Online Forensic Accounting Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its forensic accounting courses to be successful forensic accountants, forensics specialists, crime scene forensics specialists, computer forensics specialists, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 1,106,980 people employed as accountants and auditors alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $67,430. Bill and account collectors make on average $32,560 per year and there are about 403,100 of them employed today.

Forensic Accounting Organizations Forensic Accounting Common Job Tasks
  • investigating regulatory inquiries
  • quantifying losses
  • analyzing transactions
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Forensic Accounting Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: A.S. in Forensic Accounting

Program description:

Program Name: BSA/Auditing-Forensic Accountancy
Major Electives
Course Number 300/400
Credits 24.0

Level Major Elective
Course Number 100/200
Credits 15.0

Academic Strategies For The It Professional
Course Number CS 114
Credits 5.0

Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces students to the purposes and processes of university education. An emphasis is placed on study, communication, and thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation. Choose either CS114 or CS121.


Accounting I
Course Number AC114
Credits 5.0

Accounting II
Course Number AC116

Managerial accounting
Course Number AC 239

this course emphasizes the way in which accounting information can be used to aid management in planning and controlling business activities.


Federal tax
Course Number AC 256

This course introduces the students to the procedures to decipher tax information on an individual federal tax basis.


Business math
Course Number MM 255

Business math presents math skills and knowledge that students can apply to solve financial problems


Macroeconomics
Course Number Bu 204

This course includes analysis and study of macroeconomic theory, principles and practice.


Intermediate Accounting I
Course Number AC 300
Credits 6.0

h is course examines the full accounting process and covers selected conceptual accounting issues, aspects of i nancial reporting, and structure and reporting requirements for the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash l ows. In-depth analyses of current and long-term assets are also included.


Intermediate Accounting Ii
Course Number AC 301
Credits 6.0

h is course covers the accounting theory and practices associated with inventory valuations; the acquisition, cost allocation, and disposal of property, plants, and equipment; intangible assets; current liabilities, contingencies, and long-term liabilities; and investments.


Business Law
Course Number MT 311
Credits 6.0

Bachelor's Capstone in Management
Course Number MT499
Credits 6.0

Intermediate Accounting Iii
Course Number AC 302
Credits 6.0

h is course covers the accounting theory and practices associated with corporate accounting issues involving pensions, leases, earnings per share, taxes, contributed capital, and income recognition. h e reporting requirements and structure of the statement of cash l ows are examined. In-depth studies of accounting changes and error analysis are also included.


AUDITING
Course Number AC 410
Credits 6.0

h is course examines the role of the auditor in a technological global business environment. Students are exposed to the scope of auditing as a profession, the rules governing the professional ethics of the CPA, and the components of the auditing process, along with the legal liabilities and responsibilities of an auditor.


Advanced Accounting
Course Number AC 450
Credits 6.0

This course covers the accounting theory and practices associated with intercorporate investments, foreign currency transactions, and accounting for state and local governments.


Advanced Forensic Accounting
Course Number AC 465
Credits 6.0

This course provides a survey of advanced forensic accounting topics. A critical component of this course includes an examination of the legal aspects of the profession. In addition to covering accounting fraud investigation and prevention techniques, students will learn how to collect evidence, provide legal support, and testify in court


Program description: Students in Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in Accounting, auditing and forensic accountancy emphasis program have the opportunity to study payroll accounting, macroeconomics, federal taxation, and business law. The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program is designed to help prepare students to pursue a career in the accounting profession.* In conjunction with core accounting courses, classes in the auditing/forensic accountancy emphasis area focuses on the principles of auditing, forensic and cost accounting, and fraud detection. General education courses emphasize instruction in mathematics, the social and physical sciences, the arts and humanities, and communications. While requirements vary by state, the Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree program could help students meet the requirements to sit for the CPA Exam.

Forensic Accounting Courses at Post University

Program Name: Certificate: Forensic Accounting
Forensic Accounting
Course Number ACC325
Credits 3.0

Forensic Accounting is the use of accounting and other business techniques to investigate and uncover fraud, gather evidence and present findings in a courtroom setting. The criminal site investigation involves the applicable books, financial records and documents examined. Frauds include theft of cash and merchandise, corruption, bribery, kickbacks, fraudulent financial statements, hidden assets, divorces, bankruptcies, money laundering, identity theft and false insurance claims.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ101
Credits 3.0

The student will be introduced to the American Criminal Justice System from the perspective of the criminal justice professional. The course examines the historical development and role of the police, prosecution, corrections, probation, parole, and rehabilitation.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJ211
Credits 3.0

The student is introduced to the principles of criminal investigation. These include techniques and methods used in searching the crime scene, locating and interviewing witnesses, interrogating witnesses, and developing suspects. Attention is given to the basics of forensic science, including photography. Prerequisite: CRJ102.


