Online English Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its english courses to be successful english teachers, journalists, writers, novelists, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 65,490 people employed as english language and literature teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $65,860. Secondary school teachers make on average $55,150 per year and there are about 1,091,710 of them employed today.

English Organizations English Common Job Tasks
  • tailoring their instruction to meet needs
  • gathering community material
  • using the latest computer application to teach
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English Courses at Western Governors University

Program Name: M.A. in English Language Learning (PK-12) (ELL/ESL)
Foundations of Research
Course Number RFC1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam


Literature Reviews for Educational Research
Course Number JUT2
Credits 2.0

Research Proposal
Course Number JVT2
Credits 2.0

Issues in Educational Research
Course Number JTT2
Credits 2.0

MA, English Language Learning (PreK-12) Capstone Written Project
Course Number IOT2
Credits 3.0

Students will be able to choose from three areas of emphasis, depending on personal and professional interests. These areas include: instructional design, evaluation, and research. If carefully planned in advance, the individual domain projects may serve as components of the capstone. For capstones with the instructional design emphasis, students will design, manage, and develop an instructional product for which there is an identified need. The product can be delivered via the medium of choice (e.g., print-based, computer-based, videobased, web-based, or a combination of these), but students must provide a rationale for the medium selected. The instructional product you develop for your capstone should be an exportable form of instruction designed to bring your target audience to a mastery of predetermined knowledge and skills. For capstones with the evaluation emphasis, students will provide a summative evaluation of a program. These programs may relate to almost any sector, such as school that involves the education of ELL students. Summative evaluation is used to provide evidence of a program’s worth and is often used to make “go/no go” decisions. You should plan to share your results with your school or organization. For capstones with the research emphasis, students will design and conduct a databased investigation of a conclusion-oriented question (decision oriented investigations are most generally considered to be evaluation projects). The project report should be of publishable quality and may be submitted to an appropriate professional journal at the completion of the project. At the minimum students should plan to share their results with their schools or organizations.


MA, English Language Learning (PreK-12) Capstone Oral Defense
Course Number IXT2
Credits 3.0

The final master's exam will be a comprehensive oral defense and is held by conference call. Questions related to your work in the program will test your preparation and ability to synthesize and practically apply information obtained from your courses, self-directed study, and project experiences. The purpose of the defense is a checkpoint to ensure that you have acquired the critically required skills and knowledge specified in the program competencies.


Education Without Boundaries
Course Number EWB2
Credits 2.0

Culture
Course Number CUA1
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment


Language Production, Theory and Acquisition
Course Number LPA1
Credits 4.0

Performance assessment


Theories of Second Language Learning Acquisition and Grammar
Course Number SLO1
Credits 3.0

Objective assessment


Planning, Implementing, Managing Instruction
Course Number NNA1
Credits 4.0

Performance assessment


Field Experience for ELL
Course Number FEA1
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment; includes 30 hours of teaching English language learners (ELLs)


Assessment Theory and Practice
Course Number ASA1
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment


The Professional Role of the ELL Teacher
Course Number NMA1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment


Subject Specific Pedagogy: ELL
Course Number ELO1
Credits 3.0

Objective assessment


Program description: Our online master’s in ELL education will turn you into a leader. The M.A. in English Language Learning/English as a Second Language (PK-12) will prepare you to teach effectively in ELL or ESL settings and to provide curricular leadership to your school and school systems. You will become a vital asset for your school.

English Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Arts in English
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

n/a


Program description: The Bachelor of Arts degree with a language requirement and primary major in English is designed to provide students with substantive academic content in a liberal arts discipline of their choice. The program prepares students for teaching opportunities in elementary and secondary education after completion of additional methodology courses required for teacher certification in all states. The degree also provides an academic foundation for students interested in pursuing further graduate education necessary for postsecondary teaching positions in liberal arts at most colleges and universities. Focused studies are designed to provide an interdisciplinary component that will increase the student’s breadth of learning. The program will provide workers in business and government, as well as education, with learning that promotes critical thinking, information utilization, collaboration, communication, and analytical skills essential to effective and efficient work productivity.

The major in English is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of rhetoric, literature, and writing. Students will choose from topics in American and English literature, writing essentials, linguistics and poetry, literary masterpieces, and technical writing.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: California Teachers of English Learners Certificate
Foundations of Instruction for English Learners
Course Number ELD502
Credits 3.0

Course Description This Course Introduces Students To The Principles Of Teaching English Learners. It Addresses Effective Collaboration Among English Learners, Their Families, Paraprofessionals, And The Community To Improve Learning. Effective Instructional Techniques, Methodologies, Resources, And Cultural Awareness Are Also Explored. Topics And Objectives Issues And Characteristics Related To English Learners Define Characteristics And Goals Of English Language Development (eld) Programs And Their Supporting Philosophies. Examine Challenges Related To The Education Of English Learners. Describe Various Academic, Emotional, And Linguistic Fundamentals That Influence English Learners. Policies And Program Models For English Learners Examine Historical And Current Policies That Influenced The Development Of English Language Development (eld) Programs. Compare And Contrast Characteristics Of Various Program Models. Analyze The Factors Related To Eld Special Education, Including Gifted And Talented Education. Principles Of Effective Instruction For English Learners Analyze Effective Instructional Practices. Evaluate The Influences Of Cooperative Learning. Examine The Value Of Critical Pedagogy With English Learners. Language Arts And Literacy Instruction For English Learners Examine The Process Of Second Language Acquisition. Identify Instructional Approaches In Teaching A Second Language. Evaluate The Use Of Literacy Across The Curriculum. Content Instructional Methodologies For English Learners Identify Instructional Standards In Math, Science, And Social Studies Instruction For English Learners. Analyze Effective Instructional Methods For Teaching Math, Science, And Social Studies To English Learners. Explain Cultural Issues In Math, Science, And Social Studies Instruction. School, Community, And Family Collaboration Define Culture. Evaluate The Process In The Development Of Cultural Identities. Compare And Contrast Prejudice And Discrimination. Identify Characteristics Associated With Language-minority Communities. Examine The Relationship Between Cultural Diversity And Educational Achievement. Summarize The Historical Context Of Language-minority Communities. Determine Characteristics Of Effective School, Community, And Family Collaborations.


Assessment of English Learners
Course Number ELD504
Credits 3.0

Course Description This course discusses standardized and authentic assessments and assessment strategies in the areas of literacy and biliteracy development of English Learners. Issues associated with the interdependent relationship between teaching and assessment are addressed in addition to effective parental and/or community involvement in literacy development. Topics and Objectives Policy and Rationale for Assessment Determine the purpose for assessment of English learners. Examine standard-based reforms. Analyze assessment accommodations or modifications for English learners. Discern the relationship among standards, assessments, and instructional planning. Explore assessment and its link to educational services for English learners. Process of Second Language Acquisition Describe the relationship between first and second language literacy. Analyze the connection between oral language and literacy development. Demonstrate facilitative approaches to enhance language growth. Identify literacy skills assessed in educational settings. Reading and Writing Assessment Examine research related to reading and writing assessment. Analyze implications and applications for instructional literacy practices. Analyze research regarding the assessment of reading comprehension strategies for English learners. Select appropriate pre-reading, during-reading, and post-reading strategies. Content Area Assessment Compare and contrast the characteristics and uses of standardized and informal assessments. Develop appropriate rubrics to assess reading, writing, listening, and speaking proficiencies. Identify how demographics have impacted content assessment. Examine features of content area reading that pose difficulty to English learners. Analyze how assessments influence instructional practices in educational settings. Assessment and Intervention Explain the evolution of English learner programs Evaluate the interaction between first and second language literacy processes. Review guiding principles to foster biliteracy instruction. Evaluate options for assessing English learners’ cognitive and academic abilities. Determine the appropriateness of various assessments tools used to measure literacy proficiencies. Examine the relationship between language assessment and literacy instruction. Assessment of Parental and/or Community Involvement with Literacy Synthesize research implications for effective parental and/or community involvement. Apply research findings to enhance parental and/or community involvement. Identify characteristics associated with diverse educational and/or work communities.


Understanding Language Acquisition and Cognition
Course Number ELD506
Credits 3.0

Course Description This course examines language structure and use. The course also addresses second language acquisition theories, strategies, and the nature of cognitive and affective language development to assist the teacher of the English Learner. The course focuses on language acquisition development, and it provides the basis for effective instructional strategies including methods, techniques, and materials to be used with linguistically diverse students. It examines the critical elements of learning issues associated with linguistically diverse students, including the learning styles and interconnected variables that interact in second language learning and thought processes. Topics and Objectives Grammatical and Pragmatic Aspects of Language Define the term morpheme and the rules of word formation. Explain the use of morphemes to create meaningful words. Examine the properties of semantics. Analyze sentence structures and phrase meanings. Compare and contrast the use of pragmatics in a variety of social contexts. Phonetics and Phonology Identify speech sounds and alphabetic principles. Analyze articulatory phonetics of consonant formation. Describe articulation of vowel production. Identify a variety of suprasegmental features. Examine rules of phonology, pronunciation of morphemes, and phonemes. Cognitive and Affective Language Learning Theory Examine oral and written language acquisition strategies for primary and second language learning as they relate to different age and proficiency levels. Analyze the integrated nature of cognitive and affective language development, including social, regional, and functional factors. Secondary Language Acquisition for the English Learner Define the semantics and pragmatics of language acquisition. Review the major theories of second language acquisition. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of English as a second language in alternative language services. Apply the nature and process of language acquisition to classroom instructional methods and materials. Relationship of Culture to Language Learning Identify the relationship between language and culture and its impact on English learner instruction in alternative language service programs. Socio-cultural Factors in the Classroom Explore socio-cultural factors in the classroom, including stereotypes, attitudes, acculturation, and classroom culture. English Learner Instructional Strategies Analyze the origin, structure, and function of dialects and their effect on classroom instruction. Identify typical vocabulary and word formation difficulties and grammar-related communication difficulties of linguistically diverse students. Determine strategies to improve reading comprehension of linguistically diverse students. Learning Styles and Their Implications for English Learner Classrooms Analyze processing styles, learning styles, and communication strategies of English learners.


Teaching Reading and Writing to English Learners
Course Number ELD535
Credits 3.0

Course Description This course examines literacy issues related to the acquisition of English and the use of home language by English Learners (EL) in all second language programs. It also presents processes and strategies to enhance the biliteracy skills of English Learners. Topics and Objectives Program Models for Biliteracy Development Define biliteracy and describe the differences between bilingual programs and biliteracy. Identify characteristics and indicators of effective biliteracy development programs. Examine a variety of educational programs that enhance biliteracy skills. Discuss the effect of recent legislation and citizen initiatives on bilingual education programs. Language Acquisition Describe testing requirements for English Learners and how students are placed in a level of competence. Analyze various theories of language acquisition. Describe processes and factors of learning a second language in the school setting. Oral Language Development Identify characteristics of oral language production for beginning and intermediate English Learners. Examine instructional strategies that strengthen oral language development. Analyze the influence of oral language proficiency in content areas. Identify classroom assessments of second language oral development. Emergent Biliteracy Identify factors that influence early literacy development. Examine theoretical perspectives and research on emergent literacy. The Reading Process for English Learners Examine research regarding second language reading and biliteracy. Identify characteristics and instructional strategies of beginning and intermediate readers. Describe instructional reading strategies for English learners. Writing as a Process Identify the steps of process writing. Describe the benefits of process writing for English Learners. Evaluate the use of peer collaboration and editing in writing. Identify characteristics of beginning and intermediate writers. Identify strategies to enhance writing skills. Reading and Writing across the Curriculum Examine research on integration of reading and writing. Integrate content area strategies for reading and writing. Analyze how thematic units enhance reading and writing skills. Classroom Practices for Biliteracy Examine the pre-, during-, and post-reading strategies that promote biliteracy development. Describe the benefits of scaffolding for biliteracy development. Analyze the characteristics of Sheltered Instruction (SI) or Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) that promote biliteracy development. Assessment of Reading and Writing Describe theoretical approaches to literacy assessment. Identify a variety of assessment tools. Examine the use of multiple measures of assessment.


Program description: Graduate California Teachers Of English Learners Certificate
This program is available only for individuals with a California teaching credential. It fulfills requirements for the Cross-cultural Language and Academic Development (CLAD) certificate. Consisting of four six-week courses, the curriculum has been designed around the Candidate Competency Standards set forth by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Learners enrolled in this program gain a depth of knowledge regarding current theories and research in the specialized instruction of English-language development. They will develop a foundation for understanding cultural differences among English learners-and how those differences relate to academic achievement in a culturally inclusive environment. Language structure and use, and first- and second-language development is investigated. Throughout the program, strategies for instruction and assessment of a linguistically diverse student body are addressed.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

English Courses at Jones International University

Program Name: MEd in K-12 English as a Second Language Education
Introduction to Second Language Acquisition
Course Number EDU532
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines Theories Of Second Language Education In K-12 Classroom Settings. By Exploring Sociolinguistic Perspectives, Pragmatic Views, And Historical Perspectives Of Language Acquisition, The Course Elucidates Specific Principles Of First Language Acquisition Theories In Order To Understand The Relationship Between First Language And Second Language Literacy.the Course Project, Comprehensive Plan For Second Language Acquisition (sla) In The Classroom: Applying Theory To Practice In For Second Language Learners, Promotes The Application Of Sla Theory In Order To: A) Understand The Cognitive Processes Involved In Language Learning, B) Identify Specific Student Needs, And C) Utilize A Blend Of Theory And Research-based Practices To Promote Student Success. Candidates Participate In Real-world Classroom Applications Of Theory Through Classroom Observations And Interactions With Second Language Learners.


Pedagogic Principles in Second Language Learning
Course Number EDU533
Credits 3.0

This course provides a basic overview of instructional approaches and methods, both historical and current, used in facilitating second-language acquisition. Predominant topics of instruction in this course are: Historical backgrounds of various pedagogic principles for linguistically and culturally diverse language learners Current trends in language education The necessities of identifying a student’s age, language proficiency level, context, and other factors in order to create the most effective instructional strategy for a given circumstance The course project, Field Research Analysis: Identifying Best Practices for ESL Instruction, presents a compilation of assignments for each module of study. Each assignment requires candidates to analyze theoretical presentations, classroom practice, and student performance so as to judge the merit of the pedagogic method being utilized.


Teaching Language Skills
Course Number EDU534
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Best Practices For Encouraging And Teaching K-12 Linguistically Diverse Education (lde) Students' Language Development In Receptive And Productive Language, As Well As Their Integration Of Language Skills With Content Area Learning. Course Content Introduces The Siop Model For Observation, Lesson Planning, And Assessment Tools. The Course Project, English Language Skills Toolbox: Creating Resources For Educators Prepares Candidates To Select Teaching/learning Activities, Models, Methods, And/or Techniques, As Well As Assessment Tools, Suitable For K-12 Lde Students. Developing And Using These Tools And Activities Allows Candidates To Demonstrate How Teacher Decisions Apply The Principles Of Second Language Acquisition (sla).


