Online Emergency Management Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its emergency management courses to be successful emergency management coordinators, EMTs, paramedics, emergency managers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 13,060 people employed as emergency management specialists alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $56,900. Management analysts make on average $84,650 per year and there are about 552,770 of them employed today.

Emergency Management Organizations Emergency Management Common Job Tasks
  • using defibrillators
  • strapping patients on gurneys
  • receiving instructions via radio from a dispatcher
Popular Journals & Magazines
courses
 

Ranked by Excellence

Emergency Management Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: BS in Fire and Emergency Management
Principles of Emergency Services
Course Number FS 202
Credits 5.0

h is course provides students with an overview of i re protection as well as the philosophy and history of i re protection. Students will gain an understanding of career opportunities in i re protection and related i elds, i re loss analysis, and the organization and function of public and private i re protection services. This course discusses the role of i re departments as part of local governments, as well as i re service laws, regulations, and terminology. Students will also be introduced to multiagency planning and operations as related to multialarm incidents, target hazards, and major disasters. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: FS 101


Occupational Safety and Health for Emergency Services
Course Number FS 204
Credits 5.0

h is course examines the fundamentals of occupational health and safety for emergency service agencies. Students will gain knowledge of risk evaluation and control policies for i re stations, emergency vehicles, and training sites, as well as for incidents involving i re, hazardous materials, and other EMS responses. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: FS 101


Ethics for the Fire and Emergency Services
Course Number FS 205
Credits 5.0

h is course provides an understanding of the types of ethical issues that can arise in the i re and emergency services. Students will examine philosophical, psychological, and religious concepts as they relate to modern ethics. h e course will also provide an overview of various approaches to ethical theory such as deontology, utilitarianism, and virtue ethics. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: FS 101



Communications
Course Number 100/200-level
Credits 5.0

Demonstrate college-level communication through a variety of media.


Communication
Course Number 200-level
Credits 5.0

Demonstrate college-level communication through a variety of media.


Arts and Humanities Course
Course Number 300/400-LEVEL
Credits 6.0

n/a


Eight Skills of the Effective Fire Science Student
Course Number FS 100
Credits 5.0

Eight Skills of the Effective Fire Science Student is an important component of the new student experience in the undergraduate fire science and emergency management programs at Kaplan University. It is designed to ensure students’ successful social and academic transition into and pursuit of academic excellence within the University community, and provide a foundation for success within the profession. Students will be introduced to eight key skills (reading, writing, research, planning, observing, thinking, interviewing, and communicating) of professionals through dynamic and engaging interactions and presentations by practicing professionals in many areas. Real-life examples and interactions with practicing professionals will provide students with a sense of the culture and nuances of the field. The goal of this course is for students to become academically, personally, and socially successful within and beyond this intellectual community.


Fire Behavior and Combustion
Course Number FS 101
Credits 5.0

This course investigates the basic concepts of fire, its spread, and its control. The course discusses the nature and properties of the three states of matter, explains the components of fire, and describes the physical and chemical properties of fire.


Fire Prevention Practices
Course Number FS 105
Credits 5.0

This course examines fire avoidance measures, including fire prevention education, fire safety inspection, fire code enforcement, and fire investigation. Students will gain an overview of the procedures and principles of inspections commonly conducted for control of structures, occupancy, or combined purposes.


Strategy and Tactics
Course Number FS 201
Credits 5.0

This course explores firefighting strategy and tactics, methods of fire attack, and prefire planning. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of fire control principles as well as how to utilize personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the fire ground. This course also discusses special situations such as transportation emergencies and fires, high-rise fires, below-ground incidents, and confined space incidents.


Terrorism, WMD, and Disaster Response Methodology
Course Number CJ 307
Credits 6.0

This Course Will Cover The Methodology And Rationale Behind The Unified Response To A Terrorist, Weapons Of Mass Destruction (wmd), Or Disaster Incident Within The National Incident Management System (nims) And Incident Command System (ics). Students Will Explore The Management And Incident Command Response To Terrorist, Wmd, Or Disaster Events, Including Elements Of Logistics, Budgeting, Prioritization, Staffing, And Support. Students Will Examine These Methodologies From The Perspective Of Crisis Management And Consequence Management.


Advanced Principles of Firefighter Safety and Survival
Course Number FS 302
Credits 6.0

Community Rish Reduction for Fire and EMs
Course Number FS 304
Credits 6.0

Fire Prevention Organization and Management
Course Number FS 401
Credits 6.0


Leadership and Management
Course Number FS 403
Credits 6.0

Safety Risk Management for Fire and EMS
Course Number FS 412
Credits 6.0

Bachelor's Capstone in Fire and Emergency Management
Course Number FS 499
Credits 6.0

Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management is designed for emergency services personnel and addresses the new challenges in technology, human resource management, and fiscal responsibility. The general public and government appointees are demanding higher levels of training and education for those who lead our nation's first repsonse teams to catastrophic disasters, terrorist incidents, and typical emergencies. This bachelor's degree is designed to empower students to pursue leadership roles that include managing all aspects of modern fire, EMS, and emergency preparedness agencies. Additionally, this program targets those students who want to increase their administrative and management knowledge as well as occupational and life safety awareness.

Emergency Management Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice: Homeland Security and Emergency Management
English Composition (ENG115
Course Number (ENG115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics (MAT105)
Course Number (MAT105)
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Social Psychology (PSY110)
Course Number PSY110)
Credits 4.0

Focuses on major theories in social psychology and the most recent research in the field. Topics include gender, interpersonal attraction, aggression, and prosocial behavior.


Homeland Security Organization and Administration
Course Number SEC310
Credits 4.0

This course covers the structure of a homeland security organization at the local, regional, and national level. This course provides an explanation of the homeland security administration functions that must be performed at the different levels.


Emergency Management Procedures
Course Number (CRJ420)
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth review of the concepts of emergency management work. The operational aspects are discussed in relation to the skills needed to do emergency management work, as well as the analytical and critical thinking skills needed for incident command work. Emphasis is placed on the use of technologies, enhanced leadership skills, and the challenges of communications in disaster work.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the components and operations of the criminal justice system. It examines the three main components of that system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Issues and challenges within the criminal justice system and the system's future are also explored.


Introduction to Information Systems
Course Number CIS 105
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microcomputer applications including a brief introduction to computer concepts, computer operating systems, software and hardware. It introduces the student to word processing, spreadsheets, the Internet, graphics, and database software. Included is the creation of web pages, integration of the applications, and hands-on introduction to Microsoft Windows commands, files, features and functions.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Information Technology in Criminal Justice
Course Number CIS170
Credits 4.0

This course examines how information technology is used within the criminal justice system, Homeland Security, and private security. Topics covered include information systems and communication technologies used to prevent and investigate crime and manage security. Students will develop fundamental technical and research skills applicable to criminal justice.


Crime and Criminal Behavior
Course Number CRJ105
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers The Historical Development Of Social And Behavior Explanations Of Adult Crime, As Well As Juvenile Crime And New Evolutions In Crime, Including Cyber Crimes. Crime Causation Theories Are Explained In Relation To Policies Developed From These Theories And The Real And Intended Impact Of These Policies Are Discussed To Demonstrate Their Impact On Society In Regard To Crime Prevention And Criminal Rehabilitation. Prerequisites: Crj 100, Psy 100, Or Psy 105


Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
Course Number CRJ180
Credits 4.0

This course examines the criminal activity of juveniles and includes the study of gangs, status offenses, and the problems facing juveniles today. An overview of American juvenile justice is also provided, in terms of both system and practice. The causes of juvenile crime, the juvenile court system, and the institutionalization, rehabilitation, and treatment of juveniles are explored. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Ethics and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ220
Credits 4.0

This course exposes students to the various philosophical approaches for developing appropriate ethical decision-making tools for the criminal justice professional. Ethical decision-making tools are illustrated in actual application in police, courts, corrections, criminal justice policy, and criminal justice research scenarios. Emphasis is placed on professional integrity and leadership skills that support laws, policies, and procedures in criminal justice. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Criminal Law
Course Number LEG220
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with the origins of criminal law and explores its historical development into modern American crimes codes. Each lesson introduces the student to substantive criminal law and associated legal principles and terminology. This course contrasts elements of crimes against persons, crimes against property, cyber-crime, white collar crime, and other types of crime. Early and modern approaches to identifying, deterring, preventing, detecting, prosecuting, and punishing criminal behavior are also examined.


Society, Law and Government
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course examines the function of the American court system in its operational role within the government, the rule of law, and society. The criminal court process and the role of the judiciary are explained from a policy making perspective that reveals the impact of the courts on society and the rule of law in the evolution of social


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BSCJ) provides students with the knowledge, skills, and professional abilities relevant to the criminal justice field. Students will explore the theoretical, operational, and legal components of law enforcement and the prevention, adjudication, and correction of juvenile and adult crime. Graduates are prepared for careers in the public or private sector of criminal justice or cyber crime and security

Emergency Management Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Health Administration - Emergency Management
Health Care Delivery in the United States
Course Number HCS235
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides A Broad Overview Of The Various Functions Of The United States Health Care System. The Historical Evolution Of Health Care Is Examined. The Student Is Introduced To The Various Forms Of Provider Models And Service Delivery Systems Found In Private And Public Health Sectors, Including Ambulatory, Acute, Mental, And Long-term Care. The Financing Aspects Of Health Care And Their Influence On Health Care Delivery And Quality Are Outlined. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 200 And Hcs 212.


Health Care Ethics and Social Responsibility
Course Number HCS335
Credits 3.0

This course identifies ethical issues in health care. It is designed to encourage students to clarify their personal ethic with regard to health care issues. The various responsibilities involving the management of populations whose ethics may be divergent are identified. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 200.


Principles of Emergency Management
Course Number EMC310
Credits 3.0

This Course Will Explore The History And Evolution Of Emergency Management As Well As Roles Of Local, State, Regional And National Agencies. Topics Include Roles And Organizations Comprising Emergency Management, Leadership Concepts, And Technology And Communication Challenges. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Comm 215, Mth 209, Gen 200, Hcs 212, Hcs 235, And Hcs 245.


Emergency Preparedness and Planning
Course Number EMC320
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Preparation And Planning Process For Emergency And Crisis Situations From Geographical, National And Local Levels. Topics Will Include Concepts Of Response And Preparedness, Recovery And Mitigation Strategies, Hazard Analysis, Vulnerability Assessment, Exposure Pathways And Response Capability Assessment. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Comm 215,mth 209, Gen 200, Hcs 212, Hcs 235, And Hcs 245.


