Online Engineering Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its engineering courses to be successful engineers, audio engineers, aerospace engineers, automotive engineers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 2,412,730 people employed as architecture and engineering employees alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $73,590. Aerospace engineers make on average $96,270 per year and there are about 70,570 of them employed today.

Engineering Organizations Engineering Common Job Tasks
  • linking scientific discoveries and the commercial applications that meet societal and consumer needs.
  • integrating different components to make a final design
  • supervising production in factories
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Engineering Courses at Walden University

Program Name: M.S. in Health Informatics
Breadth: Global Total Quality Management
Course Number AMDS 8514
Credits 5.0

Depth: Methods and Tools for Managing Quality Improvement
Course Number AMDS 8524
Credits 5.0

Application: Reliability and Cost of Quality
Course Number AMDS 8534
Credits 4.0

Breadth: Management for World-Class Products
Course Number AMDS 8614
Credits 5.0

Depth: Collaborative/Concurrent Engineering Management
Course Number AMDS 8624
Credits 5.0

Application: Product Life Cycle Cost and Time to Market
Course Number AMDS 8634
Credits 4.0

Foundations for Doctoral Study
Course Number AMDS 8008
Credits 6.0

The Purpose Of This Course Is To Introduce Students To Walden University And To The Requirements For Successful Participation In An Online Curriculum. It Provides A Foundation For Academic And Professional Success As A Scholar-practitioner And Social Change Agent. Course Assignments Focus On Practical Application Of Writing And Critical Thinking Skills And Promote Professional And Academic Excellence. Major Assignments Include The Preparation Of The Professional Development Plan, Program Of Study, And A Sample Kam Learning Agreement. Note: Students In Selected Doctoral Programs And Specializations Are Required To Take This Course Immediately Upon Enrollment, And Must Successfully Complete It Before Proceeding With Kams Or Coursework.


Breadth: Theories of Social Change
Course Number SBSF 8110
Credits 5.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Depth: Current Research in Social Change
Course Number SBSF 8120
Credits 5.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Application: Professional Practice and Social Change
Course Number SBSF 8130
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Breadth: Theories of Human Development
Course Number SBSF 8210
Credits 4.0

Most Specializations In The Ph.d. In Education Program Require Completion Of Knowledge Area Modules (kams).the Kam Allows You To Focus Directly On Your Area Of Interest, From Initial Inquiry To The Final Dissertation. Six Kams Set The Framework For Your Faculty-guided Study, Each Comprising Three Components: •breadth: You Investigate A Range Of Theories And Concepts From Available Scholarly Literature. Kam Ii: Principles Of Human Development (12 Cr.) In Kam Ii, Students Explore Human Development From A Variety Of Perspectives, Including Those Defined By Biology, Anthropology, And Psychology. They Examine How Culture (e.g., Race, Nationality, Ethnicity, Social Class, Sex, Sexual Orientation, And Disability) Influences Human Development, And They Come To Know The Individual As Part Of A Larger Context In A Multicultural Society.


Depth: Current Research in Human Development
Course Number SBSF 8220
Credits 4.0

Description not available


Application: Professional Practice in Human Development
Course Number SBSF 8230
Credits 4.0

Description not available


Breadth: Theories of Organizational and Social Systems
Course Number SBSF 8310
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Depth: Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems
Course Number SBSF 8320
Credits 5.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Application: Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems
Course Number SBSF 8330
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Research Theory, Design, and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans.


Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8200C
Credits 4.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8300
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry; fieldwork strategies and the nature of observation; theoretical approaches to qualitative research; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical, legal, and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students use software to code data and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8250C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis, and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding multivariate data analysis and applying more advanced statistical concepts. Students explore comprehensive quantitative research designs and suitable statistical tests, the importance of quality assurance, and ethical considerations and social social-change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. This course approaches statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting the appropriate research design and statistical tests for more complex research questions or problems. Students use statistical software to perform analyses and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a quantitative research plan.


Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8350C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8450Z
Credits 4.0

This Research Course Builds Upon Knowledge And Skills Acquired In Rsch 8200z Quantitative Reasoning And Analysis And Rsch 8300z Qualitative Reasoning And Analysis. It Provides Students With More Specialized Knowledge And Skills For Designing Mixed-methods Research At The Doctoral Level. Students Gain An Understanding Of The Types Of Mixed-methods Designs And How To Select The Most Appropriate Approach For The Research Question. The Course Emphasizes Integrating Quantitative And Qualitative Elements Into True Mixed-methods Studies, Practice In Data Analysis, And Integration Of Qualitative And Quantitative Data Within A Research Write-up. Reliability And Validity In Mixed-methods Approaches Will Be Highlighted. Students Will Apply And Synthesize Their Knowledge And Skills By Developing A Truly Mixed Methods Research Plan That Appropriately Incorporates Qualitative And Quantitative Elements. (prerequisites: Rsch 8200z Or Amds 8437 And Rsch 8300z Or Amds 8427 And Residency 3.)


Breadth: Research Methods
Course Number AMDS 8710
Credits 5.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Depth: Selected Research Methods
Course Number AMDS 8720
Credits 5.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Application: Research Design
Course Number AMDS 8730
Credits 4.0

This Course For Doctoral Students Has No Specific Course Description Due To The Flexibility Inherent In The Knowledge Area Module (kam) Learning Model, Which Allows Students To Develop Expertise In Their Area Of Interest Through An Individualized Program. The Number Of Kams Required Varies By Program, But Each Kam Culminates In A Scholarly Paper Comprising Three Segments: Breadth, Depth, And Application. Through The Kam Process, Students Will Apply What They Have Learned To Meet A Need In Their Profession.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Program description: Through our M.S. in Health Informatics program, you can gain an understanding of how to integrate advanced digital technologies into the field of healthcare. Learn how to use electronic data to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare delivery as you explore the critical competencies that can help reduce healthcare costs; increase patient access to care; and improve the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of disease. Prepare to take your healthcare experience to the next level as you step into a management or leadership role in this evolving field.

Engineering Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: BSIT - Application Development
Project Managment I
Course Number IT 301
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Human Computer Interaction
Course Number IT 302
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Technology Infrastructure
Course Number IT 331
Credits 6.0

This course explores the concepts and purpose of information technology infrastructure. Emphasis is placed on expanding the student’s knowledge of computer networks and data transmissions and applying those concepts to an organization’s technology requirements.


Internet Business Fundamentals
Course Number IT 337
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Database Design
Course Number IT 354
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


IT Consulting Skills
Course Number IT 402
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


System Analysis and Design
Course Number IT 460
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Bachelor's Capstone in Information Technology
Course Number IT 499
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Visual Basics Fundamentals
Course Number IT 271
Credits 5.0

This is a fast paced Visual Basic programming course for students enrolled in the advanced start version of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology. Basic concepts and syntax used to write programs, including variables, input, output, looping and program flow are introduced. Students design and develop graphical user interface- based applications using the Visual Studio development environment. Topics include object oriented programming, using external data for input/output and software component development. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: Enrollment in the advanced start Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program


Data Structures and Algorithms
Course Number IT 310
Credits 6.0

This course teaches students how to create data structures and algorithms using proper programming techniques. The course uses an object- oriented programming language to apply concepts such as linked lists, recursion, searching and sorting, binary search, trees and graphs. The program design process and program implementation involving multiple modules, verification of program correctness and abstract data types are also stressed. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 258


Web Programming Development
Course Number IT 355
Credits 6.0

Students will learn how to create and maintain interactive and dynamic web applicatios within a server based scripting environment. Topics include Web applications, object-oriented programming and Web databases. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 271 or IT 293


Advanced Visual Basic Programming
Course Number IT 461
Credits 6.0

This course teaches students advanced Visual Basic programming techniques. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to write, debug, compile and execute Visual Basic programs. During this course student’s focus on building well engineered and maintainable programs to meet business application and programming standards. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 271 or IT 293


Foundations Of Programming Using Java
Course Number IT 258
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming in Java, where students learn analysis and design techniques of software engineering. Projects and assignments cover numerous aspects of program development. Students successfully completing the course will have the necessary background to analyze, design, and implement basic software solutions in Java.


Intermediate Visual Basic Programming
Course Number IT 293
Credits 5.0

Th is is an intermediate course in the design and implementation of programs using Visual Basic. Topics include object-oriented programming, database access, and soft ware component development.


Structured Query language
Course Number IT 350
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Program description: Students enrolled in Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a career focus area in Application Development program have the chance to study the fundamentals of information technology, operating systems, systems analysis, and project management. Coursework in the application development emphasis area allows students the opportunity to develop advanced programming and application development skills, which could prepare them for careers in this field.* Students can study various programming languages, including C#, Java, and Visual Basic. Students can also learn about web programming and development. To earn the Bachelor of Science degree, students must meet all general education requirements; general education courses give students the chance to develop a wide range of skills and knowledge through courses in the arts and humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, and communications.

Engineering Courses at Penn Foster Career School

Program Name: Motorcycle Repair Technician
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies The Advantages Of Learning At Home; Types Of Study Materials; Types Of Examinations; Accessing And Using The Features Of Our Website; Determining What Kind Of Learner You Are; Establishing A Study Schedule; Using Study Tips; Preparing For And Taking Examinations. Introduction To Motorcycle And Atv Repair Career Opportunities; Types Of Motorcycles And Atvs; Tools; Safety.


Instruction Set 2

Motorcycle and ATV Engine Configurations Engine ratings; single- and multi-cylinder two- and four-stroke engines. Practical Exercise 1


Instruction Set 3

Four-Stroke Internal-Combustion Engine Four-stroke engine operation; basic components; compression and ignition. Two-Stroke Internal-Combustion Engine Two-stroke engine operation; the advantages and disadvantages of two-stroke engines. Practical Exercise 2


Instruction Set 4

Lubrication and Cooling Systems Lubricants; oil types; bearings; bushings; seals; two- and four-stroke engine lubrication; air and liquid cooling systems. Fuel Systems Operation and design of carburetors; fuel delivery and injection systems; fuel tank and accessories. Clutches, Transmissions, and Drives Clutch types and repair; inspecting and replacing transmission components; final drive systems. Practical Exercise 3


Instruction Set 5

Two-Stroke Engine Top End Inspection Removal of engine and top end components; top end reassembly; installing the engine. Two-Stroke Engine Lower End Inspection Removing external engine components; crankshaft repair; lower end reassembly. Four-Stroke Engine Top End Inspection Engine removal; disassembly, inspection and reassembly of top end; engine installation and break-in. Four-Stroke Engine Lower End Inspection Removing electrical components, clutch, and oil pump; crankshaft disassembly and inspection; engine reassembly. Practical Exercise 4


Instruction Set 6

Electrical Fundamentals AC and DC current; circuits; electrical measurement. Charging and Ignition Systems Operation of charging and ignition systems; types and components; troubleshooting and maintenance. DC Circuits for Motorcycles and ATVs Starting systems; lighting and special accessory circuits; warning gauges/lights. Practical Exercise 5 Equipment: Digital Multimeter


Instruction Set 7

Frames, Steering, And Suspension Motorcycle/atv Frames; Front And Rear Suspension; Steering Systems. Brakes, Wheel Assemblies, And Tires Drum And Hydraulic Disc Brakes; Anti-lock Braking Systems (abs); Wheel Assemblies And Axles. Practical Exercise 6


Instruction Set 8

Motorcycle Maintenance Engine maintenance; emission systems controls operation and maintenance; detailing/cleaning; storage. Motorcycle Troubleshooting Troubleshooting drive system, electrical, carburetion, chassis, and engine-related problems. Practical Exercise 7 Work Experience Option


Graduation Set

• Repair Manual for Vintage Motorcycles


Program description: There are certain skills you need to begin a career as a Motorcycle Repair Technician. Penn Foster Career School's Motorcycle Repair training program helps you learn these skills quickly and conveniently. Your studies include:

Clutches and Ignitions
Brakes, Wheel Assemblies, and Tires
Electrical Fundamentals
Inspections, Maintenance, Troubleshooting, and Repairs.
DC Circuits for Motorcycles and ATVs
... and more.

Program Name: Small Engine Repair
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies Identifying and implementing a successful study method; planning when, where, and how you'll study; creating effective and efficient study tools, using study tools to improve chances for success. Introduction to Small Engine Repair Introduction to the small engine field and OPE repair; tools and tool usage; shop and equipment safety.


Instruction Set 2

Small Engine Parts and Operations Introduction to small engine terminology and operation theory; basic engine components; major engine systems. Practical Exercise 1


Instruction Set 3

Small Engine Lubrication and Cooling Systems Basic components, lubricants, and coolants used. Small Engine Ignition Systems Electrical theory and terminology; ignition system operation, service, and troubleshooting. Practical Exercise 2


Instruction Set 4

Small Engine Electrical Systems Basic circuit theory; DC and AC power sources; troubleshooting and repair of small engine starting, charging, and accessory circuits. Small Engine Fuel Systems Fuels used to power OPE; carburetor operation and related engine components. Equipment: • Carburetor Practical Exercise 3


Instruction Set 5

Engine Disassembly Disassembling a four-stroke and two-stroke engine. Engine Rebuild: Part 1 Using precision measuring instruments; reading service manuals; replacing worn engine parts. Engine Rebuild: Part 2 Pistons, rings, connecting rods, crankshafts, and valves. Engine Reassembly Reassembling the two-stroke and four-stroke engine; engine starting and troubleshooting. Practical Exercise 4


Instruction Set 6

Power Transmission Systems Transferring power from the engine to working equipment; drives, clutches, transmissions, final drives, and differentials. Servicing Lawn Mowers and Riding Mowers Theory of operation, maintenance, troubleshooting, and repair of lawn mowers. Servicing Garden Tractors Transmissions, electrical, steering, and braking systems of complex garden tractor systems. Practical Exercise


Instruction Set 7

Servicing Two-Stroke and Four-Stroke Power Equipment: Part 1 Basic maintenance and servicing procedures necessary for most forms of OPE. Servicing Two-Stroke and Four-Stroke Power Equipment: Part 2 Servicing and repair procedures for many types of outdoor power equipment. Practical Exercise 6


Instruction Set 8

Servicing Outboard Engines Differences between standard small engines and marine craft engines; servicing and maintenance tips. Your Outdoor Power Equipment Repair Business Opportunities in the field; starting your own business and basic management skills; successful merchandising. Supplement: Work Experience Option Practical Exercise 7


Graduation Set

• Four-cycle Service And Repair Manual (briggs And Stratton®) • Ope Certification Exam Prep. Book (helps The Student Prepare To Take The Nationally Recognized Ope Technician Certification Exam.)


Program description: Get hands-on training on repairing small engines, including lawn mower engines, motor boats and recreational vehicles. Employers prefer to hire mechanics who graduate from formal training programs and our Small Engine Repair diploma program will provide you the skills you need to succeed.

You'll learn how to:

Troubleshoot and repair engine components and systems.
Work with engines, ignition systems, and electrical circuits.
Inspect and repair small engine fuel systems.
Disassemble and rebuild all types of small engines, including two-stroke, four-stroke, outboard, and riding mower engines.
Tools and Supplies Included!
The Penn Foster Small Engine Repair training program provides you with a broad range of tools, supplies and repair manuals to provide you hands-on training in Small Engine Repair.