White-Collar Crime
Course Number CRJ332
Credits 3.0

This course provides an analysis of crimes committed by persons in a position of trust, including embezzlement, fraud, false advertising, price fixing, black market activities, and governmental corruption. Crimes against one’s employer and crimes committed by corporate executives for their corporation are studied. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Fraud Prevention & Examination
Course Number ACC315
Credits 3.0

This course covers the principles and methodology of fraud prevention, detection, deterrence and investigation. The course includes such topics as skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, non-cash misappropriations, corruption, financial management fraud, and interviewing witnesses.


Electronic Investigations
Course Number CRJ346
Credits 3.0

This course studies the vast amount of information available to investigators through public records and the internet. The focus is on how to understand, obtain, discern and utilize public record information for investigatory purposes. This course is relevant to both public and private investigators. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Program description: Several state and federal government agencies and businesses hire individuals with this background. All large public accounting firms now have a "Forensic Accounting" department and many small firms have an individual working part time in this function. In addition to providing an educational base for entry level employment into the field, this program should help prepare students to take the Certified Fraud Examiner Examination and become a Certified Fraud Examiner.

With Post University Online, you can earn Certificate in Forensic Accounting entirely online, with no commuting or interruptions in your current career.

You will study in highly interactive, small classes in 8-week accelerated modules. Our faculty will actively engage you in a high quality and relevant curriculum that prepares you to enter a rewarding career in accounting.

We prepare you for a new career in accounting, career advancement within your current organization, and management positions in small and large organizations. Many of our graduates move on the complete 4-year degrees and pursue professional certification relevant to the accounting professions (CPA and CMA).

Our accounting graduates take positions in both large multinationals and small, local firms as accountants, auditors, actuaries, budget analysts, financial managers, loan officers and counselors, and underwriters.

Forensic Accounting Courses at Capella University

Program Name: PhD - Accounting
Theory and Practice in Business
Course Number PHB8004
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore business theories, research, and practice. In particular, learners study the challenges of conducting scholarly research and the practice of leading and managing a business enterprise. Learners explore the depth and breadth of business research, the research methodologies used to conduct it, and potential business research topic areas. Learners also focus on strengthening their critical-thinking and scholarly writing skills


Marketing Strategy and Practice
Course Number OM7020
Credits 4.0

. This course presents learners with a systematic analysis of the factors that influence marketing strategy and uses marketing theory to evaluate opportunities, identify market segments, and to formulate appropriate strategies. While this course has a theoretical focus, the development of good marketing practices also receives attention


Ethics and Social Responsibility
Course Number DPA8408
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Study The Ways In Which Creating And Maintaining Public Value And Mission-specific Leadership Provides The Foundations For Ethical Behavior. Learners Analyze Case Studies That Illustrate Ethical Dilemmas In Order To Develop Intelligence, Planning, Operations, Command, Interagency Coordination, Communication, And Technology Solutions Applicable To A Variety Of Public Agencies And Situations. Prerequisite(s): Completion Of Or Concurrent Enrollment In Dpa8100. May Be Taken Concurrently With Dpa8412. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Applied Enterprise Economics
Course Number PHB7045
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine microeconomic, macroeconomic, and trade theory; evaluate the operation of markets in the allocation of scarce resources; and explore current literature in applying economic theory to financial decision making at the individual and firm level. Learners also examine topics and concepts of economics education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


organizational Systems and leadership
Course Number PHB7075
Credits 4.0

This course presents the theoretical foundations, research, and practices of organizational systems and leadership. Learners analyze organizations as systems and evaluate the ways they are affected by their structure and the external environment. Learners also examine the practice of leadership using a systems approach and synthesize organizational systems and leadership theory.


Strategy, Planning, and operations in Business
Course Number PHB8012
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine theories of and approaches to effective strategy formulation, integration, and implementation across the various functional areas of business operations. Learners focus on the skills needed to become strategic thinkers and leaders in today’s complex global business environment and practice using them to solve contemporary issues in business strategy, planning, and operations. Learners also examine business goals and objectives within the context of internal and external influences and strategic management methodologies


Quantitative Research Techniques
Course Number OM8020
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore fundamental concepts needed to conduct graduate-level quantitative research. Learners examine the foundations, methods, and applications of quantitative research; dependencies among research design, measurement, and analysis; variable types and levels of measurement; sampling; and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and hypothesis testing.


Management Theory Creation
Course Number OM8021
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the scientific, philosophical, and methodological approaches underlying organization and management research and theory. Course topics include the scholar-practitioner as social and behavioral scientist and purveyor of evidencebased management and ways of working with the extant literature. Learners analyze and report on the elements of a scientific study and evaluate the ontological, axiological, and epistemological assumptions underlying qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies. Learners also identify the strengths and limitations of various methodological approaches and provide recommendations for future research based on author-identified limitations and a review of the seminal works and recent research.