Bilingual Education
Course Number EDU535
Credits 3.0

This course provides candidates with an understanding of the pressing issues in educating bilingual learners. Students will investigate myriad issues, including: 1) differences and similarities in language and reading development for bilingual and monolingual learners, and 2) the intersection and distinction between second-language learning and special needs. The course project, Meeting the Needs of Bilingual Learners: A Field Guide for Teachers, will prepare the candidates to provide high quality education for the bilingual learners by conducting interviews and classroom observations in order to develop the course project.


Assessment for Second Language Learners of English
Course Number EDU536
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Tools For Assessing English As A Second Language (esl) Learners. Although Some Assessments Are Better Than Others And Any Assessment Is Only As Informative As The Person Interpreting The Results, A Solid Understanding Of The Following Topics Provides A Background For Assessing Esl Students: Laws And Federal Mandates That Have Shaped Assessment For Esl Learners Assessments And Assessment Items In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness Measures Of Academic English Proficiency Level And The Alignment Of Instruction With English Language Development Standards Evidence Used For Determining Goals, Accommodations, Progress, And Recommendations For Instructing Esl Students, Including Those Who Are Learning Disabled Or Gifted The Course Project, Assessment For Esl Learners: A Training For Teachers, Requires Candidates To Create A Training Program For Teachers Or Administrators From The Candidate's Own District On The Topic Of Esl Assessment In Its Various Forms. Analyzing Assessments In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness, Candidates Develop A Language Acquisition Plan For An Esl Student As Well As Methods For Identifying Giftedness And Learning Disabilities.


Multicultural Communication
Course Number EDU537
Credits 3.0

This course provides an understanding of the pressing issues in educating K-12 learners from both non-dominant and dominant cultures (e.g., multicultural education) including: The influence and historical movements in multicultural education in the U.S. How the breadth of topics in multicultural education affect K-12 teachers and learners The best practices in the education of K-12 students The course project, Multicultural Education Tutorial: Promoting and Implementing Multicultural Education in the School Community, focuses candidates on conducting interviews and using research to develop a practice for multicultural education in a school or community context.


Capstone: The Professional K-12 ESL Teacher
Course Number EDU608
Credits 3.0

This Capstone Course Focuses On Using A Teacher Work Sample (tws) To Document Lesson And Unit Adaptations To Positively Impact The Teaching Of K-12 Esl Learners. It Integrates Previous Coursework, Synthesis Of Theories, And Application Of Skills And Strategies To Demonstrate Mastery Of Educational Effectiveness. The Course Project Is, Teacher Work Sample: Impacting K-12 Student Learning. Candidates Design, Implement, And Reflect On A Lesson Plan That Has A Positive Impact On K-12 Student Learning.


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Educational Theory Into Practice
Course Number EDU500
Credits 27.0

This Course Lays A Foundation For Future Studies Through The Introduction Of Learning Theory And Methodology, And Through Practicalapplication Of The Various Practices Required In A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study. The Course Introduces Candidates To: Instructional Methods Of A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study Various Learning Theories And Instructional Methodologies Applied To Educational Practice Instructional Methods Used For Lesson Planning In Educational Practice Primary Sources For Instructional Purposes, Including Those Found In The Library Of Congress The Course Project, Lesson Plan Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (teachers) Or Curriculum Guide Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (educational Administrators), Consists Of Multiple Lesson Plans/curriculum Guides Designed For Social Studies Or Science Instruction, Each Utilizing A Particular Instructional Methodology. When The Project Is Complete, The Candidate Will Have A Guide To Classroom Application With Concrete Examples.


Literacy I
Course Number EDU527
Credits 3.0

This course presents scientifically based teaching methods, models, strategies, and approaches for teaching oral and written language skills. The course content provides a foundation for and discusses strategies for best practices in: Teaching the five components of reading: comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, phonemic awareness, and decoding/phonics Teaching writing and reading to emerging language learners The application of personal and cognitive developmental theories The course project, Work Sample Portfolio Part I: Designing and Implementing Literacy Lessons, allows candidates to implement curriculum they design, integrating pre-assessment information and post-implementation reflection. Candidates prepare lesson plans for teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, spelling, and vocabulary, and then choose one lesson plan to implement with K-12 students.


Literacy II
Course Number EDU528
Credits 3.0

This Course Continues To Cover Scientifically Based Teaching Methods, Models, Strategies, And Approaches For Teaching Oral And Written Language Skills. The Course Content Provides A Foundation For And Discusses Strategies For Best Practices In: Teaching The Five Components Of Reading: Comprehension, Vocabulary, Fluency, Phonemic Awareness, And Decoding/phonics Teaching Writing And Reading To Emerging Language Learners Within The Context Of Reading And Writing In Content Areas Formal And Informal Assessment Strategies And Techniques In Reading And Writing The Course Project, Work Sample Portfolio Part Ii: Designing And Implementing Literacy Lessons Within Content Areas, Allows Candidates To Implement Curriculum They Design, Integrating Pre-assessment And Post-implementation Reflection Within Specific Content Areas As Well As An Individual Literacy Plan. Candidates Prepare Literacy Lesson Plans Using Formal And Informal Assessment Information, And Then Implement The Lesson With K-12 Students. Prerequisites: Edu 527 Must Be Successfully Completed Before Registering For Edu 528. Student Support Counselor Permission Required For Registration.


Program description: The MEd in K-12 ESL Education: Teacher Licensure degree program prepares educators who are pursuing licensure or
certification as a teacher of students who are learning English as a second language. Candidates find coursework, including
student teaching, designed to augment their professional knowledge, skills and aptitude.
The CDE and CCHE recognize the high quality of JIU’s MEd preparation degrees and have designated JIU as a state-approved
program of teacher and principal/administrator preparation. For most states, graduating from an approved program of preparation
is an important step toward achieving educator licensure or certification.

Program Name: MEd in K-12 English as a Second Language Education: Teacher Licensure
Student Teaching: Classroom Practicum I
Course Number EDU605A
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides Candidates With An Opportunity To Apply Their Expertise In Curriculum Design, Instructional Strategies,classroom Management, And Assessment To A K–12 Educational Setting. Mixing Field Observation Experiences And Full-time Teaching, Candidates Utilize Standards-based Educational Theories And Practices Daily In Real-life Teaching And Learning Environments.in The Course Project, Student Teaching Portfolio Project I: Developing Effective Instructional Practices, Each Jiu Teacher Candidate Develops A Professional Teaching Portfolio. Components That Make Up The Portfolio Provide Evidence Of The Teacher Candidate’s Ability To (1) Develop Lesson Plans That Address Diverse Student Needs, (2) Utilize Formal And Informal Assessments To Measure And Monitor Student Performance, (3) Integrate Literacy Into Content Area Instruction, (4) Utilize Effective Classroom Management And Student Engagement Strategies, (5) Exhibit Professional And Ethical Practice That Is Responsive To Evolving Issues And Environments, And (6) Collaborate With School-based Teams And Parents To Identify, Address, And Promote Student Achievement.the Project Is A Key Assessment For Candidates In The Med In Elementary Curriculum, Instruction And Assessment: Teacher Licensure Program And It Is Designed To Demonstrate Mastery Of Association For Childhood Education International (acei) Professional Standards. Candidates In This Program Also Complete Two Other Key Assessments: Developing Effective Lesson Plans Which Involves Creating Lesson Plans, Using The Jiu Lesson Plan Protocol, To Be Implemented In The Classroom. K-12 Field Experience Mentor Evaluation Report Which Takes The Form Of A Field-based Mentor Evaluation Of The Jiu Teacher Candidate Against Multiple State And Acei Professional Standards. Prerequisites: Jiu Candidates Are Required To Complete Each Of The Items Described Below And Work Directly With Their Student Support Counselor To Register For Edu 605a: 1.complete 200 Hours Of Level-1 Field Experience: Complete 200 Hours Of Level-1 Field Experience Working With K-12 Students And Have Faxed A Completed Level-1 Field Experience Documentation Form To The Jiu Registrar’s Office. (these Hours May Be Defined As Time In The Field Working On Jiu Professional Synthesizing Projects Under The Supervision Of A Sponsor Or As Hours Completed Outside Of Jiu Coursework. For Example, Supervised Activities Working With Youth In A School Or A Community Agency Are Acceptable. All Level-1 Field Experience Must Be Completed While Enrolled At Jiu.) 2.complete Edu 600 & Edu 538*: Complete Edu 600 Teaching & Administering In Colorado & The States, And Edu 538:k-12 Teaching: Legal And Societal Contexts. 3.possess 2.5 Cumulative Gpa: Possess A Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average Of 2.5 In Courses Leading To The Master’s Degree At Jiu. 4.complete 66% Of Degree: Complete At Least 66% Of The Required Courses In Licensure Degree Program. 5.submit Passing Score On The State Licensure Exam: Submit To The Registrar’s Office A Passing Score On The Requisite State Licensure Exam(s) Required By Your State. Exam Results Must Be Received By The Jiu Registrar Prior To Registration In Edu 605a. 6.secure Student Teaching Placement: Secure A Placement In An American School That (1) Consists Of A Classroom Setting At The Grade Level And In The Subject Area Required For Intended Teaching License (e.g., Elementary Classroom, Secondary Mathematics Classroom, Etc.), And (2) ...show more »


Student Teaching: Classroom Practicum II
Course Number EDU605B
Credits 3.0

In This Course, Candidates Apply Their Expertise Of Curriculum Design, Instructional Strategies, Classroom Management, And Assessment To A K–12 Educational Setting. Mixing Field Observation Experiences And Full-time Teaching, Candidates Utilize Standards-based Educational Theories And Practices Daily In Real-life Teaching And Learning Environments. In The Course Project, Student Teaching Portfolio Project Ii: Implementing Effective Instructional Practices, Each Jiu Teacher Candidate Develops A Professional Teaching Portfolio. Components That Make Up The Portfolio Provide Evidence Of The Teacher Candidate’s Ability To (1) Develop Lesson Plans That Address Diverse Student Needs, (2) Utilize Formal And Informal Assessments To Measure And Monitor Student Performance, (3) Integrate Literacy Into Content Area Instruction, (4) Utilize Effective Classroom Management And Student Engagement Strategies, (5) Exhibit Professional And Ethical Practice That Is Responsive To Evolving Issues And Environments, And (6) Collaborate With School-based Teams And Parents To Identify, Address And Promote Student Achievement. The Project Is A Key Assessment For Candidates In The Med In Elementary Curriculum, Instruction And Assessment:teacher Licensure Program And It Is Designed To Demonstrate Mastery Of Association For Childhood Education International (acei) Professional Standards. Candidates In This Program Also Complete Two Other Key Assessments: Developing Effective Lesson Plans Which Involves Creating Lesson Plans, Using The Jiu Lesson Plan Protocol, To Be Implemented In The Classroom. K-12 Field Experience Mentor Evaluation Report Which Takes The Form Of A Field-based Mentor Evaluation Of The Jiu Teacher Candidate Against Multiple State And Acei Professional Standards. Prerequisites: (1) Edu 605a Must Be Successfully Completed Before Registering For Edu 605b. Edu 605b Must Be Taken In Consecutive Sequence With Edu605a. Student Support Counselor Permission Required For Registration Of Edu 605b.


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Educational Theory Into Practice
Course Number EDU500
Credits 27.0

This Course Lays A Foundation For Future Studies Through The Introduction Of Learning Theory And Methodology, And Through Practicalapplication Of The Various Practices Required In A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study. The Course Introduces Candidates To: Instructional Methods Of A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study Various Learning Theories And Instructional Methodologies Applied To Educational Practice Instructional Methods Used For Lesson Planning In Educational Practice Primary Sources For Instructional Purposes, Including Those Found In The Library Of Congress The Course Project, Lesson Plan Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (teachers) Or Curriculum Guide Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (educational Administrators), Consists Of Multiple Lesson Plans/curriculum Guides Designed For Social Studies Or Science Instruction, Each Utilizing A Particular Instructional Methodology. When The Project Is Complete, The Candidate Will Have A Guide To Classroom Application With Concrete Examples.


Teaching for Mathematics Comprehension
Course Number EDU518
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on teaching strategies for mathematics that simultaneously assist K-12 students in the development of conceptual understandings and the acquisition of skills that ultimately contribute to higher mathematical achievement. Using strategies and applications endorsed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, in alignment with state content standards, the course concentrates on assessing individual students’ needs in the development of instructional materials for mathematics. In the course project, Mathematics Teacher Work Sample: Supporting Student Learning, candidates develop and implement a Teacher Work Sample incorporating (1) formal and informal assessments to inform the development of objectives and learning goals, and to align instruction to student needs and instructional materials, (2) technological tools to facilitate mathematical learning, and (3) mathematical instructional strategies that elicit varied representations of mathematical ideas and facilitate students’ mathematical problem-solving skills. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in Elementary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Teacher Licensure program, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) professional standards.


K-12 Students Using Technology
Course Number EDU521
Credits 3.0

This course addresses technologies that support candidates in designing activity-based instruction for K-12 students to encourage meaningful learning and critical thinking. This course also discusses the risks associated with Internet use by children. In the course project, Technology Unit Plan and Presentation: Implementing Effective Activity-based Instruction, each candidate demonstrates effective application of knowledge, skills, and dispositions through the development of a technology unit plan that teaches K-12 students to use technology efficiently to develop a creative solution to a real-world problem, and a presentation of the unit plan for school administration and staff. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in K-12 Instructional Technology programs, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the International Society for Technology in Education Technology Facilitation Standards.


K-12 Classroom and Instructional Management
Course Number EDU523
Credits 3.0

This course teaches candidates how to create a positive learning community and take steps to maintain that environment by guiding and correcting behavior when necessary (Burden, 2006, p. 2). It focuses on four dimensions of classroom and instructional management: Environmental management Instructional management Classroom management Behavioral management The course project, Classroom Management Plan: Establishing and Maintaining a Positive Learning Environment, serves as a guide for candidates establishing a plan for their own classrooms. Candidates develop and communicate a personal philosophy regarding classroom management that references physical surroundings, student motivation approaches, rules and procedures, and strategies for dealing with challenging behaviors and diverse needs.


Exceptional Needs in Inclusive Classrooms
Course Number EDU524
Credits 3.0

This course presents an overview of current special education issues as they relate to inclusive practices. Candidates will gain an understanding of the challenges faced by exceptional students and analyze the responsibilities of educational professionals in addressing these challenges by: Developing an orientation toward effective instruction in inclusive settings through a study of the history of current special education laws as well as attitudinal issues regarding inclusive education Observing, assessing, planning, and evaluating students with instructional, behavioral, and cultural challenges Working collaboratively within a team of educational professionals, family members, and the exceptional student for decision making and problem solving In the course project, Instructional Action Plan: Supporting Students with Exceptional Needs, each candidate provides evidence of his or her ability to (1) utilize human development theory when planning lessons and delivering instruction to students with exceptional needs, (2) seek assistance and guidance from school-based teams to address students’ learning needs, and (3)implement research-based instructional strategies to develop cognitive processes related to critical thinking and problem solving. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in Elementary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment programs, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) professional standards.