Respected and Accredited
You'll earn your Career Diploma in Small Engine Repair from Regionally and Nationally Accredited Penn Foster Career School. Over 13 million students have enrolled in our training programs, making Penn Foster one of the world's largest and most respected distance learning institutions.

Snap-On Student Excellence Program
Students enrolled in the Small Engine Repair program are eligible to participate in the Snap-On Student Excellence program. This program allows students in trades and technology education programs across the country to purchase high-quality Snap-On tools at a preferred student discount. Some restrictions may apply for total purchase and quantities of certain items.

Engineering Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Executive Graduate Certificate in Information Systems: Software Engineering Emphasis
Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS510
Credits 4.0

This course provides an integrated approach to the study of systems analysis and design. It highlights CASE tools and analysis as means of solving problems


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number CIS512
Credits 4.0

This course covers the concepts of corporate data models and strategies for transforming the models into physical designs. It provides a foundation for implementing the physical designs onto various computer architectures


Advanced Software Engineering
Course Number CIS518
Credits 4.0

This course combines theory with practical applications in developing and managing software applications that support business functions. Key issues such as risk management, technology transfer, control, modeling and quality assurance are covered


Information Systems for Decision-Making
Course Number CIS500
Credits 4.0

This course examines the information requirements of an organization. It emphasizes the difference in the kinds of information needed at the operational, administrative, strategic, and organizational levels. It discusses planning and implementing a comprehensive information system and methods to measure its effectiveness.


IT Project Management
Course Number CIS517
Credits 4.0

This course provides a practical and theoretical foundation for applying project management activities to Information Technology projects. Emphasis is placed on how the systems development life cycle, prototyping, rapid application development, and acquiring and maintaining systems are managed and used in Enterprise System solutions. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Strategic Planning for Database Systems
Course Number CIS 515
Credits 4.0

This course covers strategies for developing and implementing an effective database system. Topics include database systems organization, creation, and maintenance; and evaluation criteria and standardization of database systems. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Program description: The Executive Graduate Certificate program is designed for mid and senior level managers, professional and technical specialists and individuals seeking career opportunities in the Information Systems field. The curriculum encompasses the knowledge and skills needed in pertinent professional areas. Persons interested should possess at least a bachelor’s degree in a related field.

The recipient of the executive graduate certificate may apply all credits earned toward a Master of Science degree with the same emphasis. Contact the academics department for more information.

Undergraduate prerequisites may be required for entry into the graduate certificate program; students who have not earned degrees from appropriate fields of study may be required to take additional coursework as a prerequisite for completing the program.

Program Name: Master of Science in Information Systems: Software Engineering Management Concentration
Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC 557
Credits 4.0

This course provides a framework for financial accounting concepts and practices used by internal and external users in businesses. Topics presented include the accounting cycle, financial reporting, financial statements analysis, ratio calculation and interpretation, and management decision making based on financial results.


Information Systems for Decision-Making
Course Number CIS500
Credits 4.0

This course examines the information requirements of an organization. It emphasizes the difference in the kinds of information needed at the operational, administrative, strategic, and organizational levels. It discusses planning and implementing a comprehensive information system and methods to measure its effectiveness.


Managerial Economics and Globalization
Course Number ECO 550
Credits 4.0

Applies relevant economic theory to develop a framework of analysis and techniques that business managers can use in deciding how to allocate a firm’s scarce resources to achieve its objectives. Uses economic analysis to support business strategy decisions that promote competitiveness in an environment of changing domestic and international market conditions, government regulations, trade policies, and resource availability. Systematically analyzes how global economic integration affects the production, input sourcing, and pricing decisions of firms operating in different market structures.


Quantitative Methods
Course Number MAT540
Credits 4.0

Applies quantitative methods to systems management (Decision Theory), and/or methods of decision-making with respect to sampling, organizing, and analyzing empirical data.


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number CIS512
Credits 4.0

This course covers the concepts of corporate data models and strategies for transforming the models into physical designs. It provides a foundation for implementing the physical designs onto various computer architectures


IT Project Management
Course Number CIS517
Credits 4.0

This course provides a practical and theoretical foundation for applying project management activities to Information Technology projects. Emphasis is placed on how the systems development life cycle, prototyping, rapid application development, and acquiring and maintaining systems are managed and used in Enterprise System solutions. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Network Architecture and Analysis
Course Number CIS532
Credits 4.0

his course focuses on network architecture development concepts and components including architecture functions and use. It provides the student with the skills required developing, managing, and sizing architectures in large organizations. Topics include topologies, protocols, connectivity, transactions, and performance. Prerequisites CIS 175 Introduction to Networking


Directed Research Project
Course Number EDU 590
Credits 4.0

Enables student to complete a research project in the field of major concentration. The research project will be monitored by a supervising faculty member and must be defended by the student in an oral examination. The oral defense may be conducted in a conference-style meeting of student, instructor, and second reader or technical advisor. A second type of defense allows students to present a synopsis of their project during one of the last two scheduled class meetings. Students are encouraged to discuss the project with an instructor or academic officer early in their program. Students may not fulfill the directed research requirement by completing another course.


Research Methods
Course Number RES 531
Credits 4.0

This course covers research methodology and strategic communications in business and the professions. It discusses research planning and design including the research proposal, identification of appropriate measurement instruments, and evaluation of alternative methodologies and their validity. Students are required to complete a minimum of a 20-page research proposal consistent with standards of the University's Directed Research Project (DRP). Students also acquire oral and written communication skills necessary to perform effectively as managers. All phases of the communications process - interpersonal, group, and public speaking - are illuminated throughout the course as are current challenges presented by new technology, the global marketplace, and workforce diversity.


Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS510
Credits 4.0

This course provides an integrated approach to the study of systems analysis and design. It highlights CASE tools and analysis as means of solving problems


Strategic Planning for Database Systems
Course Number CIS 515
Credits 4.0

This course covers strategies for developing and implementing an effective database system. Topics include database systems organization, creation, and maintenance; and evaluation criteria and standardization of database systems. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Advanced Software Engineering
Course Number CIS518
Credits 4.0

This course combines theory with practical applications in developing and managing software applications that support business functions. Key issues such as risk management, technology transfer, control, modeling and quality assurance are covered


Program description: The Master of Science in Information Systems (MSIS) is a professional degree program that stresses the technical, managerial, and policy issues associated with building computer based systems that support modern organizations. The program addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of specifying, designing, implementing, and managing systems that possess qualities such as portability, scalability, and interoperability (open systems).

The Master of Science in Information Systems program treats information as an organizational resource that is subject to managerial planning and control. It focuses on integration of data and distribution of information in helping organizations to be more competitive. In addition, the program offers graduates most of the academic background necessary to pursue certification as a Certified Computer Professional (CCP).

Students who have not earned degrees from appropriate fields of study may be required to take additional coursework as a prerequisite for completing the program.

Engineering Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Software Engineering
Introduction to Software Engineering
Course Number BSA385
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the fundamental, logical, and design considerations addressed during system and application software development. It provides a background in applications software development and testing techniques through a combination of theory and application. (3 credits) Prerequisite: BSA 375.


Software Architecture
Course Number CSS422
Credits 3.0

This course is an integrating course in business application software engineering. Integration, migration, and maintenance of enterprise software systems, including legacy systems, are emphasized. (3 credits) Prerequisite: POS 355.


.NET I
Course Number POS408
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Object-oriented Programming In The Context Of Business Applications Development. It Develops The Skills And Knowledge Necessary To Produce Beginning Event-driven Programs With Graphical User Interfaces (gui). Topics Include Standard Windows Compatible Forms, Controls, And Procedures. The Course Uses Visual Basic�. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Comm 215, Mth 209, And Prg 210.uisite


.NET II
Course Number POS409
Credits 3.0

This course extends the facilities and command sets of the Visual Basic programming system for Windows. Topics covered include designing Visual Basic applications, forms, event driven procedures, writing and debugging programs, databases, data files, and printing. (3 credits) Prerequisite: POS 408.A


Skills for Professional Development
Course Number GEN300
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Skills Necessary For Successful Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Research, And Communication. The Course Is Designed To Aid Adult Learners In Acquiring And Improving The Core Competencies That Are Necessary At University Of Phoenix. Students Examine Their Reasons For Returning To School And Develop Strategies For Achieving Educational Goals In School, Work, And Personal Settings. Students Are Also Introduced To The University Library And Learn How To Access Its Resources Successfully. (3 Credits) *for Flexibility In Scheduling, Campuses Are Permitted To Schedule Gen/200 To Satisfy Gen/300 Requirements.


Management Information Systems
Course Number CIS205

This course introduces the fundamentals of computer systems and the role of information processing in today's business environment. An overview is presented of information systems, systems development, operating systems and programming, database management, networking and telecommunications, and the Internet.


Fundamentals of Programming with Algorithms and Logic
Course Number PRG210

This Course Provides Students With A Basic Understanding Of Programming Development Practices. Concepts Covered Include The Application Of Algorithms And Logic To The Design And Development Of Computer Programs To Address The Problem Solving Requirements Associated With Business Information Systems. This Course Will Cover Procedural Programming Concepts Including Data Types, Controls Structures, Functional Decomposition, Arrays, And Files. Topics And Objectives Programming Fundamentals * Identify How A Computer Processes And Stores Data. * Describe The Importance Of Using A Structured, Modular Approach When Creating Program Requirements, Design, And Code. Problem Solving And Algorithm Development * Describe The Process And Methods For Problem Recognition. * Examine The Development Of Problem Solutions. * Define The Process Of Algorithm Development. Programming Logic * Apply The Concepts Of Functional Decomposition To The Development Of Programming Logic. * Demonstrate The Sequential And Selection Processing Control Structure. * Demonstrate The Iteration Control Structure. Data Structures, Verification, And Validation * Explain The Need For Complex Data Structures. * Explain The Design And Application Of Arrays To Program Logic And Data Manipulation. * Describe How Requirements And Desk Review Design Are Used To Verify Algorithms. File And Database Processing * Determine When A Sequential Data File Is More Useful Than A Database. * Differentiate Between A Flat File And A Relational Database. * Differentiate Between A Text File And A Binary File. Prerequisites: Gen300, Gen101


Web Design I
Course Number WEB236

This course introduces effective web design principles and the essential role of the web designer in today's business environment. Topics covered include site architecture, page layout, navigation, content, functionality and usability. Students will evaluate existing web sites and apply best practices to prototype a unique design using a web authoring application. Topics and Objectives Website Planning * Identify purpose and target audience. * Illustrate a site architecture map. Web Design Concepts & Techniques * Define fundamental Web design terminology. * Explain design principles for effective site navigation. * Identify Web design tools and their applications. Website Content * Recognize common media formats and plug-ins. * Explain the effective use of graphics and media in Web site design. * Discuss copyright implications. * Explain how to optimize content for search engines. Website Effectiveness * Recognize design principles of basic website appearance and functionality. * Evaluate business and e-business Web page layouts, navigation, and performance. * Identify attributes of usability. * Critique usability of a website. * Recognize accessibility standards. Website Prototyping * Apply effective design concepts and techniques to prototype a homepage and secondary page. Prerequisites: CIS205,GEN300,GEN101


Web Design II
Course Number WEB237

This Course Introduces Development Tools And Techniques Used To Publish Web Pages On The World Wide Web. Students Use Basic Hypertext Markup Language, Scripting And Presentational Technologies To Create Web Sites Without The Aid Of A Software Authoring Application. Topics Include Xhtml, Css, Javascript, Server Hosting, Site Publication, Site Maintenance And Search Engine Optimization. Topics And Objectives Introduction To Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (xhtml) * Identify Basic Xhtml Tags And Attributes. * Explain Viewing And Testing Markup Code In Various Web Browsers. * Describe How Cascading Style Sheets (css) Are Applied For Formatting Web Content. Website Development * Develop Xhtml Code That Displays Content In A Web Browser. * Apply Styles And Style Sheets To Control Various Attributes Of A Web Page And Its Content. * Create Internal, External And Anchor Hyperlinks In A Web Page. * Distinguish The Development Environment From A Production Environment. Website Interaction * Create An Effective Navigation System. * Create A Basic Web Form. * Describe How To Integrate Multimedia Files Into A Web Page. * Apply Usability Best Practices. * Apply Principles Of Effective Technical Writing And Web Design. Introduction To Javascript * Explain The Basic Application For Javascript. * Explain Javascript Arrays, Loops And Conditional Statements. * Apply Javascript Effectively In Website. Website Publication & Maintenance * Identify The Importance Of Professional Standards In Web Development. * Explain How Meta Data Can Promote A Website. * Identify The Process To Publish A Website. * Identify The Need To Maintain And Redesign A Website. Prerequisites: Web236


Technical Writing Fundamentals
Course Number ENG221

This Course Covers The Fundamentals And Best Practices Of Using Written Communication In Business And In The Information Technologies. Topics Include Strategies, Techniques, And Nuances For Producing Emails, Memos, Reports, Proposals, Project Specifications, And User Manuals, As Well As Other Technical Documents. Topics And Objectives The Technical Writing Process * Identify Uses Of Technical Writing In The Corporate Environment. * Describe The Differences Between Technical Writing And Expository Writing. Technical Writing In The Corporate Environment * Identify Intellectual Property Issues In The Corporate Environment. * Create Letters And Memos With Appropriate Formatting For The Corporate Environment. Writing Reports & Proposals * Apply Effective Document Design And Graphics In Technical Writing. * Create A Request For Proposal. Writing Technical Instructions & User Manuals * Integrate Appropriate Visual Elements Into A User Manual. * Create Clear, Concise, Accurate, And Coherent Written Communication For A User Manual. * Identify The Criteria For Writing A User Manual. Preparing Presentations * Use Effective Layout And Design In Presentations. * Prepare A Presentation For A Management Audience. Prerequisites: Gen300, Gen101


Business Systems
Course Number BSA310

This Course Reviews Common Business Systems And Their Interrelationships. Business Systems Covered Include Finance, Accounting, Sales, Marketing, Human Resources, Legal And Operations. Emphasis Is Placed Upon The Inputs And Outputs Of Information Systems, The Potential For Integration Of The Systems, And Information Systems Security. Topics And Objectives Business Structure * Identify The Application Of Information Systems In Business. * Examine The Impact Of Information Systems On The Business Structure. Business Environment * Identify Economic, Government And Legal Influences On Business. * Describe The Ethical And Security Considerations For An Information System In Business. * Describe The Need For Security Measures In It Organizations And Information Systems. Finance And Accounting * Examine Accounting Information Systems. * Analyze Accounting Information Systems And Business Processes. Sales And Marketing * Examine Contemporary Marketing Practices. * Describe Marketing In The Electronic Commerce Environment. Information Systems * Identify Types Of Information Systems And Required Security. * Apply The Concepts Of Information Systems To Business Processes. Prerequisites: Cis205, Eng221, Gen300, Gen101


Fundamentals of Business Systems Development
Course Number BSA375

This Course Introduces The Fundamental, Logical, And Design Considerations Addressed During System And Application Software Development. It Provides A Solid Background In Information Systems Analysis And Design Techniques Through A Combination Of Theory And Application. The Systems Development Life Cycle Will Be Fundamental To The Course. Topics And Objectives Systems Development Life Cycle * Define The Systems Development Life Cycle. Systems Analysis * Explain Scope And Feasibility. * Define Systems Analysis And Systems Requirements. Systems Design * Define Design Specifications. Systems Development And Implementation * Analyze Development. * Analyze Implementation. Maintenance * Identify Types Of Maintenance. Prerequisites: Bsa310, Cis319, Gen300, Gen101, Comm215, Mth209


Project Planning & Implementation
Course Number CMGT410

This course provides the foundation for understanding the broad concepts of successful planning, organization, and implementation within the realm of information technology. This course uses real-world examples and identifies common mistakes and pitfalls in project management. Topics covered include project scoping, estimating, budgeting, scheduling, tracking and controlling.