Survey of Applied Research Methods
Course Number OM8022
Credits 4.0

. This course focuses on research designs for qualitative, quantitative, mixedmethods, and applied research in organization and management. Learners move beyond conducting reviews of literature at the methodological level, focusing on research design in order to evaluate specific design features related to reliability and threats to validity, and to craft their own research prospectus. Learners explore the meaning of content and process gaps, problems, and opportunities uncovered through a review of the literature. They also examine issues related to management science research ethics and the role of the Institutional Review Board (IRB)


Advanced Research: Mixed-Methods Research Designs
Course Number PHB8024
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using mixed-methods research designs in applied business and organizational research. Learners examine the philosophic foundations and practical implications of merging numerical and non-numerical data to gain a comprehensive perspective of complex business and organizational phenomena than that gained by using either quantitative or qualitative methods alone. Learners also focus on using evidencebased practice to create actionable knowledge in local contexts; connect theory with practice to address core performance and quality metrics; and develop a comprehensive mixed-methods research prospectus


Teaching Practice Seminar
Course Number OM8910
Credits 4.0

Learners in this seminar examine the practice fundamentals necessary for a teaching career in management education. Syllabus and course development, online and classroom instruction, as well as the fundamentals of human development in the classroom are explored


leadership Practice Seminar
Course Number OM8920
Credits 4.0

. Learners in this seminar examine the practice fundamentals needed to prepare themselves for an executive leadership role. Learners review theories and models of leadership from a scholar-practitioner perspective and gain an understanding of the leadership responsibilities required by today’s complex and diverse organizations


Consulting Practice Seminar
Course Number OM8930
Credits 4.0

Learners in this seminar examine the fundamentals necessary for building and establishing a management consulting business or preparing themselves for possible careers in consulting or management. Learners review the various roles of the consultant and assess their own consulting experience, skills, and abilities. Learners also evaluate and apply marketing principles to a consulting business, examine the legal aspects of establishing their own consulting business, and explore the role of ethics in being a successful consultant


Survey in Financial Accounting
Course Number PHB8410
Credits 4.0

. Learners in this course study financial accounting standards and practices and associated legal, regulatory, and reporting issues. Learners focus on the relationship between financial accounting research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of financial accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


Survey in Managerial Accounting
Course Number PHB8415
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study managerial accounting and its association with managerial practice and decision making. Learners focus on the relationship between managerial accounting research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of managerial accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


Accounting Information Systems
Course Number PHB8420
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study accounting information systems and their influence on internal and external financial reporting, managerial decision making, audit, and control. Learners explore emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications of accounting information systems and examine topics and concepts of accounting information systems education. Learners also strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Auditing
Course Number PHB8422
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study audit program design, planning, and implementation and associated regulatory topics, including the SarbanesOxley Act. Learners explore emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications of auditing and examine topics and concepts of auditingeducation. Learners also strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects.


International Accounting
Course Number PHB8424
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study international accounting standards and the evolving process of harmonization and compare U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with those of other countries. Learners focus on the relationship between international accounting and finance research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of international accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research project


Fraud Examination
Course Number PHB8426
Credits 4.0

This course provides an examination of the nature and causes of fraud and presents various approaches to prevent, detect, investigate, and regulate fraudulent activity, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Learners explore emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications of fraud and examine topics and concepts of fraud education. Learners also strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Forensic Accounting
Course Number PHB8428
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study the requirements, processes, and techniques used to present accounting and financial information in the legal environment. Learners focus on the relationship between forensic accounting research and practice and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of forensic accounting education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Taxation
Course Number PHB8430
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of various taxation systems. Learners evaluate the influence of taxation on society and economic decision making and explore its emerging trends, technologies, and societal implications. Learners also examine topics and concepts of taxation education and strengthen their skills in discerning and describing research topics, reviewing literature, and designing research projects


Dissertation Research 1 Dissertation Research 30
Course Number PHB9921–PHB9950
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication for a total of 30 credits.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Program description: The doctoral specialization in Accounting is designed for accounting faculty, accounting professionals such as certified public accountants and certified and chartered management accountants, or those with a Master of Accountancy or equivalent degree. The specialization provides learners the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of accounting research, practice, and education and strengthen the skills needed to think critically about and formulate appropriate solutions to accounting problems. Throughout the specialization, learners evaluate advanced theoretical constructs, standards, and techniques of accounting practice; analyze strategic implications of various accounting issues; and conduct scholarly research that contributes to the field of accounting. Upon successful completion of this specialization, learners are prepared to pursue advancement in accounting research, practice

Forensic Accounting Courses at Jones International University

Program Name: MBA in Forensic Accounting
Fundamental Forensic Knowledge
Course Number ACC600CC600
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Forensic Accounting Student To Professional Standards And Legal Issues Including Aicpa Professional Standards And The Uniform Standards Of Professional Appraisal Practice (uspap), The Sarbanes-oxley Act Of 2002 And Corporate Governance, And Federal Securities Laws And Pertinent Internal Revenue Code Citations.