Political and Policy issues for Emergency Management
Course Number EMC330
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Political And Policy Environment Which Affects Emergency Management. The Course Is Intended To Help Emergency Managers Develop An Understanding Of Local, State, And Federal Policies Are Developed And Maintained. In Addition, Legal Issues Involving State And Federal Law Effecting Emergency Operations Will Be Studied. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Comm 215, Mth 209, Gen 200, Hcs 212, Hcs 235, And Hcs 245.


Emergency Services and the Community
Course Number EMC340
Credits 3.0

This Course Will Look At The Social Dimensions Of Community Responses To Disaster Related Issues. Emphasis Will Be Placed On Examining Effective Community Outreach And Preparation Programs As Well As Distribution Mechanisms For Public Information. In Addition, Students Will Assess Demographic Implications And Their Impact On Emergency Prevention Activities And Services. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Comm 215, Mth 209, Gen 200, Hcs 212, Hcs 235, And Hcs 245.


Managing Emergency Response Operations
Course Number EMC350
Credits 3.0

This Course Focuses On The Principles And Practices That Promote Effective Disaster Response Operations In Emergency Management. Students Will Examine The Roles And Responsibilities Of The Participants In A Crisis Event, And Identify Possible Problems Associated With Response Operations Such As Inadequate Preparedness Measures, Safety And Site Security, And Communication. In Addition, Impact Of Disaster On Response Organization And Personnel Will Be Discussed. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Comm 215, Mth 209, Gen 200, Hcs 212, Hcs 235, And Hcs 245.


Foundations for General Education and Professional Success
Course Number GEN200
Credits 3.0

This general education course is designed to introduce the intentional learner to communication, collaboration, information utilization, critical thinking, problem solving and professional competence and values. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach for the learner to develop personal, academic strategies in order to reach desired goals and achieve academic success.


Health Care Vocabulary
Course Number HCS212

This course provides students with a foundational set of basic health care vocabulary that relates to a variety of health care work settings. Students will review terms and concepts related to the structure and professions within the health care delivery systems. In addition, students will also explore terminology related to body systems and common diseases and treatments associated with these systems.


Introduction to Health and Disease
Course Number HCS245

This course introduces students to the basic principles of illness and disease as well as the impact of disease trends on the delivery of services. The clinical manifestations of diseases commonly seen in the health care environment will be reviewed. The impact of health promotion and wellness program perspectives will be presented.


Health Care Communication Strategies
Course Number HCS320

This course offers students the foundational knowledge and skills to communicate effectively in a variety of health care workplace settings. Students will review basic medical terminology, discuss the influences of gender and culture, examine channels of communication including the development of interpersonal and technology related communication, and the impact of consumer and interdisciplinary communication.


Health Care Management
Course Number HCS325

The course explores fundamental concepts of management theory as applied to health care. Students will examine the organizational structure of the health care delivery system and administrative processes such as planning, problem solving, decision making, and quality productivity improvement. Emphasis will also be placed on the major issues and problem areas confronting health service administrators.


Human Resources in Health Care
Course Number HCS341

This course examines the complexities and multiple issues involved in human resources management in health care organizations. Students will examine the strategic role of human resource management in response to changes in the health care industry. In addition, issues such as recruitment, retention, performance management, organizational development, and employee relations are examined. Federal, state, and professional regulatory requirements specific to health care are emphasized.


Health Care Information Systems
Course Number HCS483

The course provides an overview of the integration of technology in the health care setting. Students will examine the processes used in the selection, application and evaluation of computer software and hardware. Methods and processes to make informed business decisions related to the application and use of technology in health care will be discussed.



Health Care Financial Accounting
Course Number HCS405

This course provides an understanding of the general principles of accounting applied in the health care environment. It includes an overview of sources of revenue for various health care entities. The fundamentals of financial planning, cost concepts, capital budgeting and management analysis are applied in the health care environment. Issues surrounding the development and management of budgets are also examined.


Economics: The Financing of Health Care
Course Number HCS440

This course provides an overview of the economics of health care. The various payers are examined, including private, state, and federal entities. Issues such as the cost effectiveness of prevention, the management of patients and their diseases, as well as the cost of treatment settings are discussed. Third party reimbursement from various sources, ranging from for-profit insurance carriers to charitable donations, are reviewed. The health care system's use of grant funding and research dollars is described.


Health Care Research Utilization
Course Number HCS465

This course introduces the students to the purpose and process of research as applied in health care. Students will examine the role of statistics and various research methods. In addition, students will analyze the key elements of evidence-based research within health care.


Health Care Quality Management and Outcomes Analysis
Course Number HCS451

This course examines the relationships between health care quality and organizational performance management. The student is introduced to the rationale for performance management and the role of the governing body of the health care organization in ensuring compliance with the standards of regulatory and accreditation organizations. Methods for assuring quality in process and outcome management are described, as well as the significance and statistical application of measuring outcomes. Various health care customers are identified. Changing trends in the provision and reimbursement of health care services are reviewed.


Health Administration Capstone
Course Number HCS449

Students in this course summarize their learning and formulate strategies to manage various challenges they will encounter in the healthcare environment. Students will also assess the impact of their educational experiences on their ethical perspectives and critical thinking skills. Students will reflect on and evaluate their personal and professional growth, the benefits of lifelong learning, and the impact of these elements on their future.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) Program is designed to integrate a framework of general education courses with a health care curriculum that provides the graduate with the foundational knowledge needed to enter today’s challenging health industry. The BSHA curriculum focuses on the basic body of knowledge, understanding, and skills identified as relevant to an ever expanding and diverse health care arena.

Coursework includes content in some of the following areas- management, finance, legal and ethical parameters, human resources, and information systems. Upon completion of the core curriculum healthcare students have the opportunity to select a concentration that is designed to expand their professional opportunities.

The Emergency Management concentration is designed for EMTs, First Responders, Firefighters, or any other emergency personnel that want to expand their knowledge and skills related to emergency management. Focus will be on principles of emergency management, managing emergency response operations, and planning and preparedness of emergency situations. In addition to the required course of study, students must satisfy General Education and Elective requirements to meet the 120 (124 for Kansas) semester-credit minimums required for completion of the degree.

Note: The diploma awarded for this programs will read as: Bachelor of Science in Health Administration and will not reflect the concentration. Concentrations are reflected on the transcript only

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Emergency Management Courses at Capella University

Program Name: BS - Emergency Management
Principles of Emergency Management
Course Number PS4210
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to concepts and problems associated with crisis and emergency management. Learners examine emergencies, crises, and disasters, and explore the need to develop crisis and contingency plans. Other course topics include the National Response and National Contingency plans; organizing, preparing, and managing a response organization in a turbulent environment; and effective crisis incident decision making and communication.


Emergency Planning
Course Number PS4220
Credits 4.0

This Course Presents The Strategies And Skills Required For Successful Emergency Planning. Learners Study The Components Of An Effective Emergency Plan And The Principles And Resources That Guide The Planning Process. Learners Examine Federal Requirements Governing Emergency Management And Emergency Planning Structures, Including Emergency Operations Centers (eocs), The National Incident Management System (nims), The Incident Command System (ics), And Mutual Aid Agreements. Learners Also Analyze The Effect Of Disasters On Physical And Psychological Health


Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Course Number PS4225
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course assess the factors that influence how emergency and homeland security leaders respond to and manage an emergency situation. Learners examine the assessment and deployment of emergency management assets and identify the differences between various law enforcement agencies and the resources they use to respond to critical incidents.


Leadership in Emergency Management
Course Number PS4230
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine and apply leadership theories and strategies used in crisis environments. Learners study the fundamentals of human resource management and evaluate the tools needed to build effective teams.


Technology in Emergency Management
Course Number PS4240
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the role of information technology in crisis and response management. Learners examine disaster and crisis information requirements and determine appropriate uses of technology during emergency situations. Learners also study the causes and effects of information breakdowns during emergency situations.


Decision Management in Critical Incidents
Course Number PS4250
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course develop the critical thinking and analytical skills needed to make effective decisions in critical environments. Learners gain an understanding of the tactical, practical, and political decisions made in the emergency management field, and analyze potential responses to those decisions


Hazard Identification and Vulnerability
Course Number PS4260
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the basic structure of hazard identification and evaluate the methods used to make environmental and structural vulnerability assessments. Learners also evaluate retrospective and predictive approaches to properly identify and prepare for man-made and natural disasters.


Hazard Mitigation and Preparedness
Course Number PS4265
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine various hazard mitigation strategies, tools, and techniques used to reduce vulnerability. Learners also explore the mitigation and preparedness functions of emergency managers; the role of politics in hazard mitigation policy at the local, state, and federal levels; and the private sector’s potential contributions to managing development in hazardous areas.


Disaster Response Operations and Management
Course Number PS4270
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an understanding of incident management operations, from threat detection to post-incident analysis. Learners assess the challenges associated with responding effectively to terrorist situations and evaluate the effect of stress on incident management.


Disaster Recovery
Course Number PS4280
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners analyze recovery strategies applied to disasters and evaluate the effectiveness of recovery efforts. Learners also examine the different ways in which various agencies work together as part of the longer-term recovery process.


Social Dimensions of Disaster
Course Number PS4290
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course identify how events of crisis affect people. Learners develop an awareness of the effect of human influence and behavior on disaster response and recovery.


Statistical Literacy
Course Number MAT2050
Credits 3.0

This course emphasizes the learner as a consumer of statistics rather than a producer of statistical calculations. Learners apply critical-thinking skills to arguments involving statistics and interpret and evaluate statistics used in real-world situations.


Communication Strategies for the Public Safety Professional
Course Number PS3004
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners build and strengthen the skills needed to succeed in their program and the workplace. Learners engage in interactive activities that help them develop a public safety perspective and expand their organizational, research, critical-thinking, and problem-solving skills. Learners also participate in building a learning community, share talents and resources with courseroom peers, and prepare professional written communications. Other topics include teamwork, ethics, and project creation. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number PS3100
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system and its evolution in response to the continually changing forces that influence crime control. Learners gain an understanding of criminal justice theory and its relation to criminality, the criminal justice system, and the principles of the adjudication process.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number PS3200
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the growing field of emergency management. Learners study various hazard threats and examine strategies for determining and reducing vulnerability. Learners also analyze disaster response and recovery behaviors and activities. Course topics include local, state, and federal emergency management organizations and the impact of various stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, on the emergency management process.