Database Concepts
Course Number DBM381

This course covers database concepts. Topics include data analysis, the principal data models with emphasis on the relational model, entity-relationship diagrams, database design, normalization, and database administration.


SQL for Business
Course Number POS410

This Course Covers Structured Query Language (sql) That Provides A Unified Language That Lets You Query, Manipulate, Or Control Data In A Business Applications Environment. Topics And Objectives Sql Table * Create Tables Using Sql. Table Queries * Apply Single-table Queries. * Apply Multiple-table Queries. Data Changes * Apply Changes To Data. * Apply Changes To Tables. Reports * Apply Reporting In Sql. Embedded Sql * Explain Embedded Sql. * Apply Sql To A Business Application. Prerequisites: Comm215, Dbm380, Gen300, Mth209, Gen101, Mth212, Mth233


Network and Telecommunications Concepts
Course Number NTC360

This course provides an overview of telecommunication systems in a business environment. Topics covered include voice communications, standards, transmission, networks, and internetworking.


Java Programming I
Course Number PRG420

This Course Introduces Object-oriented Programming In The Context Of Business Applications Development. The Basics Of The Java Programming Language Are Covered. Topics And Objectives Java Basics * Explain The Java Virtual Machine. * Explain The Terminology Of Object-oriented Terminology. * Explain Documenting, Coding, Compiling, Executing, Testing, And Debugging Java Programs. Data Types * Define Data Types. * Explain Classes And Methods. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Selection And Repetition * Explain Selection. * Explain Repetition. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Arrays * Explain Arrays. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Objects * Explain Objects. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Pos370, Gen101, Mth212, Prg210, Mth233


Java Programming II
Course Number PRG421

This Course Continues The Subject In Prg/420, Java Programming I. Topics Include Designing Complex Applications And The Use Of Data Files. Topics And Objectives User Interface * Explain Java User Interfaces. Applets * Explain Applets. * Apply Java Programming. Threads * Explain Error Handling. * Explain Threads. * Apply Java Programming. Files * Explain File Read And Write. * Apply Java Programming. Multimedia * Explain Graphics, Sound, And Animation. * Apply Java Programming. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Prg420, Gen101, Mth212, Mth233


Introduction to Operating Systems
Course Number POS355

This Course Provides An Introduction To Operating Systems. Topics Covered Include Operating System Concepts, Program Execution, And Operating System Internals Such As Memory, Processor, Device, And File Management. A Variety Of Operating Systems Are Compared And Contrasted. Topics And Objectives Computer System * Identify And Define Components Of A Computer System. Operating Systems * Identify And Define Components Of An Operating System (os). * Explain Memory Management. * Explain Processor Management. Windows Server * Explain The Basics Of The Windows Server Operating System. Unix * Explain The Basics Of The Unix Operating System. * Compare And Contrast Windows Xp, Windows 2003, And Linux. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Ntc360, Gen101, Cis205, Mth212, Mth233


Application Implementation
Course Number CMGT445

This Course Will Cover The Process And Issues Associated With The Implementation Of A Computer Application Information System. Topics Will Include The Processes Associated Sponsor And Stakeholder Approvals, End User Training, Technical Staff Training, Conversion From Existing Application(s) And Integration Into The Information System Production Environment. This Course Will Also Examine The Use Of Development And Testing Environments And The Testing Procedures Related To The Implementation Of A Computer Application Information System. Topics And Objectives Implementation Planning * Identify Implementation Milestones And Resources. * Explain Phases Of Application Implementation. * Explain The Implementation Plan. * Identify Implementation Stakeholders. * Explain The Implementation Plan Approval Process. Software Acquisition * Explain The Request For Proposal Process. * Compare Methods Of Software Evaluation And Selection. * Explain The Vendor Selection Process. Change Control And Project Risk Management * Explain The Change Control Process. * Explain Software Versioning. * Evaluate Methods For Identifying Areas Of Project Risk. * Explore Project Risk Mitigation Strategies. Application Documentation * Describe The Content And Purpose Of Application Documentation. * Compare Technical, User And System Training Documentation. Technical Environment Preparation * Compare Development, Test, And Production Technical Environments. * Explain The System Turnover Process. Application Testing * Compare Application Testing Objectives And Methods. * Explain Test Data Preparation. * Organization Preparation * Explain Organizational Change Strategies. * Explain Process Business Procedures. Training * Compare Technical Training And End User Training. * Explain Methods And Timing Considerations For Training Personnel. Data Conversion * Explain Data Transformation And Migration. * Explain Conversion Programs And Procedures. * Explain Sample Data Extraction For Testing. * Describe The Conversion Schedule. System Launch * Compare System Startup Alternatives. * Identify Implementation Roles. * Explain Timeline For Key Activities. * Describe Startup Activities. System Support And Maintenance * Explain System Support Roles And Functions. * Explain The Process Of Enhancing System Functionality. Prerequisites: Bsa310, Bsa375, Bsa400, Bsa411, Bsa412, Cis205, Cmgt410, Cmgt411, Dbm380, Eng221, Gen300, Ntc360, Pos355, Pos410, Prg210, Prg420, Prg421, Web236, Web237, Gen101


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) program is focused on the acquisition of theory and application of technical competencies associated with the information technology profession. The courses prepare students with fundamental knowledge in core technologies, such as systems analysis and design, programming, database design, network architecture and administration, Web technologies and application development, implementation and maintenance.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Engineering Courses at Norwich University

Program Name: Master of Civil Engineering
Strategic Resources Management
Credits 6.0

This seminar focuses on the strategic management of the intangible assets of an organization: human capital, information capital, and organizational capital. Human motivation, workforce utilization, performance measurement, leadership, organizational culture and change, management information systems, knowledge management, and contingency planning are discussed in detail during the seminar. You learn to translate strategy into operational terms, to align the organization to its strategy, and to apply course content in an individual project and in an integrated corporate partner case study. (6 credit hours)


Engineering Analysis Techniques
Credits 3.0

A fast-paced review of fundamental techniques from typical undergraduate level calculus courses as they apply to engineering analysis and design. Designed to prepare students for entry into the Environmental / Water Resources Engineering and Structural Engineering tracks of the Master of Civil Engineering program. Open only to conditionally accepted students in the engineering graduate programs or with permission of the Program Director


Project Management Techniques, Tools, and Practices
Credits 6.0

This seminar focuses on the “nuts and bolts” or fundamentals of project management and practices. The course will explore the key elements of project management from the project management framework, the project life cycle, project process and key project management knowledge areas. Additionally, project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, resource and schedule management will be studied. Other key areas of focus will be project management procurement and overall project communications requirements.


Engineering Mathematics
Credits 6.0

First and second order differential equations, basic matrix algebra with emphasis on solving systems of equations and understanding eigenvalues and eigenvectors, numerical techniques for solving both differential and algebraic equations, and an introduction to partial differential equations. Basic concepts in probability and statistics, random variables, testing hypotheses, confidence intervals, and correlation along with the least squares line. In addition to solving problems by hand, students will also be using software tools


Capstone Design Project
Credits 6.0

This six credit hour course has two parts: an in-depth capstone design project and an introduction to utility systems. Civil engineering projects have always had social, political, economic, and environmental impacts. The capstone design project requires you to anticipate these impacts prior to project implementation. As the engineer in a leadership position you will direct the project from conception to completion. This includes the preparation of a comprehensive project business plan that will include project goals, political hurdles, anticipated revenues and expenses, marketing, facility design, etc.; all pertaining to the design of a major civil engineering project. In addition to the capstone design project you will learn about a topic neglected in most undergraduate civil engineering programs, utility systems. This portion of the course will provide an overview of the fundamentals of utility systems: heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment; power supply systems and equipment; lighting, communication, and security systems; plumbing systems and equipment.



Program description: Norwich University's unique online Master of Civil Engineering program was specifically designed for working professionals, and can be completed in as few as 21 months. The program relieves you of the constraints of traditional classroom education by providing all class interaction via a virtual classroom. Norwich created the program based on ASCE recommendations to enable you to Enhance your technical knowledge, while developing your project and business management expertise,Acquire knowledge specific to your area of interest in structural, geotechnical, construction management, or environmental/water resources engineering.

Engineering Courses at Penn Foster College

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Civil Engineering Technology
Technology Orientation
Course Number MET 100
Credits 1.0

The development of engineering and engineering technology; technical mathematics; use of a scientific calculator.


Technical Mathematics 1
Course Number MAT 110
Credits 2.0

Use of formulas; algebraic operations; use of determinants; use of exponents; logarithms. PREREQ: None


Technical Science
Course Number SCI 165
Credits 2.0

Use of metrics; nature of heat; expansion of gases, fundamental laws of chemistry; organic chemistry. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Technical Mathematics 2
Course Number MAT 122
Credits 2.0

Practical geometry; plane trigonometry; polygons and solids; angles; trigonometric functions. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Basic Surveying 1
Course Number CET 111
Credits 3.0

Tapes and accessories; electronic measurements; use of transit and theodolite; adjustment of instruments; angle measurements; trigonometric leveling; error of closure; computation of area by latitudes and departures or planimeter. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1 & 2


Basic Surveying 2
Course Number CET 112
Credits 3.0

Tangents and horizontal curves; grades and vertical curves; transition curves; field layout of simple, compound, and spiral curves; elevations on vertical curves. PREREQ: Basic Surveying 1


Land Surveying
Course Number CET 115
Credits 3.0

Determination of true meridian; latitudes and longitudes; subdivision of townships and sections; legal descriptions. PREREQ: Basic Surveying 2


Engineering Economy
Course Number IET 121
Credits 1.0

Operating costs; investment methods; interest tables; engineering valuation. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Engineering Materials
Course Number MET 123
Credits 2.0

Composition and properties of metals, ceramics, concrete, glass, graphite, plastics, and wood. PREREQ: Technical Math


Introduction to Microprocessors
Course Number EET 160
Credits 2.0

Introduction to computers; introduction to microprocessor applications; microprocessor basics. PREREQ: None


Engineering Mechanics
Course Number MET 170
Credits 3.0

Branches of engineering mechanics; free-body diagrams; kinematics; force-mass acceleration method; impulse momentum; collision of two bodies. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1 and 2


Concrete
Course Number CET 120
Credits 2.0

Production of concrete; design of concrete mixes; test for concrete; field methods in concrete construction. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1 and 2


Topographic Drawing & Surveying
Course Number CET 123
Credits 5.0

Use of drafting instruments; plotting traverses; plotting cross sections and profiles; city and village maps; plane-table surveying; topographic maps; methods of control. PREREQ: Basic Surveying 1


Earthwork
Course Number CET 127
Credits 1.0

Surveys for determining grade; crosssectioning; formation of embankments; shrinkage and swell; moving cut to fill mass diagrams. PREREQ: Basic Surveying 2


Mechanics of Materials
Course Number MET 126
Credits 2.0

Simple stresses; welded, bolted, and riveted joints; fixed and moving loads on beams; reaction at beam support; theory of column design; radius of gyration.


Geodetic Surveying
Course Number CET 223
Credits 3.0

Monuments and markers; triangulation surveys; methods of projection; subdivision of city blocks into lots. PREREQ: Topographic Drawing and Surveying; Land Surveying


Structural Steel Design
Course Number CET 236
Credits 3.0

Allowable unit stresses; design of connections; composite design of steel and concrete; design of column base plates. PREREQ: Mechanics of Materials


Reinforced Concrete Design
Course Number CET 239
Credits 2.0

Investigation and design of rectangular beams; T-beams; double-reinforced beams, and continuous beams; design of processed concrete beams. PREREQ: Mechanics of Materials


Fluid Mechanics
Course Number MET 220
Credits 3.0

Properties of materials; intensity of pressure; center of pressure; flow of water in open channels; rate of discharge through water. PREREQ: Engineering Mechanics


Introduction to Computer Programming
Course Number CSC 262
Credits 3.0

n/a


Highway Construction and Design 1
Course Number CET 241
Credits 3.0

Soil studies; subgrades and drainage; location surveys; volume and speed studies; signs. PREREQ: Topographic Drawing and Surveying


Highway Construction and Design 2
Course Number CET 242
Credits 2.0

Stabilized soil-bound surfaces; design of concrete pavements; design of pipe culverts. PREREQ: Basic Surveying 2; Concrete


Analytic Geometry and Calculus
Course Number MAT 220
Credits 4.0

Rectangular coordinates, graphics of linear equation; average rate of change; applications of integrals; derivatives and their applications; applications of calculus to shapes and moments. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1 and 2


Organizational Behavior
Course Number BUS 340
Credits 3.0

Management approaches; human decision-making; conflict management; communication in groups; power and influence; organizational environment, structure and design; fundamental forces of change. PREREQ: Principles of Management or similar management course


Resident Laboratory Training
Course Number CET 249
Credits 3.0

Students will be required to complete a series of comprehensive, practical experiments using various measuring instruments. Experiments are designed to provide familiarization with instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data, and laboratory reporting techniques. Students may earn credit for this by completing the course at an approved school or by submitting a life/work experience portfolio demonstrating completion of similar skills to those emphasized in the laboratory training. PREREQ: Semester 3


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Business and Technical Writing
Course Number ENG 121
Credits 3.0

Writing Styles; Abc Method Of Organizing Material; Grammar (parts Of Speech, Active And Passive Voice, Complete Sentences Vs. Sentence Fragments; Parallel Construction); Using Action Verbs; Constructing Paragraphs; Writing Memos, Business Letters, And Emails; Organizing Material; Conducting Research; Documenting Sources; Outlining; Providing Illustrations; Writing Reports, Proposals, Descriptions, Instructions, Articles, And Manuals. Prereq: None


Program description: The Civil Engineering Technology
Program is designed to meet the increased
demand for trained engineering
technicians. This program is designed to
assist civil engineers in the planning,
design, and construction of highways
and buildings. There are a wide variety
of entry-level employment opportunities
available to individuals who have
training as an engineering technician.

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology
Technology Orientation
Course Number MET100
Credits 1.0

The development of engineering and engineering technology; technical mathematics; use of a scientific calculator.


Fundamentals of Electricity
Course Number EET101
Credits 3.0

DC principles; nature of electricity; electric cells and batteries; electrical language and hardware; DC generators; AC principles and components; alternating current; AC currents; types of electric circuits.


Fundamentals of Electronics
Course Number EET103
Credits 3.0

Electronic components; semiconductor switching devices; switching and connection devices; basic electronic circuits; amplifiers; oscillators; modulation and detection circuits; logic circuits; pulse digital circuits.


Physical Science
Course Number SCI167
Credits 3.0

Principles that define and govern the physical universe as we know it; chemistry; physics, earth and space sciences.