Specialized Forensic Knowledge
Course Number ACC601
Credits 3.0

In this case based course students will examine current issues, changes in legislation and court cases involving fraud examination and forensic accounting.


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Leading from a Global Perspective
Course Number BC607
Credits 3.0

This course analyzes the impact of globalization on business. It is designed to help students develop their capacity for working in a global business environment by discussing ethical and political issues, future scenarios for a multi-centric world, and imprinted views on what is “good” and what is “bad.” Students will investigate a wide range of topics including: Global challenges for business Culture, diversity, and the digital divide The paradox of corporate personhood Free trade versus fair trade The course project is a Strategic Entry Report: Developing a Plan for a Business Operation Abroad. The report will include an overview of the cultural, political, and macroeconomic environment in a target country and region, and an estimate of the costs and political risks of doing business there. Students will make a supported, clear-cut, yes-or-no recommendation on whether to establish a business operation in the target country.


Making Ethical Management Decisions
Course Number ETH401
Credits 4.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Economics and Competitive Strategies
Course Number MBA502
Credits 3.0

This course examines managerial economics, which is a part of the field of microeconomics. Students will learn how to interpret and how to predict the actions of consumers (the demand side of the economy) and the actions of firms (the supply side).Students will investigate a wide range of related topics including: Standard economic principles that apply to traditional and “new-economy” firms Strategic interactions or game theory Investment theory and capital markets Information technology’s impact on the behavior of firms and consumers Students will participate in Forum discussions and write eight short papers. Some assignments require independent research, and all require concise analysis of specific course topics. Students will apply their personal perspective to the solution of challenging, real-world problems.


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACC560
Credits 4.0

Covers the creation, use, and interpretation of internal accounting data and information. Emphasizes the managerial functions of cost control and reporting, budgeting, profit planning, and projections used in decision-making. Prerequisites ACC 557 Financial Accounting


Financial Management
Course Number FIN534
Credits 4.0

Introduces The Concepts Of Finance. Reviews The Basic Tools And Their Use For Making Financial Decisions. Explains How To Measure And Compare Risks Across Investment Opportunities. Analyzes How The Firm Chooses The Set Of Securities It Will Issue To Raise Capital From Investors As Well As How The Firm’s Capital Structure Is Formed. Examines How The Choice Of Capital Structure Affects The Value Of The Firm. Presents Valuation And Integrate Risk, Return And The Firm’s Choice Of Capital Structure. Prerequisites Acc 560 Managerial Accounting Acc 557 Financial Accounting


Marketing Management
Course Number BBA304
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental concepts and issues in marketing. Students will learn to analyze an organization’s marketing environment and its potential customers. Based on these insights, students will discuss the key functions of marketing, which consist primarily of decisions related to product, price, place (distribution), and promotion.


Auditing I
Course Number MBA620
Credits 3.0

This course systematically presents the audit process, introducing the concepts of audit risk, materiality, and evidence. The risk assessment process proposed by the Auditing Standards Board and adopted by the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board is incorporated into the course. Students will investigate a wide range of related topics including: Risk assessment and materiality Evidence and documentation Internal control and audit sampling Auditing processes for revenue, purchases, and human resources management Students will evaluate realistic auditing cases, supporting their positions with appropriate calculations. They will also explore and evaluate Internet resources related to course topics, and participate in Forum discussions that challenge them to think critically about and apply conceptual and technical auditing practices. Prerequisites: BBA408 (Intermediate Accounting II) or the equivalent


Auditing II
Course Number MBA621
Credits 3.0

This course addresses auditing theory and practice with regard to the following business processes: inventory, financing assets, long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, and income statement accounts. It provides an introduction to completing the audit and reporting responsibilities, including professional responsibilities relative to assurance, attestation, and internal auditing services. Students will investigate a wide range of related topics including: Auditing the finance process Reporting on audited financial statements Completing the engagement Implementing internal control over financial reporting Students will complete application problem assignments to gain experience in applying auditing techniques, often requiring calculations to derive numerical solutions. Discussion assignments will challenge them to think critically about and apply conceptual and technical auditing issues. Prerequisites: MBA620 (Auditing I) or the equivalent