Principles of Security Management
Course Number PS3300
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Course topics include security department management and operations, emergency and disaster management, the role of security in risk management, and integrating security with local law enforcement organizations and the role of security management in the business environment.


Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Number PS3400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the essential concepts of the emerging field of homeland security. Learners study a range of threats to U.S. security, including specialty weapons, cyber attacks, and smuggling. Learners also examine current issues related to large-scale refugee flow and civil liberties, and evaluate homeland security domains, including strategy, fear management, and crisis communications. This course helps learners build a foundational vernacular upon which to critically analyze homeland security.


Applied Public Safety Theory
Course Number PS3500
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major theoretical approaches to threats to public safety from the eighteenth century and the Enlightenment period through the present. Learners study the work of experts associated with the historical, international body of criminology knowledge. Learners explore a range of issues and apply public safety theory and research to analyze them, further developing their critical thinking and writing skills.


Principles of Public Safety Investigation
Course Number PS3600
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing breaches in physical, information, or personnel security. Learners examine the principles and procedures used for crime scene investigation and protection from security and law enforcement perspectives. Learners also study methods of collecting and preserving evidence; interviewing and interrogating complainants, witnesses, suspects, and victims; and employing scientific applications in criminal justice and private security investigations.


Justice, Crime, and Ethics
Course Number PS3700
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ethical dimension of law enforcement practice and acquire the critical knowledge and skills that support ethical, on-the-job decision making. Learners examine major ethical problems such as discrimination, corruption, deception, racial profiling, and excessive force using material drawn from commissions of inquiry, internal affairs investigations, published literature, human rights documentation, and observed police-community relations. Learners explore the bases for developing personal and professional ethics, guided by professional codes of practice and human rights standards.


Applied Public Safety Research Methods
Course Number PS3800
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners are introduced to the principles of social research in the field of public safety. Learners use the scientific method to collect data and analyze research questions specific to crime prevention, emergency planning, information security, and hazard assessment. Learners also explore the ethics of public safety research techniques and practical applications of research.


History of Violence in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS3900
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners review the history of violence in U.S. society, focusing on war, terrorism, hostility, and conquest. Course content emphasizes the roles of local, state, and federal public safety agencies in addressing violence issues in the post-9/11 era.


Introductory Public Safety Statistical Research
Course Number PS3950
Credits 6.0

This course introduces learners to basic statistical language and procedures related to crime phenomena data. Learners practice basic skills such as reading and calculating formulas and analyze the effects of measurement techniques, distribution shapes,and other factors of the statistic-selection process. Learners also examine two-variable relationships, including correlation and prediction measures. Prerequisite(s): MAT2050, PS3800.


Public Safety Capstone Project
Course Number PS4990
Credits 6.0

The capstone project is the culmination of the bachelor’s degree program in Public Safety and is intended to demonstrate the technical and applied public safety knowledge and the critical-thinking and communication skills learners gain during their program. Learners formulate ideas for a new public safety approach, create a vision, and develop a strategic plan that describes how to implement their concept. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Elective Courses CJ
Credits 37.0

Choose 37 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


General Education Classes
Credits 45.0

General Education Requirements are 45 quarter credits with a minimum of 6 quarter credits from each category: Communications, Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, Social Science.


Program description: The Emergency Management specialization focuses on providing undergraduate learners with the knowledge and skills needed for effective emergency and disaster management. Specialization topics include emergency preparedness and planning, disaster response and recovery, hazard mitigation, and public safety. Upon successful completion of this specialization, learners are prepared to pursue careers in emergency management, emergency services coordination, response and recovery team management, hazard mitigation, emergency preparedness, and risk assessment.

Program Name: MS - Emergency Management
Survey of Public Safety Issues, Theories, and Concepts
Course Number PSF5002
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with foundational public safety academic content that helps them prepare for course work in their chosen Public Safety specialization. Learners analyze various public safety theories, concepts, and research from the practitioner-scholar perspective, including law, policy analysis, emergency management and business continuity, leadership, multiculturalism, criminological theory, and public safety research methodology.


Research Methodology in Public Safety
Course Number PSF5006
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of various graduate-level public safety and criminal justice research methodologies. Learners study major research methodologies and quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research design approaches to rigorous scholarly inquiry. This course also provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative research data analysis tools. This course is aimed primarily at master’s learners, although PhD learners may take it as an elective.


Public Safety Ethnic and Cultural Awareness
Course Number PSF5334
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the salience of race, ethnicity, and culture in public safety and the ways public safety addresses the diverse needs of multicultural citizens. Learners analyze cultural experiences from gender, social class, religion, and disabled-status perspectives, and study and apply theoretical approaches for addressing cross-culturalism.


Public Safety Organizational Leadership
Course Number PSF5600
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Examine The Strategic Development And Direction Of Public Safety Leadership Within Policing, Law Enforcement, Fire Suppression, Emergency Management, And Emergency Medical Response In The United States. In Particular, Learners Focus On The Components Of Public Safety, Including Risk Assessment, Preparedness, Prevention, And Response In An All-hazards Environment. Learners Also Explore The Role Of The Public Safety Leader, The Need For The Integration Of Functions In Traditional Public Safety Agencies, Threats Ranging From Potential Bio-terror Attacks To Natural Disasters, And Contemporary Challenges Outside The Scope Of Public And Private Security And National Defense. Prerequisite(s): Mpa/ms In Public Safety Joint Degree Program Learners Must Have Completed Mpa5424.


Critical Incident Stress Management
Course Number PSF5620
Credits 4.0

Critical Incident Stress Can Be Debilitating To Public Safety First-responders. This Course Provides Insight Into Critical Incident Stress, Critical Incident Stress Disorder (cisd), Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (ptsd), And Critical Incident Stress Management (cism). The Course Focuses On Understanding The Consequences Of Unaddressed Critical Incident Stress And Examines Effective Stress Management Strategies. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Disaster Management
Course Number PSF5621
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the anatomy of a disaster event, both natural and intentional. Preparedness, post-disaster response, recovery, and mitigation are topics central to the emerging field of emergency management.


National Incident Management Systems
Course Number PSF5622
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Examine The Fragmented Structure Of Public Safety Agencies, Emerging Threats To Public Safety, And The Formation And Development Of The National Incident Management System (nims) And Incident Command System (ics). Course Topics Include Chemical, Biological, Radiological/nuclear, And Explosive (cbrne) Incidents And Threats, And A Variety Of Integrated Best Practices And Standards For Handling Weapons Of Mass Destruction (wmd) And Protecting Critical Infrastructures.


Critical Infrastructure Risk Assessment, Evaluation, and Analysis
Course Number PSF5623
Credits 4.0

The post-9/11 environment demands awareness and analysis of our critical resources and infrastructure. Learners in this course examine the Homeland Security National Priorities and National Preparedness standards and how they can be used to conduct risk assessments, evaluations, and analyses of critical national infrastructure.


Integrative Project for Public Safety learners
Course Number PSF5991
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners demonstrate proficiency in their specialization area by applying learning from required and elective courses to complete an analysis of a public safety organization or system, or propose a new application in their professional field.


Program description: The doctoral Emergency Management specialization emphasizes crisis and disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Throughout the specialization, learners examine the dynamic nature of critical incidents; historical, social, and demographic disaster management issues; and current disaster management theory, research, and practice. Designed for current leaders or those aspiring to become leaders or managers in the public safety or emergency management field, this specialization provides learners with the opportunity to strengthen the professionalism and leadership skills needed to promote crisis intervention and disaster resilience. Successful graduates of this specialization demonstrate the ability to critically analyze all phases of emergency management and are prepared to pursue leadership or managerial careers or operational, policy, or consulting positions in a public safety organization or within an emergency management field.

Program Name: PhD - Emergency Management
Emergency Management Research, Theory, and Practice
Course Number PSF8003
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of research, theories, and principles of emergency management; the evolution of the field in the United States; and the role of government and the all-hazards approach. Learners study core emergency management processes, including mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery, and analyze disaster case studies and critique the government response from an emergency manager perspective. Learners also focus on developing and cultivating the critical-thinking and writing skills needed to apply emergency management theory to practice.


Contemporary Public Safety Leadership
Course Number PSF8601
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the factors contributing to increased demands on public safety agencies and the need for effective leadership at all levels within the public safety domain, including changing demographics, new technologies, globalization, and terrorism. Learners explore emerging issues, challenges, and theoretical assumptions of leadership in the public safety field and evaluate the impact of public safety paradigms on the ability to lead in an era of rapid and constant change.


Theories of Leadership
Course Number PSF8602
Credits 4.0

Learners in this doctoral seminar course examine the leadership theories that inform public safety research and practice. Learners explore foundational tenants of leadership theory and evaluate their associated impacts on organizations, leaders, and followers.


Diversity Issues in Public Safety
Course Number PSF8606
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the impact of increased diversity in our communities and the heightened need to understand and address how racial, ethnic, and cultural pluralism affect human behavior. Topics include ways in which public safety organizations must reflect changes in social attitudes, practices, policies, and concepts such as transparency, diversity, and inclusion within public safety organizations.


Public Safety Incident Command Paradigm
Course Number PSF8634
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study the development and effectiveness of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) from its inception to its current state. Topics include examining integrated best practices, standards, and techniques critical to successfully managing national emergencies and leading the successful implementation of a national standard of practice for emergency response.


Epistemology of Practice Knowledge
Course Number HS8106
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine theories that guide the acquisition of knowledge within human services professions. Learners critically analyze and evaluate the methods used to develop social science theory as a precursor to examining and applying the scientific method. Learners also study theory derivation, the link between research methods and theory, and the ways scholar-practitioners apply the scientific method.


Fundamentals of Social Science Research
Course Number HS8100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to social science research, particularly in the context of human services. Learners focus on becoming educated consumers of research and examine major concepts and techniques of social science research, including problem formulation, identification of variables, literature review, research design, sampling, definition and measurement of study variables, instrument construction, and data collection and analysis. Learners also critically evaluate published research, apply research findings to professional practice, and practice designing research studies in their field of interest.


Quantitative Research Methods in the Human Services
Course Number HS8111
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the research methods and designs human service professionals use to solve specific social problems. Topics include human subjects protection, measurement, development of instruments, data collection and management, and initial phases of data analysis. Learners also consider methodological adaptations when conducting research with vulnerable and diverse populations.


Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Course Number HS8112
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate qualitative research methods and designs. Learners focus on developing the skills used to synthesize information related to qualitative research methodology and examine ethical issues associated with the qualitative research process


Advanced Study in Research Methods
Course Number HS8113
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the relevance and appropriateness of specific research methodologies in preparation for using them in the dissertation. The course emphasizes conceptualizing, planning, and designing a doctoral research proposal and includes topics such as planning and sampling; measurement; statistical and qualitative analytic models; results planning, analysis, and interpretation; and ethical considerations


Principles of Organization Theory and Practice
Course Number DPA8404
Credits 4.0

This Course Presents The Ways Organizational Behavior Is Influenced By Individual Differences, Group Processes And Interactions, And Organizational Processes. Learners Examine Motivation, Productivity, Diversity, Group Development, Team Building, Collaboration, Coordination With Outside Contractors, Decision-making And Communication Processes, Power And Politics, And Organizational Culture. Learners Also Focus On Developing The Skills And Abilities Essential For Effective Management In Changing Organizational Contexts. Prerequisite(s): Completion Of Or Concurrent Enrollment In Dpa8400. May Be Taken Concurrently With Dpa8100. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Stress Management in Public Safety Organizations
Course Number PSF8626
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study an integrated approach to assessing and managing stress in public safety organizations. Learners analyze various stress-assessment tools and stress prevention, intervention, and management strategies for public safety personnel. Learners also examine psychological and physiological approaches to identifying and managing stress, lifestyle-change stress reduction methods, and behavioral and organizational strategies for managing high levels of stress.


Critical Incident Stress
Course Number PSF8630
Credits 4.0

Critical Incident Stress Can Be Debilitating To First Responders. Learners In This Course Analyze The Dynamics Of Critical Incident Stress And Evaluate Psychological And Physiological Disorders Such As Critical Incident Stress Disorder (cisd) And Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (ptsd). Learners Develop A Hypothesis That Supports A Proposal For A Comprehensive Approach To Critical Incident Stress Management (cism).


Case Studies in Critical Incident Management
Course Number PSF8631
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Case Studies In Critical Incident Management Connected With Chemical, Biological, Radiological/nuclear, And Explosive (cbrne) Incidents In Order To Understand Best Practices In Emergency Event Management. Learners Evaluate The National Incident Management System (nims) For Its Effectiveness During Cbrne Events And Explore Topics Such As How Nims Could Best Coordinate Interagency Responses To Weapons Of Mass Destruction (wmd) Events.


Theoretical Constructs of Emergency Management
Course Number PSF8635
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze emergency management theories and best practices and their foundations in the comprehensive emergency management model that includes preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Learners also strategically examine natural disasters and disasters compelled by human action and identify ways to integrate the comprehensive emergency management model with best practice.


Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation
Course Number PSF8609
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of theoretical approaches and strategies of U.S. disaster preparedness and mitigation. Learners analyze U.S. disaster law and policy and assess the importance of national mitigation policies. Learners also explore disaster preparedness and mitigation concepts from an all-hazards perspective and recommend cost-effective preparedness and mitigation strategies and activities to reduce or eliminate the risk to human life and property and make communities more disaster resilient.


Emergency Management Operations
Course Number PSF8612
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with a theoretical and operational overview of disaster response that is scalable, flexible, and adaptable. Learners analyze the incident command and management structures, roles, and responsibilities of tribal, local, state, and federal agencies and the private sector from an all-hazards perspective. Learners also explore critical functions of emergency operations, incident command, and unified command centers during responses to various emergency events including floods, hazardous materials, pandemics, and terrorist attacks.


Global Issues of Disaster Management
Course Number PSF8615
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners analyze disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation from an international perspective and examine a multidisciplinary approach to disaster management and humanitarian assistance. Learners evaluate the importance of building partnerships with nations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and other disaster management organizations to promote collective awareness and understanding of complex international emergencies. Learners also use disaster management theories and case studies to identify best practices of multijurisdictional communication and coordination during real-world disaster events.


Business Continuity for Emergency Management
Course Number PSF8638
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study the business continuity planning (BCP) process and develop a business continuity plan. Learners explore best practices for design, development, and implementation during all phases of emergency management. This course highlights the need for proactive continuity planning and preparedness in information technology and communications networks.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number ED9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number ED9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number ED9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number ED9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Program description: The doctoral Emergency Management specialization emphasizes crisis and disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Throughout the specialization, learners examine the dynamic nature of critical incidents; historical, social, and demographic disaster management issues; and current disaster management theory, research, and practice. Designed for current leaders or those aspiring to become leaders or managers in the public safety or emergency management field, this specialization provides learners with the opportunity to strengthen the professionalism and leadership skills needed to promote crisis intervention and disaster resilience. Successful graduates of this specialization demonstrate the ability to critically analyze all phases of emergency management and are prepared to pursue leadership or managerial careers or operational, policy, or consulting positions in a public safety organization or within an emergency management field.

Emergency Management Courses at Baker College

Program Name: Associate of Applied Science - Emergency Services Management
Law and Ethics for Emergency Services Personnel
Course Number ESM 201
Credits 2.0

Focuses on legal, ethical, and bioethical aspects of emergency services. Included topics are licensure and certification, professional liability, quality assurance, and risk management


Emergency Services Management Operations and Finance
Course Number ESM 211
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to a broad scope of strategic planning, marketing tactics, and operational decisions in emergency services management. This course also introduces students to an overview of basic accounting principles and finance in emergency services settings along with addressing considerations in budget preparation and management.


Emergency Services Management Seminar
Course Number ESM 251
Credits 4.0

Discusses A Variety Of Significant Issues Related To Emergency Services In Today’s Dynamic, Customer-driven Environment. This Course Focuses On Challenges Of Changes And Management’s Response To Change, The Diversity Of Management Methods, And Managing Strategies For The Future. As A Seminar, This Course Uses Peer Teaching And Learning Approaches, Involves Group Learning Experiences In A Team Environment, Requires Practical Application Of Concepts And Includes A Capstone Project. This Course Culminates The Associate’s Degree In The Emergency Services Management Program. Prerequisite(s): Esm 201, Esm 211.


Management and Supervision
Course Number MGT 211
Credits 4.0

Investigates the developmental role of the modern manager. Areas covered in the course are planning, decision making, forecasting, goal-setting, motivation, communication, staffing, and utilizing problem-solving concepts through group simulation and case studies.


Group Dynamics
Course Number SPK 211
Credits 4.0

Integrates And Applies Knowledge Gained From The Oral Communication And Human Relations Classes. Specifically, Small Group Communication In Work And Social Organizations, Both Verbal And Nonverbal, Is The Primary Focus. Prerequisite(s): Psy 101 Or Psy 111, Spk 201.


Communication Elective
Course Number ELECT 121A
Credits 4.0

Computer Literacy Elective
Course Number ELECT161B
Credits 2.0

Law and Ethics for Emergency Services Personnel
Course Number ESM 201
Credits 2.0

Focuses on legal, ethical, and bioethical aspects of emergency services. Included topics are licensure and certification, professional liability, quality assurance, and risk management.


Cooperative Education I
Course Number WRK 211
Credits 1.0

Emergency Services Management Operations and Finance
Course Number ESM 211
Credits 4.0

Introduces students to a broad scope of strategic planning, marketing tactics, and operational decisions in emergency services management. This course also introduces students to an overview of basic accounting principles and finance in emergency services settings along with addressing considerations in budget preparation and management.


Emergency Services Management Seminar
Course Number ESM 251
Credits 4.0

Discusses A Variety Of Significant Issues Related To Emergency Services In Today’s Dynamic, Customer-driven Environment. This Course Focuses On Challenges Of Changes And Management’s Response To Change, The Diversity Of Management Methods, And Managing Strategies For The Future. As A Seminar, This Course Uses Peer Teaching And Learning Approaches, Involves Group Learning Experiences In A Team Environment, Requires Practical Application Of Concepts And Includes A Capstone Project. This Course Culminates The Associate’s Degree In The Emergency Services Management Program. Prerequisite(s): Esm 201, Esm 211.


Management and Supervision
Course Number MGT 211
Credits 4.0

Investigates the developmental role of the modern manager. Areas covered in the course are planning, decision making, forecasting, goal-setting, motivation, communication, staffing, and utilizing problem-solving concepts through group simulation and case studies.


Group Dynamics
Course Number SPK 211
Credits 4.0

Integrates And Applies Knowledge Gained From The Oral Communication And Human Relations Classes. Specifically, Small Group Communication In Work And Social Organizations, Both Verbal And Nonverbal, Is The Primary Focus. Prerequisite(s): Psy 101 Or Psy 111, Spk 201.


Professional Career Strategies
Course Number WRK 291B
Credits 1.0

Communication Elective
Course Number ELECT 121A
Credits 4.0

Computer Literacy Elective
Course Number ELECT161D
Credits 2.0

Computer Literacy Elective
Course Number ELECT161D
Credits 2.0

Computer Literacy Elective
Course Number ELECT161D
Credits 2.0

Computer Literacy Elective
Course Number ELECT161D
Credits 2.0

Composition I
Course Number ENG 101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number ENG 102
Credits 4.0

Oral Communications
Course Number SPK 201
Credits 4.0

Mathematics for Business
Course Number MTH 101
Credits 4.0

Presents the application of mathematical skills to business functions to provide students with the basics needed to compute problems in the areas of simple interest, ratios, percentages, compound interest, annuities, and present values. Prerequisite(s): MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.


Introductory Algebra
Course Number MTH 111
Credits 4.0

Human Relations
Course Number PSY 101
Credits 4.0

General Psychology
Course Number PSY 111
Credits 4.0

Oral Communication
Course Number SPK 201
Credits 4.0

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presenta


Program description: This program is designed to meet the needs of students who are currently employed in or planning to pursue a career in emergency services management. Emphasis will be placed on individual and group problem solving, management and supervision, and an exploration of current issues specific to emergency services.

Emergency Management Courses at University of Maryland University College

Program Name: MS in Management: Emergency Management
Comprehensive Crisis and Emergency Management
Course Number EMAN 600
Credits 3.0

An analysis of all hazards, phases (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery), and actors involved in crisis and emergency management. Discussion covers the definition of crises, emergencies, and disasters and concepts and issues in crisis and emergency management. Focus is on developing crisis, contingency, and incident management plans. Current frameworks, management systems, and command systems for organizing a response, deploying resources, managing the response organization, supporting crisis communication, and making decisions in a turbulent environment are examined. Topics are discussed from U.S. and international perspectives.