Literacy I
Course Number EDU527
Credits 3.0

This course presents scientifically based teaching methods, models, strategies, and approaches for teaching oral and written language skills. The course content provides a foundation for and discusses strategies for best practices in: Teaching the five components of reading: comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, phonemic awareness, and decoding/phonics Teaching writing and reading to emerging language learners The application of personal and cognitive developmental theories The course project, Work Sample Portfolio Part I: Designing and Implementing Literacy Lessons, allows candidates to implement curriculum they design, integrating pre-assessment information and post-implementation reflection. Candidates prepare lesson plans for teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, spelling, and vocabulary, and then choose one lesson plan to implement with K-12 students.


Literacy II
Course Number EDU528
Credits 3.0

This Course Continues To Cover Scientifically Based Teaching Methods, Models, Strategies, And Approaches For Teaching Oral And Written Language Skills. The Course Content Provides A Foundation For And Discusses Strategies For Best Practices In: Teaching The Five Components Of Reading: Comprehension, Vocabulary, Fluency, Phonemic Awareness, And Decoding/phonics Teaching Writing And Reading To Emerging Language Learners Within The Context Of Reading And Writing In Content Areas Formal And Informal Assessment Strategies And Techniques In Reading And Writing The Course Project, Work Sample Portfolio Part Ii: Designing And Implementing Literacy Lessons Within Content Areas, Allows Candidates To Implement Curriculum They Design, Integrating Pre-assessment And Post-implementation Reflection Within Specific Content Areas As Well As An Individual Literacy Plan. Candidates Prepare Literacy Lesson Plans Using Formal And Informal Assessment Information, And Then Implement The Lesson With K-12 Students. Prerequisites: Edu 527 Must Be Successfully Completed Before Registering For Edu 528. Student Support Counselor Permission Required For Registration.


Introduction to Second Language Acquisition
Course Number EDU532
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines Theories Of Second Language Education In K-12 Classroom Settings. By Exploring Sociolinguistic Perspectives, Pragmatic Views, And Historical Perspectives Of Language Acquisition, The Course Elucidates Specific Principles Of First Language Acquisition Theories In Order To Understand The Relationship Between First Language And Second Language Literacy.the Course Project, Comprehensive Plan For Second Language Acquisition (sla) In The Classroom: Applying Theory To Practice In For Second Language Learners, Promotes The Application Of Sla Theory In Order To: A) Understand The Cognitive Processes Involved In Language Learning, B) Identify Specific Student Needs, And C) Utilize A Blend Of Theory And Research-based Practices To Promote Student Success. Candidates Participate In Real-world Classroom Applications Of Theory Through Classroom Observations And Interactions With Second Language Learners.


Pedagogic Principles in Second Language Learning
Course Number EDU533
Credits 3.0

This course provides a basic overview of instructional approaches and methods, both historical and current, used in facilitating second-language acquisition. Predominant topics of instruction in this course are: Historical backgrounds of various pedagogic principles for linguistically and culturally diverse language learners Current trends in language education The necessities of identifying a student’s age, language proficiency level, context, and other factors in order to create the most effective instructional strategy for a given circumstance The course project, Field Research Analysis: Identifying Best Practices for ESL Instruction, presents a compilation of assignments for each module of study. Each assignment requires candidates to analyze theoretical presentations, classroom practice, and student performance so as to judge the merit of the pedagogic method being utilized.


Teaching Language Skills
Course Number EDU534
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Best Practices For Encouraging And Teaching K-12 Linguistically Diverse Education (lde) Students' Language Development In Receptive And Productive Language, As Well As Their Integration Of Language Skills With Content Area Learning. Course Content Introduces The Siop Model For Observation, Lesson Planning, And Assessment Tools. The Course Project, English Language Skills Toolbox: Creating Resources For Educators Prepares Candidates To Select Teaching/learning Activities, Models, Methods, And/or Techniques, As Well As Assessment Tools, Suitable For K-12 Lde Students. Developing And Using These Tools And Activities Allows Candidates To Demonstrate How Teacher Decisions Apply The Principles Of Second Language Acquisition (sla).


Bilingual Education
Course Number EDU535
Credits 3.0

This course provides candidates with an understanding of the pressing issues in educating bilingual learners. Students will investigate myriad issues, including: 1) differences and similarities in language and reading development for bilingual and monolingual learners, and 2) the intersection and distinction between second-language learning and special needs. The course project, Meeting the Needs of Bilingual Learners: A Field Guide for Teachers, will prepare the candidates to provide high quality education for the bilingual learners by conducting interviews and classroom observations in order to develop the course project.


Assessment for Second Language Learners of English
Course Number EDU536
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Tools For Assessing English As A Second Language (esl) Learners. Although Some Assessments Are Better Than Others And Any Assessment Is Only As Informative As The Person Interpreting The Results, A Solid Understanding Of The Following Topics Provides A Background For Assessing Esl Students: Laws And Federal Mandates That Have Shaped Assessment For Esl Learners Assessments And Assessment Items In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness Measures Of Academic English Proficiency Level And The Alignment Of Instruction With English Language Development Standards Evidence Used For Determining Goals, Accommodations, Progress, And Recommendations For Instructing Esl Students, Including Those Who Are Learning Disabled Or Gifted The Course Project, Assessment For Esl Learners: A Training For Teachers, Requires Candidates To Create A Training Program For Teachers Or Administrators From The Candidate's Own District On The Topic Of Esl Assessment In Its Various Forms. Analyzing Assessments In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness, Candidates Develop A Language Acquisition Plan For An Esl Student As Well As Methods For Identifying Giftedness And Learning Disabilities.


Multicultural Communication
Course Number EDU537
Credits 3.0

This course provides an understanding of the pressing issues in educating K-12 learners from both non-dominant and dominant cultures (e.g., multicultural education) including: The influence and historical movements in multicultural education in the U.S. How the breadth of topics in multicultural education affect K-12 teachers and learners The best practices in the education of K-12 students The course project, Multicultural Education Tutorial: Promoting and Implementing Multicultural Education in the School Community, focuses candidates on conducting interviews and using research to develop a practice for multicultural education in a school or community context.


Teaching & Administering in Colorado & the States
Course Number EDU600
Credits 3.0

This course discusses qualifications for state licensure in Colorado and other states, and includes in-depth discussions of the following pertinent topics: How teaching, learning, and administering in Colorado are informed by the state's standards-based education principles and expected assessment outcomes How Colorado's standards fit within the context of voluntary national standards or guidelines created by national education organizations How Colorado's standards compare with those established in other states The course project, Licensure Portfolio: Identifying and Understanding State Requirements for Licensure, provides a useful resource for candidates pursuing their goal of becoming a licensed professional. Candidates learn about Colorado's content and performance standards, and those of other states, as well as other important information and resources regarding licensure requirements.


Program description: The MEd in K-12 ESL Education: Teacher Licensure degree program prepares educators who are pursuing licensure or certification as a teacher of students who are learning English as a second language. Candidates find coursework, including student teaching, designed to augment their professional knowledge, skills and aptitude.The CDE and CCHE recognize the high quality of JIU’s MEd preparation degrees and have designated JIU as a state-approved program of teacher and principal/administrator preparation. For most states, graduating from an approved program of preparation is an important step toward achieving educator licensure or certification.

Program Name: MEd in K-12 English as a Second Language Specialist: Bilingual Education
Educational Theory Into Practice
Course Number EDU500
Credits 27.0

This Course Lays A Foundation For Future Studies Through The Introduction Of Learning Theory And Methodology, And Through Practicalapplication Of The Various Practices Required In A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study. The Course Introduces Candidates To: Instructional Methods Of A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study Various Learning Theories And Instructional Methodologies Applied To Educational Practice Instructional Methods Used For Lesson Planning In Educational Practice Primary Sources For Instructional Purposes, Including Those Found In The Library Of Congress The Course Project, Lesson Plan Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (teachers) Or Curriculum Guide Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (educational Administrators), Consists Of Multiple Lesson Plans/curriculum Guides Designed For Social Studies Or Science Instruction, Each Utilizing A Particular Instructional Methodology. When The Project Is Complete, The Candidate Will Have A Guide To Classroom Application With Concrete Examples.


Teaching for Mathematics Comprehension
Course Number EDU518
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on teaching strategies for mathematics that simultaneously assist K-12 students in the development of conceptual understandings and the acquisition of skills that ultimately contribute to higher mathematical achievement. Using strategies and applications endorsed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, in alignment with state content standards, the course concentrates on assessing individual students’ needs in the development of instructional materials for mathematics. In the course project, Mathematics Teacher Work Sample: Supporting Student Learning, candidates develop and implement a Teacher Work Sample incorporating (1) formal and informal assessments to inform the development of objectives and learning goals, and to align instruction to student needs and instructional materials, (2) technological tools to facilitate mathematical learning, and (3) mathematical instructional strategies that elicit varied representations of mathematical ideas and facilitate students’ mathematical problem-solving skills. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in Elementary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Teacher Licensure program, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) professional standards.


K-12 Students Using Technology
Course Number EDU521
Credits 3.0

This course addresses technologies that support candidates in designing activity-based instruction for K-12 students to encourage meaningful learning and critical thinking. This course also discusses the risks associated with Internet use by children. In the course project, Technology Unit Plan and Presentation: Implementing Effective Activity-based Instruction, each candidate demonstrates effective application of knowledge, skills, and dispositions through the development of a technology unit plan that teaches K-12 students to use technology efficiently to develop a creative solution to a real-world problem, and a presentation of the unit plan for school administration and staff. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in K-12 Instructional Technology programs, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the International Society for Technology in Education Technology Facilitation Standards.


K-12 Classroom and Instructional Management
Course Number EDU523
Credits 3.0

This course teaches candidates how to create a positive learning community and take steps to maintain that environment by guiding and correcting behavior when necessary (Burden, 2006, p. 2). It focuses on four dimensions of classroom and instructional management: Environmental management Instructional management Classroom management Behavioral management The course project, Classroom Management Plan: Establishing and Maintaining a Positive Learning Environment, serves as a guide for candidates establishing a plan for their own classrooms. Candidates develop and communicate a personal philosophy regarding classroom management that references physical surroundings, student motivation approaches, rules and procedures, and strategies for dealing with challenging behaviors and diverse needs.


Exceptional Needs in Inclusive Classrooms
Course Number EDU524
Credits 3.0

This course presents an overview of current special education issues as they relate to inclusive practices. Candidates will gain an understanding of the challenges faced by exceptional students and analyze the responsibilities of educational professionals in addressing these challenges by: Developing an orientation toward effective instruction in inclusive settings through a study of the history of current special education laws as well as attitudinal issues regarding inclusive education Observing, assessing, planning, and evaluating students with instructional, behavioral, and cultural challenges Working collaboratively within a team of educational professionals, family members, and the exceptional student for decision making and problem solving In the course project, Instructional Action Plan: Supporting Students with Exceptional Needs, each candidate provides evidence of his or her ability to (1) utilize human development theory when planning lessons and delivering instruction to students with exceptional needs, (2) seek assistance and guidance from school-based teams to address students’ learning needs, and (3)implement research-based instructional strategies to develop cognitive processes related to critical thinking and problem solving. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in Elementary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment programs, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) professional standards.


Literacy I
Course Number EDU527
Credits 3.0

This course presents scientifically based teaching methods, models, strategies, and approaches for teaching oral and written language skills. The course content provides a foundation for and discusses strategies for best practices in: Teaching the five components of reading: comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, phonemic awareness, and decoding/phonics Teaching writing and reading to emerging language learners The application of personal and cognitive developmental theories The course project, Work Sample Portfolio Part I: Designing and Implementing Literacy Lessons, allows candidates to implement curriculum they design, integrating pre-assessment information and post-implementation reflection. Candidates prepare lesson plans for teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, spelling, and vocabulary, and then choose one lesson plan to implement with K-12 students.


Literacy II
Course Number EDU528
Credits 3.0

This Course Continues To Cover Scientifically Based Teaching Methods, Models, Strategies, And Approaches For Teaching Oral And Written Language Skills. The Course Content Provides A Foundation For And Discusses Strategies For Best Practices In: Teaching The Five Components Of Reading: Comprehension, Vocabulary, Fluency, Phonemic Awareness, And Decoding/phonics Teaching Writing And Reading To Emerging Language Learners Within The Context Of Reading And Writing In Content Areas Formal And Informal Assessment Strategies And Techniques In Reading And Writing The Course Project, Work Sample Portfolio Part Ii: Designing And Implementing Literacy Lessons Within Content Areas, Allows Candidates To Implement Curriculum They Design, Integrating Pre-assessment And Post-implementation Reflection Within Specific Content Areas As Well As An Individual Literacy Plan. Candidates Prepare Literacy Lesson Plans Using Formal And Informal Assessment Information, And Then Implement The Lesson With K-12 Students. Prerequisites: Edu 527 Must Be Successfully Completed Before Registering For Edu 528. Student Support Counselor Permission Required For Registration.


Introduction to Second Language Acquisition
Course Number EDU532
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines Theories Of Second Language Education In K-12 Classroom Settings. By Exploring Sociolinguistic Perspectives, Pragmatic Views, And Historical Perspectives Of Language Acquisition, The Course Elucidates Specific Principles Of First Language Acquisition Theories In Order To Understand The Relationship Between First Language And Second Language Literacy.the Course Project, Comprehensive Plan For Second Language Acquisition (sla) In The Classroom: Applying Theory To Practice In For Second Language Learners, Promotes The Application Of Sla Theory In Order To: A) Understand The Cognitive Processes Involved In Language Learning, B) Identify Specific Student Needs, And C) Utilize A Blend Of Theory And Research-based Practices To Promote Student Success. Candidates Participate In Real-world Classroom Applications Of Theory Through Classroom Observations And Interactions With Second Language Learners.


Pedagogic Principles in Second Language Learning
Course Number EDU533
Credits 3.0

This course provides a basic overview of instructional approaches and methods, both historical and current, used in facilitating second-language acquisition. Predominant topics of instruction in this course are: Historical backgrounds of various pedagogic principles for linguistically and culturally diverse language learners Current trends in language education The necessities of identifying a student’s age, language proficiency level, context, and other factors in order to create the most effective instructional strategy for a given circumstance The course project, Field Research Analysis: Identifying Best Practices for ESL Instruction, presents a compilation of assignments for each module of study. Each assignment requires candidates to analyze theoretical presentations, classroom practice, and student performance so as to judge the merit of the pedagogic method being utilized.