Technical Mathematics 2
Course Number MAT122
Credits 2.0

Practical geometry; plane trigonometry; polygons and solids; angles; trigonometric functions.


Electrical/Electronic Measurements and Instruments
Course Number EET105
Credits 3.0

Transformer fundamentals; checking simple circuits; troubleshooting with basic meters; how a voltmeter works; how an ammeter works; AC measuring instruments; multi-purpose test instruments; oscilloscopes; component testers; digital test equipment.


Electric Motors and Controls
Course Number EET210
Credits 3.0

Principles of generator and motor operation; principles of induction motors and synchronous motors; performance and speed control; principles of motor control systems; solid-state drive systems; SCRs as AC to DC converters; installation and maintenance of drive systems.


Basic Drafting
Course Number MET101
Credits 3.0

Recognizing and interpreting various types of drawings; using drafting equipment; drawing techniques; creating projections; adding dimensions, sections, auxiliary views, and breaks to drawings; geometric drawing systems.


Quality Control Systems
Course Number MET221
Credits 3.0

Establishing quality systems; interpreting conventional and GD&T system drawings; setting up and using inspection tools and equipment; developing part acceptance procedures; statistical process control (SPC) fundamentals and practical applications.


Electrical Equipment
Course Number EET212
Credits 3.0

Sizing and selecting conductors, raceways,devices, and controls incorporated in electrical systems; identifying key characteristics of electrical equipment including circuit protection, outlet; control devices; creating ladder logic relay diagrams.


Interpreting the National Electric Code®
Course Number EET214
Credits 3.0

Locating the applicable code section to identify specific electrical installation requirements; interpreting and applying code specifications during the electrical-system design process; evaluating sample installations to ensure code compliance.


Electrical Installations
Course Number EET216
Credits 3.0

How electricity is generated and distributed; interpreting blueprints that represent various types of electrical systems; evaluating industrial electrical system requirements; specifying the correctequipment and conductor type and capacity for electrical systems; the role of each major component in a utility’s electrical distribution system; the basic design characteristics of underground distribution systems.


Electro/Mechanical Control Technology
Course Number MET240
Credits 3.0

Recognizing control system types; various types of feedback loops, designing digital and analog systems; operation of controlled and sensing devices; system evaluation and troubleshooting.


Drafting with AutoCAD®
Course Number MET202
Credits 3.0

Computer-aided drafting and design systems; AutoCAD® menus and features; file and entity creation; drawing organization; displaying modifying, and annotating drawings; data exchange and output methods.


Resident Laboratory Training
Course Number EET249
Credits 3.0

This two-week session includes the use of various measuring instruments for performing a series of comprehensive experiments. The experiments are designed to provide familiarization with instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data, and laboratory reporting techniques.


Technical Mathematics 1
Course Number MAT 110
Credits 2.0

Use of formulas; algebraic operations; use of determinants; use of exponents; logarithms. PREREQ: None


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Information Literacy
Course Number ENG 103
Credits 1.0

Teaches students to become effective in finding and utilizing information at libraries and other information centers, and through electronic resources available in libraries and on the World Wide Web. PREREQ: None


English Composition
Course Number ENG100
Credits 3.0

1)The Basics; The Writing Process; Descriptive Writing; 2)Narrative Writing; Reflective and Persuasive Writing. 3)Textbooks included


Readings in World Civilization
Course Number SSC105
Credits 3.0

Importance of the study of history; major events of the sixteenth through twentieth centuries; causal relationships between events and trends.


Essentials of Psychology
Course Number SSC130
Credits 3.0

Biology and behavior; consciousness; memory; thought and language; intelligence; personality and gender; stress; community influences.


Foundations of Political Science
Course Number SSC 150
Credits 3.0

The normative questions of politics; logical and empirical analysis of political questions. PREREQ: None


Business and Technical Writing
Course Number ENG121
Credits 3.0

Writing styles; ABC method of organizing material; grammar (parts of speech, active and passive voice, complete sentences vs. sentence fragments; parallel construction); using action verbs; constructing paragraphs; writing memos, business letters, and emails; organizing material; conducting research; documenting sources; outlining; providing illustrations; writing reports, proposals, descriptions, instructions, articles, and manuals.


Art Appreciation
Course Number HUM 102
Credits 3.0

Artistic media; historical periods and artistic movements; roles of the artist and the viewer; art criticism. PREREQ: None


Music Appreciation
Course Number HUM 104
Credits 3.0

Appreciating music; roles of composer and listener; principles of music theory and instrumentation; historical periods; varying styles of music. PREREQ: None


Introduction to Literature
Course Number ENG115
Credits 3.0

Reading and analysis of the main genres of literature; poetry, fiction, and drama; themes and forms of literature.


Program description: The Electrical Engineering
Technology Program is designed to
meet the needs of the electrical and
electronics industries for men and
women trained as engineering
technicians. Such trained personnel
will be qualified to assist engineers and
scientists in the various branches of the
electrical and electronics professions.

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Industrial Engineering Technology
Manufacturing Processes
Course Number IET 110
Credits 4.0

Cutting tools; machine tools; welding techniques; magneforming; testing of materials; nondestructive testing techniques; micrometers; gauges; basic numerical control. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Industrial Safety
Course Number IET 243
Credits 3.0

Procedures for handling various materials; operating different kinds of machinery; performing job tasks safely; survey of the regulations designed to improve industrial safety. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Operational Analysis
Course Number IET 235
Credits 2.0

Operation analysis procedures; selection of process and tooling; plant layout and material handling. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Materials Management and Inventory Control
Course Number IET 237
Credits 3.0

Production Scheduling, Planning, And Mrp; Capacity Management (crp); Production Activity Control; Demand Forecasting; Inventory Processes; Warehousing And Materials Handling; Just-in-time Planning; Product-quality Control; Total-quality Management (tqm).


Tool Design 1
Course Number MET 241
Credits 3.0

Single-point, multi-point, and rotary tools; types of work-holding devices; tool wear and failure; shearing and die-cutting; bending, forming and extrusion dies; forging dies. PREREQ: Manufacturing Processes


Tool Design 2
Course Number MET 242
Credits 3.0

Principles of gauging; tools for soldering, brazing, and mechanical joining processes; safety; tool materials. PREREQ: Tool Design 1


Technology Orientation
Course Number MET 100
Credits 1.0

The development of engineering and engineering technology; technical mathematics; use of a scientific calculator.


Technical Mathematics 1
Course Number MAT 110
Credits 2.0

Use of formulas; algebraic operations; use of determinants; use of exponents; logarithms. PREREQ: None


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Engineering Materials
Course Number MET 123
Credits 2.0

Composition and properties of metals, ceramics, concrete, glass, graphite, plastics, and wood. PREREQ: Technical Math


Information Literacy
Course Number ENG 103
Credits 1.0

Teaches students to become effective in finding and utilizing information at libraries and other information centers, and through electronic resources available in libraries and on the World Wide Web. PREREQ: None


English Composition
Course Number ENG 100
Credits 3.0

This course teaches the skills and techniques of effectively developing, drafting, and revising college-level essays toward a specific purpose and audience: active reading, prewriting strategies, sentence and paragraph structure, thesis statements, varied patterns of development (e.g., illustration, comparison/contrast, classification), critical reading toward revision of structure and organization, editing for the standard written conventions, use and documentation of outside sources. Students submit three essays (process analysis, causal analysis, argumentation) and a course journal. PREREQ: None


Physical Science
Course Number SCI 167
Credits 3.0

Principles that define and govern the physical universe as we know it; chemistry; physics, earth and space sciences.


Technical Mathematics 2
Course Number MAT 122
Credits 2.0

Practical geometry; plane trigonometry; polygons and solids; angles; trigonometric functions. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Readings in World Civilization
Course Number SSC 105
Credits 3.0

Importance of the study of history; major events of the sixteenth through twentieth centuries; causal relationships between events and trends. PREREQ: None


Engineering Mechanics
Course Number MET 170
Credits 3.0

Branches of engineering mechanics; free-body diagrams; kinematics; force-mass acceleration method; impulse momentum; collision of two bodies. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1 and 2


Basic Drafting
Course Number MET 101
Credits 3.0

Recognizing and interpreting various types of drawings; using drafting equipment; drawing techniques; creating projections; adding dimensions, sections, auxiliary views, and breaks to drawings; geometric drawing systems.


Quality Control Systems
Course Number MET 221
Credits 3.0

Establishing quality systems; interpreting conventional and GD&T system drawings; setting up and using inspection tools and equipment; developing part acceptance procedures; statistical process control (SPC) fundamentals and practical applications.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number BUS 340
Credits 3.0

Management approaches; human decision-making; conflict management; communication in groups; power and influence; organizational environment, structure and design; fundamental forces of change. PREREQ: Principles of Management or similar management course


Business and Technical Writing
Course Number ENG 121
Credits 3.0

Writing Styles; Abc Method Of Organizing Material; Grammar (parts Of Speech, Active And Passive Voice, Complete Sentences Vs. Sentence Fragments; Parallel Construction); Using Action Verbs; Constructing Paragraphs; Writing Memos, Business Letters, And Emails; Organizing Material; Conducting Research; Documenting Sources; Outlining; Providing Illustrations; Writing Reports, Proposals, Descriptions, Instructions, Articles, And Manuals. Prereq: None


Electro/Mechanical Control Technology
Course Number MET 240
Credits 3.0

Recognizing control system types; various types of feedback loops, designing digital and analog systems; operation of controlled and sensing devices; system evaluation and troubleshooting.


Drafting with AutoCAD®
Course Number MET 202
Credits 3.0

Computer-aided drafting and design systems; AutoCAD® menus and features; file and entity creation; drawing organization; displaying modifying, and annotating drawings; data exchange and output methods.


Music Appreciation
Course Number HUM 104
Credits 3.0

Appreciating music; roles of composer and listener; principles of music theory and instrumentation; historical periods; varying styles of music. PREREQ: None


Resident Laboratory Training
Course Number CET 249
Credits 3.0

Students will be required to complete a series of comprehensive, practical experiments using various measuring instruments. Experiments are designed to provide familiarization with instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data, and laboratory reporting techniques. Students may earn credit for this by completing the course at an approved school or by submitting a life/work experience portfolio demonstrating completion of similar skills to those emphasized in the laboratory training. PREREQ: Semester 3


Program description: The Industrial Engineering
Technology Program is designed
to meet the increased demand for
trained engineering technicians.
The program will prepare technicians
to assist industrial engineers in the
planning, quality control, or
production and operation of
engineering, manufacturing,
or commercial operations.

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology
Mechanical Design 1
Course Number MET 231
Credits 3.0

Stress analysis; work, energy and power; design stress; moment diagrams; friction; lubrication systems; ball and roller bearings. PREREQ: Mechanics of Materials; Manufacturing Processes


Mechanical Design 2
Course Number MET 232
Credits 3.0

Shaft design and seals; fasteners; couplings; welding and weld designs; belting; power screws; gears; cams; flywheels; fluid power; governors; professional registration. PREREQ: Mechanical Design 1


Technology Orientation
Course Number MET 100
Credits 1.0

The development of engineering and engineering technology; technical mathematics; use of a scientific calculator.


Manufacturing Processes
Course Number IET 110
Credits 4.0

Cutting tools; machine tools; welding techniques; magneforming; testing of materials; nondestructive testing techniques; micrometers; gauges; basic numerical control. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Technical Mathematics 1
Course Number MAT 110
Credits 2.0

Use of formulas; algebraic operations; use of determinants; use of exponents; logarithms. PREREQ: None


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Engineering Materials
Course Number MET 123
Credits 2.0

Composition and properties of metals, ceramics, concrete, glass, graphite, plastics, and wood. PREREQ: Technical Math


Information Literacy
Course Number ENG 103
Credits 1.0

Teaches students to become effective in finding and utilizing information at libraries and other information centers, and through electronic resources available in libraries and on the World Wide Web. PREREQ: None


English Composition
Course Number ENG 100
Credits 3.0

This course teaches the skills and techniques of effectively developing, drafting, and revising college-level essays toward a specific purpose and audience: active reading, prewriting strategies, sentence and paragraph structure, thesis statements, varied patterns of development (e.g., illustration, comparison/contrast, classification), critical reading toward revision of structure and organization, editing for the standard written conventions, use and documentation of outside sources. Students submit three essays (process analysis, causal analysis, argumentation) and a course journal. PREREQ: None


Physical Science
Course Number SCI 167
Credits 3.0

Principles that define and govern the physical universe as we know it; chemistry; physics, earth and space sciences.


Technical Mathematics 2
Course Number MAT 122
Credits 2.0

Practical geometry; plane trigonometry; polygons and solids; angles; trigonometric functions. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1


Fluid Mechanics
Course Number MET 220
Credits 3.0

Properties of materials; intensity of pressure; center of pressure; flow of water in open channels; rate of discharge through water. PREREQ: Engineering Mechanics


Readings in World Civilization
Course Number SSC 105
Credits 3.0

Importance of the study of history; major events of the sixteenth through twentieth centuries; causal relationships between events and trends. PREREQ: None


Engineering Mechanics
Course Number MET 170
Credits 3.0

Branches of engineering mechanics; free-body diagrams; kinematics; force-mass acceleration method; impulse momentum; collision of two bodies. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1 and 2


Basic Drafting
Course Number MET101
Credits 3.0

Recognizing and interpreting various types of drawings; using drafting equipment; drawing techniques; creating projections; adding dimensions, sections, auxiliary views, and breaks to drawings; geometric drawing systems.


Quality Control Systems
Course Number MET 221
Credits 3.0

Establishing quality systems; interpreting conventional and GD&T system drawings; setting up and using inspection tools and equipment; developing part acceptance procedures; statistical process control (SPC) fundamentals and practical applications.


Mechanics of Materials
Course Number MET 126
Credits 2.0

Simple stresses; welded, bolted, and riveted joints; fixed and moving loads on beams; reaction at beam support; theory of column design; radius of gyration.


Business and Technical Writing
Course Number ENG 121
Credits 3.0

Writing Styles; Abc Method Of Organizing Material; Grammar (parts Of Speech, Active And Passive Voice, Complete Sentences Vs. Sentence Fragments; Parallel Construction); Using Action Verbs; Constructing Paragraphs; Writing Memos, Business Letters, And Emails; Organizing Material; Conducting Research; Documenting Sources; Outlining; Providing Illustrations; Writing Reports, Proposals, Descriptions, Instructions, Articles, And Manuals. Prereq: None


Electro/Mechanical Control Technology
Course Number MET 240
Credits 3.0

Recognizing control system types; various types of feedback loops, designing digital and analog systems; operation of controlled and sensing devices; system evaluation and troubleshooting.


Drafting with AutoCAD®
Course Number MET202
Credits 3.0

Computer-aided drafting and design systems; AutoCAD® menus and features; file and entity creation; drawing organization; displaying modifying, and annotating drawings; data exchange and output methods.