Forensic Accounting
Course Number MBA624
Credits 3.0

This course systematically approaches fraud detection and deterrence concepts relative to forensic accounting. It addresses what fraud is and how it is committed, detected, and deterred. The course is based on the three main categories of occupational fraud and abuse: Asset misappropriation Corruption Fraudulent statements Students will complete case studies and problem assignments that often require calculations to derive numerical solutions. Discussions and written assignments will challenge them to think critically about conceptual and technical issues covered in the course. Prerequisites: MBA621 (Auditing II), or the equivalent


MBA Capstone
Course Number MBA580
Credits 3.0

This course requires students to integrate prior course work and demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of an organization in the accomplishment of its goals and strategies. The focus is on strategic management. Course topics include an exploration of a wide range of management concepts and principles, including: Strategic leadership systems Business models Effective governance systems Strategic planning for organizational growth The course project is a Strategic Business Analysis: Developing a Plan for Growth. It requires students to assess an organization’s business strategy, leadership system, global prospects, code of conduct, and growth opportunities with an ethical emphasis.


Program description: The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines forensic as “belonging to, used in, or suitable to courts of judicature or to public
discussion and debate”. The Forensic Accountant, through their knowledge of accounting practices, provides findings that are of
high enough quality to be presentable and sustainable in a court of law.
Degree Learning Objectives:
Apply concepts of audit risk, materiality, and evidence to selected audit and assurance services, processes and business
systems
Understand professional audit responsibilities relative to assurance, attestation, and internal auditing services
Evaluate different approaches to fraud detection and deterrence relative to forensics accounting
Evaluate and understand the legal issues and industry standards that impact the forensic accountant
Analyze current topics in Forensic Accounting
Develop foundational business knowledge and skills through the core courses
Who should enroll:
Students who are interested in examining and determining the whether an accounting or financial activity is legal in support of
corporate compliance officers, lawyers, and law enforcement personnel. This work may focus on fraud prevention for risk
mitigation, fraud detection, or both. The JIU MBA specialization in Forensic Accounting is an advanced accounting degree
designed for students who have a prior accounting degree (undergraduate or masters level) and wish to combine that knowledge
with specialized knowledge in auditing and forensic accounting – the Forensic Accountant’s role is to detect abnormalities within
accounting systems and as such first need to know what normal accounting practices are. JIU undergraduate accounting majors
who have completed their accounting course work and wish to take these courses as their upper level electives are also welcome.

Forensic Accounting Courses at Utica College

Program Name: Bachelor in Economic Crime Investigation
Computer Hardware and Peripherals
Course Number CRJ 107
Credits 3.0

Computer hardware and peripherals and other digital media used in commission of cyber-crimes. Hands-on examination of devices, including building, configuring, upgrading, troubleshooting, diagnosis, and repair.


American Policing
Course Number CRJ 212
Credits 3.0

Role of police in American society. Topics include nature of police subculture, professionalism, personnel selection, unionism and operational trends.


Issues in Juvenile Justice
Course Number CRJ 221
Credits 3.0

Philosophy and methods of criminal justice programs for the prevention and control of youth crime. History of juvenile justice system, police handling of juveniles, the juvenile court, detention, and treatment of offenders.


American Corrections
Course Number CRJ 224
Credits 3.0

Overview of probation, jails, prisons, and parole. Incarceration rationales, methods of dealing with offenders, organizational theory, inmate social systems, and program effectiveness.


Security Administration
Course Number CRJ 328
Credits 3.0

Principles of administration of physical, human, and asset security. Risk assessment, training, emergency management, disaster recovery, and the global aspects of security administration.


Information Security
Course Number CRJ 333
Credits 3.0

Protection of proprietary information in both the corporate and government sectors. Topics include: information as a resource, legal issues, policy formulation, administrative and technical remedies, and case studies.


Economic Crime Investigation
Course Number CRJ 334
Credits 3.0

White collar crime in the United States. Emphasizes investigatory techniques related to these types of crime. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 103 or equivalent.


Constitutional Law/Criminal Process
Course Number CRJ 342
Credits 3.0

Case study approach to theoretical and applied knowledge of constitutional issues affecting the criminal justice system. Develops research and analytical skills for further study of the Constitution and its changing interpretation. Prerequisite: Government and Politics 341.


Law of Economic Crime
Course Number CRJ 343
Credits 3.0

Government and judicial regulations of financial institutions, commercial entities, their agents, and employees in relation to economic and business crime. Constitutional issues in investigations by governmental and corporate entities in both a substantive and procedural context.


Criminal Evidence
Course Number CRJ 345
Credits 3.0

Rules of evidence and trial procedures applicable to criminal cases at the state and federal levels. Student mock trial experience as witness and attorney.


Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Course Number CRJ 351
Credits 3.0

Design, operation, and legal basis for systems of justice in other countries. Governmental, political, demographic, and economic factors in past and current trends in the adjudication of offenders. Cross-cultural analysis of causes of crime and systems of justice. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 103.