Teaching Language Skills
Course Number EDU534
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Best Practices For Encouraging And Teaching K-12 Linguistically Diverse Education (lde) Students' Language Development In Receptive And Productive Language, As Well As Their Integration Of Language Skills With Content Area Learning. Course Content Introduces The Siop Model For Observation, Lesson Planning, And Assessment Tools. The Course Project, English Language Skills Toolbox: Creating Resources For Educators Prepares Candidates To Select Teaching/learning Activities, Models, Methods, And/or Techniques, As Well As Assessment Tools, Suitable For K-12 Lde Students. Developing And Using These Tools And Activities Allows Candidates To Demonstrate How Teacher Decisions Apply The Principles Of Second Language Acquisition (sla).


Bilingual Education
Course Number EDU535
Credits 3.0

This course provides candidates with an understanding of the pressing issues in educating bilingual learners. Students will investigate myriad issues, including: 1) differences and similarities in language and reading development for bilingual and monolingual learners, and 2) the intersection and distinction between second-language learning and special needs. The course project, Meeting the Needs of Bilingual Learners: A Field Guide for Teachers, will prepare the candidates to provide high quality education for the bilingual learners by conducting interviews and classroom observations in order to develop the course project.


Assessment for Second Language Learners of English
Course Number EDU536
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Tools For Assessing English As A Second Language (esl) Learners. Although Some Assessments Are Better Than Others And Any Assessment Is Only As Informative As The Person Interpreting The Results, A Solid Understanding Of The Following Topics Provides A Background For Assessing Esl Students: Laws And Federal Mandates That Have Shaped Assessment For Esl Learners Assessments And Assessment Items In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness Measures Of Academic English Proficiency Level And The Alignment Of Instruction With English Language Development Standards Evidence Used For Determining Goals, Accommodations, Progress, And Recommendations For Instructing Esl Students, Including Those Who Are Learning Disabled Or Gifted The Course Project, Assessment For Esl Learners: A Training For Teachers, Requires Candidates To Create A Training Program For Teachers Or Administrators From The Candidate's Own District On The Topic Of Esl Assessment In Its Various Forms. Analyzing Assessments In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness, Candidates Develop A Language Acquisition Plan For An Esl Student As Well As Methods For Identifying Giftedness And Learning Disabilities.


Multicultural Communication
Course Number EDU537
Credits 3.0

This course provides an understanding of the pressing issues in educating K-12 learners from both non-dominant and dominant cultures (e.g., multicultural education) including: The influence and historical movements in multicultural education in the U.S. How the breadth of topics in multicultural education affect K-12 teachers and learners The best practices in the education of K-12 students The course project, Multicultural Education Tutorial: Promoting and Implementing Multicultural Education in the School Community, focuses candidates on conducting interviews and using research to develop a practice for multicultural education in a school or community context.


Teaching & Administering in Colorado & the States
Course Number EDU600
Credits 3.0

This course discusses qualifications for state licensure in Colorado and other states, and includes in-depth discussions of the following pertinent topics: How teaching, learning, and administering in Colorado are informed by the state's standards-based education principles and expected assessment outcomes How Colorado's standards fit within the context of voluntary national standards or guidelines created by national education organizations How Colorado's standards compare with those established in other states The course project, Licensure Portfolio: Identifying and Understanding State Requirements for Licensure, provides a useful resource for candidates pursuing their goal of becoming a licensed professional. Candidates learn about Colorado's content and performance standards, and those of other states, as well as other important information and resources regarding licensure requirements.


Student Teaching: Classroom Practicum I
Course Number EDU605A
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides Candidates With An Opportunity To Apply Their Expertise In Curriculum Design, Instructional Strategies,classroom Management, And Assessment To A K–12 Educational Setting. Mixing Field Observation Experiences And Full-time Teaching, Candidates Utilize Standards-based Educational Theories And Practices Daily In Real-life Teaching And Learning Environments.in The Course Project, Student Teaching Portfolio Project I: Developing Effective Instructional Practices, Each Jiu Teacher Candidate Develops A Professional Teaching Portfolio. Components That Make Up The Portfolio Provide Evidence Of The Teacher Candidate’s Ability To (1) Develop Lesson Plans That Address Diverse Student Needs, (2) Utilize Formal And Informal Assessments To Measure And Monitor Student Performance, (3) Integrate Literacy Into Content Area Instruction, (4) Utilize Effective Classroom Management And Student Engagement Strategies, (5) Exhibit Professional And Ethical Practice That Is Responsive To Evolving Issues And Environments, And (6) Collaborate With School-based Teams And Parents To Identify, Address, And Promote Student Achievement.the Project Is A Key Assessment For Candidates In The Med In Elementary Curriculum, Instruction And Assessment: Teacher Licensure Program And It Is Designed To Demonstrate Mastery Of Association For Childhood Education International (acei) Professional Standards. Candidates In This Program Also Complete Two Other Key Assessments: Developing Effective Lesson Plans Which Involves Creating Lesson Plans, Using The Jiu Lesson Plan Protocol, To Be Implemented In The Classroom. K-12 Field Experience Mentor Evaluation Report Which Takes The Form Of A Field-based Mentor Evaluation Of The Jiu Teacher Candidate Against Multiple State And Acei Professional Standards. Prerequisites: Jiu Candidates Are Required To Complete Each Of The Items Described Below And Work Directly With Their Student Support Counselor To Register For Edu 605a: 1.complete 200 Hours Of Level-1 Field Experience: Complete 200 Hours Of Level-1 Field Experience Working With K-12 Students And Have Faxed A Completed Level-1 Field Experience Documentation Form To The Jiu Registrar’s Office. (these Hours May Be Defined As Time In The Field Working On Jiu Professional Synthesizing Projects Under The Supervision Of A Sponsor Or As Hours Completed Outside Of Jiu Coursework. For Example, Supervised Activities Working With Youth In A School Or A Community Agency Are Acceptable. All Level-1 Field Experience Must Be Completed While Enrolled At Jiu.) 2.complete Edu 600 & Edu 538*: Complete Edu 600 Teaching & Administering In Colorado & The States, And Edu 538:k-12 Teaching: Legal And Societal Contexts. 3.possess 2.5 Cumulative Gpa: Possess A Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average Of 2.5 In Courses Leading To The Master’s Degree At Jiu. 4.complete 66% Of Degree: Complete At Least 66% Of The Required Courses In Licensure Degree Program. 5.submit Passing Score On The State Licensure Exam: Submit To The Registrar’s Office A Passing Score On The Requisite State Licensure Exam(s) Required By Your State. Exam Results Must Be Received By The Jiu Registrar Prior To Registration In Edu 605a. 6.secure Student Teaching Placement: Secure A Placement In An American School That (1) Consists Of A Classroom Setting At The Grade Level And In The Subject Area Required For Intended Teaching License (e.g., Elementary Classroom, Secondary Mathematics Classroom, Etc.), And (2) ...show more »


Student Teaching: Classroom Practicum II
Course Number EDU605B
Credits 3.0

In This Course, Candidates Apply Their Expertise Of Curriculum Design, Instructional Strategies, Classroom Management, And Assessment To A K–12 Educational Setting. Mixing Field Observation Experiences And Full-time Teaching, Candidates Utilize Standards-based Educational Theories And Practices Daily In Real-life Teaching And Learning Environments. In The Course Project, Student Teaching Portfolio Project Ii: Implementing Effective Instructional Practices, Each Jiu Teacher Candidate Develops A Professional Teaching Portfolio. Components That Make Up The Portfolio Provide Evidence Of The Teacher Candidate’s Ability To (1) Develop Lesson Plans That Address Diverse Student Needs, (2) Utilize Formal And Informal Assessments To Measure And Monitor Student Performance, (3) Integrate Literacy Into Content Area Instruction, (4) Utilize Effective Classroom Management And Student Engagement Strategies, (5) Exhibit Professional And Ethical Practice That Is Responsive To Evolving Issues And Environments, And (6) Collaborate With School-based Teams And Parents To Identify, Address And Promote Student Achievement. The Project Is A Key Assessment For Candidates In The Med In Elementary Curriculum, Instruction And Assessment:teacher Licensure Program And It Is Designed To Demonstrate Mastery Of Association For Childhood Education International (acei) Professional Standards. Candidates In This Program Also Complete Two Other Key Assessments: Developing Effective Lesson Plans Which Involves Creating Lesson Plans, Using The Jiu Lesson Plan Protocol, To Be Implemented In The Classroom. K-12 Field Experience Mentor Evaluation Report Which Takes The Form Of A Field-based Mentor Evaluation Of The Jiu Teacher Candidate Against Multiple State And Acei Professional Standards. Prerequisites: (1) Edu 605a Must Be Successfully Completed Before Registering For Edu 605b. Edu 605b Must Be Taken In Consecutive Sequence With Edu605a. Student Support Counselor Permission Required For Registration Of Edu 605b.


Program description: The MEd in K-12 ESL Education Specialist: Bilingual Education degree program is designed for licensed educators who are
bilingual and interested in pursuing an additional endorsement as a teacher of students who are learning English as a second
language. Candidates find coursework designed to augment their professional knowledge, skills and aptitude.
The CDE and CCHE recognize the high quality of JIU’s MEd preparation degrees and have designated JIU as a state-approved
program of teacher and principal/administrator preparation. For most states, graduating from an approved program of preparation
is an important step toward achieving educator licensure or certification

Program Name: MEd in K-12 English as a Second Language Specialist: Bilingual Education Teacher Licensure
Educational Theory Into Practice
Course Number EDU500
Credits 27.0

This Course Lays A Foundation For Future Studies Through The Introduction Of Learning Theory And Methodology, And Through Practicalapplication Of The Various Practices Required In A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study. The Course Introduces Candidates To: Instructional Methods Of A Typical Jiu Distance-learning Course Of Study Various Learning Theories And Instructional Methodologies Applied To Educational Practice Instructional Methods Used For Lesson Planning In Educational Practice Primary Sources For Instructional Purposes, Including Those Found In The Library Of Congress The Course Project, Lesson Plan Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (teachers) Or Curriculum Guide Portfolio: Integrating Learning Theory Into Practice (educational Administrators), Consists Of Multiple Lesson Plans/curriculum Guides Designed For Social Studies Or Science Instruction, Each Utilizing A Particular Instructional Methodology. When The Project Is Complete, The Candidate Will Have A Guide To Classroom Application With Concrete Examples.


Teaching for Mathematics Comprehension
Course Number EDU518
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on teaching strategies for mathematics that simultaneously assist K-12 students in the development of conceptual understandings and the acquisition of skills that ultimately contribute to higher mathematical achievement. Using strategies and applications endorsed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, in alignment with state content standards, the course concentrates on assessing individual students’ needs in the development of instructional materials for mathematics. In the course project, Mathematics Teacher Work Sample: Supporting Student Learning, candidates develop and implement a Teacher Work Sample incorporating (1) formal and informal assessments to inform the development of objectives and learning goals, and to align instruction to student needs and instructional materials, (2) technological tools to facilitate mathematical learning, and (3) mathematical instructional strategies that elicit varied representations of mathematical ideas and facilitate students’ mathematical problem-solving skills. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in Elementary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Teacher Licensure program, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) professional standards.


K-12 Students Using Technology
Course Number EDU521
Credits 3.0

This course addresses technologies that support candidates in designing activity-based instruction for K-12 students to encourage meaningful learning and critical thinking. This course also discusses the risks associated with Internet use by children. In the course project, Technology Unit Plan and Presentation: Implementing Effective Activity-based Instruction, each candidate demonstrates effective application of knowledge, skills, and dispositions through the development of a technology unit plan that teaches K-12 students to use technology efficiently to develop a creative solution to a real-world problem, and a presentation of the unit plan for school administration and staff. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in K-12 Instructional Technology programs, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the International Society for Technology in Education Technology Facilitation Standards.


K-12 Classroom and Instructional Management
Course Number EDU523
Credits 3.0

This course teaches candidates how to create a positive learning community and take steps to maintain that environment by guiding and correcting behavior when necessary (Burden, 2006, p. 2). It focuses on four dimensions of classroom and instructional management: Environmental management Instructional management Classroom management Behavioral management The course project, Classroom Management Plan: Establishing and Maintaining a Positive Learning Environment, serves as a guide for candidates establishing a plan for their own classrooms. Candidates develop and communicate a personal philosophy regarding classroom management that references physical surroundings, student motivation approaches, rules and procedures, and strategies for dealing with challenging behaviors and diverse needs.


Exceptional Needs in Inclusive Classrooms
Course Number EDU524
Credits 3.0

This course presents an overview of current special education issues as they relate to inclusive practices. Candidates will gain an understanding of the challenges faced by exceptional students and analyze the responsibilities of educational professionals in addressing these challenges by: Developing an orientation toward effective instruction in inclusive settings through a study of the history of current special education laws as well as attitudinal issues regarding inclusive education Observing, assessing, planning, and evaluating students with instructional, behavioral, and cultural challenges Working collaboratively within a team of educational professionals, family members, and the exceptional student for decision making and problem solving In the course project, Instructional Action Plan: Supporting Students with Exceptional Needs, each candidate provides evidence of his or her ability to (1) utilize human development theory when planning lessons and delivering instruction to students with exceptional needs, (2) seek assistance and guidance from school-based teams to address students’ learning needs, and (3)implement research-based instructional strategies to develop cognitive processes related to critical thinking and problem solving. The project is a key assessment for candidates in the MEd in Elementary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment programs, and it is designed to demonstrate mastery of the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) professional standards.


Literacy I
Course Number EDU527
Credits 3.0

This course presents scientifically based teaching methods, models, strategies, and approaches for teaching oral and written language skills. The course content provides a foundation for and discusses strategies for best practices in: Teaching the five components of reading: comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, phonemic awareness, and decoding/phonics Teaching writing and reading to emerging language learners The application of personal and cognitive developmental theories The course project, Work Sample Portfolio Part I: Designing and Implementing Literacy Lessons, allows candidates to implement curriculum they design, integrating pre-assessment information and post-implementation reflection. Candidates prepare lesson plans for teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, spelling, and vocabulary, and then choose one lesson plan to implement with K-12 students.


Literacy II
Course Number EDU528
Credits 3.0

This Course Continues To Cover Scientifically Based Teaching Methods, Models, Strategies, And Approaches For Teaching Oral And Written Language Skills. The Course Content Provides A Foundation For And Discusses Strategies For Best Practices In: Teaching The Five Components Of Reading: Comprehension, Vocabulary, Fluency, Phonemic Awareness, And Decoding/phonics Teaching Writing And Reading To Emerging Language Learners Within The Context Of Reading And Writing In Content Areas Formal And Informal Assessment Strategies And Techniques In Reading And Writing The Course Project, Work Sample Portfolio Part Ii: Designing And Implementing Literacy Lessons Within Content Areas, Allows Candidates To Implement Curriculum They Design, Integrating Pre-assessment And Post-implementation Reflection Within Specific Content Areas As Well As An Individual Literacy Plan. Candidates Prepare Literacy Lesson Plans Using Formal And Informal Assessment Information, And Then Implement The Lesson With K-12 Students. Prerequisites: Edu 527 Must Be Successfully Completed Before Registering For Edu 528. Student Support Counselor Permission Required For Registration.