Art Appreciation
Course Number HUM 102
Credits 3.0

Artistic media; historical periods and artistic movements; roles of the artist and the viewer; art criticism. PREREQ: None


Tool Design 1
Course Number MET 241
Credits 3.0

Single-point, multi-point, and rotary tools; types of work-holding devices; tool wear and failure; shearing and die-cutting; bending, forming and extrusion dies; forging dies. PREREQ: Manufacturing Processes


Tool Design 2
Course Number MET 242
Credits 3.0

Principles of gauging; tools for soldering, brazing, and mechanical joining processes; safety; tool materials. PREREQ: Tool Design 1


Resident Laboratory Training
Course Number CET 249
Credits 3.0

Students will be required to complete a series of comprehensive, practical experiments using various measuring instruments. Experiments are designed to provide familiarization with instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data, and laboratory reporting techniques. Students may earn credit for this by completing the course at an approved school or by submitting a life/work experience portfolio demonstrating completion of similar skills to those emphasized in the laboratory training. PREREQ: Semester 3


Program description: The Mechanical Engineering
Technology Program is designed
to meet the increased demand for
trained engineering technicians in
manufacturing industries and design
offices. Such technicians will be able to
assist production, manufacturing, and
design engineers in the automotive,
heavy machinery, machine tool,
aerospace, chemical, and other related
industries.
There is a wide variety of entry-level
employment opportunities available to
individuals who have training as
engineering technicians.

Engineering Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Computer Engineering Technology
Signal Processing with Lab
Course Number ECET-350
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Analog Signal Processing (asp) And Digital Signal Processing (dsp), With Emphasis On Dsp. Students Program Asp And Dsp Chips For Applications In Communications,control Systems, Digital Audio Processing And Digital Image Processing. They Also Use Computer Software To Simulate Asp And Dsp Circuit Performance, And To Analyze Data Acquired In The Lab.


Data Communications and Networking with Lab
Course Number ECET-375
Credits 4.0

This course introduces principles of data communications,including noise effects, multiplexing and transmission methods.Coursework also covers protocols, architecture, and performance analysis of local and wide area networks.Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-360
Credits 4.0

This course introduces basic operating system concepts such as process states and synchronization, multiprocessing, multiprogramming,processor scheduling, resource management, static and dynamic relocation, virtual memory, logical and physical input/output, device allocation, disk scheduling and file management.Also introduced are techniques required to develop device drivers. Computer software is used throughout the course.Prerequisite: ECET-370 / 5-4


Data Structures and Algorithms with Lab
Course Number ECET-370
Credits 4.0

This course introduces data structures (lists, strings, stacks,queues, trees), data encapsulation, as well as algorithms for recursion, sorting and searching. A high-level language such as C++ or Java is used. Prerequisite: COMP-328 / 5-4


Database System Design with Lab
Course Number ECET-450
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Structured Query Language (sql) For Implementing And Accessing A Relational Database. Also Covered Is How To Embed Sql Into A High-level Language Such As C++ Or Java. Prerequisites: Ecet-305 And Ecet-370 / 5-4


Structured Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-122
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Structured Design And Programming Techniques,as Well As Common Tools To Write, Compile, Run And Debug Programs Written In A High-level Programming Language To Solve A Variety Of Engineering Problems. Corequisite: Math-190; Prerequisite:ecet-100 / 5-4


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-220
Credits 4.0

This course introduces concepts of object-oriented programming,such as objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance, which are used to solve problems related to electronics and computer engineering technology using a high level language such as C++. Prerequisite: COMP-122 / 5-4


Programming Environments and Java with Lab
Course Number COMP-328
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Alternate Programming Environments Such As Command-line-oriented Unix Or Linux And Eclipse Ide. Also Introduced Are The Java Programming Language And Advanced Programming Concepts Such As Exception Handling And The Event-driven Model For Graphical User Interfaces. Prerequisite: Comp-220 / 4-3


Product Development
Course Number ECET-390
Credits 2.0

This course examines the product development cycle from initial concept through manufacturing. Coursework addresses project management, total quality management, codes and standards,prototype development, reliability, software engineering and product testing. Each student team prepares a written proposal for a senior project and makes an oral presentation of the proposal to the class. The approved proposal forms the basis for the capstone project, which is developed and completed in the subsequent series of lab courses. Prerequisite: ECET-330 / 3-2


Senior Project Development Lab I
Course Number ECET-492L
Credits 1.0

Working In Teams, Students In This First Course In A Three-course Sequence Initiate Development Of The Senior Project Approved In Ecet-390. Teams Submit Written Progress Reports And Make Oral Presentations Describing The Project To The Class. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisite: Ecet-390 / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab II
Course Number ECET-493L
Credits 1.0

This course, the second in a three-course sequence, requires student teams to complete prototype development of their senior project. Teams submit written progress reports and make oral presentations describing project progress. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-492L / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab III
Course Number ECET-494L
Credits 1.0

In this final course of the three-course project development lab sequence, student teams complete development of the senior project. Teams submit written progress reports, make oral presentations describing project progress, and provide concluding written and oral presentations. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-493L / 2-1


Technology Integration I
Course Number ECET-299
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Four Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned.prerequisite: Completion Of At Least 40 Credit Hours In Required Comp, Ecet And Math Courses,including Comp-328, Ecet-220,ecet-230 And Math-270 / 2-1


Technology Integration II - CET
Course Number ECET-498
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, Physics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Seven Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned. Prerequisite:completion Of At Least 86 Credit Hours In Required Comp,ecet, Math And Phys Courses / 1-1


Real-Time Operating System Design with Lab
Course Number ECET-420
Credits 4.0

This course introduces characteristics of operating systems required to support embedded microprocessor systems and how these systems differ from conventional operating systems.Coursework covers “hard” and “soft” real-time operating systems and includes topics such as threads, scheduling, priority and inter-process communication. Students use computer software such as assemblers and compilers in the course. Prerequisite:ECET-365 / 5-4


Pre-Calculus
Course Number MATH-190
Credits 4.0

This Course Emphasizes Topics That Form The Foundation For Study Of Electronics, Engineering Technology, Game And Simulation Programming, And Calculus. Topics Include Analyzing And Graphing Quadratic, Polynomial, Rational, Exponential,logarithmic And Trigonometric Functions; And Developing Complex Solutions To Problems In Rectangular, Trigonometric And Euler Form. Students Use Computer Software And Technology To Assist In Problem Solving And Analysis. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-104 Or Math-114. / 4-4


College Physics I with Lab
Course Number PHYS-310
Credits 4.0

This calculus-based course emphasizes fundamental laws of mechanics – the basis of most electronic control systems.Students use computer software packages to simulate system performance and analyze data acquired through lab exercises.Prerequisite: MATH-260 / 5-4


Electronic Circuits and Devices I with Lab
Course Number ECET-110
Credits 4.0

This Course, The First In A Three-course Sequence, Introduces Concepts Of Electrical Circuit Analysis, And Electronic Circuit Analysis And Design. The Sequence Integrates Study Of Both Passive Electrical Circuits (resistors, Capacitors And Inductors) And Active Electronic Circuits (diodes, Transistors And Analog Integrated Circuits Such As Operational Amplifiers). Lab Exercises Provide Experience With Passive And Active Electronic Components,and Their Design, Integration, Testing And Troubleshooting In Practical Circuits Of Moderate Complexity. Corequisite:math-190; Prerequisite: Ecet-100 / 5-4


Introduction to Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology with Lab
Course Number ECET-100
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basic Concepts Of The Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Field, Including Electronic Components, Introductory Circuit Analysis, Digital Logic, Computer Usage And Design Of Microcontroller-based Electronic Systems, And Emphasizes Hardware And Software Development.corequisite: Math-104 Or Placement Into Math-190 / 5-4


Digital Circuits and Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-230
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Design And Analysis Of Digital Circuits –bases For All Computer Systems And Virtually All Other Electronic Systems In Use Today. Topics Include Combinational And Sequential Logic, Digital Integrated Circuit Electrical Characteristics, Programmable Logic Devices And Hardware Description Languages.students Use Development And Analysis Software And Instrumentation For Circuit Verification. Corequisite: Ecet-220; Prerequisites:comp-122, Ecet-100 And Ecet-210 / 5-4


Microprocessor Architecture with Lab
Course Number ECET-330
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Internal Architecture Of The Microprocessor– The Basic Building Block Of Current Electronic Systems.students Use Assembly Language And/or High-level Language To Program The Microprocessor And Develop Simple Algorithms.applications Of The Microprocessor As A Computing Element Used With Storage Devices And Embedded Controllers Are Covered.computer Software Tools Such As Assemblers, Compilers And Ides Are Used For Program Design, Implementation And Testing.prerequisites: Comp-328 And Ecet-230 / 5-4


Embedded Microprocessor Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-365
Credits 4.0

Students in this course use an embedded microcomputer to control electrical and/or mechanical systems. Students design and develop various applications involving data acquisition and control. System development and engineering trade offs are emphasized to demonstrate best design practices. Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Program description: Computer Engineering Technology program graduates are
prepared to join the work force as technical professionals
in a variety of industries, including information technology.
CET graduates take an applications-oriented approach to
designing and implementing software, interfaces that link
computers to other physical systems, and computer systems
or other digital subsystems. They design software systems;
create code and protocols; test and evaluate hardware and
software products and processes; and diagnose and solve
problems. Graduates should also possess appropriate
knowledge, experience and skills to function effectively
in multidisciplinary teams, adapt to changes in technical
environments throughout their careers and progress in their
professional responsibilities.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Electronics Engineering Technology
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In the context of a general introduction to psychology and the social sciences, this course explores human development across the life span. Topics include physical, cognitive, psychological, social and moral development of infants, children, adolescents and adults. Coursework also addresses developmental theories, motivation, personality development, culture, and general psychological theories and principles.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues


Career Development
Course Number CARD-405
Credits 2.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry.


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information


Analytical Methods in Engineering Technology
Course Number ECET-305
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Mathematical Methods Required To Solve Advanced Engineering Technology Problems. Topics Include Transform Methods, And Probability And Statistics. Students Use Computer Software To Analyze And Solve Problems. Prerequisites: Comp-122 And Math-270


Applied Calculus I
Course Number MATH-260
Credits 4.0

This course, the first in a two-course sequence, provides the basis for solving advanced problems in electronics and computer engineering technology, as well as in physics. Problemsolving in nature, the course covers topics such as functions, limits, differentiation and integration. Students use computer software for analysis and problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH-190


Applied Calculus II
Course Number MATH-270
Credits 4.0

This course, the second in a two-course sequence, provides further skills for solving advanced problems in electronics and computer engineering technology, as well as in physics. Problemsolving in nature, the course covers sequences and series, and introduces differential and difference equations. Students use computer software for analysis and problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH-260


College Physics II with Lab
Course Number PHYS-320
Credits 4.0

This Calculus-based Course Covers Topics Such As Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, Electromagnetic Fields, Wave Propagation, Optics, Sensors And Transducers. Students Use Computer Software To Simulate System Performance And Analyze Data Acquired Through Lab Exercises. Prerequisites: Math-260 And Phys-310


Electronic Circuits and Devices II with Lab
Course Number ECET-210
Credits 4.0

This course, the second in a three-course sequence, furthers students’ knowledge of electrical circuit analysis, and electronic circuit analysis and design. Prerequisite: ECET-110


Electronic Circuits and Devices III with Lab
Course Number ECET-220
Credits 4.0

This course, the third in a three-course sequence, expands on concepts of electrical circuit analysis, and analysis and design of electronic circuits. Prerequisite: ECET-210


Microprocessor Interfacing with Lab
Course Number ECET-340
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Microprocessor Interfacing To Peripheral Devices. Basic Input/output Operations Are Evaluated, And Specific Peripheral Devices – Including A/ds, D/as, Keyboards, Displays, And Serial And Parallel Communication Channels – Are Studied. Software (high-level And Assembly) And Hardware Aspects Of These Devices Are Developed. Polling And Interrupt-driven Software Drivers Are Compared And Contrasted. Integration And Testing Of Designs Are Emphasized. Prerequisites: Ecet-299 And Ecet-330


Mechatronics with Lab
Course Number ECET-402
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Electronic Control Of Mechanical Systems. Topics Include Sensors And Transducers, Signal Conditioning, Actuators, Controllers, System Models, System Transfer Functions And Dynamic System Response. Students Use Computer Software To Analyze, Simulate And Solve Problems. Prerequisites: Ecet-340 And Ecet-350


Technology Integration II - EET
Course Number ECET-499
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, Physics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Seven Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned. Prerequisite: Completion Of At Least 86 Credit Hours In Required Comp, Ecet, Math And Phys Courses


Wireless Communications with Lab
Course Number ECET-380
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Principles And Techniques Used To Analyze And Design Wireless Communication Systems. Topics Include Electromagnetic Waves, Antennas, Propagation And Digital Modulation. Mobile And Cellular Systems Are Emphasized; Other Selected Applications Such As Wireless Local Area Network (wifi), Broadband Wireless (wimax) And Bluetooth (wireless Pan) Are Also Covered. Students Use Computer Software To Simulate, Analyze And Solve Problems. Prerequisite: Ecet-310


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 3-3


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In The Context Of A General Introduction To Psychology And The Social Sciences, This Course Explores Human Development Across The Life Span. Topics Include Physical, Cognitive, Psychological, Social And Moral Development Of Infants, Children, Adolescents And Adults. Coursework Also Addresses Developmental Theories, Motivation, Personality Development, Culture, And General Psychological Theories And Principles. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Pre-Calculus
Course Number MATH-190
Credits 4.0

This Course Emphasizes Topics That Form The Foundation For Study Of Electronics, Engineering Technology, Game And Simulation Programming, And Calculus. Topics Include Analyzing And Graphing Quadratic, Polynomial, Rational, Exponential,logarithmic And Trigonometric Functions; And Developing Complex Solutions To Problems In Rectangular, Trigonometric And Euler Form. Students Use Computer Software And Technology To Assist In Problem Solving And Analysis. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-104 Or Math-114. / 4-4


College Physics I with Lab
Course Number PHYS-310
Credits 4.0

This calculus-based course emphasizes fundamental laws of mechanics – the basis of most electronic control systems.Students use computer software packages to simulate system performance and analyze data acquired through lab exercises.Prerequisite: MATH-260 / 5-4


Electronic Circuits and Devices I with Lab
Course Number ECET-110
Credits 4.0

This Course, The First In A Three-course Sequence, Introduces Concepts Of Electrical Circuit Analysis, And Electronic Circuit Analysis And Design. The Sequence Integrates Study Of Both Passive Electrical Circuits (resistors, Capacitors And Inductors) And Active Electronic Circuits (diodes, Transistors And Analog Integrated Circuits Such As Operational Amplifiers). Lab Exercises Provide Experience With Passive And Active Electronic Components,and Their Design, Integration, Testing And Troubleshooting In Practical Circuits Of Moderate Complexity. Corequisite:math-190; Prerequisite: Ecet-100 / 5-4


Introduction to Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology with Lab
Course Number ECET-100
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Basic Concepts Of The Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Field, Including Electronic Components, Introductory Circuit Analysis, Digital Logic, Computer Usage And Design Of Microcontroller-based Electronic Systems, And Emphasizes Hardware And Software Development.corequisite: Math-104 Or Placement Into Math-190 / 5-4


Digital Circuits and Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-230
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Design And Analysis Of Digital Circuits –bases For All Computer Systems And Virtually All Other Electronic Systems In Use Today. Topics Include Combinational And Sequential Logic, Digital Integrated Circuit Electrical Characteristics, Programmable Logic Devices And Hardware Description Languages.students Use Development And Analysis Software And Instrumentation For Circuit Verification. Corequisite: Ecet-220; Prerequisites:comp-122, Ecet-100 And Ecet-210 / 5-4


Microprocessor Architecture with Lab
Course Number ECET-330
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Internal Architecture Of The Microprocessor– The Basic Building Block Of Current Electronic Systems.students Use Assembly Language And/or High-level Language To Program The Microprocessor And Develop Simple Algorithms.applications Of The Microprocessor As A Computing Element Used With Storage Devices And Embedded Controllers Are Covered.computer Software Tools Such As Assemblers, Compilers And Ides Are Used For Program Design, Implementation And Testing.prerequisites: Comp-328 And Ecet-230 / 5-4


Embedded Microprocessor Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-365
Credits 4.0

Students in this course use an embedded microcomputer to control electrical and/or mechanical systems. Students design and develop various applications involving data acquisition and control. System development and engineering trade offs are emphasized to demonstrate best design practices. Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Signal Processing with Lab
Course Number ECET-350
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Analog Signal Processing (asp) And Digital Signal Processing (dsp), With Emphasis On Dsp. Students Program Asp And Dsp Chips For Applications In Communications,control Systems, Digital Audio Processing And Digital Image Processing. They Also Use Computer Software To Simulate Asp And Dsp Circuit Performance, And To Analyze Data Acquired In The Lab.