Hazard Risk and Vulnerability Assessment
Course Number EMAN 610
Credits 3.0

An examination of risk, hazard, and vulnerability. Topics include systematic hazard risk assessment, risk mitigation (reduction), risk transfer, and risk analysis. Discussion covers contemporary approaches to risk assessment and management of naturally or technologically induced hazards. Environmental hazard assessment is also examined. Seminal works published in the area are reviewed.


Information Technology in Emergency Management
Course Number EMAN 620
Credits 3.0

An Overview Of The Role Of Information In Crisis And Response Management. Discussion Covers Disaster And Crisis Information Requirements; Information Technologies And Decision Support Tools Applied To Crisis, Disaster, And Emergency Management; And Information Problems Encountered During Emergencies. Tools Used Include The Global Positioning System (gps), Geographical Information Systems (gis), Computer Hardware, And Hazard And Emergency Management-related Software Packages, As Well As Decision Analysis Methods. Assignments Include Practical Case Studies.


Crisis Communication for Emergency Managers
Course Number EMAN 630
Credits 3.0

An exploration of current strategies and tactics for managing the range of communication responsibilities and issues that arise during a variety of crisis situations. Traditional and new media methods for analyzing crisis and communications management issues (including the use of current technologies) are applied using relevant public relations research, theory, and case examples. A strategic approach is used to better identify issues, goals, stakeholders, messaging, and other aspects involved in developing community-specific public responses to crisis situations.


Seminar in Emergency Management Leadership
Course Number EMAN 670
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: 30 credits, including all core and specialization courses for the emergency management specialization (except MGMT 670). An examination of successful leadership in managing crises, disasters, and emergencies through analysis of case studies. Discussion covers the various characteristics and leadership styles most effective in emergency management. Various theories, models, historical examples, and practical applications are reviewed. Topics include breaking down barriers between bureaucratic systems and methods of operation; seeking to create a culture of disaster prevention and preparedness; acquiring resources for risk assessments, plan development, training, and exercising. Ethics and legal issues in emergency management and the procurement of facilities and supplies are also examined. Focus is on understanding how integrated plans must address specific hazards, community vulnerabilities, and risks.


Concepts in Homeland Security
Course Number HSMN 610
Credits 3.0

(Formerly ITSM 620.) An overview of the basic concepts of homeland security, including infrastructure protection, jurisdiction, and issues in technical areas such as interconnectivity and interoperability. The nation’s telecommunications and information technology networks are examined as both vulnerable assets and critical solutions.


Business Continuity: Disaster Recovery, Planning, and Response
Course Number HSMN 630
Credits 3.0

(formerly Itsm 626.) An In-depth Examination Of Managerial And Technical Strategies For Maintaining Enterprise Resiliency In The Face Of Man-made Or Natural Disruptions To Business Operations. Emphasis Is On The Importance Of Advanced Planning. Techniques For Performing Business Risk Assessment And Potential Incident Impact Analysis Are Explored. Discussion Covers Alternative Models For Supporting Contingency Operations, Including The Use Of Service-level Agreements. Key Activities And Processes Involved In Post-event Business Resumption, Including The Recovery Of Key Information Assets, Are Reviewed. Various Formal Business Continuity Standards (such As Iso 17799) Are Also Introduced. Actual And Hypothetical Cases Are Analyzed.


Organizational Theory
Course Number MGMT 610
Credits 3.0

(Formerly ADMN 601.) An overview of the fundamental concepts of organizational theory and design in the context of a postindustrial and increasingly global society. The study of organizations encompasses several key knowledge areas essential to today’s manager: the impact of technological and workforce changes on society, organizational ethics and social responsibility, global issues, history of management thought and its relevance for managers today, and systems thinking and the challenges of managing in today’s complex and rapidly changing environment. Discussion addresses essential concepts in organizational theory and design, including measuring effectiveness, organizational life cycles, options for organizational structure and becoming the learning organization


Intercultural Communication and Leadership
Course Number MGMT 615
Credits 3.0

(formerly Iman 605. Not Open To Students Who Have Completed Mgmt 620, Mgmt 625, Mgmt 630, Admn 620, Admn 625, Admn 625c, Or Admn 635c.) A Study Of Organizational Communication, Leadership, And Decision-making Skills Essential For All Managers In Intercultural Environments. Theories Of Culture Are Examined And Applied In Relation To Leadership Style And Practices, As Well As To Organizational Communication Across Cultural Groups. Team Development And Leadership Are Explored In An Intercultural Environment.


Financial Decision Making
Course Number MGMT 640
Credits 3.0

(Formerly ADMN 630.) Prerequisite: Knowledge of the fundamental concepts of financial accounting and economics, including opportunity cost, the time value of money, and financial analysis. An investigation of financial decision making in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasis is on the application of financial and nonfinancial information to a wide range of management decisions, from product pricing and budgeting to project analysis and performance measure-ment. Various decision-making tools (such as break-even analysis, activity-based costing procedures, linear programming, discounted cash flow techniques, and the balanced scorecard) are examined. Contemporary managerial techniques, such as target costing and kaizen costing, are explored as a means of improving operational efficiency.


Statistics for Managerial Decision Making
Course Number MGMT 650
Credits 3.0

(Formerly ADMN 638.) Prerequisite: Knowledge of the fundamentals of statistical methods, techniques, and tools. An examination of how managers organize, analyze, and interpret data for decision making. Focus is on developing skills in using statistical tools to make effective business decisions in all areas of public and private-sector decision making, including accounting, finance, marketing, production management, and human resource management. Topics include collecting data; describing, sampling, and presenting data; probability; statistical inference; regression analysis; forecasting; and risk analysis. Microsoft Excel is used extensively for organizing, analyzing, and presenting data.


Strategic Management Capstone
Course Number MGMT 670
Credits 3.0

(Formerly ADMN 651.) Prerequisite: 24 credits of program coursework, including all core courses. A capstone investigation of how strategy interacts with and guides an organization within its internal and external environments. Focus is on corporate and business unit–level strategy, strategy development, strategy implementation and the overall strategic management process. Topics include organizational mission, vision, goal setting, environmental assessment and strategic decision making. Techniques such as industry analysis, competitive analysis and portfolio analysis are presented. Discussion covers strategic implementation as it relates to organizational structure, policy, leadership and evaluation issues. Case analyses and text materials are used to integrate knowledge and skills gained through previous study. Problems and issues of strategy formulation are investigated through participation in the Business Strategy Game simulation


Program description: Master of Science in Management: Emergency Management

Emergency Management Specialization Description

The emergency management specialization is designed for individuals who intend to assume greater management responsibility in helping communities reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters in both private and public settings. Students gain an essential understanding of the entire vision, mission, and principles of emergency management with an emphasis on leadership, management, use of technology and cross-agency collaboration.

The curriculum covers management theories and its application and emergency management-related research including interpreting hazard, vulnerability, and risk-related data and literature. Courses also explore the major principles of this cross-disciplinary field that integrates all activities necessary to build, sustain, and improve the ability to mitigate against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from threatened or actual natural disasters, acts of terrorism, or other man-made disasters.

Program Name: MS in Technology Management: Emergency Management
Systems Analysis and Operations Research
Course Number TMAN 621
Credits 3.0

An introduction to the fundamentals of systems analysis and operations research. The goal is to acquire an understanding of the systems view of a product, service or process to include a generic representation of its elements and dynamics. Emphasis is on the skills, tools and methodologies needed to quantitatively analyze and optimize systems and to make decisions as technology managers. State-of-the-art analytical tools and quantitative methods, including computer-based solutions, are discussed. Topics include decision theory, linear programming, transportation problems, network analysis, game theory, reliability theory, cost estimating and expert systems


Foundations of Management and Technology
Course Number TMAN 600
Credits 6.0

Alternate Course Choice: Tman 600 Foundations Of Management And Technology (6) May Be Taken Instead Of Tman 611 And 633. A Study Of The Foundations Of Management And The Principles Of Managing Technology In Organizations. Topics Include Various Organizational Factors That Affect Efficiency And Effectiveness And Global Competitiveness, Such As Group Behavior, Organization Structure, Environmental Factors, International Competitiveness, Organization Culture, Change Management, Decision Making, Team Effectiveness, Values, Conflict, Power, And Politics. Ethics And The Socially Responsible Environment Within Which Mangers Must Operate Are Stressed Through Readings And Practical Applications. Discussion Also Covers Key Concepts Of Technology Management And The Role Of Technology Managers In All Sectors Of The Workforce. Focus Is On Examining Technological Innovation From A Historical Perspective, Including Its Impact On The Economy; Public Policy; Global Competitiveness; And Organizational Strategy, Effectiveness, And Efficiency. Students Who Receive Credit For Tman 600 May Not Receive Credit For Tman 611 Or Tman 633.


Principles of Technology Management
Course Number TMAN 611
Credits 3.0

(Formerly TMAN 601.) An introduction to key concepts in technology management and the role of technology managers in both private- and public-sector organizations. How organizational entities can be structured and managed to respond effectively to dynamic changes caused by technology and international competition is examined. The key cycles in the development of technology—including their impact on the economy, industrial sectors, and organizational strategy and survival—are covered from a historical perspective. Management is examined from both a process and system perspective. The major technical, social, legal, and ethical issues in innovating and implementing technology are presented.


Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation
Course Number TMAN 614
Credits 3.0

A study of the effective management of technical organizations in an increasingly competitive, rapidly changing global environment. A coherent process for the formulation, implementation, and assessment of business strategy is provided. A historical framework for the birth, growth, maturation, and decline of business innovation is presented. Findings and recommendations on contemporary businesses and industrial sectors are reported. Technology management is examined within a strategic framework that integrates strategy setting, implementation, and assessment process; historical analogies/cases of business innovation through maturation lifecycle; and application of lessons learned in contemporary business cases in business, government, and nonprofit organizations.


Economics and Financial Analysis for Technology Managers
Course Number TMAN 625
Credits 3.0

A study of the financial tools managers use to find answers to four important questions: What is the financial condition of the firm What long-term investment should the firm make How can the money be raised for the investments And how will the firm meet its daily financial requirements Topics include accounting statements, tax implications, types of costs, profit recognition, financial markets, investment decision tools, net present value, free cash flows, project financing, valuation of firms, risk-return, cost of capital, long-term financing, short-term financing, and equity financing for entrepreneurs. Discussion also covers mergers and acquisition activities, governance and ethics, and international aspects. Business cases from contemporary firms and readings relevant to technology management are used to illustrate the application of financial concepts.