Introduction to Second Language Acquisition
Course Number EDU532
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines Theories Of Second Language Education In K-12 Classroom Settings. By Exploring Sociolinguistic Perspectives, Pragmatic Views, And Historical Perspectives Of Language Acquisition, The Course Elucidates Specific Principles Of First Language Acquisition Theories In Order To Understand The Relationship Between First Language And Second Language Literacy.the Course Project, Comprehensive Plan For Second Language Acquisition (sla) In The Classroom: Applying Theory To Practice In For Second Language Learners, Promotes The Application Of Sla Theory In Order To: A) Understand The Cognitive Processes Involved In Language Learning, B) Identify Specific Student Needs, And C) Utilize A Blend Of Theory And Research-based Practices To Promote Student Success. Candidates Participate In Real-world Classroom Applications Of Theory Through Classroom Observations And Interactions With Second Language Learners.


Pedagogic Principles in Second Language Learning
Course Number EDU533
Credits 3.0

This course provides a basic overview of instructional approaches and methods, both historical and current, used in facilitating second-language acquisition. Predominant topics of instruction in this course are: Historical backgrounds of various pedagogic principles for linguistically and culturally diverse language learners Current trends in language education The necessities of identifying a student’s age, language proficiency level, context, and other factors in order to create the most effective instructional strategy for a given circumstance The course project, Field Research Analysis: Identifying Best Practices for ESL Instruction, presents a compilation of assignments for each module of study. Each assignment requires candidates to analyze theoretical presentations, classroom practice, and student performance so as to judge the merit of the pedagogic method being utilized.


Teaching Language Skills
Course Number EDU534
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Best Practices For Encouraging And Teaching K-12 Linguistically Diverse Education (lde) Students' Language Development In Receptive And Productive Language, As Well As Their Integration Of Language Skills With Content Area Learning. Course Content Introduces The Siop Model For Observation, Lesson Planning, And Assessment Tools. The Course Project, English Language Skills Toolbox: Creating Resources For Educators Prepares Candidates To Select Teaching/learning Activities, Models, Methods, And/or Techniques, As Well As Assessment Tools, Suitable For K-12 Lde Students. Developing And Using These Tools And Activities Allows Candidates To Demonstrate How Teacher Decisions Apply The Principles Of Second Language Acquisition (sla).


Bilingual Education
Course Number EDU535
Credits 3.0

This course provides candidates with an understanding of the pressing issues in educating bilingual learners. Students will investigate myriad issues, including: 1) differences and similarities in language and reading development for bilingual and monolingual learners, and 2) the intersection and distinction between second-language learning and special needs. The course project, Meeting the Needs of Bilingual Learners: A Field Guide for Teachers, will prepare the candidates to provide high quality education for the bilingual learners by conducting interviews and classroom observations in order to develop the course project.


Assessment for Second Language Learners of English
Course Number EDU536
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Tools For Assessing English As A Second Language (esl) Learners. Although Some Assessments Are Better Than Others And Any Assessment Is Only As Informative As The Person Interpreting The Results, A Solid Understanding Of The Following Topics Provides A Background For Assessing Esl Students: Laws And Federal Mandates That Have Shaped Assessment For Esl Learners Assessments And Assessment Items In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness Measures Of Academic English Proficiency Level And The Alignment Of Instruction With English Language Development Standards Evidence Used For Determining Goals, Accommodations, Progress, And Recommendations For Instructing Esl Students, Including Those Who Are Learning Disabled Or Gifted The Course Project, Assessment For Esl Learners: A Training For Teachers, Requires Candidates To Create A Training Program For Teachers Or Administrators From The Candidate's Own District On The Topic Of Esl Assessment In Its Various Forms. Analyzing Assessments In Terms Of Linguistic And Cultural Appropriateness, Candidates Develop A Language Acquisition Plan For An Esl Student As Well As Methods For Identifying Giftedness And Learning Disabilities.


Multicultural Communication
Course Number EDU537
Credits 3.0

This course provides an understanding of the pressing issues in educating K-12 learners from both non-dominant and dominant cultures (e.g., multicultural education) including: The influence and historical movements in multicultural education in the U.S. How the breadth of topics in multicultural education affect K-12 teachers and learners The best practices in the education of K-12 students The course project, Multicultural Education Tutorial: Promoting and Implementing Multicultural Education in the School Community, focuses candidates on conducting interviews and using research to develop a practice for multicultural education in a school or community context.


Teaching & Administering in Colorado & the States
Course Number EDU600
Credits 3.0

This course discusses qualifications for state licensure in Colorado and other states, and includes in-depth discussions of the following pertinent topics: How teaching, learning, and administering in Colorado are informed by the state's standards-based education principles and expected assessment outcomes How Colorado's standards fit within the context of voluntary national standards or guidelines created by national education organizations How Colorado's standards compare with those established in other states The course project, Licensure Portfolio: Identifying and Understanding State Requirements for Licensure, provides a useful resource for candidates pursuing their goal of becoming a licensed professional. Candidates learn about Colorado's content and performance standards, and those of other states, as well as other important information and resources regarding licensure requirements.


Student Teaching: Classroom Practicum I
Course Number EDU605A
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides Candidates With An Opportunity To Apply Their Expertise In Curriculum Design, Instructional Strategies,classroom Management, And Assessment To A K–12 Educational Setting. Mixing Field Observation Experiences And Full-time Teaching, Candidates Utilize Standards-based Educational Theories And Practices Daily In Real-life Teaching And Learning Environments.in The Course Project, Student Teaching Portfolio Project I: Developing Effective Instructional Practices, Each Jiu Teacher Candidate Develops A Professional Teaching Portfolio. Components That Make Up The Portfolio Provide Evidence Of The Teacher Candidate’s Ability To (1) Develop Lesson Plans That Address Diverse Student Needs, (2) Utilize Formal And Informal Assessments To Measure And Monitor Student Performance, (3) Integrate Literacy Into Content Area Instruction, (4) Utilize Effective Classroom Management And Student Engagement Strategies, (5) Exhibit Professional And Ethical Practice That Is Responsive To Evolving Issues And Environments, And (6) Collaborate With School-based Teams And Parents To Identify, Address, And Promote Student Achievement.the Project Is A Key Assessment For Candidates In The Med In Elementary Curriculum, Instruction And Assessment: Teacher Licensure Program And It Is Designed To Demonstrate Mastery Of Association For Childhood Education International (acei) Professional Standards. Candidates In This Program Also Complete Two Other Key Assessments: Developing Effective Lesson Plans Which Involves Creating Lesson Plans, Using The Jiu Lesson Plan Protocol, To Be Implemented In The Classroom. K-12 Field Experience Mentor Evaluation Report Which Takes The Form Of A Field-based Mentor Evaluation Of The Jiu Teacher Candidate Against Multiple State And Acei Professional Standards. Prerequisites: Jiu Candidates Are Required To Complete Each Of The Items Described Below And Work Directly With Their Student Support Counselor To Register For Edu 605a: 1.complete 200 Hours Of Level-1 Field Experience: Complete 200 Hours Of Level-1 Field Experience Working With K-12 Students And Have Faxed A Completed Level-1 Field Experience Documentation Form To The Jiu Registrar’s Office. (these Hours May Be Defined As Time In The Field Working On Jiu Professional Synthesizing Projects Under The Supervision Of A Sponsor Or As Hours Completed Outside Of Jiu Coursework. For Example, Supervised Activities Working With Youth In A School Or A Community Agency Are Acceptable. All Level-1 Field Experience Must Be Completed While Enrolled At Jiu.) 2.complete Edu 600 & Edu 538*: Complete Edu 600 Teaching & Administering In Colorado & The States, And Edu 538:k-12 Teaching: Legal And Societal Contexts. 3.possess 2.5 Cumulative Gpa: Possess A Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average Of 2.5 In Courses Leading To The Master’s Degree At Jiu. 4.complete 66% Of Degree: Complete At Least 66% Of The Required Courses In Licensure Degree Program. 5.submit Passing Score On The State Licensure Exam: Submit To The Registrar’s Office A Passing Score On The Requisite State Licensure Exam(s) Required By Your State. Exam Results Must Be Received By The Jiu Registrar Prior To Registration In Edu 605a. 6.secure Student Teaching Placement: Secure A Placement In An American School That (1) Consists Of A Classroom Setting At The Grade Level And In The Subject Area Required For Intended Teaching License (e.g., Elementary Classroom, Secondary Mathematics Classroom, Etc.), And (2) ...show more »


Student Teaching: Classroom Practicum II
Course Number EDU605B
Credits 3.0

In This Course, Candidates Apply Their Expertise Of Curriculum Design, Instructional Strategies, Classroom Management, And Assessment To A K–12 Educational Setting. Mixing Field Observation Experiences And Full-time Teaching, Candidates Utilize Standards-based Educational Theories And Practices Daily In Real-life Teaching And Learning Environments. In The Course Project, Student Teaching Portfolio Project Ii: Implementing Effective Instructional Practices, Each Jiu Teacher Candidate Develops A Professional Teaching Portfolio. Components That Make Up The Portfolio Provide Evidence Of The Teacher Candidate’s Ability To (1) Develop Lesson Plans That Address Diverse Student Needs, (2) Utilize Formal And Informal Assessments To Measure And Monitor Student Performance, (3) Integrate Literacy Into Content Area Instruction, (4) Utilize Effective Classroom Management And Student Engagement Strategies, (5) Exhibit Professional And Ethical Practice That Is Responsive To Evolving Issues And Environments, And (6) Collaborate With School-based Teams And Parents To Identify, Address And Promote Student Achievement. The Project Is A Key Assessment For Candidates In The Med In Elementary Curriculum, Instruction And Assessment:teacher Licensure Program And It Is Designed To Demonstrate Mastery Of Association For Childhood Education International (acei) Professional Standards. Candidates In This Program Also Complete Two Other Key Assessments: Developing Effective Lesson Plans Which Involves Creating Lesson Plans, Using The Jiu Lesson Plan Protocol, To Be Implemented In The Classroom. K-12 Field Experience Mentor Evaluation Report Which Takes The Form Of A Field-based Mentor Evaluation Of The Jiu Teacher Candidate Against Multiple State And Acei Professional Standards. Prerequisites: (1) Edu 605a Must Be Successfully Completed Before Registering For Edu 605b. Edu 605b Must Be Taken In Consecutive Sequence With Edu605a. Student Support Counselor Permission Required For Registration Of Edu 605b.


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Program description: The MEd in K-12 ESL Education Specialist: Bilingual Education Teacher Licensure degree program prepares educators who are
pursuing licensure or certification as a teacher of students who are learning English as a second language. Candidates find
coursework, including student teaching, designed to augment their professional knowledge, skills and aptitude.
The CDE and CCHE recognize the high quality of JIU’s MEd preparation degrees and have designated JIU as a state-approved
program of teacher and principal/administrator preparation. For most states, graduating from an approved program of preparation
is an important step toward achieving educator licensure or certification.

English Courses at Full Sail University

Program Name: Creative Writing Masters - Online
The Art of Visual Storytelling
Course Number CWM 510
Credits 4.0

In The Art of Visual Storytelling Course, students study the universal themes of traditional storytelling as well as their applications to visual narrative design and new nonlinear and interactive forms of media. Students will analyze historical examples of visual narratives and then convey ideas and emotions through the use of images and traditional storytelling techniques in order to design new narratives in a variety of entertainment media formats


Multimedia Terms and Genres
Course Number CWM 530
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/multimedia-terms-and-genres-CWM%20530

In the Multimedia Terms and Genres Course, students master the professional vocabulary of multimedia writing and study production processes required of the degree program. Students will learn basic writing techniques for film, animation, and gaming. They will create sample narratives and then structure their narratives so that they may be used in multiple media formats. Students will learn how various rules and production processes vary in multimedia presentations.


Literary Research
Course Number CWM 520
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/literary-research-CWM%20520

The Literary Research Course provides students with basic instruction to research techniques, methodologies, and information sources relevant to developing and expanding authentic and compelling storylines. Students will explore elements of narrative structure and approaches that work best for various entertainment media genres. In addition, students will begin writing exercises, preparing them for the advanced writing requirements of the degree program.


Character Creation and Development
Course Number CWM 540
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/character-creation-and-development-CWM%20540

In the Character Creation and Development Course, students are introduced to various psychological profiles for characters, create a portfolio of characters ranging from simple to complex, and give vital authenticity to characters through the creation of characters’ backstories. In addition to creating characters, students will explore how various types of media influence the development of characters. Various classic, traditional, and popular films, games, and animation will be reviewed and analyzed to further explore what types of characters are the best fit for each format.


Script Analysis and Criticism
Course Number CWM 550
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/script-analysis-and-criticism-CWM%20550

In the Script Analysis and Criticism Course, students will learn to recognize elements that create powerful narratives and how they can be best integrated in various multimedia formats. Students will analyze classic films, animation, and games for structure, style, and content and identify how traditional scripts differ across multimedia formats and are transformed into visual narratives. An objective of the course is for students to learn the correct questions to ask themselves when preparing scripts for production in different visual contexts.


Film Screenwriting and Storyboarding
Course Number CWM 560
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/film-screenwriting-and-storyboarding-CWM%20560

In the Film Screenwriting and Storyboarding Course, students will apply what they have learned in the previous courses by writing a screenplay for a short film and overseeing the storyboarding of the screenplay for production. Understanding screenwriting and storyboarding will provide students with the knowledge of the creative process that links all media components together. Other areas of focus will include the following: the screenplay from pitch to screen, structures and formats, and storyboarding and visual thinking.


Writing for Games
Course Number CWM 610
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/writing-for-games-CWM%20610

The Writing for Games Course provides a technical overview of how games are created and presents a variety of video games, gaming genres, and gaming platforms from a storytelling point of view. Areas of exploration will include mythology, military history and warfare, science fiction literature and films, fantasy fiction literature and films, comic books, and graphic novels. Students will formulate a gaming concept that incorporates creative processes such as developing plot, setting, characters, and interactive narrative.


Storytelling and Storyboarding for Animation
Course Number CWM 620
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/storytelling-and-storyboarding-for-animation-CWM%20620

In the Storytelling and Storyboarding for Animation Course, the creative process and writing techniques for several animation genres and formats will be explored. The history of animation and the works of legendary animators will be analyzed for style and perspective. Students will incorporate concepts of visual storytelling, narrative structures, character creation and development, scriptwriting, and storyboarding into the creation of a script for an animation short.