Communications Systems with Lab
Course Number ECT-263
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers Basic Communications Systems At The Circuit And Subsystem Levels. Topics Include Signal Analysis And Troubleshooting For Analog And Digital Communications Systems. The Effects Of Noise Are Presented. Through Lab Exercises, Students Analyze Signals And Troubleshoot Communications Systems’ Performance. Electronic Design Automation (eda) Software Is Used To Predict System Performance. Prerequisite: Ect-246


Data Communications and Networking with Lab
Course Number ECET-375
Credits 4.0

This course introduces principles of data communications,including noise effects, multiplexing and transmission methods.Coursework also covers protocols, architecture, and performance analysis of local and wide area networks.Prerequisite:ECET-340 / 5-4


Structured Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-122
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Structured Design And Programming Techniques,as Well As Common Tools To Write, Compile, Run And Debug Programs Written In A High-level Programming Language To Solve A Variety Of Engineering Problems. Corequisite: Math-190; Prerequisite:ecet-100 / 5-4


Object-Oriented Programming with Lab
Course Number COMP-220
Credits 4.0

This course introduces concepts of object-oriented programming,such as objects, classes, encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance, which are used to solve problems related to electronics and computer engineering technology using a high level language such as C++. Prerequisite: COMP-122 / 5-4


Programming Environments and Java with Lab
Course Number COMP-328
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Alternate Programming Environments Such As Command-line-oriented Unix Or Linux And Eclipse Ide. Also Introduced Are The Java Programming Language And Advanced Programming Concepts Such As Exception Handling And The Event-driven Model For Graphical User Interfaces. Prerequisite: Comp-220 / 4-3


Product Development
Course Number ECET-390
Credits 2.0

This course examines the product development cycle from initial concept through manufacturing. Coursework addresses project management, total quality management, codes and standards,prototype development, reliability, software engineering and product testing. Each student team prepares a written proposal for a senior project and makes an oral presentation of the proposal to the class. The approved proposal forms the basis for the capstone project, which is developed and completed in the subsequent series of lab courses. Prerequisite: ECET-330 / 3-2


Senior Project Development Lab I
Course Number ECET-492L
Credits 1.0

Working In Teams, Students In This First Course In A Three-course Sequence Initiate Development Of The Senior Project Approved In Ecet-390. Teams Submit Written Progress Reports And Make Oral Presentations Describing The Project To The Class. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisite: Ecet-390 / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab II
Course Number ECET-493L
Credits 1.0

This course, the second in a three-course sequence, requires student teams to complete prototype development of their senior project. Teams submit written progress reports and make oral presentations describing project progress. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-492L / 2-1


Senior Project Development Lab III
Course Number ECET-494L
Credits 1.0

In this final course of the three-course project development lab sequence, student teams complete development of the senior project. Teams submit written progress reports, make oral presentations describing project progress, and provide concluding written and oral presentations. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: ECET-493L / 2-1


Technology Integration I
Course Number ECET-299
Credits 1.0

In This Course, Students Apply And Integrate Concepts Learned In Computer Programming, Mathematics, And Electronics And Computer Engineering Technology Courses In The First Four Semesters Of The Program By Solving Problems In The Particular Discipline Or Subject Area. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 70 Percent, And Grades Of D Are Not Assigned.prerequisite: Completion Of At Least 40 Credit Hours In Required Comp, Ecet And Math Courses,including Comp-328, Ecet-220,ecet-230 And Math-270 / 2-1


Operating Systems with Lab
Course Number ECET-360
Credits 4.0

This course introduces basic operating system concepts such as process states and synchronization, multiprocessing, multiprogramming,processor scheduling, resource management, static and dynamic relocation, virtual memory, logical and physical input/output, device allocation, disk scheduling and file management.Also introduced are techniques required to develop device drivers. Computer software is used throughout the course.Prerequisite: ECET-370 / 5-4


Data Structures and Algorithms with Lab
Course Number ECET-370
Credits 4.0

This course introduces data structures (lists, strings, stacks,queues, trees), data encapsulation, as well as algorithms for recursion, sorting and searching. A high-level language such as C++ or Java is used. Prerequisite: COMP-328 / 5-4


Program description: The Electronics Engineering Technology program prepares
graduates to join the work force as technical professionals
in a variety of industries. EET graduates play essential roles
on the engineering team, typically designing and implementing
hardware and software solutions to technical problems. Graduates should also possess appropriate knowledge, experience
and skills to function effectively in multidisciplinary teams,
adapt to changes in technical environments throughout their
careers and progress in their professional responsibilities

Program Name: Master of Electrical Engineering
Probability and Statistics for Engineer
Course Number EE501
Credits 3.0

This course covers statistics, probability theory and its engineering applications, random variables, distribution and density functions.Prerequisite: admission to the MSEE program


Computer Communications Networks
Course Number EE502
Credits 3.0

This course investigates network architectures, protocols,service interface, and local and wide area networks. Coursework also addresses data communication principles and techniques such as transmission, signaling, encoding, error detection and correction, data link control and multiplexing. Prerequisite:admission to the MSEE program


Core Assessment and Project Prospectus
Course Number EE600
Credits 3.0

This course assesses students’ knowledge of core MSEE course material and initiates development of an advanced-level project within an established concentration area. To initiate the project,students present a fully developed project prospectus with an initial project design and acquire approval of the project through faculty advisement. The course is one semester-credit hour;students earn grades of A, B or F upon course completion.Corequisite: PM586; prerequisites: EE501, EE502, EE560, EE561,EE562 and good academic standing


MSEE Project Development I
Course Number EE601
Credits 3.0

With faculty guidance, students continue work on an advanced level project related to their area of concentration. Upon course completion, students will have finalized, implemented and started to analyze their design. The course is one semester-credit hour; students earn grades of A, B or F upon course completion.Prerequisites: EE600 and good academic standing


MSEE Project Development II
Course Number EE602
Credits 3.0

In this course, the third of a three-course capstone sequence, students finish an advanced-level project related to their area of concentration.The project is completed under approval and guidance of one or more faculty advisors. The course is one semester-credit hour; students earn grades of A, B or F upon course completion.Prerequisites: EE601 and good academic standing


Project Management Systems
Course Number PM586
Credits 3.0

With an emphasis on planning, this course introduces project management fundamentals and principles from the standpoint of the manager who must organize, plan, implement and control non routine activities to achieve schedule, budget and performance objectives. Topics include project life cycles, organization and charters; work breakdown structures; responsibility matrixes; as well as planning, budgeting and scheduling systems. Planning and control methods such as PERT/CPM, Gantt charts, earned value systems, project management software applications and project audits are introduced. No prerequisite


Mathematical Methods for Computer Systems Engineering
Course Number EE560
Credits 3.0

This course provides fundamental mathematical knowledge needed to design and analyze computer systems. Topics include probability and stochastic processes; finite state machines;Markov chains; set, queueing and graph theory; network performance analysis; synthesis of networks; optimal routing;and optimization methods. Prerequisite: EE501


Computer Systems Organization
Course Number EE561
Credits 3.0

This course provides an overview of computer organization and assembly language programming. Topics include stored program computers; linking and loading; assembly language programming, with emphasis on translating high-level language constructs; data representation and arithmetic algorithms;basics of logic design; and processor design, including data path,hardwired control and microprogrammed control. Prerequisite:admission to the MSEE program


Computer Architecture
Course Number EE562
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on instruction set design, processors,control units, memory hierarchies, pipelining and input/output systems. Quantitative analysis of design alternatives and evaluation of reliability, performance and cost are emphasized.Prerequisite: EE561


Real-Time Systems
Course Number EE563
Credits 3.0

This course explores design methodologies for embedded real-time systems. Topics include hardware technologies, throughput analysis,hardware/software tradeoffs, language issues arising in real time systems, design of real-time kernels, context switching,memory allocation and scheduling, and real-time data structures.Prerequisite: EE562


Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
Course Number EE564
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on data structures, operations performed on data and design of non-numeric algorithms that act on data structures. Other topics include advanced-level discussions on topics such as lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, trees,balanced trees, graphs and dictionaries. Prerequisites: EE502 and EE561


Distributed Systems
Course Number EE565
Credits 3.0

This course covers principles of designing distributed systems and developing a real system via an applications-based project. Topics include models of distributed systems; distributed transactions, file systems, algorithms, multimedia applications and real-time systems; infrastructures for building distributed systems; cryptography and distributed security; and systems and networking support for distributed multimedia systems.Prerequisite: EE562


Multimedia System
Course Number EE568
Credits 3.0

This course covers information theory and mathematics needed to analyze multimedia compression algorithms. Also addressed are video compression; motion estimation and compensation;modern image and video coding standards; and multimedia networks and communications. Prerequisite: admission to the MSEE program


Local and Wide Area Networks
Course Number EE569
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines Local And Wide Area Networks From A Design Perspective. Current And Emerging Standards And Protocols,and Performance Analysis Of Various Types Of Local Area Networks(lans) And Wide Area Networks (wans), Are Addressed. Interconnection Technologies Such As Frame Relay, Integrated Services Digital Networks And Lan/wan Management Are Also Addressed Prerequisite: Ee502


Introduction to Neural Networks
Course Number EE541
Credits 3.0

This course explores methods and techniques of artificial neural networks. Topics include modeling artificial neurons and their interconnections, as well as various learning and self-organizing processes. Prerequisite: EE501


Reliability Engineering
Course Number EE551
Credits 3.0

This course investigates concepts and techniques of reliability evaluation of electronic components, systems and engineering processes, including software reliability. Prerequisite: EE501


Broadband Networks
Course Number EE586
Credits 3.0

This Course Addresses Architecture Standards For Future Broadband Networks, Including Synchronous Optical Network (sonet) And Asynchronous Transfer Mode (atm), As Applied To Design Of High-speed Local, Campus And Metropolitan Area Networks. Topics Include Implementation Issues Of Transporting Connectionless Data Packets, Signaling And Routing, Congestion Flow Control And Network Management Techniques. Prerequisite: Ee502


Wireless Networks
Course Number TM563
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Program description: The Electronics Engineering Technology program prepares
graduates to join the work force as technical professionals
in a variety of industries. EET graduates play essential roles
on the engineering team, typically designing and implementing
hardware and software solutions to technical problems. Graduates should also possess appropriate knowledge, experience
and skills to function effectively in multidisciplinary teams,
adapt to changes in technical environments throughout their
careers and progress in their professional responsibilities.

Engineering Courses at University of Maryland University College

Program Name: MS in Information Technology: Software Engineering
Software Design and Implementation
Course Number SWEN 646
Credits 3.0

(formerly Mswe 646.) A Guide For The Transition From Programming-in-the-small To Programming-in-the-large. Software Development Processes And The Role Of Design As Applied In Those Processes Are Discussed. Review Covers Major Design Methods And Available Computer-aided Software Engineering (case) Tools, The Proper Application Of Design Methods And Techniques For Estimating The Magnitude Of The Development Effort. Strengths And Weaknesses Of The Development Methods Are Covered, And Traceability To Requirements And Code Are Examined


Software Verification and Validation
Course Number SWEN 647
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 647.) A study of the evaluation of software for correctness, efficiency, performance and reliability. Skills covered include program proving, code inspection, unit-level testing and system-level analysis. The difficulty and cost of some types of analysis and the need for automation of tedious tasks are examined. Problem-solving skills are stressed, especially in the analysis of code. The textbook world is contrasted with the real world using case studies and personal experiences. Industry attitudes toward reliability and performance are also discussed


Software Maintenance
Course Number SWEN 648
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 648.) A guide for the transition from programming for the short term to programming for the long term. Review covers the role of creation and maintenance in the software development process, as well as analysis and implementation of a software design. Topics also include the need for software maintenance and evolution, software maintenance process and performance issues, planning for extended software life and effective mechanisms to control software change


Usability Engineering
Course Number SWEN 651
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: SWEN 645. A study of the theory and practice of designing user interfaces for interactive systems. Topics include the principles of usability engineering and basic rules for usable design. User interfaces are evaluated using techniques such as contextual inquiry, task analysis, and usability testing. Discussion also covers when these techniques are most appropriate


Software Engineering Project
Course Number SWEN 670
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 617.) A comprehensive examination of the tools, skills and techniques of software engineering and their application. Completion of a major team project is designed to integrate knowledge and skills gained through previous study and provide experience of the constraints commonly experienced in industry (such as scheduling and vagueness of clients). Project requires forming teams (organization) and scheduling work to meet the deadlines imposed by the contract (syllabus)


Information Technology Foundations
Course Number ITEC 610
Credits 3.0

A fundamental study of technology and its applications, as well as the economic and social issues they have raised. Topics include computers, peripherals, databases, and networks; operations (of business, government, and other enterprises), decision support systems, and acquisition of information technology resources; and information security, productivity, equitable access by users, intellectual property rights, and global reach. Discussion also covers current and future developments in the field and their implications.


Information Technology Infrastructure
Course Number ITEC 620
Credits 3.0

An introduction to the broad variety in information technology infrastructures from the perspectives of systems architecture, data communications, and networks. Topics include enterprise information infrastructure, multinational enterprise, servers and Web services, layered network architecture, convergence and Internet protocols, global WAN services, enterprise network design, wireless technologies, network security, network management, server architectures, storage management and networks, and content management networks.


Information Systems Analysis, Modeling, and Design
Course Number ITEC 630
Credits 3.0

(Formerly CSMN 635.) A study of systems analysis and design, using selected engineering and management science techniques and practices. Topics include requirements determination, modeling, decision making, and proposal development. The System Development Life Cycle Model, including system implementation and post implementation activities, is examined. Emphasis is on the specification of the information system�s logical and physical analysis and design from a management perspective. Research and project assignments related to information systems analysis, design, implementation, and/or project planning and control, require individual and group work.