Cybercrime Investigations and Forensics I
Course Number CRJ 355
Credits 3.0

Intrusion detection methodologies, tools and approaches to incident response. Computer forensic principles, including operating system concepts, registry structures, file system concepts, boot process, and file operations. Introduction to forensic tools.


Cybercrime Investigations and Forensics II
Course Number CRJ 356
Credits 3.0

Digital information retrieval methods. Exercises for search, recovery, imaging, analysis, and preservation of evidence on disk drives and other storage media. Advanced topics such as disk geometry and analysis of UNIX systems.


Cybercrime Investigations and Forensics III
Course Number CRJ 455
Credits 3.0

Theory and techniques for tracking attackers across the Internet. Practical exercises from case studies of Internet-based crimes.


Administrative Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 382
Credits 3.0

Issues in the organization and management of criminal justice agencies, including police departments, prosecutors offices, courts, jails, prisons, and community corrections.


Computer Forensics
Course Number CRJ 435
Credits 3.0

Root methods, forensic tools and procedures used in analysis of digital evidence in computer hardware, software and peripherals. Rules applicable to extraction and preservation of data and digital evidence. Prerequisite: Computer Science 303.


System Vulnerability Assessments
Course Number CRJ 438
Credits 3.0

Threats to information systems and process for performance of audits, assessments, penetration tests, and architecture reviews. Use of tools for such studies and practical experience in conducting assessments and preparing reports.



Senior Seminar
Course Number CRJ 461
Credits 3.0

Selected topics of current interest. Emphasizes critical analysis of current research literature and development of action projects by seminar members. Integrates previous learning as a capstone experience. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


Internship
Course Number CRJ 470
Credits 15.0

agency under co-supervision of faculty and agency personnel. Field experience, periodic conferences and seminars, written and reading assignments designed to combine theory and professional practice. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


Independent Study
Course Number CRJ 490
Credits 1.0

Exploration of criminal justice problems in depth. Individual independent study on plan submitted by the student. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


Summer Study Abroad in China/South Korea
Course Number CRJ 477
Credits 6.0

Comparative study of culture, society, and criminal justice systems in South Korea, China, and USA. Students will visit metropolitan police headquarters, courts, prisons and interact with the appropriate professionals in those facilities.


Information System Threats, Attacks and Defenses
Course Number CRJ 362
Credits 3.0

Overview of methods and motives of cybersecurity incident perpetrators, and the countermeasures employed to organizations and agencies to prevent and detect those incidences. Discussion of ethical obligations of security professionals.


Fraud Prevention and Detection Technologies
Course Number CRJ 347
Credits 3.0

Types of proactive technology programs and tools used to prevent and detect the occurrence of fraud in face-to-face transactions, e-commerce and e-business. Includes development and implementation of business models for production of prevention and detection products and techniques.


Cybercrime Law and Investigations
Course Number CRJ 335
Credits 3.0

Cybercrimes, including computer crimes, Internet fraud, e-commerce, and threats to the national infrastructure. Policies, legal issues, and investigative techniques and strategies, and implications for investigation and enforcement on a global scale.


Modern Techniques in Crime Investigation
Course Number CRJ 314
Credits 3.0

Theory and practice of modern investigation methods for public and private sector agencies. Techniques and procedures for evidence collection, preservation, and presentation. Reviews investigation resources, including crime laboratory and databases. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 103 or equivalent.


Corruption and Organized Crime
Course Number CRJ 313
Credits 3.0

Development of organized crime in the United States and its impact on social, economic, and political institutions. Special focus on role of corruption as a facilitator of crime. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 103 or equivalent.


Special Topics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 300
Credits 3.0

Consideration of one or more contemporary topics. Tailored by individual instructors. Each variation may be taken for credit. (Limit of 12 credit hours.)


Probation/Parole and Sentencing Alternatives
Course Number CRJ 250
Credits 3.0

Major theoretical and operational concepts related to probation, parole, and alternatives to incarceration at state and federal levels. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 103.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 103
Credits 3.0

History, theory, and structure of the criminal justice system emphasizing substantive and procedural criminal law; police, prosecution, defense, courts, institutional and community corrections; juvenile justice subsystem.


Introduction to Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Number CRJ 101
Credits 1.0

Basic research/writing principles that should be applied to criminal justice as a field of study.


Program description: The Utica College - Bachelor's in Economic Crime Investigation you will combine criminal justice studies with either accounting or computer security depending on your needs. You will enjoy a rewarding and satisfying educational experience with you opt for the Utica College - Bachelor's in Economic Crime Investigation, and you can look forward to working your way to a brighter and better future in terms of your career. This is a popular and well respected qualification, and could prove invaluable in this field for those that wish to progress their careers and enjoy a more challenging and demanding role with bigger and better rewards.