Editing for Film, Game, and Animation Scripts
Course Number CWM 630
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/editing-for-film-game-and-animation-scripts-CWM%20630

In the Editing for Film, Game, and Animation Scripts Course, students learn how to edit, rewrite, and correct writing elements as challenges are presented in the production of various projects. Students will develop strategies for correcting these issues through learning how to troubleshoot, analyze content objectively from various viewpoints, and address structural issues that can occur during the creative writing process. Students will also learn how to properly edit and format a script for final presentation and professional submission


Creative Writing Portfolio I
Course Number CWM 640
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/creative-writing-portfolio-i-CWM%20640

The Creative Writing Portfolio I Course requires students to select an entertainment media genre and distribution method and begin the development of a concept script for their final thesis project. The final thesis project will consist of a Creative Writing Portfolio that includes a professional, viable script with evidence of incorporated culminating components of the degree program including visual storytelling, narrative structures, character creation, and storyboarding. In addition, the Creative Writing Portfolio will document research students conducted to develop and expand authentic and compelling storylines. Students will “pitch” their concept scripts to faculty and peers and justify selected writing elements based on the specific entertainment media genre and distribution method of choice. Feedback will be provided within these contexts as well as application of current writing trends, authenticity, compelling qualities, and feasibility.


Creative Writing Portfolio II
Course Number CWM 650
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/creative-writing-portfolio-ii-CWM%20650

In the Creative Writing Portfolio II Course, students will reevaluate the writing elements, authenticity, compelling qualities, and feasibility of their concept scripts for their chosen entertainment media genres and distribution methods based on the feedback received from faculty and peers in the Creative Writing Portfolio I course. Students will then implement their project plans and begin the writing process. Final scripts will be properly formatted to meet the expectations of the chosen entertainment media genres and distribution methods within the entertainment media industry and will be ready to be pitched to potential employers upon graduation.


The Business of Creative Writing
Course Number CWM 690
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/the-business-of-creative-writing-CWM%20690

In The Business of Creative Writing Course, students will learn about the business of creative writing as well as similarities and differences among different entertainment media genres and distribution methods. This course will complement students’ writing skills with the marketing, publishing, and legal basics necessary to be successful creative writers in the entertainment media industry. In addition, current issues, topics, and trends that may impact the careers of graduates will be addressed, such as the roles of literary agents and unions, new technologies, and new opportunities.


The Business of Creative Writing
Course Number CWM 690
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/the-business-of-creative-writing-CWM%20690

In The Business of Creative Writing Course, students will learn about the business of creative writing as well as similarities and differences among different entertainment media genres and distribution methods. This course will complement students’ writing skills with the marketing, publishing, and legal basics necessary to be successful creative writers in the entertainment media industry. In addition, current issues, topics, and trends that may impact the careers of graduates will be addressed, such as the roles of literary agents and unions, new technologies, and new opportunities.


Character Creation and Development
Course Number CWM 540
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/character-creation-and-development-CWM%20540

In the Character Creation and Development Course, students are introduced to various psychological profiles for characters, create a portfolio of characters ranging from simple to complex, and give vital authenticity to characters through the creation of characters’ backstories. In addition to creating characters, students will explore how various types of media influence the development of characters. Various classic, traditional, and popular films, games, and animation will be reviewed and analyzed to further explore what types of characters are the best fit for each format.


Creative Writing Portfolio I
Course Number CWM 640
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/creative-writing-portfolio-i-CWM%20640

The Creative Writing Portfolio I Course requires students to select an entertainment media genre and distribution method and begin the development of a concept script for their final thesis project. The final thesis project will consist of a Creative Writing Portfolio that includes a professional, viable script with evidence of incorporated culminating components of the degree program including visual storytelling, narrative structures, character creation, and storyboarding. In addition, the Creative Writing Portfolio will document research students conducted to develop and expand authentic and compelling storylines. Students will “pitch” their concept scripts to faculty and peers and justify selected writing elements based on the specific entertainment media genre and distribution method of choice. Feedback will be provided within these contexts as well as application of current writing trends, authenticity, compelling qualities, and feasibility.


Creative Writing Portfolio II
Course Number CWM 650
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/creative-writing-portfolio-ii-CWM%20650

In the Creative Writing Portfolio II Course, students will reevaluate the writing elements, authenticity, compelling qualities, and feasibility of their concept scripts for their chosen entertainment media genres and distribution methods based on the feedback received from faculty and peers in the Creative Writing Portfolio I course. Students will then implement their project plans and begin the writing process. Final scripts will be properly formatted to meet the expectations of the chosen entertainment media genres and distribution methods within the entertainment media industry and will be ready to be pitched to potential employers upon graduation.


Editing for Film, Game, and Animation Scripts
Course Number CWM 630
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/editing-for-film-game-and-animation-scripts-CWM%20630

In the Editing for Film, Game, and Animation Scripts Course, students learn how to edit, rewrite, and correct writing elements as challenges are presented in the production of various projects. Students will develop strategies for correcting these issues through learning how to troubleshoot, analyze content objectively from various viewpoints, and address structural issues that can occur during the creative writing process. Students will also learn how to properly edit and format a script for final presentation and professional submission


Film Screenwriting and Storyboarding
Course Number CWM 560
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/film-screenwriting-and-storyboarding-CWM%20560

In the Film Screenwriting and Storyboarding Course, students will apply what they have learned in the previous courses by writing a screenplay for a short film and overseeing the storyboarding of the screenplay for production. Understanding screenwriting and storyboarding will provide students with the knowledge of the creative process that links all media components together. Other areas of focus will include the following: the screenplay from pitch to screen, structures and formats, and storyboarding and visual thinking.


Literary Research
Course Number CWM 520
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/literary-research-CWM%20520

The Literary Research Course provides students with basic instruction to research techniques, methodologies, and information sources relevant to developing and expanding authentic and compelling storylines. Students will explore elements of narrative structure and approaches that work best for various entertainment media genres. In addition, students will begin writing exercises, preparing them for the advanced writing requirements of the degree program.


Multimedia Terms and Genres
Course Number CWM 530
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/multimedia-terms-and-genres-CWM%20530

In the Multimedia Terms and Genres Course, students master the professional vocabulary of multimedia writing and study production processes required of the degree program. Students will learn basic writing techniques for film, animation, and gaming. They will create sample narratives and then structure their narratives so that they may be used in multiple media formats. Students will learn how various rules and production processes vary in multimedia presentations.


Script Analysis and Criticism
Course Number CWM 550
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/script-analysis-and-criticism-CWM%20550

In the Script Analysis and Criticism Course, students will learn to recognize elements that create powerful narratives and how they can be best integrated in various multimedia formats. Students will analyze classic films, animation, and games for structure, style, and content and identify how traditional scripts differ across multimedia formats and are transformed into visual narratives. An objective of the course is for students to learn the correct questions to ask themselves when preparing scripts for production in different visual contexts.


Storytelling and Storyboarding for Animation
Course Number CWM 620
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/storytelling-and-storyboarding-for-animation-CWM%20620

In the Storytelling and Storyboarding for Animation Course, the creative process and writing techniques for several animation genres and formats will be explored. The history of animation and the works of legendary animators will be analyzed for style and perspective. Students will incorporate concepts of visual storytelling, narrative structures, character creation and development, scriptwriting, and storyboarding into the creation of a script for an animation short.


Writing for Games
Course Number CWM 610
Credits 4.0
More Info http://online.fullsail.edu/degrees/creative-writing-mfa/courses/writing-for-games-CWM%20610

The Writing for Games Course provides a technical overview of how games are created and presents a variety of video games, gaming genres, and gaming platforms from a storytelling point of view. Areas of exploration will include mythology, military history and warfare, science fiction literature and films, fantasy fiction literature and films, comic books, and graphic novels. Students will formulate a gaming concept that incorporates creative processes such as developing plot, setting, characters, and interactive narrative.


Program description: In the Creative Writing Master of Fine Arts
Online Degree Program, storytelling is not
merely taught as it relates to the typical
output mediums of print and publishing,
but it also teaches you the necessary skills
to explore a professional creative writing
career within the world of entertainment.

English Courses at Robert Morris University

Program Name: BA English Studies
Study Of Literature
Course Number ENGL2000
Credits 3.0

none availible


Study Of Essay
Course Number ELIT2010
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to the study of the historical origin and development of the essay as a genre through analysis of select essays written during the Renaissance, Reformation and Enlightenment (16th through 18th centuries) as well as essays by 19th century Romantic and Victorian authors. Students are also exposed to contemporary essays written in English from a variety of perspectives by a culturally diverse group of essayists. In addition, students learn fundamental rhetorical principles of invention, arrangement, and style in order to analyze the essays read for the course and to construct personal and scholarly essays. Prerequisite: COSK1221


Study Of Language
Course Number ENGL2540
Credits 3.0

This course examines spoken language from a formal, scientific perspective. The major concerns are the interrelated systems that comprise language, namely the phonetic, phonological, morphological, and semantic systems. Also studied are the regional, historical, and social variations of language. Primary attention is given to the English language, though examples of systems in other languages are also analyzed, as are the constraints of social situations and attitudes toward language and language instruction. Prerequisite: COSK1221


Study Of Rhetoric
Course Number ENGL3500
Credits 3.0

none availible


American Literature I
Course Number ELIT3080
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Historical Growth, Philosophical Premises, And Literary Techniques Of Important Writers In American Literature Up Through The Civil War. Students Read A Wide, Diverse Range Of Literature, Such As Native American, Spanish American, And African American Literatures, In The Genres Of Fiction, Essays, Poetry, Journals, Autobiographies, And Slave Narratives. Students Also Study Aesthetic And Intellectual Movements Such As Neo-classicism, Romanticism, And Transcendentalism. The Course Focuses On Historical Development With Emphasis On The American Renaissance Of The 1850's. Students Investigate Print, Internet Resources, And Electronic Databases And Write Literacy Research Essays In Mla Format. Prerequisites: Cosk2220 And Any Elit Course


American Literature Ii
Course Number ELIT3090
Credits 3.0

This Course Enables Students To Study The Historical Growth, Philosophical Premises, And Literary Techniques Of Important Writers In American Literature From The Civil War To Today With Emphasis On The Modern Period. Students Read A Wide, Diverse Range Of Literature Including Minority Literatures, Especially The Immigrant Experience. Students Also Study Genres Such As Fiction, Poetry, Journals, And Autobiographies, And Aesthetic Movements Such As Realism, Naturalism, And Modernism. Students Investigate Print, Internet Resources, And Electronic Databases And Write Literacy Research Essays In Mla Format. Prerequisites: Cosk2220 And Any Elit Course


British Literature I
Course Number ELIT3120
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Historical Growth, Philosophical Premises, And Literary Techniques Of Important Writers In British And Commonwealth Literature From Beowulf Through The Middle Ages, Renaissance, The Restoration And The 18th Century. Students Read A Wide Range Of Literature, Including Fiction, Drama, Poetry, Journals, And Autobiographies. The Course Focuses On Historical Development With Emphasis On Significant Schools And Movements Such As The Metaphysical Poets And The Neoclassical Writers. This Course Excludes Shakespeare. Students Investigate Print, Internet Resources, And Electronic Databases And Write Literary Research Essays In Mla Format. Prerequisites: Cosk2220 And Any Elit Course


British Literature Ii
Course Number ELIT3130
Credits 3.0

British Literature From 1789 Examines The Historical Growth, Philosophical Premises, And Literary Techniques Of Important Writers In British And Commonwealth Literature From The Late 18th Century To The Modern Era. Students Read A Wide Range Of Literature, Including Fiction, Drama, Essays, Poetry, Journals, And Autobiographies. The Course Focuses On Historical Development With Emphasis On Significant Schools And Movements Such As Romanticism, Victorian Writers, And Modernism. Students Investigate Print, Internet Resources, And Electronic Databases And Write Literary Research Essays In Mla Format. Prerequisites: Cosk2220 And Any Elit Course


SHAKESPEARE
Course Number ELIT3520
Credits 3.0

This Course Enables Students To Study Drama As Practiced By Shakespeare. While Examining The History Of Shakespearean Production And The Historical And Cultural Contexts Of Shakespeare's England, Students Practice Close, Critical Readings Of At Least One Tragedy, One Comedy, And One History Play. To Help Them Grasp Shakespeare's Dramatic Technique, Students May Participate In Dramatic Readings, Block And Deliver Short Scenes From Key Plays, And Compare And Contrast Actors' Interpretations Of Various Dramatic Scenes. Prerequisites: Cosk2220 And Any Elit Course 3 Credits


SEMINAR
Course Number ELIT4800
Credits 3.0

This Course Enables Senior English And English Education Majors To Analyze And Synthesize The Key Issues Of The Discipline Through Detailed Studies Of Literature And Close Readings Of Texts, Considering Their Aesthetic Values, Social And Political Ideologies, Rhetorical And Genre Strategies, And Major Biographical Facts About The Authors. Students Compile Annotated Bibliographies, Make Oral Presentations, Write Short Papers Analyzing Critical Problems, And Write One 20-25 Page Scholarly Essay Based On Their Research. Prerequisites: Any Elit Course, Cosk2230 And 75 Credits, Or Permission Of Department Head.


