibilities

Electronics Courses at Ashworth College

Program Name: Basic Electronics Offline
Getting Started in Electronics
Course Number Lesson 1

How to set up a lab; common test equipment and electronics supplies; starting a parts and materials inventory; getting components at low or no cost.


Basic Electrical Concepts
Course Number Lesson 2

Resistors, potentiometers, rheostats, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; color coding; voltage, current, resistance, AC and DC, conductance, and power; circuits; the laws of electricity.


Alternating Current and Transformers
Course Number Lesson 3

Understanding AC waveshapes, frequency, amplitude, and calculations; inductance; DC resistance; sine waves; transformers; soldering for the first time; desoldering techniques; safety concerns.


Diodes and Rectification
Course Number Lesson 4

Solid-state devices explained; basic operational principles of diodes; the common types of diodes; referencing; full-wave and half-wave rectifiers; testing bridge rectifier modules.


Capacitors and DC Filtering
Course Number Lesson 5

Kinds of capacitors and their construction; important capacitor operating principles; filter capacitors; designing raw DC power supplies.


Transistors and Voltage Regulation
Course Number Lesson 6

Operating principles of transistors; common transistor types and configurations; transistor-amplifier comparisons; impedance matching.


Special-Purpose Diodes and Opto-Electronic Device
Course Number Lesson 7

Zener, Schottky, and varactor diodes; diacs; tunnel and fast recovery diodes; noise and transient suppression diodes; a brief look at quantum physics; practical circuit projects.


Audio Amplification
Course Number Lesson 8

Transistor biasing and load considerations; amplifier classes; audio amplifier output configurations and operational basics; high-quality audio systems.


Power Control Devices and Circuits
Course Number Lesson 9

Silicon-controlled rectifiers; the triac; UJTs; diacs; neon tubes; using thyristors in power-control circuits; how to build a soldering iron controller.


Field-Effect Transistors (FET) and Batteries
Course Number Lesson 10

FET operational principles; how to build a high-quality mosfet audio amplifier; additional practical circuit projects; battery types; how to build a general-purpose battery charger.


Integrated Circuits
Course Number Lesson 11

Operational amplifiers; IC or hybrid audio amplifiers; IC voltage regulators; special-purpose ICs; improving the lab-quality power supply; how to build a quad-outputpower supply; additional practical circuit projects.


Resonance and IC Filters
Course Number Lesson 13:

Inductive and capacitive reactance; reflected impedance; resonance; passive filters; integrator and differentiator circuits; waves; harmonics.


Diagnosing Analog and Audio Circuits
Course Number Lesson 14:

Troubleshooting digital and analog equipment and audio-amplifier consumer chips; narrowing the problem; block diagrams; using a bench power supply; signal tracing; output devices; troubleshooting basic low-frequency amplifier circuits; audio distortion problems.


In-Circuit DiscreteSemi-Conductor and Troubleshooting
Course Number Lesson 15:

How To Troubleshoot The Pn Junction Diode And Bipolar And Fet Circuits; How Transistor Circuits, Diodes, Zener Diodes, Ujt Oscillators, And Thyristors Operate; Transistor And Resistor Arrays; Voltage Regulator Ics And Consumer Ic Chips; Understanding Analog Switches; Optical Isolators.


AM, FM, TV and RF Troubleshooting Techniques
Course Number Lesson 16:

Modulation; transmission and reception of RF signals; watts, transmitters, and components; radio receivers; TV; AM and FM detectors; microvolt signals in receivers.


Diagnosing Pulse and Digital Circuits
Course Number Lesson 17:

Pulsed waveforms; source and load instruments; the originating pulse and processing pulse circuits; digital IC references; understanding digital schematic diagrams; digital gates; how to troubleshoot digital circuits.


Basic Automotive Maintenance
Course Number Lesson 1

Engine oil and coolant; automatic and manual transmission fluids; brake and hydraulic clutch system fluid; power steering fluid; AC refrigerant; manual steering sector lubricant; grease; battery electrolyte; windshield washer solvent; fuels; differential and transaxle lubricant; evaluating worn parts; parts ordering, specifying and repair.


Program description: Electronics touches every aspect of our lives from a simple
alarm clock to satellites, and heart monitors. You’ll go deep
into the field starting with basic principles. Then you’ll
advance to digital electronics, transistors, transformers,
integrated circuits, computers and much more. Optional
lessons show you how to build a lab power supply, an audio
amplifier, battery charger – and more.

Program Name: Basic Electronics Online
Getting Started in Electronics
Course Number Lesson 1

How to set up a lab; common test equipment and electronics supplies; starting a parts and materials inventory; getting components at low or no cost.


Basic Electrical Concepts
Course Number Lesson 2

Resistors, potentiometers, rheostats, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; color coding; voltage, current, resistance, AC and DC, conductance, and power; circuits; the laws of electricity.


Alternating Current and Transformers
Course Number Lesson 3

Understanding AC waveshapes, frequency, amplitude, and calculations; inductance; DC resistance; sine waves; transformers; soldering for the first time; desoldering techniques; safety concerns.


Diodes and Rectification
Course Number Lesson 4

Solid-state devices explained; basic operational principles of diodes; the common types of diodes; referencing; full-wave and half-wave rectifiers; testing bridge rectifier modules.