Program Name: Executive Masters in Economic Crime Management
Professional Seminar
Course Number ECM 601
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide students with the foundation for the master's degree in Economic Crime Management. Focus will be on four thematic areas: management economic crime, technology, and analytical skills. Background knowledge will be provided to prepare students for in-depth coursework in these areas. Students will be exposed to the learning and communications skills necessary to succeed in an independent study degree program


Organizational Theory, Structure and Design
Course Number ECM 611
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to familiarize students with the structure and design of organizations. Emphasis will be on systems theory and its applicability to today's environment, identifying external environmental forces, designing optimal corporate structure for the organization's mission, changing organizational structure and analyzing the process and effects of corporate infrastructure


The Manager in a Global Environment
Course Number ECM 612
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to familiarize students with the challenges faced by managers and organizations precipitated by the postindustrial knowledge-based, global society. Discussions will include topics such as the changing concepts of technology and knowledge, impact of workforce changes on managers and organizations, the evolution of management thought and concepts, managing in foreign cultures, international law issues and managing a multi-cultural workforce



Financial Investigations
Course Number ECM 626
Credits 3.0

Study of financial crime in the context of business operations; methods of detection; and methods of investigation, including analysis of financial documents, investigation process and techniques, and preparation of investigative case report


Fraud Management and Technology
Course Number ECM 631
Credits 3.0

The challenges of management in an increasingly technological environment. The history and evolutionary development of counter-fraud technology. The integration of fraud management in the development of new corporate products or instruments. Anticipating new forms of frauds based on the application of new and projected technologies


Information and Communication Security
Course Number ECM 632
Credits 3.0

Issues and concepts related to the protection of information and information systems. Threats and vulnerabilities to internal and external modes of communication. Securing communications, information systems and computer technology. Legal, ethical and privacy issues related to information security


Networks and Internet Security
Course Number ECM 633
Credits 3.0

The course will focus on the key components associated with the threats and vulnerabilities to computers and networks. Students will develop an understanding of distributed systems and how they work, an appreciation for various methods of network and Internet security and the necessary strategies to promote successful business plans/policies. Legal, ethical and privacy issues will be discussed


Fraud Management and Compliance
Course Number ECM 637
Credits 3.0

Application of principles and practices of compliance and operational risk assessment and mitigation to the management of fraud prevention detection, and investigation


Advanced Fraud Analysis
Course Number ECM 642
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to familiarize students with innovative analytic approaches used to perform complex fraud analysis. Topics include: link analysis, data mining, advanced statistical tools, case management systems and expert system approaches such as neural network early-warning software


Professional Project I
Course Number ECM 651
Credits 3.0

The professional project proposal will be developed during this semester. The professional project will be developed and finalized consistent with the Graduate Research Proposal Guidelines for the Economic Crime Management Program


Professional Project II
Course Number ECM 652
Credits 3.0

Completion of the professional project, including data collection, analysis and submission of the project report, or other methodologies approved by the Research Committee


Thesis I
Course Number ECM 653
Credits 3.0

Planned research and writing directed by the student's thesis committee. The thesis proposal will be developed during this semester. The thesis will adhere to the Graduate Research Proposal Guidelines for the Economic Crime Management Program


Thesis II
Course Number ECM 654
Credits 3.0

Completion of the thesis, including data collection, analysis and submission of the thesis. The thesis will adhere to the Graduate Research Proposal Guidelines for the Economic Crime Management Program


Program description: The Economic Crime Management Executive Master's program combines the areas of management, technology, and analytical skills with a knowledge and understanding of economic crime from a global perspective, and focuses on fraud and risk management strategies, current economic crime challenges, and applying innovative technological and analytical solutions.

Forensic Accounting Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Financial Forensics
World History Since 1500
Course Number HIST150
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to most significant events, personalities, trends and issues associated with the historical development of world civilization in the five centuries since the Middle-Ages, beginning with an overview of the Renaissance and Reformation and concluding with an assessment of the contemporary legacy of the Cold War. It explores the rise of capitalism and the modern nation state, the expansion of Western Europe, advances in science and technology, the impact of industrialization, and the global conflicts of the 20th Century


World History and Culture I
Course Number HIST210
Credits 4.0

HIST210 covers major cultures and civilizations of the world from ancient times to the birth of western imperialism in the 16th Century. Topics include cultures and historical experiences representative of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and pre-Columbian America. Of particular interest is the evolution of world religions or philosophies that prevail and are still critical in the modern world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference for the historical events which shaped the modern world outside Indo-European civilization.