Organizational Performance Management
Course Number TMAN 632
Credits 3.0

An overview of the most successful strategies and approaches for achieving a high-performing organization, based on the latest research findings and the examples of successful global organizations. Topics include organizational capabilities in managing costs, ensuring quality in products and services, and enhancing customer satisfaction, as well as performance capabilities (such as organizational values, adaptability, flexibility, agility, responsiveness, and decisiveness) that enable organizations to anticipate and respond to change. The Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence are examined as assessment tools for achieving desired organizational capabilities. Discussion also covers specific approaches that contribute to high performance and organizational effectiveness, such as customer relationship management, supply chain management, Six Sigma methodology, and other process improvement tools. Successful applications of these strategies and approaches are illustrated.


Managing People in Technology-Based Organizations
Course Number TMAN 633
Credits 3.0

An overview of the management of three levels of behavior in organizations: individual employee behavior, group behavior, and organizational behavior. Topics include emerging organizational behavior issues such as knowledge management, work design, virtual organizations and teams, contingent workforce management, creativity/innovation, sociotechnical systems, the development of learning and boundary-less organizations, emotional intelligence, the global workforce, and the formulation of pay/retention strategies. Contemporary organizational behavior theories are linked to their applications in technology-based organizations through the use of real-life examples, case studies, and current events.


Managing Strategy and Performance in Technology-Based Organizations
Course Number TMAN 680
Credits 6.0

Alternate Course Choice: Tman 680 Managing Strategy And Performance In Technology-based Organizations (6) May Be Taken Instead Of Tman 614 And 632. An Investigation Of Strategy And Organizational Performance In The Context Of Managing Technological Innovations. Discussion Covers The Strategic Management Process In Technology-based Organizations: Assessing The Competitive Dynamics Of A Strategic Situation, Formulating Strategy, Implementing Strategy, And Evaluating And Controlling Strategy. An Integrative Performance Management Approach, Based On The Latest Research And Case Studies Of Successful High-tech Organizations, Is Adopted. The Need For A Clear Alignment Between Strategy And Organizational Performance Management To Achieve Sustainable Competitive Advantage In The Global Corporate Environment Is Examined. Students Who Receive Credit For Tman 680 Cannot Receive Credit For Tman 614 Or Tman 632.


Comprehensive Crisis and Emergency Management
Course Number EMAN 600
Credits 3.0

An analysis of all hazards, phases (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery), and actors involved in crisis and emergency management. Discussion covers the definition of crises, emergencies, and disasters and concepts and issues in crisis and emergency management. Focus is on developing crisis, contingency, and incident management plans. Current frameworks, management systems, and command systems for organizing a response, deploying resources, managing the response organization, supporting crisis communication, and making decisions in a turbulent environment are examined. Topics are discussed from U.S. and international perspectives.


Hazard Risk and Vulnerability Assessment
Course Number EMAN 610
Credits 3.0

An examination of risk, hazard, and vulnerability. Topics include systematic hazard risk assessment, risk mitigation (reduction), risk transfer, and risk analysis. Discussion covers contemporary approaches to risk assessment and management of naturally or technologically induced hazards. Environmental hazard assessment is also examined. Seminal works published in the area are reviewed.


Information Technology in Emergency Management
Course Number EMAN 620
Credits 3.0

An Overview Of The Role Of Information In Crisis And Response Management. Discussion Covers Disaster And Crisis Information Requirements; Information Technologies And Decision Support Tools Applied To Crisis, Disaster, And Emergency Management; And Information Problems Encountered During Emergencies. Tools Used Include The Global Positioning System (gps), Geographical Information Systems (gis), Computer Hardware, And Hazard And Emergency Management-related Software Packages, As Well As Decision Analysis Methods. Assignments Include Practical Case Studies.


Crisis Communication for Emergency Managers
Course Number EMAN 630
Credits 3.0

An exploration of current strategies and tactics for managing the range of communication responsibilities and issues that arise during a variety of crisis situations. Traditional and new media methods for analyzing crisis and communications management issues (including the use of current technologies) are applied using relevant public relations research, theory, and case examples. A strategic approach is used to better identify issues, goals, stakeholders, messaging, and other aspects involved in developing community-specific public responses to crisis situations.


Seminar in Emergency Management Leadership
Course Number EMAN 670
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: 30 credits, including all core and specialization courses for the emergency management specialization (except MGMT 670). An examination of successful leadership in managing crises, disasters, and emergencies through analysis of case studies. Discussion covers the various characteristics and leadership styles most effective in emergency management. Various theories, models, historical examples, and practical applications are reviewed. Topics include breaking down barriers between bureaucratic systems and methods of operation; seeking to create a culture of disaster prevention and preparedness; acquiring resources for risk assessments, plan development, training, and exercising. Ethics and legal issues in emergency management and the procurement of facilities and supplies are also examined. Focus is on understanding how integrated plans must address specific hazards, community vulnerabilities, and risks.


Program description: The emergency management specialization is designed for individuals who intend to assume greater management responsibility in helping communities reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters in both private and public settings. Students gain an essential understanding of the entire vision, mission, and principles of emergency management with an emphasis on leadership, management, use of technology and cross-agency collaboration.

The curriculum covers management theories and its application and emergency management-related research including interpreting hazard, vulnerability, and risk-related data and literature. Courses also explore the major principles of this cross-disciplinary field that integrates all activities necessary to build, sustain, and improve the ability to mitigate against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from threatened or actual natural disasters, acts of terrorism, or other man-made disasters.
Program Options

MS in Technology Management students may pursue a dual degree option that combines either degree with the Master of Business Administration (MBA). MS in Management students may also pursue a dual degree option with the Master of Distance Education (MDE).

Emergency Management Courses at Benedictine University

Program Name: Disaster Management Certificate
Psychology and Sociology of Disasters
Course Number MPH 654
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=928

This course considers the psychological, sociological and communication aspects of working with the public. Students learn the current best practices designed to mitigate the deleterious psychological and sociological impact of disasters.


Principles of Emergency and Disaster Management
Course Number MPH 650
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=914

This course considers how to manage the unique safety requirements of health care organizations within the framework provided by OSHA regulations and voluntary accreditation organizations. Topics include infection control, bloodborne pathogens, patient safety, ergonomics, construction safety, respiratory protection, fire protection and emergency response


Disaster Assessment and Mitigation
Course Number MPH 656
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1057

This course will include a survey of natural and manmade disasters. The student will learn how to estimate the probability of these events for a specific situation as well as measures to prevent, mitigate and recover from a disaster.


Disaster Management in Public Health
Course Number MPH 657
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1058

This course examines incident preparedness and response from a variety of public health dimensions including: acute and chronic health care delivery, impacts on vulnerable populations, delivery of basic human services, epidemic response, and environmental and occupational health. Students will learn how to prepare for and address disruptions of public health systems arising from disasters.


Program description: As natural disasters and catastrophes pose greater risks to communities, the demand for skilled professionals who can manage and mitigate their effects continues to grow. The online Certificate in Disaster Management equips you with the essential abilities needed from a public health standpoint to prepare for and prevent disasters, assess risk, communicate with organizations and populations, make decisions and take action according to established models and practices, and aid in the recovery process.

Program Name: M.P.H. - Disaster Management
Health Policy
Course Number MPH 610
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=848

This course considers current health policies as outcomes of the larger political and social debates as well as the determinants of disease and the resources and information gathering systems necessary to formulate health policies.


Health Care Safety Management
Course Number MPH 658
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1064

This course considers how to manage the unique safety requirements of health acre organizations within the framework provided by OHSA regulations and voluntary accreditation organizations. Topics include: infection control, bloodborne pathogens, patient safety, ergonomics, construction safety, respiratory protection, fire protection and emergency response.


Management of Health Care Organizations
Course Number MPH 662
Credits 4.0

This course is an overview of the organizational structures, management styles and challenges in health care organizations. This course addresses key business functions as they apply to effective management of health care organizations. It includes view of coverage of managerial functions and organizational matters in the health care arena as they relate to hospitals and provider-based organizations


Community Health and Risk Education
Course Number MPH 688
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes assessment, evaluation and development skills in community health education including utilization of Internet and media-based technologies. Students will also learn how to apply the principles of effective risk communication to address the specific health needs of their audiences. Offered Summer term


Introduction to Statistical Analysis
Course Number MPH 511
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=670

Basic statistical concepts and Excel applications including frequency distributions, central tendency, variability via parametric and non-parametric methods.


Health Behavior
Course Number MPH 601
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=831

Overview of social and psychological determinants and theories of health behavior.


Health Systems
Course Number MPH 602
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=832

Overview of the history, basic structures and operations of public health and health care delivery systems.


Epidemiology
Course Number MPH 604
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=837

This Course Analyzes Chronic And Communicable Disease Patterns In The U.s. And The World. It Covers The Epidemiological Triad And Other Models, Preventive Health And Medicine, Disease In History And Civilization And The Study Of Epidemiological Statistical Methods. Prerequisite: Mph 511 Or Mba 541


Environmental Health
Course Number MPH 605
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=838

The health implications of human relationships to the biosphere are examined as well as the effect of environmental change upon physical, biological and social patterns. Alternative solutions for environmental problems are explored.


Methods of Research in Public Health
Course Number MPH 606
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=841

This Course Is An Overview Of Research Design, Collection And Reporting Of Data, Interpretation Of Findings, Inferential Procedures And Current Public Health Research. Prerequisite: Mph 511 Or Mba 541.


Community Health Analysis
Course Number MPH 607
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=844

This Course Focuses On The Factor In The Analysis Of Health Needs In Communities, Leading To Proposals For Solutions. It Involves Field Work And Utilization Of Research Skills. This Course Should Be Taken After The Completion Of Core Courses. Prerequisites: Mph 511 Or Mba 541, Mph 601, Mph 602, Mph 603, Mph 604, Mph 605, Mph 606.


Health Policy
Course Number MPH 610
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=848

This course considers current health policies as outcomes of the larger political and social debates as well as the determinants of disease and the resources and information gathering systems necessary to formulate health policies.


Biology of Public Health
Course Number MPH 611
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1128

Exploring how diseases occur in order to plan effective interventions. Students will learn how infectious diseases are transmitted; risk factors and biological processes for common diseases; and the impact of these diseases, disorders, conditions, and control strategies on the health of the public.


Management for Health Professionals
Course Number MPH 662
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1065

This course is an overview of the organizational structures, management styles and challenges in health care organizations. This course addresses key business functions as they apply to effective management of health care organizations. It includes view of coverage of managerial functions and organizational matters in the health care arena as they relate to hospitals and provider-based organizations.