Capacitors and DC Filtering
Course Number Lesson 5

Kinds of capacitors and their construction; important capacitor operating principles; filter capacitors; designing raw DC power supplies.


Transistors and Voltage Regulation
Course Number Lesson 6

Operating principles of transistors; common transistor types and configurations; transistor-amplifier comparisons; impedance matching.


Special-Purpose Diodes and Opto-Electronic Device
Course Number Lesson 7

Zener, Schottky, and varactor diodes; diacs; tunnel and fast recovery diodes; noise and transient suppression diodes; a brief look at quantum physics; practical circuit projects.


Audio Amplification
Course Number Lesson 8

Transistor biasing and load considerations; amplifier classes; audio amplifier output configurations and operational basics; high-quality audio systems.


Power Control Devices and Circuits
Course Number Lesson 9

Silicon-controlled rectifiers; the triac; UJTs; diacs; neon tubes; using thyristors in power-control circuits; how to build a soldering iron controller.


Field-Effect Transistors (FET) and Batteries
Course Number Lesson 10

FET operational principles; how to build a high-quality mosfet audio amplifier; additional practical circuit projects; battery types; how to build a general-purpose battery charger.


Integrated Circuits
Course Number Lesson 11

Operational amplifiers; IC or hybrid audio amplifiers; IC voltage regulators; special-purpose ICs; improving the lab-quality power supply; how to build a quad-outputpower supply; additional practical circuit projects.


Resonance and IC Filters
Course Number Lesson 13:

Inductive and capacitive reactance; reflected impedance; resonance; passive filters; integrator and differentiator circuits; waves; harmonics.


Diagnosing Analog and Audio Circuits
Course Number Lesson 14:

Troubleshooting digital and analog equipment and audio-amplifier consumer chips; narrowing the problem; block diagrams; using a bench power supply; signal tracing; output devices; troubleshooting basic low-frequency amplifier circuits; audio distortion problems.


In-Circuit DiscreteSemi-Conductor and Troubleshooting
Course Number Lesson 15:

How To Troubleshoot The Pn Junction Diode And Bipolar And Fet Circuits; How Transistor Circuits, Diodes, Zener Diodes, Ujt Oscillators, And Thyristors Operate; Transistor And Resistor Arrays; Voltage Regulator Ics And Consumer Ic Chips; Understanding Analog Switches; Optical Isolators.


AM, FM, TV and RF Troubleshooting Techniques
Course Number Lesson 16:

Modulation; transmission and reception of RF signals; watts, transmitters, and components; radio receivers; TV; AM and FM detectors; microvolt signals in receivers.


Diagnosing Pulse and Digital Circuits
Course Number Lesson 17:

Pulsed waveforms; source and load instruments; the originating pulse and processing pulse circuits; digital IC references; understanding digital schematic diagrams; digital gates; how to troubleshoot digital circuits.


Basic Automotive Maintenance
Course Number Lesson 1

Engine oil and coolant; automatic and manual transmission fluids; brake and hydraulic clutch system fluid; power steering fluid; AC refrigerant; manual steering sector lubricant; grease; battery electrolyte; windshield washer solvent; fuels; differential and transaxle lubricant; evaluating worn parts; parts ordering, specifying and repair.


Program description: Ashworth College's Career Diploma in Basic Electronics program is intended for students who want to learn about the inner workings of electronics. The program begins with lessons in basic principles and expands to cover more advanced topics, such as building and troubleshooting. Students have the opportunity to study digital electronics, transistors, transformers, integrated circuits, and computers. Ashworth College supplies all students with an illustrated lesson book, study guides, tutorial assistance, online support, and a time management guide. Students also receive a digital multimeter, solderless breadboard, soldering supplies, and electronic components.
Request Info
Learning Format:

Online
Program Length:

17 Lessons
Required Courses for a Career Diploma in Basic Electronics:

Degree program and course requirements are subject to change. Contact Ashworth College to confirm the most accurate information before enrolling in a program.

* Lesson 1: Getting Started in Electronics
* Lesson 2: Basic Electrical Concepts
* Lesson 3: Alternating Current and Transformers
* Lesson 4: Diodes and Rectification
* Lesson 5: Capacitors and DC Filtering
* Lesson 6: Transistors and Voltage Regulation
* Lesson 7: Special-Purpose Diodes and Opto-Electronic Device
* Lesson 8: Audio Amplification
* Lesson 9: Power Control Devices and Circuits
* Lesson 10: Field-Effect Transistors (FET) and Batteries
* Lesson 11: Integrated Circuits
* Lesson 12: Digital Electronics and Computers
* Lesson 13: Resonance and IC Filters
* Lesson 14: Diagnosing Analog and Audio Circuits
* Lesson 15: In-Circuit Discrete Semi-Conductor and Troubleshooting
* Lesson 16: AM, FM, TV and RF Troubleshooting Techniques
* Lesson 17: Diagnosing Pulse and Digital Circuits

Electronics Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Electronics Schools (campus and online)

Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Princeton University
Total Programs 56
Number of Subjects 59
Rank in USA 8th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
California Institute of Technology
Total Programs 38
Number of Subjects 41
Rank in USA 21st
University of California-San Diego
Total Programs 121
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 22nd
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
Tufts University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 24th
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th