English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Professional Speaking
Course Number ENGL210
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations


World History Since 1500 or World History and Culture I
Course Number HIST150 or HIST210
Credits 4.0

World History Since 1500 This course introduces the student to most significant events, personalities, trends and issues associated with the historical development of world civilization in the five centuries since the Middle-Ages, beginning with an overview of the Renaissance and Reformation and concluding with an assessment of the contemporary legacy of the Cold War. It explores the rise of capitalism and the modern nation state, the expansion of Western Europe, advances in science and technology, the impact of industrialization, and the global conflicts of the 20th Century. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls World History and Culture I HIST210 covers major cultures and civilizations of the world from ancient times to the birth of western imperialism in the 16th Century. Topics include cultures and historical experiences representative of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and pre-Columbian America. Of particular interest is the evolution of world religions or philosophies that prevail and are still critical in the modern world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference for the historical events which shaped the modern world outside Indo-European civilization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls


Career Planning
Course Number INTD340
Credits 4.0

During this course students will investigate career development theory, cultural aspects of professional career fields, responsibilities professionals have toward society and leadership roles of the professional in today’s society. Students learn techniques for researching and investigating potential career paths and opportunities, identifying transferable skills, preparing a resume, marketing themselves, interviewing, negotiating salary and employment packages, and entering today’s workforce. Students will develop their professional portfolios with papers, projects, and capstones from other courses and work projects to help market themselves in the work place.


Introduction to IT
Course Number IT190
Credits 4.0

Introduction to IT Introduction to IT provides an overview of issues and opportunities presented by the fast-paced world of information technology. Students receive an overview of computer-based systems and learn about the development, operation, and management of these systems. The course includes basic hardware and software principles and current information systems. Topics include databases and networking and their critical organizational importance, IT systems development, the impact of the Internet on organizations, and emerging technologies and trends for the future. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT080 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL310
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an understanding of ethical expectations and prepares the student to make decisions that are ethically correct and legal. The study of ethics includes the development of ethical standards, prima facie obligations, responsibilities, societal aims and professional codes of conduct. The course will follow the aims of normative ethics. The students should expect to participate and become involved in case studies, hypothetical situations and discussions to develop an attitude that is ethically acceptable, as well as to practice the concepts learned to aid in decision making.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOCL101
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the organization of social behavior and the relationship of society and social conditions. Emphasis will be placed on culture, norm, stratification, systems, structure, social institutions and social change in different cultures.


Accounting I
Course Number ACCT101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces fundamental accounting concepts and explores the accounting environment. It covers the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and introduces the concept of internal accounting controls.


Accounting II
Course Number ACCT202
Credits 4.0

This course covers accounting for balance sheet items for partnerships and corporate entities. In addition, students will be exposed to accounting for the capital structure, inventory, long-term liabilities, payroll, investments and international operations of a firm.


Accounting III
Course Number ACCT203
Credits 4.0

This course completes the fundamentals of financial accounting and includes managerial cost accounting through job costing and process costing applications. Topics covered include the financial analysis of financial statement information, the contribution margin approach to decision-making, and the budgeting process.


International Business
Course Number BADM350
Credits 4.0

During this course the student studies the international business environment as it relates to global competitiveness. This course explores strategy, organizations, operations, finance, marketing, and coping with different economic systems. Differences between foreign and domestic environments and the impact of these differences on managing in an international business setting are examined.


Operations Management
Course Number BADM360
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on solving the problems associated with the planning and control of production/manufacturing and service operations. The following concepts are explored: forecasting, planning products, processes, technologies and facilities, demand and inventory in the production systems, control for productivity, quality and reliability.


Business Law I
Course Number BADM410
Credits 4.0

This course provides an understanding of the principles underlying the legal environment of business. It examines the current legal rules and regulations affecting businesses and discusses the new developments and trends that will greatly affect future transactions. It also outlines the legal aspects of intellectual property especially as it relates to e-business.


Program description: CTU's Bachelor of Science in Financial Forensics degree program is designed for students who wish to combine a solid foundation in Finance and Accounting with the knowledge and skills necessary to enter the field of financial investigations. Students can take classes that give them a solid foundation in financial regulations and statutes, finance and accounting concepts and criminal investigations. Specialized concentration courses that focus on the investigation of money laundering, terrorist financing, and forensic accounting can give the students the skills critical to participating in financial investigations.

Forensic Accounting Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Forensic Accounting Schools (campus and online)

University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Boston College
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 94
Rank in USA 29th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
Texas A & M University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 135
Rank in USA 36th
University of Georgia
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 156
Rank in USA 38th
College of William and Mary
Total Programs 59
Number of Subjects 71
Rank in USA 39th
Carnegie Mellon University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 115
Rank in USA 44th
Michigan State University
Total Programs 220
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 45th
Washington and Lee University
Total Programs 61
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 47th