Online Forensic Science Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its forensic science courses to be successful forensic science technicians, forensics specialists, crime scene forensics specialists, forensic scientists, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 12,870 people employed as forensic science technicians alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $55,070. Biological scientists make on average $69,430 per year and there are about 29,630 of them employed today.

Forensic Science Organizations Forensic Science Common Job Tasks
  • specializing in areas such as dna analysis
  • providing information/opinions to investigators
  • providing detailed information on particular crimes
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Ranked by Excellence

Forensic Science Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Bachelor's (BSCJ) - Forensic Science
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Comparative Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJS 305
Credits 4.5

This course gives students a rationale for understanding and appreciating the different ways justice is conceived and administered internationally. This course serves as a basis for comparing various justice systems as they relate to the American justice system. Students will explore how various countries organize their law enforcement, judicial systems and corrections agencies, and compare them with the American criminal justice system.


Crime Victim Studies
Course Number CRJS 310
Credits 4.5

This course presents the scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to victims and their situations. It also looks at the different types of victimizations, how victimization rates are measured, and what attempts the government has made to increase the involvement of victims’ role in the criminal justice system.


Constitutional Law
Course Number CRJS 400
Credits 4.5

This course examines the United States Constitution, its history, evolution and influence on the criminal justice system, including the structure of government and our system of checks and balances. Additionally, students will analyze doctrinal shifts in the court’s decisions, and critique the role of individual jurisprudential viewpoints in judicial decision making.


Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 410
Credits 4.5

This course offers a social historical overview of issues of race, class, gender, crime, and justice. The impact of the criminal justice system on culturally diverse groups is the primary theme of all class activities.


Ethics and Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 420
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of ethical conduct in the administration of justice. This course explores moral choices associated with individuals in the criminal justice field, and examines consequences associated with various choice options.


Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Number CRJS 430
Credits 4.5

This course teaches students the theoretical aspects of conducting and investigating research problems in criminology and criminal justice. It explores the entire research process from beginning to end including the following techniques: problem identification, data collection, measurement, reliability, and validity issues. Students will also examine the ethical issues in the research process and how to analyze and document the research findings in a written assignment.


Applied Statistics
Course Number CRJS 440
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to teach students basic inferential statistical computations and analyses. The course focuses on practical applications rather than advanced statistical analysis. Students will develop skills in statistical application related to criminal justice policies and this course prepares students for the work place or those who are interested in pursuing graduate studies involving research.


Advanced Topics in Corrections
Course Number CRJS 450
Credits 4.5

This course examines the theories and practices involved in probation and parole processes and decision-making. Topics include pre-sentence and pre-parole investigations, probation and parole supervision, the administration of corrections services including treatment and release decision making processes. Finally this course examines juvenile corrections and the use of intermediate methods of treatment including electronic monitoring, community service, and the use of restitution.


Senior Capstone in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 499
Credits 4.5

This course offers a comprehensive and systematic analysis of key contemporary criminal justice issues through a close review of the theories and policies guiding many crime fighting strategies. By applying critical thinking and analytical skills, oral and written communication skills, and information systems skills, students will learn of the complex nature of crime and society’s response to criminality. This course serves as the CJ capstone class and involves the student preparing a project agreed upon between the student and the instructor. Each project will require research, report writing, oral presentation, and interactive teamwork.


Criminalistics
Course Number CRJS 365
Credits 4.5

This course introduces the non-scientific student to the field of forensic science through an exploration of its applications to criminal investigations, and clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory. The course combines classroom lecture/discussion with practical laboratory exercises related to field forensics. Topics include the recognition, identification, collection/preservation, individualization, and evaluation of physical evidence such as hairs, fibers, chemicals, blood, semen, glass, soil, fingerprints, documents, firearms, impression evidence, and serial number restoration. Students will document a crime scene by means of photography, notes, and scene sketching.


Aspects of Forensic Psychology
Course Number CRJS 375
Credits 4.5

This course examines the aspects of human behavior directly related to the legal process and the professional practice of psychology in the context of forensic science. The course explores many aspects of the practice of forensic psychology including assessment, treatment, and consultation within the legal system that encompasses both criminal and civil law. The student will learn the many ways psychology can assist and influence the legal system. Finally, students will be introduced to various career opportunities in forensic psychology and will be exposed to a variety of professionals who work in the area of forensic science.



Cybercrimes
Course Number CRJS 475
Credits 4.5

This hands-on introductory course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to begin a computer- based investigation. The course begins with an overview of computer forensics and then proceeds to introduce forensics tools, concepts, and documentation of evidence/procedures. The course uses common and accepted incident Response Policies and Procedures for previewing and securing digital evidence. Topics include: the basics of computer evidence and basic forensic methodology.


Program description: This Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BSCJ) degree program features a concentration in Forensic Science and is designed for students wishing to pursue an interest in a fascinating field that combines scientific and criminal justice techniques. Coursework is structured to assist them in the development of their goals as they acquire the knowledge and skills common to forensic science professionals.

Forensic Science Courses at Saint Leo University

Program Name: MSCJ with Forensic Science Specialization
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number CRJ 530
Credits 3.0

This course examines the ethical issues relevant to the administration of criminal justice. The origins of ethical standards, the effect of these standards on the administration of justice, and issues of ethi-cal leadership will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of ethics into criminal justice policy making and the establishment of defined values as a means of agency direction and activity.