Principles of Emergency and Disaster Management
Course Number MPH 650
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=914

This course considers how to manage the unique safety requirements of health care organizations within the framework provided by OSHA regulations and voluntary accreditation organizations. Topics include infection control, bloodborne pathogens, patient safety, ergonomics, construction safety, respiratory protection, fire protection and emergency response


Psychology and Sociology of Disasters
Course Number MPH 654
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=928

This course considers the psychological, sociological and communication aspects of working with the public. Students learn the current best practices designed to mitigate the deleterious psychological and sociological impact of disasters.


Disaster Assessment and Mitigation
Course Number MPH 656
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1057

This course will include a survey of natural and manmade disasters. The student will learn how to estimate the probability of these events for a specific situation as well as measures to prevent, mitigate and recover from a disaster.


Disaster Management in Public Health
Course Number MPH 657
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1058

This course examines incident preparedness and response from a variety of public health dimensions including: acute and chronic health care delivery, impacts on vulnerable populations, delivery of basic human services, epidemic response, and environmental and occupational health. Students will learn how to prepare for and address disruptions of public health systems arising from disasters.


Health Care Safety Management
Course Number MPH 658
Credits 4.0
More Info http://www1.ben.edu/catalogs/catalogs/graduate/2009-2010/description_detail.asp?gCourseID=1064

This course considers how to manage the unique safety requirements of health acre organizations within the framework provided by OHSA regulations and voluntary accreditation organizations. Topics include: infection control, bloodborne pathogens, patient safety, ergonomics, construction safety, respiratory protection, fire protection and emergency response.


Hazard Assessment and Preparedness Planning
Course Number MPH 656
Credits 4.0

This course will include a survey of natural and manmade disasters. The student will learn how to estimate the probability of these events for a specific situation as well as measures to prevent, mitigate and recover from a disaster.


Principles and Practices of Emergency Response and Recovery
Course Number MPH 650
Credits 4.0

This course considers how to manage the unique safety requirements of health care organizations within the framework provided by OSHA regulations and voluntary accreditation organizations. Topics include infection control, bloodborne pathogens, patient safety, ergonomics, construction safety, respiratory protection, fire protection and emergency response.


Program description: On September 11, 2001, the nation and the public health community were awakened to the need for public health professionals to take an active role in the management of disasters. Benedictine University's Online Master of Public Health (MPH) - Disaster Management program is designed for the widest spectrum of health care professionals as well as officials in government, law enforcement and emergency services.

Benedictine's Online MPH - Disaster Management concentration emphasizes the many skills necessary to prevent disasters from a health standpoint, assessing risk, developing plans, communicating with various organizations and populations, acting in accordance with established models and practices, and aid in recovery.

Benedictine's Online MPH - Disaster Management program offers small class sizes and the personal attention expected of a top-tier private university, while conveniently offering fully online courses to maximize your flexibility and mobility. Recognizing that the most desirable students are often the most professionally committed, the Online MPH Disaster Management program is designed for the busy, working adult student.

Emergency Management Courses at Utica College

Program Name: MS in Criminal Justice Administration - Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Quantitative Analysis for Management
Course Number ECN 607
Credits 3.0

Scientific approaches to decision making; descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis and hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and process control


Law And Public Policy
Course Number CRJ615
Credits 3.0

Addresses the intersection of law and public policy and the impact those disciplinary areas present for the management of criminal justice agencies. Topical areas include: the structure of criminal and civil law, including criminal and civil procedure; the impact of civil and criminal liability principles on leadership and planning in criminal justice agencies; and development and trends in public policy as applied to the criminal justice system. Case study method will be applied for much of the course material


Ethical Leadership
Course Number CRJ616
Credits 3.0

Examines the main approaches to ethics and the issues of social justice. Through readings and case studies, the course presents a number of models for individual and organizational ethical behavior. This is presented with the view that criminal justice organizations and participants are part of enforcers of rules within a social order


Research For Decision Making
Course Number CRJ623
Credits 3.0

Designed to serve as a basic overview to criminal justice research methods with emphasis on evaluative research. Research presents multifold challenges regarding access to sample, measurement reliability, complex and ever changing socio-cultural environment that affects human behavior as well as ethical issues. Nonetheless, the research findings in this field often lead to policy implications that have an impact (direct and indirect) on people’s daily lives especially with the growing global nature of crime. The course would also include discussions on ethics of conducting research, data analysis and report writing


Technological Challenges In Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ677
Credits 3.0

Provides criminal justice administrators with an overview of management issues related to technology in criminal justice organizations and operations. The course offers a technical primer of terms and operations involving informational technology, network security, information security, and contingency planning. A case study approach will be used to simulate leadership and planning situations that administrators may face


Leadership And Planning Project I
Course Number CRJ691
Credits 3.0

The first part of the major project series related to leadership and planning. Following the identification of a topic, each student will further develop an original project that deals with leadership and planning in an organizational context. During the course, the following elements will be presented: statement of the problem, definition of terms, issue identification, review of the topic from a historical, legal, economic and operational basis


Leadership And Planning Major Project Ii
Course Number CRJ692
Credits 3.0

The second part of the major project series related to leadership and planning. Based on Part I, each student will continue with the completion of project, which may include an analyses of a course of action and evaluation of outcomes


Homeland Security And Emergency Management
Course Number CRJ602
Credits 3.0

This course provides an in-depth review of homeland security and emergency management concepts within the framework of criminal justice administration. As this is a graduate course for in-service professions, there will be applied field applications in terms of emergency planning and problem solving. Included in the course are a review of leadership competencies needed for administrators in these important areas


Homeland Security Leadership In Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ612
Credits 3.0

The study of Homeland Security Leadership in Criminal Justice will be, initially, via duel studies of the actions and mindset necessary for personal leader, as well as the fundamentals on where federal, state, and local criminal justice agencies fit in the nation’s overall homeland security efforts. The course culminates with the two topics of leadership and homeland security merging to create effectiveness, the barometer with which a leader is truly measured


Terrorism And Counter-terrorism
Course Number CRJ675
Credits 3.0

Evolution of terrorism; organization and tactics of terrorist organizations and rogue states; and legal and operational issues of counterterrorism. Objectives of the course include: 1) Define terrorism and describe the principal types of terrorist organizations; 2) Recall the tactics and methodologies utilized by terrorist organizations; 3) Comprehend the various types of countermeasures (counterterrorism) and the limitations on use in free society; and 4) Apply the various legal and regulatory restrictions in various countermeasures


Program description: This challenging program will provide you with the tools to move up the ranks in the changing and challenging criminal justice field. While intended primarily for working professionals seeking to further their careers with advance knowledge of the criminal justice process, the online MS in Criminal Justice Administration also features a Homeland Security and Emergency Management elective sequence that serves the needs of both a variety of criminal justice practitioners as well as individuals with bachelor's degrees looking to build upon their credentials to enter the field. The program offers two specializations:

Homeland Security and Emergency Management: Proactively protect people, organizations, and your country by learning methods of assessing, mitigating, and preventing attacks and disasters. Students will be trained in key elements of FEMA’s National Incident Management System (NIMS), as well as the Incident Command System (ICS). Unit coursework covers topics that help students develop a base level of knowledge that is important to local and federal emergency management operations.

Emergency Management Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice - Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS14
Credits 4.0

This course surveys the agencies that comprise the criminal justice system which are primarily law enforcement, the courts and corrections. The student will learn the processes of these components and their relationship to one another as well as the roles of related agencies


Criminal Justice Ethic
Course Number CJUS26
Credits 4.0

This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they relate to the field of criminal justice. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for criminal justice professionals, and the student will apply ethical standards to different situations they may encounter working in the criminal justice professions


Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS29
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the general principles of criminal law. Specifically it includes both the policy and procedure of criminal law, giving students the ability to apply the essential elements of general criminal law principles to specific substantive crimes


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS375
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendant’s Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.


Terrorism: Origins, Ideologies and Goals
Course Number HLS110
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the study and history of terrorism. Students will learn the ideologies of many of the terrorist organizations that have impacted the United States and other nations. Students will also gain an understanding of the motivations and goals of many terrorist organizations.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number HLS120
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to give the student an introduction to emergency management – an all-hazards approach: definitions of important terms; types and history of hazards; and organizational responses to natural, accidental, and man-made hazards. Students will be introduced to the concepts of preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery.


Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy
Course Number HLS200
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Strategy. This is the process an organization uses to determine its direction, and make decisions to pursue this direction. Students will be introduced to resource allocation, including capital, technology, and human resources.


Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies and Applications
Course Number HLS210
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the technology and systems utilized by Homeland Security and Emergency Management organizations. This course also looks at how terrorist organizations have and do use technology to their benefit.


HR and Administrative Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS300
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the many human resource and administrative issues as they relate to Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about diversity in the Homeland Security workplace, as well as how diversity impacts how homeland security and emergency management personnel do their jobs.


Understanding Critical Infrastructures
Course Number HLS305
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the protection of critical infrastructures, one of the core functions of Homeland Security. In this course, the student will learn how to identify the different sectors of critical infrastructure, and the assets within various sectors that must be protected. The student will also be introduced to strategies utilized to protect various key assets.


Comparative Approaches to Event Management
Course Number HLS310
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the role of Emergency Management in dealing with both natural disasters and man-made attacks. In this course, the student will learn the similarities and differences in dealing with different types of catastrophes, and the challenges faced by each type. Students will also consider the implications for strategic planning presented by both natural disasters and manmade attacks.


Interagency Relationships in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS315
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the nature of the relationships that exist between the various agencies involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Federal, state, and local agencies all play a role in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and this course helps the student to understand how the various agencies interact with each other and work together to protect this nation from all types of hazards and threats. Students will also develop their leadership skills, a vital component to successful communication and coordination with other agencies.


Private Sector Role in Homeland Securit
Course Number HLS320
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the role of the private sector in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about the functions of private organizations involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, including collaboration between public and private agencies. The student will also develop a strategic plan for a private agency.


Research Methodology and Policy Analysis
Course Number HLS325
Credits 4.0

Understanding the role of research and policy analysis in homeland security and emergency management is incredibly critical. Students will learn and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology within the homeland security and emergency management system and become familiar with the range and scope of quantitative and qualitative tools available to the criminal justice researcher. This course will assess the homeland security and emergency management system including research theory, inquiry structure, and modes of observation, data interpretation, program evaluation, and policy analysis. This course is designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of statistical analysis, developing and constructing a research plan, and evaluating the results of said research in the context of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.