Information Technology Project Management
Course Number ITEC 640
Credits 3.0

An examination of the fundamental principles and practice of managing programs and projects in an information processing and high-tech environment. The dynamic nature of IT and the effect of life cycles are explored. The fundamental building blocks of high-tech management styles (including project planning, organizational structure, team building, and effective control mechanisms) are addressed. Discussion covers the effect of product and project life cycles in delivering a successful IT project, considering the obsolescence factors in procurement/ stakeholder contracts. The goal is to gain a solid foundation to successfully manage each phase of the project life cycle, work within organizational and cost constraints, set goals linked directly to stakeholder needs, and utilize proven management tools to execute a dynamic project on time and within budget. Emphasis is on how to apply the essential concepts, processes, and techniques in the management of large-scale governmental or commercial programs.


Systems Engineering
Course Number SWEN 603
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 603.) An examination of the systems engineering process, with special emphasis on software engineering as a discipline within systems engineering. Topics include an overview of system theory and structures, elements of the system life cycle (including systems design and development), risk and trade-off analyses, modeling and simulation, and the tools needed to analyze and support the systems process.


System and Software Standards and Requirements
Course Number SWEN 645
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 645.) An examination of major models of software requirements and specifications (sequential and concurrent systems), existing software standards and practices, and formal methods of software development. A comparative survey of various languages and methods serves to emphasize similarities and significant differences. Topics also include writing system and software requirements, formal specification analysis, formal description reasoning, models of “standard” paradigms, and translations of such models into formal notations.


Program description: The Software Engineering specialization provides a foundation in technical concepts and design techniques, as well as management and teamwork approaches, for building software systems. The emphasis of this specialization is on implementing software engineering projects within cost and schedule by applying proven and innovative practices that overcome the shortcomings of an undisciplined approach.

Engineering Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Software Systems Engineering
Macroeconomics
Course Number ECO201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose
Course Number ENGL126
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Workshop That Builds Upon Engl125—real World Writing. It Is A Workshop Format—highly Experiential And Hands On. Students Practice Drafting Progressively Complex Papers, Demonstrating The Capacity To Do College Level Research And Write Essays That Convey Information, Make A Point Or Provide An Opinion. They Will Study The Apa Handbook, Learn To Do Research (beyond Wikipedia!) And Cite Resources Without Plagiarizing Them. In Addition, This Course Uses Readings To Demonstrate Excellence And Eloquence In Speaking And Writing, Emphasizing The Crucial Synergy Between Learning To Write And Developing The Practice Of Intelligent Reading Of Texts. This Will Be A Highly Collaborative Course, With Students Reading And Critiquing Others’ Work, As A Means To Create A Learning Community As Well As Develop Critical Capacities.


The Software Engineering Profession
Course Number SWE311
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the breadth of the software engineering profession. The importance of communication among a variety of stakeholders, the role of standards, and professional ethics are emphasized. Students investigate the historical and current practices in the software engineering discipline, and then explore its future directions.


Software Engineering Capstone II
Course Number SWE482
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Capstone II continues the software product development that began in SWE481. Working in teams, students use their requirement and design specifications to develop and test a software product. This course requires the development and test of the product following the project plan.


Professional Communications
Course Number ENG210
Credits 4.0

This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process.


Real World Writing
Course Number ENGL125
Credits 4.0

This Is One Of The Most Important Courses You Can Take—it Will Lay The Foundation For Your Entire College And Professional Career As An Educated Person. In It, We Will Address How To Write And Speak To Make A Point; How To Use Good Grammar, Vocabulary And Logical Thinking; As Well As How To Find A Suitable Topic For Your Writing Assignments. We Will Start With The Basics: Reviewing Sentences And Paragraphs, And Then Move On To The Classic Five-part College Essay Or Theme. 321 Effective November 15, 2010 For Students Starting On Or After January 2, 2011 There Are Different Rules Of The Game For Writing Academically Than Writing For Business. We Want To Teach Students The “culture” Of Being Solid College-level Communicators And Successful Professionals. This Workshop Course Is Highly Experiential, Supportive, And Collaborative, As Students Read And Critique Each Others’ Work. This Is The First In A Sequence On Composition And Writing Skills. The Second Course, Engl126, In This Series Will Build Upon This One—addressing How To Research And Use Resources Without Plagiarizing, How To Utilize The Apa Formatting For Documentation And How To Make A Persuasive Argument. Our View Of The Required Composition Sequence Is That It Is Essential For All Who Want To Become Skilled Critical Thinkers And Educated People.


American Culture in Transition
Course Number HIS120
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural “isms,” and America’s relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society.


World Literature
Course Number LTR215
Credits 4.0

This literature course examines a wide range of stories, poems, and plays. Students learn how to interact with and respond to literature.


College Level Algebra
Course Number MAT150
Credits 4.0

In this course, students will take an interactive and visual approach to college-level algebra. It covers functions and inverse functions, such as linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions and their graphs. The course includes methods to solve systems of equations and inequalities.


Discrete Mathematics
Course Number MAT200
Credits 4.0

This course builds a mathematical foundation in concepts associated with the Computer Sciences. Topics include symbolic logic, induction, sets, relations, functions, Big-Oh, graphs, trees, automata and context-free grammars


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Principles of Business
Course Number MGM110
Credits 4.0

This survey course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL310
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an understanding of ethical expectations and prepares the student to make decisions that are ethically correct and legal. The study of ethics includes the development of ethical standards, prima facie obligations, responsibilities, societal aims and professional codes of conduct. The course will follow the aims of normative ethics. The students should expect to participate and become involved in case studies, hypothetical situations and discussions to develop an attitude that is ethically acceptable, as well as to practice the concepts learned to aid in decision making.


Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

This course surveys major areas of psychological science, including human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, learning, memory, and biological influences.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Building Your Success Strategy Plan
Course Number UNIV101
Credits 4.0

UNIV101 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students learn effective tools and skills necessary for academic success, integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.


Career Planning and Management
Course Number UNIV201
Credits 4.0

This course provides the framework for effective career management as students gain insight into themselves and potential career fields, acquiring knowledge and skills needed to successfully plan career transitions.


Unix Fundamentals
Course Number CS126
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Students Explore End User Interaction With The Unix Operating System. This Course Examines The Basic Features Of The Unix Operating System, Unix Commands, The Unix File System, The Unix Shells, And Shell Programming. It Also Draws Comparisons Between Unix And Linux. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: It106 Or Cs106 Or Cs123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Fundamentals of Database Systems
Course Number CS251
Credits 4.0

This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems. Topics covered in this course include conceptual and logical database designs for several businesses, implementing these designs using a database management system and developing business applications that access these databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT106 Availability: Virtual Campus


Structured Query Language for Data Management
Course Number CS362
Credits 4.0

This course gives complete coverage of SQL, with an emphasis on storage, retrieval and the manipulation of data. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS250 or CS251 or IT235 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Computer Security
Course Number CSS150
Credits 4.0

This course provides the foundation for the study of computer system security. The course centers around the ten domains comprising the Information Security Common Body of Knowledge. Topics include access control systems, telecommunications and network security, cryptography, operations security and business continuity and disaster recovery planning. Students will be exposed to security management practices as well as security architecture and models security laws, investigations and ethics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Web Development I
Course Number EM208
Credits 4.0

The Fundamentals Of Web Servers, Web Sites, Html, Xhtml And Web Authoring Are Presented In The Context Of Using The Technology To Craft A Message For An Audience. Also Includes Fundamentals Of Linking, Graphics, And Other Media. The Creation Of A Web Site Project Is Required.


Introduction to Programming Logic
Course Number IT106
Credits 4.0

This course is the study of programming logic and the application of this logic to problem solving. In the course we will discuss and apply many approaches to problem solving such as step algorithms, flow charts, truth tables, and pseudo-code. Students will learn techniques to translate real life problems into forms that will enable computer programs to solve them. Students will learn and apply programming language constructs (i.e. linear, branching, iteration, subroutines, etc.) using a visual tool. These techniques and tools should allow students to create and design programming logic that will become a foundational skill for future programming courses. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Programming
Course Number IT110
Credits 4.0

The course is an introduction to Java programming and object-oriented techniques. This is designed for students just starting out in programming. Fundamental programming concepts such as string manipulation, file input and output, and error handling are incorporated in lab assignments. These concepts provide the framework for the development of a very basic Graphical User Interface (GUI) application. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments
Course Number IT140
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of operating systems and specialized networking operating system models. The fundamentals of common operating systems, client/server environments, network infrastructure, theoretic models and system architecture are discussed, including legacy operating system platforms and security processes utilized in today's enterprises. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Network Management
Course Number IT245
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Network Management Explores The Management Concepts And Processes Of Planning, Improving, Creating, Updating, And Revising The Processes Of Monitoring And Adjusting Performance Of The Network. Network Management Has A Tactical And Operational Process As Well As Strategic Implications. Additional Topics Covered In This Class Include: Network Models, Managed Objects, Configuration, Managing Agents, Network Management Software, Protocol Suites Such As Tcp/ip And Osi Seven-layer Model. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None


Information Technology Architectures
Course Number IT401
Credits 4.0

The major objective of this course is to introduce the concepts, methodology and terminology of Enterprise Architecture and integrate this knowledge with previous courses in operating systems, database management systems, networking, and programming. The course primarily focuses on the overall planning process of enterprise architecture. Issues and options involved in implementing an enterprise architecture incorporating a distributed IT system are examined from a Macro Level. An ongoing discussion is conducted on how the emergent profession of enterprise architecture fits into the duties and responsibilities of today's IT manager. Other resources and references relating to the field of enterprise architecture are introduced. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT245 or IT200 or IT242; IT110 or IT115 or IT171; CS251 or CS250 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Systems Analysis and Design
Course Number IT422
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Systems Analysis And Design Provides Instruction On The System Development Life Cycle (sdlc) Phases. This Course Looks At The Sdlc As A Structured Approach For Developing Requirements, Performing Analysis, Producing The Design, Coding Or Installation Of The Solution, Testing The Application And Installing The Final Product. The System As Defined In This Course Could Include A Network, Telecommunications, New Software Development Or Other Information Systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Availability: Virtual Campus


Systems Acquisition and Sourcing
Course Number IT424
Credits 4.0

Systems Acquisition and Sourcing explores the business and technical decision making process for “buy versus build,” in-sourcing versus outsourcing, evaluation and benchmarking and testing. In addition topics such as contracts and Request for Proposals (RFP) are explored and analyzed. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT422 Availability: Virtual Campus


System Integration and Organization Deployment
Course Number IT426
Credits 4.0

System Integration and Organization Deployment focuses on the technical and cultural integration of a system into an organization. This course explains and expands upon system support strategies, user support plans, enterprise integration approaches, standards, and best practices. Discussion of organizational culture and change management is also explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT424 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Project Management
Course Number MPM210
Credits 6.0

This Course Provides An Overview And Introduction To The Discipline Of Project Management, Coupled With An Examination Of The Techniques That Project Managers Use To Complete Their Projects On Schedule, Within Budgeted Cost, And According To Specified Scope. Using Materials Based On The Pmbok® (guide To Project Management Body Of Knowledge, Published By The Project Management Institute Or Pmi®), Students Learn The Operational Framework Of Project Management Relating To The Project Lifecycle Of Project Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling, And Closing. This Course Also Provides The Basis For The More Advanced Development Of Project Management Skills In Subsequent Project Management Courses.


Data Structures
Course Number CS230
Credits 4.0

In this course a student learns the principles behind both simple and advanced data structures. Study includes data types, arrays, stacks, queues, lists and trees. Students demonstrate understanding of these principles through the completion of several programs.


User Interface Design
Course Number CS346
Credits 4.0

Developing usable software products is vital in today’s competitive marketplace. This course provides in-depth coverage of the computer human interface, user interface design, user profiling, prototyping and usability testing. Note: this class does not require programming skills


Object Oriented Methods
Course Number CS377
Credits 4.0

Object Oriented Methods introduces the student to the basic concepts of object-oriented analysis and design. Use case modeling, class modeling and state modeling using common notations are covered. Completion of several exercises and a final project are required.


Software Requirements Engineering
Course Number CS455
Credits 4.0

Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, identification, definition, and documentation. Students will explore and practice elicitation techniques, define functional and non-functional requirements, write use-case scenarios, explore user interface alternatives, learn how to analyze and model requirements, and develop a requirements traceability matrix that spans the software development lifecycle.


Software Design
Course Number CS457
Credits 4.0

Software Design defines and describes the behavior of the software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course.


Software Testing
Course Number CS459
Credits 4.0

Software Testing provides an overview of a variety of testing practices and methods, and then gives the students the opportunity to apply the theory as they perform software tests. This course focuses on the types of tests that are conducted during the software development lifecycle, such as unit testing, usability testing, operational testing, integration testing, stress testing, and system testing. Students develop a test procedure, a test plan, conduct system and usability testing, and write a test report that documents the results.


Introduction to Java Programming I
Course Number IT151
Credits 4.0

This course introduces programming using the Java language. The basic concepts of object-oriented programming will be discussed in this course. Topics studied will include algorithmic logic, control structures, data and program design, objects and classes. Students will complete several Java programs before the end of this course. This course should prepare students to take Introduction to Java Programming II.


Introduction to Java Programming II
Course Number IT152
Credits 4.0

This course continues the introduction of programming using the Java language. The foundation of object-oriented programming will be discussed in this course. Topics studied will include creation of classes and objects, object responsibilities and characteristics, and UML class diagrams. Students will complete several object-oriented Java programs before the end of this course. This course should prepare students to take Intermediate Java Programming I.


Project Risk Management
Course Number MPM344

Project Risk Management Is A Study Of Risk Management In The Context Of Projects And Programs, With Special Focus On Developing The Competency Of The Project Risk Manager. This Course Addresses The Area Of Non-speculative, Business Risk. Specific Emphasis Is Placed On Risk Minimization, Risk Control, And Risk Management. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Mpm210 Or Mpm401


Project Performance and Quality Assurance
Course Number MPM357

In This Course, Students Will Explore Quality Assurance Concepts And Principles Within The Total Project Quality Management Framework In Manufacturing Or Service Organizations. Students Will Also Study Benchmarking, The Contractual Aspects Of Quality, Quality Tools And Techniques That Utilize Statistical Process Control, Process Improvement, Yield Management, Quality Issues Of Incoming Material Control And Quality Audits. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Mpm210 Or Mpm401


Software Processes
Course Number SWE410
Credits 4.0

This course gives the student an overview of the software process using the most common development methodologies currently used in industry. Students are introduced to IEEE standards for software processes. The relationship between software quality and process is emphasized with the benefits of process improvement


Software Project Management
Course Number SWE440
Credits 4.0

Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.


Human Elements in Projects and Organizations
Course Number SWE441
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on issues of productivity, quality of work, motivation, morale, communication, and coordination within computer science, software engineering, and business data processing projects and organizations. Communication and coordination among the layers of individuals, teams, projects, organizations, and business milieus are addressed. Emphasis can be placed on particular topics in the course, depending on the interests of the students, their sponsors, and the instructor. During each session, students will compile lists of action items for improving the topics covered. For students with work experience, their lists will reflect their experiences; students without work experience will prepare lists that reflect typical strengths, weaknesses, and best practices based on the presentations, readings, and experiences of their classmates and the instructor.


Software Engineering Capstone I
Course Number SWE481
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Capstone I involves the development of a software product from conception through deployment. Working in teams, students design and develop a software system based on user requirements. This course reinforces the principles of requirements engineering and software design. It includes the analysis and design of a software product and a plan for the overall project.