(select One)african Am Lit/world Lit/women And Literature
Course Number (Select one)ELIT2030/ELIT2055/ELIT2080
Credits 3.0

Elit2030 - African Amer Lit & Experience Spring 2011 The Course Focuses On Texts Created By African Americans Which Reflect The Diverse Thoughts, Beliefs, Customs, Struggles, Achievements, And Visions Of African American Writers. This Course Teaches Students The Process Of Close Reading, Analysis, And Interpretation Of Literature And Invites Students To Make Connections Between Literature And Their Experiences. The Course Stresses In-depth Reading And Concentrates On The Interrelationships Of Literary Works And The Social And Cultural Values And Beliefs Reflected In And Affected By Those Works. Some Attention Is Given To The Terminology Basic To Literary Study And To The Place Of Literature In A Well-rounded Education. The Course Is Designed For Students Without Prior Coursework In Literature. Prerequisite: Cosk1221 Elit2055 - World Literature Spring 2011 This Course Examines Ancient And Modern Texts From A Variety Of Cultures. This Course Teaches Students The Process Of Close Reading, Analysis, And Interpretation Of Literature And Invites Students To Make Connections Between Literature And Their Experiences. The Course Stresses In-depth Reading And Concentrates On The Interrelationships Of Literary Works And The Social And Cultural Values And Beliefs Reflected In And Affected By Those Works. Some Attention Is Given To The Terminology Basic To Literary Study And To The Place Of Literature In A Well-rounded Education. The Course Is Designed For Students Without Prior Coursework In Literature. Prerequisite: Cosk1221 Elit2080 - Women And Literature Spring 2011 This Course Focuses On Texts Created By Women Writers Which Reflect The Diverse Thoughts, Beliefs, Customs, Struggles, Achievements, And Visions Of Women. This Course Teaches Students The Process Of Close Reading, Analysis, And Interpretation Of Literature And Invites Students To Make Connections Between Literature And Their Experiences. The Course Stresses In-depth Reading And Concentrates On The Interrelationships Of Literary Works And The Social And Cultural Values And Beliefs Reflected In And Affected By Those Works. Some Attention Is Given To The Terminology Basic To Literary Study And To The Place Of Literature In A Well-rounded Education. The Course Is Designed For Students Without Prior Coursework In Literature. Prerequisite: Cosk1221


Grammar & Editing
Course Number ENGL3010
Credits 3.0

none availible


History Of The English Language
Course Number ENGL3110
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores The Development Of English Phonetic, Phonological, Syntactic, Semantic, And Graphic Systems. Special Attention Is Given To Old And Middle English And To Literary Texts Exemplifying The Languages Of These Periods, Such As Beowulf And Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Prerequisites: Cosk2220 And Any Elit Course


Writing Practices & Theories
Course Number ENGL4000
Credits 3.0

This course explores theories and central issues surrounding the performance and teaching of writing. Studens examine connections among composition theories, practices in teaching writing, and the role of personal experience in writing. The emphasis is on developing a theoretical understanding of how people write, but pragmatic issues also receive attention. The course addresses the following questions: Why do we write How do we learn to write What writing processes do we or could we use What theories or values are embedded in our conceptualizations of how people learn to write and in our definitions of the writing process What kinds of environments foster the learning writing Prerequisite: 60 credits


Introduction To Web Development
Course Number INFS2150
Credits 3.0

Web Design Is An Intermediate Level Course That Integrates Cascading Style Sheets (css), The Javascript Programming Language, And Dynamic Html Into A Deliverable Web-based Ecommerce Or Transactional Processing System Interface. Css's Display And Print Properties Are Presented In Detail Through Various Practical Web Design Projects. Student Will Be Able To Organize Complicated Web Page Designs, Position Html Elements, Control Visibility And Presentation Of Html Layers Similar In Quality Found In The Desktop Publishing Environment. By Using The Document Object Model, Students Will Use Javascript Client-side Programming Language To Transform Static Web Pages Into Applications That Will Interact With The Web User, Enhance Document Navigation, Process Data Before Submitting To A Server And Store State Information Through The Use Of Cookies. Integrating Dhtml (dynamic Html) Concepts With Javascript Will Enable A Student To Code Javascript That Will Change Web Page Content And Style Dynamically And Instantly In Response To User Interaction.


Organizational Communciation
Course Number COMM2700
Credits 3.0

none availible


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL3030
Credits 3.0

Course description unavailable, please contact Academic Services. Please try again at a later time


TECHNICAL Editing
Course Number ENGL3040
Credits 3.0

Course description unavailable, please contact Academic Services. Please try again at a later time


Professional Writing
Course Number COMM3030
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to introduce students to a set of advanced intellectual and rhetorical skills. The course explores theories in writing as well as prepares students to handle applied situations in the field of professional writing. The projects required in this course form a sequenced set of conventions that will enable students to work through practical situations that occur in the workplace. These projects are designed to assist students in developing analytical and persuasive skills which employers see as both necessary and challenging. Prerequisite: COSK2220


Document Design
Course Number COMM3520
Credits 3.0

This Course Prepares Students To Explore Practical Applications Of Verbal And Visual Rhetoric For Specific Subjects, Audiences And Purposes. Students Will Examine Various Theories Of Writing, Layout, Color, Design, Iconography And Typography. By Applying The Principles Of Invention, Arrangement, Style And Delivery, Students Will Develop Strategies To Create, Analyze, Test And Critique Documents. A User-oriented Approach Will Be Stressed In All Design Practices From Planning Through Production. Prerequisites: Artm2050 Or Comm3030 And 75 Credits


Copy Editing
Course Number JRNL2020
Credits 3.0

This course will prepare journalism students to edit text for publication. Upon successful course completion students will be able to: 1) edit text for spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes. 2) enforce Associated Press style when editing. edit text for clarity and effectiveness without impinging on the creativity or autonomy of the author.


(select One)information Gathering/writing For Magazines
Course Number (Select one)JRNL2015/JRNL3055
Credits 3.0

Jrnl2015 - Info Gathering For Journalism Spring 2011 This Course Will Prepare Journalism Students To Gather Information Necessary To Write Newspaper Articles. Upon Successful Course Completion Students Will Be Able To: 1) Find Information Through Interpersonal, Textual, Electronic And Internet Channels. 2) Know The Implications Of Copyright And Intellectual Property Law On Information Gathering. Know When All The Necessary Information For A Particular Story Has Been Acquired. (know When All The Questions Have Been Answered.) Jrnl3055 - Writing For Magazines/e-zines Spring 2011 This Class Will Take A Rhetorical Approach To Freelance Writing For Magazines And Electronic Publications. Students Will Critically Examine Existing Texts And Publications As They Meet The Rhetorical Needs Of Audience, Purpose And Context. In Addition, Students Will Assess A Specific Target Audience For Its Informational/entertainment Needs And Collaborate In The Creation Of An Original Electronic Publication That Meets Those Needs. Students Will Also Develop A Publishable Portfolio Of Two Full Length Feature Articles Targeted To Specific Publications Along With Corresponding Pitch Letters. This Course Encourages Students To Experiment Across Genres With Their Writing And To Actively Engage In The Exciting World Of Freelance Publishing. Prerequisite: Cosk1221 Or Permission Of The Instructor


Internship
Course Number ENGL4XXX
Credits 3.0

none availible


Open Electives
Credits 18.0

Students Are Encouraged To Take Classes In Areas That Are Relevant To Their Professional Trajectory: Information Systems, Business, Engineering, Media Arts, Organizational Studies, Etc. Open Elective 3 Credits Open Elective 3 Credits Open Elective 3 Credits Open Elective 3 Credits Open Elective 3 Credits Open Elective 3 Credits


Program description: The English degree program at Robert Morris University provides students with unique choices and experiences as well as the kind of academic preparation necessary for a career in today's competitive job market. Besides taking courses in writing and literature, students may elect courses in professional communications, in which they create brochures, prepare public relations documents and write newspaper copy.The specialization in English Studies combines the study of American and English literature with communications, including professional writing, document design and journalism production. Students also gain a solid background in liberal arts. This program is particularly well-suited for students seeking careers in professional and corporate training.

English Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Teaching English as a Second Language - TESL
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

n/a


Program description: A degree in ESL teaching qualifies an individual to work in various settings as an ESL instructor, usually in colleges or public schools. Coursework in this discipline includes training in educational methodology, English grammar, linguistics and literary standards, student evaluation techniques, and selection of material. Graduates may qualify to either work in ESL instruction at colleges or private instructional facilities. Many graduates choose to pursue higher levels of education and eventually qualify to work at colleges or universities. Generally a certificate course in ESL instruction is enough for admission to entry-level employment.

English Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BA in English Literature
Analysis of World Literature
Course Number ENG 250
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


English Literature I
Course Number ENG 260
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


English Literature II
Course Number ENG 270
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


American Literature I
Course Number ENG 350
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


American Literature II
Course Number ENG 353
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Introduction to English Grammar and Linguistics
Course Number ENG 358
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Shakespeare
Course Number ENG 450
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Major Author
Course Number ENG 425
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Literary Movement
Course Number ENG 424
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


The Short Story
Course Number ENG 356
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


The Novel
Course Number ENG 460
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors
with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected
authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical
thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching.
Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its
potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.

Program Name: BS in Elementary Education - English (With IR and Cert.)
Exploring Education as a Profession
Course Number EDU 300
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the major goals, principles, and concepts of multicultural education. Specifically, four central topics will guide the study: 1) clarifying key concepts and terminology; 2) discovering multiple perspectives in culture and history; 3) understanding cultural and individual differences in teaching and learning; 4) becoming a multicultural and effective teacher.


Education Foundations and Framework
Course Number EDU 215
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course provides a study of the historical, philosophical, and sociological influences that have shaped American education; the issues faced by educators today; and the challenges of the future that await people now entering the teaching profession. No Fingerprint Clearance necessary.


Cultural Diversity in the Classroom
Course Number EDU 230
Credits 4.0

This course examines the relationship of cultural values to the formation of self-concept and learning styles. The roles of prejudice, stereotyping, and cultural incompatibilities in education are also evaluated. No Fingerprint Clearance necessary.


SEI English Language Teaching: Foundations and Methodologies
Course Number ESL 223N
Credits 3.0

The historical, legal, theoretical, and sociological foundations of programs of instruction for students with non-English language backgrounds are presented. The study of models, prototypes, and methodologies for ESL instruction is included. Practicum hours: 10. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance.


Educational Psychology
Course Number EDU 313N
Credits 3.0

This course provides a thematically arranged study of the theories and principles of psychology that have influenced instructional practices. Behavioral and cognitive approaches to learning, motivation, and instruction are explored. Prerequisite: No Fingerprint Clearance required.


Instructional Technology
Course Number EDU 225
Credits 4.0

This course provides future teachers the opportunity to examine the use of technology in the 21st century classroom. In addition to studying and utilizing a variety of technologies, such as computer software and hardware, students develop a personal technology philosophy and classroom technology plan designed to enhance and shape their teaching skills and knowledge in order to better utilize emerging technology.


Curriculum, Methods and Assessment: Social Studies
Course Number EED 465
Credits 4.0

This Course Is Designed To Assist Elementary Teachers With Methods Of Instruction, Unit And Daily Lesson Plan Construction, Use Of Literary Materials And Resources, And Developing A Coherent, Assessment-based, Data-driven Program Fostering Social Studies In The Classroom. Laboratory Experiences Include Multicultural Classrooms. Practicum Hours: 20. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance, Edu 215, Edu 313n, And Three Credits Of History.


Educating the Exceptional Learner
Course Number SPE 226
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course is a survey of the unique learning needs of exceptional students. Special focus is given to the referral process, appropriate instructional modifications and accommodations for exceptional students, hot topics and trends, and IDEA law. Practicum hours: 15. Prerequisite: Fingerprint Clearance.


Curriculum, Methods, and Assessment: Science and Mathematics
Course Number EED 364
Credits 4.0

This Course Is Designed To Acquaint Elementary Teachers With The Curriculum, Theory, And Effective Techniques For The Teaching And Assessment Of Science And Mathematics. Students Are Involved In Formulation Of Programs, Planning Instruction, Employing Science And Mathematics Resources And Materials That Are Currently Being Used In The Public Schools, And Using Instructional Models. This Course Includes Laboratory Experiences. Practicum Hours: 20. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance, Edu 215 Or Edu 313n; A Bio Course With A Lab; And A Chm Or Phy Course With A Lab.


Curriclum, Methods, and Assessment: Literacy and Language Arts K-3
Course Number EED 470
Credits 4.0

This course includes a wide range of literacy and assessment strategies based on instructional outcomes. Course content is strategically planned to enable participants to make informed decisions based on data in literacy and language instruction. This course includes reading diagnostics, assessments, and strategies implemented with a single elementary student in a site-based reading lab. Practicum hours: 20. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance and EDU 215.


Classroom Engagement and Management
Course Number EDU 450
Credits 4.0

This Course Is Designed To Allow Prospective Teachers The Opportunity To Learn Techniques Involved In The Successful Engagement And Management Of A Learning Environment. Major Emphasis Is Given To The Establishment Of A Realistic Discipline Plan To Manage Student Behavior, As Well As Engagement And Management Techniques And Strategies To Maximize Instructional Time, Classroom Procedures, And Physical Space. Prerequisites: Edu 215 And Edu 230.


Curriculum, Methods, and Assessment: Literacy and Language Arts, 4-8
Course Number EED 475
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to develop a coherent, assessment-based, data-driven program fostering literacy in the classroom. Course content is strategically planned to enable participants to make informed decisions based on assessment data in literacy and language instruction. The course includes discourse theory as it pertains to the teaching of reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on planning and delivery of lessons in reading comprehension, literature, phonics, writing, oral language, vocabulary, and evaluation of learning. Practicum hours: 20. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance and EDU 215.


Arizona and Federal Government
Course Number POS 301
Credits 2.0

This course is a survey of Arizona history and government, as well as American government. It meets the teacher certification requirement for Arizona government and American government.


Student Teaching Session A
Course Number EED 480NA
Credits 6.0

Teacher Candidates Are Required To Fulfill A 16-week Internship Experience In A Classroom With A Certified, Experienced Teacher. The Semester Includes The Opportunity To Improve Skills In Classroom Management, Assessment, And Professional Preparation, And To Utilize Applicable Content Standards, Arizona Professional Teacher’s Standards, And Interstate New Teacher Assessment And Support Consortium Standards Within The Classroom. Prerequisites For A: One Of The Following Combinations: 1) Successful Completion Of All Courses In Pos And Content Area, Senior Status, A 2.8 Gpa, And Approval And Placement By Office Of Field Placement And Certification; Or 2) Successful Completion Of All Courses In Pos And Content Area; Senior Status; A 2.8 Gpa; Successful Completion Of State Mandated Basic Skills And Content Area Exams Or Praxis I ® (basic Skills) And Praxis Ii ® (content Area ); And Approval And Placement By Office Of Field Experience; Arizona Residents Will Be Require


Student Teaching Session B
Course Number EED 480NB
Credits 6.0

This Session Is A Continuation Of Session A. All Paperwork For Student Teaching Must Be Submitted By The Due Date The Semester Prior To Student Teaching. Prerequisites For B: One Of The Following Combinations: 1) Successful Completion Of All Courses In Pos And Content Area, Senior Status, A 2.8 Gpa, And Approval And Placement By Office Of Field Placement And Certification; Or 2) Eed 480na.


Analysis of World Literature
Course Number ENG 250
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Introduction to English Grammar and Linguistics
Course Number ENG 358
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


English Literature I
Course Number ENG 260
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


American Literature I
Course Number ENG 350
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education with an Emphasis in English (Grades K-8) (Eligible for Institutional Recommendation) program is designed for students interested in the education of children in grades K-8, and for those who are seeking teacher certification. The format and courses of this regionally accredited and Arizona-approved program are designed to maximize the content knowledge that the teacher candidate will possess upon graduation. Courses are taught by experts in their respective fields who share knowledge and experience in areas of educational psychology, philosophy, methodology, and curriculum development. All courses are directly aligned with the Arizona Professional Teacher Standards and the Interstate New Teacher Support and Assessment Consortium Standards. Opportunities are provided to apply concepts, theories, and research throughout the program. Assignments within many of the courses guide students through over 100 hours of observational and practice-based experiences, and the final semester of the program includes a full-time, 16-week student teaching component. These educational settings must be state certified environments and mentor teachers must be fully certified. Teacher candidates are responsible for contacting their state department of education for certification requirements and program approval. Furthermore, teacher candidates should consult the Grand Canyon University Catalog, the University Policy Handbook, and an academic counselor to obtain information regarding current policies and procedures inherent in a teacher credentialing program. Graduates of the Bachelor of Education in Elementary Education program are prepared to become informed educators in public and private schools and other settings requiring a teaching credential.