Advanced Application of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies
Course Number HLS330
Credits 4.0

This course takes a practical look at the limitations presented by current technology. Also, this course introduces the student to the concept of interoperability, which addresses the ability of diverse agencies and jurisdictions to communicate, to exchange data, and to use that information effectively.


Emergent Topics in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS340
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to topics on the forefront of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. This course is designed to reflect the most current state of discourse on topics relating to Homeland Security and Emergency Management.


Introduction to Intelligence
Course Number HLS350
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the principles of intelligence, the different intelligence disciplines, the intelligence cycles, and the intelligence community.


Counterintelligence
Course Number HLS360
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to counterintelligence concepts, such as counterintelligence basic principles, concepts, missions, and functions. Students will also be introduced to counterintelligence operations and techniques. Students will also learn the history and evolution of counterintelligence in the United States.


Constitutional Law and Public Policy Analysis
Course Number HLS400
Credits 44.0

In this course the student will discuss and analyze concepts of Constitutional Law and Public Policy as they apply to Homeland Security. The student will evaluate homeland security policies in terms of their effects on civil liberties, and the public’s involvement in homeland security.


The Psychology of Fear Management and Terrorism
Course Number HLS410
Credits 4.0

This course looks at the motivations of terrorist groups, and the psychological impact of terrorist attacks. It will aid the student in understanding the role of government and the media in shaping the public perception of, and response to, terrorist events.


Strategic Planning and Budgeting for Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS420
Credits 4.0

This course further develops the student’s knowledge base for strategic planning and budgeting, building on the concepts learned in HLS200, Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy, taking a more in-depth look at the strategic planning process.


Planning for Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS430
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the planning process for Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Students will be introduced to the “how-to” aspects of planning.


Local Emergency Management and Civil Preparedness
Course Number HLS450
Credits 4.0

This course develops the student’s knowledge in the area of local emergency management. Students will learn of the challenges faced by local agencies, such as communication and coordination. The student will develop strategies to implement at the local level to enhance civil preparedness.


Advanced Application of Intelligence in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS460
Credits 4.0

This course looks at the relationship between local law enforcement and the intelligence community. It introduces the student to state and local intelligence activities, and it discusses policing and actionable intelligence.


Evaluating Risk in Critical Infrastructure
Course Number HLS470
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of risk assessment. At the completion of the course, students will be able to understand the value of various risk tools, and apply those tools to any critical infrastructure to reduce the risk associated with future terrorist attacks. The aim of this course is to show how to analyze critical infrastructure systems, their weaknesses, and how to formulate strategies that allocate resources in the most efficient and effective manner.


Knowledge Into Practice: Communications and Emergency Planning
Course Number HLS480
Credits 4.0

This course integrates many of the primary areas of focus in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, such as: intelligence, strategic planning, critical infrastructure, research and analysis, technology and strategic communications. The student will develop an emergency plan in one of the four primary areas of preparedness, response, mitigation, or recovery.


Homeland Security
Course Number CJUS250
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CJUS343
Credits 4.0

Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior.


Professional Communications
Course Number ENG210
Credits 4.0

This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process.


Real World Writing
Course Number ENGL125
Credits 4.0

This Is One Of The Most Important Courses You Can Take—it Will Lay The Foundation For Your Entire College And Professional Career As An Educated Person. In It, We Will Address How To Write And Speak To Make A Point; How To Use Good Grammar, Vocabulary And Logical Thinking; As Well As How To Find A Suitable Topic For Your Writing Assignments. We Will Start With The Basics: Reviewing Sentences And Paragraphs, And Then Move On To The Classic Five-part College Essay Or Theme. 321 Effective November 15, 2010 For Students Starting On Or After January 2, 2011 There Are Different Rules Of The Game For Writing Academically Than Writing For Business. We Want To Teach Students The “culture” Of Being Solid College-level Communicators And Successful Professionals. This Workshop Course Is Highly Experiential, Supportive, And Collaborative, As Students Read And Critique Each Others’ Work. This Is The First In A Sequence On Composition And Writing Skills. The Second Course, Engl126, In This Series Will Build Upon This One—addressing How To Research And Use Resources Without Plagiarizing, How To Utilize The Apa Formatting For Documentation And How To Make A Persuasive Argument. Our View Of The Required Composition Sequence Is That It Is Essential For All Who Want To Become Skilled Critical Thinkers And Educated People.


Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose
Course Number ENGL126
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Workshop That Builds Upon Engl125—real World Writing. It Is A Workshop Format—highly Experiential And Hands On. Students Practice Drafting Progressively Complex Papers, Demonstrating The Capacity To Do College Level Research And Write Essays That Convey Information, Make A Point Or Provide An Opinion. They Will Study The Apa Handbook, Learn To Do Research (beyond Wikipedia!) And Cite Resources Without Plagiarizing Them. In Addition, This Course Uses Readings To Demonstrate Excellence And Eloquence In Speaking And Writing, Emphasizing The Crucial Synergy Between Learning To Write And Developing The Practice Of Intelligent Reading Of Texts. This Will Be A Highly Collaborative Course, With Students Reading And Critiquing Others’ Work, As A Means To Create A Learning Community As Well As Develop Critical Capacities.


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


American Culture in Transition
Course Number HIS120
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural “isms,” and America’s relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society.


World Literature
Course Number LTR215
Credits 4.0

This literature course examines a wide range of stories, poems, and plays. Students learn how to interact with and respond to literature.


Real World Math
Course Number MATH105
Credits 4.0

In this course, students explore how to survive in a number-driven world, to increase their mathematical knowledge for making logical decisions, and to begin to develop connections with mathematics in their related field of study and daily lives.


Math for Professionals
Course Number MATH140
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better understand and appreciate the study of mathematics. Specifically, this course focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope toward business applications.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Principles of Business
Course Number MGM110
Credits 4.0

This survey course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled.


Organizational Behavior Principles
Course Number MGM335
Credits 4.0

In this course students examine individual and group behavior within the context of the organizational design and culture. This course provides theoretical and practical knowledge for understanding topics such as motivation, leadership, managerial decision-making, group processes, and conflict resolution.


American Government
Course Number PBAD200
Credits 4.0

Provides the student with an overview of the framework and basic functions of the various branches of government, the role of politics in democracy, and the relationship of government and public policy. Students will also consider the similarities and differences between national, state, and local governments.


Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

This course surveys major areas of psychological science, including human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, learning, memory, and biological influences.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Sociology
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students will develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Building Your Success Strategy Plan
Course Number UNIV101
Credits 4.0

UNIV101 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students learn effective tools and skills necessary for academic success, integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.


Career Planning and Management
Course Number UNIV201
Credits 4.0

This course provides the framework for effective career management as students gain insight into themselves and potential career fields, acquiring knowledge and skills needed to successfully plan career transitions.


Program description: Homeland Security encompasses a broad range of disciplines that play vital roles in the protection of our nation. Developed with guidance provided by the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security, this program is designed to help students acquire an in-depth understanding of emergency management, technology, communications, intelligence, critical infrastructure, terrorism and other knowledge needed in a wide range of government and private organizations. Upon successful completion of this program, graduates can be prepared to apply the fundamentals of homeland security and emergency management to create plans, analyze risk and propose solutions.

Emergency Management Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BS in Public Safety and Emergency Management
History and Development of Emergency Management
Course Number EMM 300
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with insight into the profession of emergency management, its history, principles, participants, functions, structure, and future. This course includes concepts related to accreditation of emergency management programs, professional associations, and professional credentials


Emergency Operations and Techniques
Course Number EMM 305
Credits 4.0

The knowledge and practice gained in this course will provide the emergency manager and first responder with management and supervision skills and techniques that are specific to emergency management and to the agencies employing emergency managers. These skills and techniques of management are necessary for success in the emergency services environment


Mitigation Planning
Course Number EMM 310
Credits 4.0

This course examines the processes and principles of mitigation planning for emergency management, the benefits of mitigation, and the development and implementation of appropriate mitigation measures


Disaster Response and Recovery
Course Number EMM 415
Credits 4.0

This course addresses disaster recovery and business continuity in public agencies and private companies, an explanation of federal guidelines for government continuity planning, and professional practices for business continuity planning in private companies, as well as how to address and respond to special emergency management issues in disasters, including animal care, special needs populations, and evacuations


Terrorism’s Impact on Emergency Management
Course Number EMM 442
Credits 4.0

This course examines the historical and political impact of terrorism on emergency management, including examples of terrorist activity, a summary of federal government efforts, and media coverage of terrorism


Servant Leadership
Course Number PSC 410
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on servant leadership and ethical leadership, explores how servant leadership is different from other styles of leadership, and examines how this connects to ethics, accountability, and being a responsible leader


Organizational Behavior and Management
Course Number PSC 420
Credits 4.0

Drawing upon real-world management situations, this course is a study of individual and group behavior in organizations through detailed coverage of the functions of management, individual differences/diversity, leadership, motivation, decision making, organizational design, and organizational change and development. Emphasis is placed on how an understanding of organizational behavior leads to effective management practice


Project Management
Course Number PSC 450
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the unique challenges associated with managing projects as related to the overarching management framework of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on balancing competing priorities related to human recourses, time constraints, and physical resources/materials. Additional focus is placed on managing and controlling project scope


Action Research Project
Course Number PSC 495
Credits 4.0

This course provides a structured way for managers to take an overview and general management perspective. Emphasis is on a research project that synthesizes major elements of the professional studies program


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Science in Public Safety and Emergency Management program is a
bachelor’s degree completion program that provides a theoretical and applied approach to the professional
education of students, while ensuring relevance to the homeland security and public safety industries. The
program emphasizes the fundamentals of emergency management while providing an interdisciplinary course of
study in the skills and practices of emergency planning and management. Candidates for the degree include
those working in or desirous of working in one of several fields, including emergency management, fire
protection, emergency medical response, law enforcement, environmental health and safety, and other related
fields. The program highlights the application of research methodology; the utilization of communication skills
at the personal, professional, and public level; and the development of professional skills and knowledge in the
fields of public safety and emergency management.

Emergency Management Courses at Ohio Christian University

Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in Business - Disaster Management

Program description: Ohio Christian University's Adult & Online Degree Programs offer Associate, Bachelor, and Master's degrees in an accelerated degree program format designed for busy adults. With classes available online or on campus, OCU makes earning your degree convenient, flexible, and affordable.

Emergency Management Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Emergency Management Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Princeton University
Total Programs 56
Number of Subjects 59
Rank in USA 8th
Brown University
Total Programs 135
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 9th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
Tufts University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 24th
Pomona College
Total Programs 61
Number of Subjects 56
Rank in USA 25th