Program description: If you are interested in building credentials in the field of systems engineering, this Software Systems Engineering concentration program can help you gain meaningful perspectives that can help you achieve your career objectives. It is designed to help prepare you to elicit, identify, define and document software requirements - and will challenge you to develop use case scenarios for requirement creation and software design. As you progress, you will have the opportunity to apply appropriate software design models to develop a software solution as well as planning, implementing and reporting software testing.
After you complete CTU's online Software Systems training, you can pursue career opportunities such as:

* Software Engineer – entry level
* Computer Programmer
* Applications Developer
* Software Architect – entry level
* Network Administrator
* Database Administrator
* Network Operations Analyst
* Network Architect
* Systems Designer
* Business Analyst
* Systems Analyst
* IT Project Leader
* Technology Sales Account Representative
* And many other related occupations

Program Name: Master of Science in Computer Science - Software Engineering
Computer Systems Architecture
Course Number CS644
Credits 4.0

Computer Systems Architecture reviews the architectural paradigms for various types of software systems, including distributed and heterogeneous systems. The course includes an in-depth examination of how software quality is supported in the system architecture. It examines several architectural evaluation methods to analyze the merits of candidate architectures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Software Systems Engineering Process
Course Number CS671
Credits 4.0

This course presents the current research and application of the principles of the software process and process improvement. The in-depth analysis of the basic principles behind software process improvement provides a framework for further investigation. The concepts of software development, configuration management, quality assurance, metrics and risk management are explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Computer Science Capstone
Course Number CS698
Credits 4.0

Computer Science Capstone
Course Number CS698
Credits 4.0

or any 600 level course
Course Number ELE
Credits 4.0

Computer Networking
Course Number CS635
Credits 4.0

This Course Surveys Both The Foundational Concepts And Current State Of The Practice In Computer Networking. The Lower Four Layers Of The Osi Reference Model Are Investigated Along With A Comprehensive Treatment Of The Tcp/ip Protocol Suite. Network Issues, Such As Addressing And Routing, And Transport Issues, And Connections And Reliability Are Discussed. Major Network Applications Are Also Surveyed, Including Examination Of Their Use In Current Practice.


Software Project Management
Course Number SWE440
Credits 4.0

Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.


Database Systems
Course Number CS660
Credits 4.0

This course explores the current state of the practice in database systems and provides a foundation for future study. Topics include the database life cycle, database models, relational algebra, SQL and an overview of the analysis, design, and implementation of relational databases. Concepts and issues in transaction processing, concurrency, security, data warehouses and data marts, distributed databases and web-based database systems are discussed.


Systems Engineering Methods
Course Number CS672
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Methods provides an overview of the techniques and approaches used in systems engineering. The topics include the models, evaluation methods, decision-making processes, system quality, system design, integration, logistics, maintenance, and system disposal.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Software Requirements Engineering
Course Number CS455
Credits 4.0

Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, identification, definition, and documentation. Students will explore and practice elicitation techniques, define functional and non-functional requirements, write use-case scenarios, explore user interface alternatives, learn how to analyze and model requirements, and develop a requirements traceability matrix that spans the software development lifecycle.


Software Design
Course Number CS457
Credits 4.0

Software Design defines and describes the behavior of the software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course.


Program description: If you are a computer science engineer, then earning a Master of Science in Computer Science with a concentration in Software Engineering (MSCS-SE) can help you gain a competitive edge in pursuing increasing levels of responsibility in your career. Employment of computer software engineers is expected to grow at the national level by up to 38 percent through the year 2016 as organizations design and develop new computer software systems, and incorporate new technologies in a rapidly growing range of applications in order to maximize the efficiency of their computer systems.

The MSCS-SE degree program can give you the skills necessary for the organization and control of software development efforts using industry-current software engineering techniques to successfully deliver software systems requiring multi-person effort. You can learn to apply the principles and techniques of computer science, engineering and mathematical analysis to the design, development, testing and evaluation of the software and systems that can optimize the performance of computers in their many applications.

Program Name: Master's of Business Administration - Environmental and Social Sustainability
Foundations of Sustainable Business
Course Number ESS600
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the various definitions of sustainability in the context of business organizations. The triple bottom line (people, planet and profits) is introduced. Through an examination of recent policy changes and case studies of environmentally and socially responsible organizations, this course lays the foundation for understanding sustainable business.


Sustainable Operations
Course Number ESS620
Credits 4.0

Best practice in the production and distribution of goods and services requires an understanding of process analysis, quality improvement, planning and control, risk management, and supply chain management. These topics will all be covered in this course, but instead of using the traditional measure of economic success, solutions will be evaluated against their impact on social justice, environmental responsibility, and economic success.


Applied Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT614
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using available accounting information to help managers of the firm make relevant decisions. Examines how the financial information developed for external users forms the basis for the managerial accounting system. Explores costing systems, cost behavior analysis, responsibility accounting and volume-profit relationships.


Applied Managerial Economics
Course Number ECON616
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the practical aspects of both micro- and macroeconomics and how they are applied to the managerial environment. The students investigate the role of economic principles in management analysis and decision making: the study of demand, cost, and supply concepts from a business viewpoint; and the application of national income measures to strategic planning and the future.


Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments
Course Number EMBA690
Credits 4.0

Students will master analytical and integrative tools to perform in-depth analyses of industries, firms, and competitors. Course material includes methods to predict competitive behavior and develop and implement strategic plans to achieve and sustain a competitive profile in the emerging global marketplace.


Applied Managerial Finance
Course Number FINC615
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes management decision making utilizing accounting and finance concepts. The following subjects are addressed in the course: financial reports and metrics, financial analysis and planning, financial forecasting, financial markets, financial leverage, working capital management, capital budgeting processes, cost of capital and long term financing. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a financial strategy report and accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of financial analysis from either the academic or professional literature.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Applied Managerial Decision-Making
Course Number MGMT600
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the practical application of descriptive and inferential statistics to decisions made in a managerial role. The following subjects are addressed in the course: data summarization and presentation, data analysis, test of hypotheses, discrete and continuous distributions, estimation theory, simple and multiple correlation and regression, analysis of variance, multivariate statistics and non parametric methods. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a data aggregation and reduction exercise report and by accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of applied statistics from either the academic or professional literature.


Graduate Research Methods
Course Number MGMT605
Credits 4.0

This course will provide a working knowledge of quantitative, qualitative, mixed, and action research approaches. It covers the entire research process for each of these methods to include: formulating research questions; developing research proposals; performing a literature search and analysis; sampling and measurement; research design; data analysis; and writing and presenting the research report will be analyzed.


Applied Managerial Marketing
Course Number MKTG630
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the application of marketing concepts, tools and decision-making processes middle managers use in developing marketing plans, programs and strategies. Within the marketing strategy framework, it also examines market analysis and measurement, profitability and productivity analysis, product development, promotion and pricing strategies, the logistics systems approach and the marketing plan. The student will apply the knowledge learned by structuring and presenting to the class a practical strategic marketing plan.


Implementing the Triple Bottom Line
Course Number ESS610
Credits 4.0

This course examines the inherent difficulties in implementing the triple bottom line. It will focus on making the difficult decisions that simultaneously address economic, ethical, technological, social justice, and environmental concerns. The focus is on developing a plan for an organization that makes progress in all of these areas.


Program description: The Environmental and Social Sustainability Degree concentration is offered to students who are passionate about helping to build a better world. In addition to the foundations of sustainable business, this Business Administration Master's Degree program provides students with the knowledge they will need to apply the principles of the Triple Bottom Line (People, Planet, Profit). Course content will focus on making difficult decisions that attempt to simultaneously address economic, ethical, technological, social justice, and environmental concerns.
The Environmental and Social Sustainability Degree Concentration Includes 2 CTU Academic Certificates

CTU Academic Certificates are résumé-enhancing credentials built right into course content, so you can progressively add marketable skills to your professional qualifications as you study.

* Business Administration
* Environmental and Social Sustainability

Program Name: Doctor of Computer Science
Research and Writing I
Course Number CS801
Credits 3.0

This course is one of a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses) is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Current Topics in the Discipline
Course Number CS803
Credits 5.0

This course provides an overview of current topics in the disciplines of computer science, software engineering, and sub-disciplines such as security. A high-level view of where topics fit helps students to better understand how the disciplines relate to one another. Students also discuss the state of the practice for selected disciplines and sub-disciplines and narrow their area of specialization for the remainder of the degree program. Prerequisite: None


Research Methods
Course Number CS804
Credits 5.0

This course introduces experimental design and analysis of data. Topics include independent and dependent variables, how to collect data, hypothesis testing and other forms of data analysis. You will be expected to design and conduct an experiment, collect and analyze data, and then write a technical report on your effort. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing II
Course Number CS806
Credits 3.0

This course is the second in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Project Management and Process Engineering
Course Number CS807
Credits 5.0

This Course Provides An Understanding Of The Technical And Managerial Processes Involved In Planning And Conducting Projects To Develop And Maintain Complex, Software-intensive Systems. Students Prepare Project Plans And Critically Evaluate Process Models Such As The Sei Capability Maturity Models, Iso/ieee Standard 12207, And The Pmi Body Of Knowledge. Emphasis Is Placed On Project Management, System Development, Information Security, And Other Process Areas. In Addition, Trends In Software Development Methods, Tools, And Techniques That Support These Processes Are Covered. We Also Discuss How The Software Lifecycle Relates To Business Process Improvement And Why Many Process Improvement Initiatives Fail. Students Perform Research Into Current Best Practices, Prepare A Project Plan For A Realistic Software Project, Conduct An Assessment Of Selected Processes In Their Organizations, And Recommend Improvements For The Software Processes They Have Selected. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing III
Course Number CS811
Credits 3.0

This course is the third in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IV
Course Number CS816
Credits 3.0

This course is the fourth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing V
Course Number CS821
Credits 3.0

This course is the fifth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VI
Course Number CS826
Credits 3.0

This course is the sixth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VII
Course Number CS831
Credits 3.0

This course is the seventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VIII
Course Number CS836
Credits 3.0

This course is the eighth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Requirements Engineering
Course Number CS837
Credits 5.0

This course presents the state of the practice in requirements engineering for software-intensive systems, emphasizing distributed systems and information security. Topics covered include requirements elicitation, feasibility analysis; cost-benefit analysis; the operational concept document; the requirements specification; verification; preparation for validation; requirements management; reconciling requirements with development constraints; and trends in requirements methods, tools, and techniques. Students will discuss the role of requirements engineering in the system lifecycle, with emphasis on quality considerations such as security, reliability, and scalability. Students perform research into current best practices and conduct a term project that incorporates requirements for a realistic system. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IX
Course Number CS841
Credits 3.0

This course is the ninth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing X
Course Number CS846
Credits 3.0

This course is the tenth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XI
Course Number CS851
Credits 3.0

This course is the eleventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Software Architecture and Design
Course Number CS854
Credits 5.0

Architectural frameworks and patterns are often used in the design of software systems. This course teaches students to understand commonly used frameworks and patterns and how to tailor framework and combine patterns in software design. Students will also study the role of software architects in the development of software systems and the advantages of systematic development processes that include an architectural design phase. Prerequisite: None


Futuring and Innovation
Course Number CS855
Credits 5.0

Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Introduces formal methods of innovation and diffusion of innovation. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XII
Course Number CS856
Credits 3.0

This course is the final one in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members, and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Simulation and Modeling
Course Number CS810
Credits 5.0

Complex Computing Applications Are Launched System Wide Only After Simulation, Modeling And Testing Have Been Conducted And The Results Analyzed. This Course Addresses Fundamental Issues In Developing Those Processes And Prepares Students For Their Own Project Simulation Or Model. Students Will Be Able To Describe Differences In Various Methods Of Central Tendency, Effectively Use Anova And Glm For Data Analysis And Demonstrate How Different Testing Variables Can Affect Simulations Or Models. Prerequisite: None


Usability and Interaction
Course Number CS820
Credits 5.0

This course investigates what qualities of a software product make it usable. Emphasis is placed on how one includes usability concerns throughout the software life cycle, how one designs for usability, how to determine experimentally the usability of a product, and the importance of early usability testing on a simple prototype. Students will be expected to design and conduct usability experiments and then analyze the data in order to refine product design. Prerequisite: None


Advanced Topics in Database Systems
Course Number CS825
Credits 5.0

Computer Science is dynamic; Moore’s Law tells us that today’s standard could very well be obsolete in 18 months. This course addresses the top three issues of current database theory and practice, identifying current trends and near future changes in the field. As such, the course content will vary according to the evolution of the discipline. Students will research major literature sources that address issues and trends, compare and contrast centralized database systems with distributed databases and identify principles behind database warehousing and data mining. Prerequisite: None


Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Course Number CS838
Credits 5.0

This course covers the fundamentals of concurrent and distributed systems including threading, synchronization and deadlock prevention as well as logical clocks, group communication and distributed transactions. It also covers current topics such as web services and software for multiprocessors and multicore processors. Prerequisite: None


System Metrics and Risk Analysis
Course Number CS840
Credits 5.0

Software development has risks – time, resources, and change. Measuring and managing risk is essential to successful software development. In this course, students will investigate and analyze current and emerging best practices for managing risk and learn how a good metrics program can be developed. Students will also use metric data to support risk exposure, while developing a risk mitigation plan for their organization. Prerequisite: None


Networking and Security
Course Number CS850
Credits 5.0

A generation ago, business referred to the shop owner down the street. Today’s business is global; companies have offices around the world, processing data twenty-four hours a day. Keeping software synchronized, online and secure is the ongoing challenge of computer professionals. In this course, students will assess the impact on security concerns when an organization moves from a centralized system to a distributed system. This includes describing emerging security issues and risk factors and designing a secure information system. Prerequisite: None


Program description: If you are a computer science professional interested in taking your career development to the highest level and making key leadership contributions in your area of expertise, you may want to consider enrolling in the Doctor of Computer Science (DCS) degree program offered through Colorado Technical University.

The Doctor of Computer Science degree program encourages you to think and act strategically and facilitates in developing your ability to predict future trends and make positive contributions in your area of technical expertise through mentoring, action research and practical projects. You can also perform research that advances the field of computer science and perfect your ability to effectively communicate technical material to non-technical decision makers. This Doctor of Computer Science degree program is designed by computer science professionals and academics to help you:

Develop a software process improvement plan for an organization.
Design, test and implement an experiment, reporting on the results.
Evaluate established and emerging security systems.
Predict future trends and developments based on data and research.
All three years of the Doctor of Computer Science degree program are designed to provide computer science professionals with the theoretical, research and application capabilities necessary to pursue a successful career and research in their chosen field.

Year one of this executive format Computer Science degree program focuses on research in the software engineering process: analysis, design, simulation and modeling, which should result in a broad overview of computer science and enable the use of simulation and modeling skills to produce an experimental design. Year two is designed to help you form a personal understanding of the advanced research and methods used in the specialized area of study. The focus of research is database systems, software usability, and new developments in computer science. Projects include the preparation of an industry white paper and a proposal for research to be carried out in the third year. The final year of the program involves developing metrics and risk analysis programs, exploration of high level design issues, evaluation of methods of maintaining security in distributed systems, and anticipating and planning for the future. The deliverable in year three is an applied research project to be submitted to an academic journal.

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