Program Name: BS in Secondary Education - English
Education Foundations and Framework
Course Number EDU 215 ∆
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course provides a study of the historical,philosophical, and sociological influences that have shaped American education; the issues faced by educators today; and the challenges of the future that await people now entering the teaching profession. No Fingerprint Clearance necessary.


SEI English Language Teaching: Foundations and Methodologies
Course Number ESL 223N
Credits 3.0

The historical, legal, theoretical, and sociological foundations of programs of instruction for students with non-English language backgrounds are presented. The study of models, prototypes, and methodologies for ESL instruction is included. Practicum hours: 10. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance.


Secondary Methods and Data Driven Pedagogy
Course Number SED 444
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to help teachers and prospective teachers of young adults find their own teaching styles and recognize the different learning styles of their students in order to make appropriate decisions about all aspects of the teaching profession.Emphasis is given to teaching methodology that encourages problem solving, active participation, and assessment. Course content is strategically planned to enable participants to make informed educational decisions about student learning based on data. This course focuses on the principles and practices involved in various models of educational assessment, evaluation, and testing. Practicum hours: 30. Prerequisite: Fingerprint Clearance.


Adolescent Literacy
Course Number SED 435
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to assist teacher candidates in understanding, evaluating and implementing effective pedagogy in adolescent literacy. A graduate in adolescent literacy should be able to recognize and assess the defining elements of literacy, from decoding skills to higher level critical thinking applications.Subsequently, teachers should be able to understand, evaluate, and promote effective literacy pedagogy as it relates to the adolescent learner. Practicum hours: 30. Prerequisite: Fingerprint Clearance.


Reading and Learning Strategies for Middle and Secondary Schools
Course Number SED 454
Credits 4.0

This Course Develops A Broad Range Of Reading (from Decoding Skills To Higher Level Critical Thinking Applications), Teaching, And Learning Strategies To Effectively Enhance The Learning Of Middle And Secondary School Students. A Major Emphasis Is Given To Utilization Of These Strategies In The Midst Of Today’s Socially And Culturally Diverse Classrooms. Subsequently, Teachers Should Be Able To Understand, Evaluate, And Promote Effective Adolescent Literacy Pedagogy. Practicum Hours: 30. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance, Edu 215, And Edu 230.


Secondary Curriculum Development and Assessment
Course Number SED 455
Credits 4.0

In this study of secondary school curriculum development, major emphasis is given to planning instructional objectives and lessons, assessing objectives, and developing a model curriculum. Practicum hours: 20. Prerequisites: Fingerprint Clearance and SED 444.


Exploring Education as a Profession
Course Number EDU 310
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to provide an overview of the education profession for students who are inspired to be teachers. Students explore a variety of the common issues, trends, and opportunities that professional educators face in the field. No Fingerprint Clearance necessary


English Literature I
Course Number ENG 260
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


American Literature I
Course Number ENG 350
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Introduction to English Grammar and Linguistics
Course Number ENG 358
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Shakespeare
Course Number ENG 450
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Cultural Diversity in the Classroom
Course Number EDU 230
Credits 4.0

This course examines the relationship of cultural values to the formation of self-concept and learning styles. The roles of prejudice, stereotyping, and cultural incompatibilities in education are also evaluated. No Fingerprint Clearance necessary.


Educational Psychology
Course Number EDU 313N
Credits 3.0

This course provides a thematically arranged study of the theories and principles of psychology that have influenced instructional practices. Behavioral and cognitive approaches to learning, motivation, and instruction are explored. Prerequisite: No Fingerprint Clearance required.


Instructional Technology
Course Number EDU 225
Credits 4.0

This course provides future teachers the opportunity to examine the use of technology in the 21st century classroom. In addition to studying and utilizing a variety of technologies, such as computer software and hardware, students develop a personal technology philosophy and classroom technology plan designed to enhance and shape their teaching skills and knowledge in order to better utilize emerging technology.


Educating the Exceptional Learner
Course Number SPE 226
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course is a survey of the unique learning needs of exceptional students. Special focus is given to the referral process, appropriate instructional modifications and accommodations for exceptional students, hot topics and trends, and IDEA law. Practicum hours: 15. Prerequisite: Fingerprint Clearance.


Classroom Engagement and Management
Course Number EDU 450
Credits 4.0

This Course Is Designed To Allow Prospective Teachers The Opportunity To Learn Techniques Involved In The Successful Engagement And Management Of A Learning Environment. Major Emphasis Is Given To The Establishment Of A Realistic Discipline Plan To Manage Student Behavior, As Well As Engagement And Management Techniques And Strategies To Maximize Instructional Time, Classroom Procedures, And Physical Space. Prerequisites: Edu 215 And Edu 230.


Arizona and Federal Government
Course Number POS 301
Credits 2.0

This course is a survey of Arizona history and government, as well as American government. It meets the teacher certification requirement for Arizona government and American government.


Student Teaching Session A
Course Number EED 480NA
Credits 6.0

Teacher Candidates Are Required To Fulfill A 16-week Internship Experience In A Classroom With A Certified, Experienced Teacher. The Semester Includes The Opportunity To Improve Skills In Classroom Management, Assessment, And Professional Preparation, And To Utilize Applicable Content Standards, Arizona Professional Teacher’s Standards, And Interstate New Teacher Assessment And Support Consortium Standards Within The Classroom. Prerequisites For A: One Of The Following Combinations: 1) Successful Completion Of All Courses In Pos And Content Area, Senior Status, A 2.8 Gpa, And Approval And Placement By Office Of Field Placement And Certification; Or 2) Successful Completion Of All Courses In Pos And Content Area; Senior Status; A 2.8 Gpa; Successful Completion Of State Mandated Basic Skills And Content Area Exams Or Praxis I ® (basic Skills) And Praxis Ii ® (content Area ); And Approval And Placement By Office Of Field Experience; Arizona Residents Will Be Require


Student Teaching Session B
Course Number EED 480NB
Credits 6.0

This Session Is A Continuation Of Session A. All Paperwork For Student Teaching Must Be Submitted By The Due Date The Semester Prior To Student Teaching. Prerequisites For B: One Of The Following Combinations: 1) Successful Completion Of All Courses In Pos And Content Area, Senior Status, A 2.8 Gpa, And Approval And Placement By Office Of Field Placement And Certification; Or 2) Eed 480na.


Advanced Methodologies of Structured English Immersion
Course Number ESL 433N
Credits 3.0

In this course, students continue to examine the fundamentals of the legal, historical, and educational foundations of Structured English Immersion and other instructional programs for English Language Learners. Theoretical principles of language acquisition and the role of culture in learning are examined. Methods of assessment are identified and analyzed. Students identify strategies to promote English language development and improve student achievement. They plan, deliver, and evaluate instruction for English language learners


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education with an Emphasis in English (Eligible for Institutional
Recommendation) is a degree offered by the College of Education in conjunction with the College of Liberal
Arts for students desiring to prepare for a career in teaching grades 7 -12. The format and courses of this
regionally accredited and Arizona-approved program are designed to maximize the content knowledge that the
teacher candidate will possess upon graduation. The Secondary Education program is designed to prepare
students for careers in middle schools and high schools. Students/applicants are responsible for contacting their
state department of education for certification requirements and program approval. The student/applicant should
consult the Grand Canyon Academic Catalog, University Policy Handbook, and an academic advisor to obtain
information regarding current policies and procedures inherent in a teacher credentialing program. Courses are
taught by experts in their respective fields who share knowledge and experiences in the areas of educational
psychology, reading strategies, teaching methods, assessment, classroom management, and curriculum
development. All courses are directly aligned with the Arizona Professional Teacher Standards and the
Interstate New Teacher Support and Assessment Consortium Standards. Opportunities are provided to apply
concepts, theories, and research throughout the teacher preparation program.

Program Name: MED Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) (No IR, No Cert.)
Internal Auditing
Course Number ACC 612
Credits 3.0

Students study the principles involved in internal auditing. Topics include internal controls, the responsibilities and authority of the internal audit function, the types of audits conducted by internal auditors, and accounting ethics. Forensic accounting and Sarbanes-Oxley will also be covered.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC 250
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An Introduction To The Accounting Cycle And The Construction Of Financial Statements. Students Explore The Fundamental Principles And Practices Of Financial Accounting As Outlined By Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (gaap); The Steps In The Accounting Cycle From Journalizing Transactions Through The Preparation Of Financial Statements; And The Use And Interpretation Of The Balance Sheet, Income Statement, And Statement Of Cash Flows. Prerequisite: Mat 134 Or Equivalent College Algebra Course.


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACC 350
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An Introduction To The Use Of Managerial Accounting Data In The Decision-making Process. Topics Include The Use Of Cost-volume-profit (cvp) Analysis And Relevant Costs In Decision Making, Using Budgets And The Balanced Scorecard To Evaluate Performance, Methods For Setting Prices Of Products And Services, And Analyzing Capital Investment Opportunities. Prerequisite: Acc 250.


Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number ACC 370
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An In-depth Study Of Accounting Objectives, Principles, Theory, And Practice As Related To The Balance Sheet And Income Statement. Students Will Explore Accounting For Assets, Liabilities, And Equity Items, The Specific Rules For Accounting For Pensions, Postretirement Benefits, Leases, And Accounting Changes, And Other Items Frequently Addressed On The Uniform Certified Public Accounting Examination (uniform Cpa Exam). Prerequisite: Acc 350


Intermediate Accounting II
Course Number ACC 371
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An In-depth Study Of Accounting Objectives, Principles, Theory, And Practice As Related To The Balance Sheet And Income Statement. Students Explore Liabilities And Equity Items; The Specific Rules For Accounting For Pensions; Postretirement Benefits, Leases, And Accounting Changes; And Other Items Frequently Addressed On The Uniform Certified Public Accounting Examination (uniform Cpa Exam). This Course Also Includes An Analysis And Interpretation Of A Firm’s Three Principal Financial Statements And Their Uses From A Managerial Perspective. Prerequisites: Acc 370 And Fin 350


Cost Accounting
Course Number ACC 360
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of principles of internal accounting, including job order systems, process costing, activity-based costing, and budgeting. Prerequisite: ACC 350.


Intermediate Accounting (Retired)
Course Number ACC 355
Credits 4.0

This Course Is An In-depth Study Of Accounting Objectives, Principles, Theory, And Practice As Related To The Balance Sheet And Income Statement. Students Will Explore Accounting For Assets, Liabilities, And Equity Items, The Specific Rules For Accounting For Pensions, Postretirement Benefits, Leases, And Accounting Changes, And Other Items Frequently Addressed On The Uniform Certified Public Accounting Examination (uniform Cpa Exam). Prerequisite: Acc 350.


Financial Statement Analysis
Course Number ACC 486
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides A Detailed Analysis And Interpretation Of A Firm’s Three Principal Financial Statements And Their Uses From A Managerial Perspective. Prerequisites: Acc 350 And Fin 350.


Corporate Taxation
Course Number ACC 429
Credits 3.0

A study of the theory and practices of accounting for income taxes of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: ACC 322.


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number ACC 430
Credits 3.0

An Analysis Of Current Practices And Technologies Used To Design, Install, Operate, And Manage An Integrated, Automated Accounting System. Application Controls, Information Security Requirements, And Integration With Other Business Information Systems Are Examined. Prerequisites: Acc 212 And Sym 301.


Taxation
Course Number ACC 460
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of the theory and practices of accounting for income taxes of corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, and individuals. Other taxes covered include payroll and sales taxes. Prerequisite: ACC 250.


Advanced Accounting
Course Number ACC 485
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides A Study Of Accounting Theory As It Applies To Partnerships And Business Combinations, International Accounting, And Governmental Accounting. Prerequisites: One Of The Following: 1) Acc 355, Or 2) Acc 370 And 371.


Auditing
Course Number ACC 491
Credits 4.0

Auditing Is An Examination Of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards, Procedures Involved In The Auditing Process, And Ethical Issues Faced By The Auditor. Through Class Discussions, Practical Applications And Case Studies, Students Learn The Responsibilities Of The Independent Public Auditor In The Expression Of Opinion Within The Guidelines Set By The Aicpa’s Code Of Professional Ethics. Topics Include The Nature And Types Of Audits, Auditor Responsibilities And Legal Liabilities, Audit Reports, Auditing Procedures, Ethical Issues, Contemporary Issues In Auditing, And The Sarbanes-oxley Act Of 2002. Prerequisite: Acc 350.


Accounting Theory
Course Number ACC 495
Credits 3.0

An exploration of financial accounting theory and its role in current accounting practice. Prerequisites: ACC 322.


Accounting Practices
Course Number ACC 501
Credits 3.0

This course is designed for students who have not had accounting in their undergraduate work or for those who desire a refresher in accounting. Topics covered include the accounting cycle, the presentation and valuation of accounts shown on the Balance Sheet and Income Statement, the Statement of Cash Flows, cost behavior, and budgeting.


Business Law and Ethics for Accounting
Course Number ACC 623
Credits 4.0

This course gives students a robust legal and ethical framework that is crucial for accountants and managers under SarbanesOxley. Using case studies that incorporate the principles of business law, the AICPA code, and other systems of ethics, students learn how a commitment to ethics can enable accounting professionals to meet their ethical obligations to all stakeholders.


Financial Intelligence and Decision Making
Course Number ACC 633
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on understanding, interpreting, and using financial information for the purposes of making sound financial decisions. The concept of financial intelligence is introduced as it relates to effectively analyzing and assessing financial performance to understand what numbers really mean and when or how to appropriately challenge them.


Program description: The Master of Education in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) (Not Eligible for
Institutional Recommendation) program is designed for certified teachers or administrators with an interest in
teaching ESL students in the classroom or serving as a district ESL coordinator. The format and courses of this
regionally accredited program are tailored to meet the needs of the adult learner and to maximize strengths that
the working educator possesses. Courses are taught by experts in their respective fields who share knowledge
and experience in areas of linguistics, second language acquisition, and curriculum development. Opportunities
are provided to apply concepts, theories, and research throughout the program, but particularly in a TESOL
practicum that guides students through observational and practice-based experiences. Graduates of the program
are prepared to become leaders in the ESL/TESOL initiatives that districts must undertake in an ever-increasing
school climate of diversity.

English Courses by State & City

Top 20 US English Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Princeton University
Total Programs 56
Number of Subjects 59
Rank in USA 8th
Brown University
Total Programs 135
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 9th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th