Public Policy Making in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 560
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to increase the knowledge of the student about policy development in crimi-nal justice. Of specific concern will be problem identification and the movement of an idea or issue into public policy, with special emphasis on the participants in the criminal justice policy-making process. Course content will include indicators of problems that cause concern in criminal justice and elevate that problem to such a level that public policy making is required, strategic management of criminal justice policy, and the role of the criminal justice executive as an agent of change.


Leadership Applications in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 565
Credits 3.0

Contemporary literature holds that "managers do things right; leaders do the right thing." This course will offer an analysis of the most effective theories of organizational leadership, with a focus on their appropriate applications within criminal justice. Of critical importance will be the identification and discussion of those critical leadership skills necessary to advance a criminal justice agency.


Applied Project in Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number CRJ 590
Credits 6.0

This course is designed to be a capstone project in which the student will use all the skills, attitudes, and knowledge acquired from the program curriculum to address an important problem or launch a program initiative related to the administration of criminal justice. The objective of this course is primarily outcomes assessment for the Graduate Program. For successful completion of this course and the Master of Science in Criminal Justice degree requirements, students must demonstrate both a mastery of the curriculum content and an articulated ability to apply what has been learned to professional endeavors. The curriculum guide to be developed for this course will contain a grading rubric to ensure systematic evaluations of students' levels of mastery.


Introduction to Forensic Science
Course Number CRJ 545
Credits 3.0

This course will serve as an introduction to the disciplines most recognized in the field of forensic science and how they apply to the criminal justice practitioner/administrator. This course is designed to offer information on the history of forensic science and "criminalistics" as well as the current technologies available today, including the procedures and methods of laboratory analysis. Methods to be covered include the recognition, protection, documentation, and collection of physical evidence; laboratory analysis of such physical evidence; and courtroom acceptance of new forensic technologies.


Advanced Forensic Science
Course Number CRJ 546
Credits 3.0

This course will review the forensic science disciplines covered in CRJ 545 and introduce the student to the scientific techniques used in processing evidence found at investigations and scenes. This course is designed to allow the student to complete hands-on exercises in the forensic disciplines most commonly used in today's criminal justice environment.


Forensic and Medicolegal Death Investigation
Course Number CRJ 547
Credits 3.0

This course will review the various forensic science disciplines that collectively represent the field of forensics known as forensic medicolegal death investigation. It will explore the complex relationship between law enforcement (the investigator) and the technical and often mysterious world of the medical professional (the pathologist and medical examiner). The course will survey investigative techniques currently having significant impact upon death investigation from a variety of perspectives, both legal and medical. These perspectives will include such areas as post mortem investigations by pathologists and on the scene investigations by the medical examiner, all determinative of how the law enforcement investigations will proceed. The course is designed to introduce students to various specialized areas of medicolegal aspects of death investigation, such as childhood death. An additional purpose of this course is to expand the students' exposure and understanding of the various death scene situations that they may encounter from both a law enforcement perspective and a medical perspective when there may not be trained medical examiners available on the scene. Students will be introduced to the scientific and investigative techniques used in processing evidence and information found in death cases that are discovered and retrieved during autopsy, toxicology studies, anthropological opinions, and various other forensic disciplines.


Crime Scene Investigation and Management
Course Number CRJ 548
Credits 3.0

This Course Will Introduce The Student To The Forensic Techniques Used In Crime Scene Investigations (csi), And The Processing And Retrieval Of Trace Evidence Such As Dna And Other Items Of Evidentiary Value. Additionally, The Course Will Introduce The Student To Accepted Methodologies Employed In Contemporary Crime Scene Management. Students Will Also Explore And Become Familiar With Commonly Accepted Forensic Techniques, Contemporary Specialized Techniques, And Judicial Expectations And Requirements Demanded By The Judicial Process Relative To The Admittance Of Evidence Collected By Forensic Crime Scene Investigators.


Special Topics
Course Number CRM 300
Credits 1.0

Prerequisite: permission of faculty member A variable-content course that is designed to offer a specialized topic, such as capital punishment, parole and probation, RICO, or organized crime.


Terrorism in Israel
Course Number CRJ 501
Credits 3.0

This course provides a comprehensive overview of international and domestic terrorism, arising from either religious or secular roots. It will examine the historical and philosophical underpinnings of terrorism in general, and specifically in Israel. Terrorist organizations in Israel will be studied, and a special emphasis will be placed on that government's preventive and investigative techniques in dealing with terrorist attacks. In addition, the student will be exposed to the rationale used by terrorist groups in an attempt to justify their attacks on Israel.


Hostage Negotiations Phase I & II
Course Number CRJ 502
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to engage students in essential intellectual and practical questions relating to the study and practice of hostage negotiations and their impact of law enforcement. The students will participate in group activities that allow them to understand the positive and negative effects of hostage negotiations. The intent of such a course is to provide students with an understanding of the crisis team structure, the dynamics of negotiations, the value of using trained police negotiators as opposed to other civilians in the workforce, the psychology in hostage negotiations, the team concept behind negotiations, communicating with people in crisis, dealing with the media, negotiator stress, and practical role plays.


Preventing Terrorist Attacks
Course Number CRJ 503
Credits 3.0

This course provides a comprehensive overview of international and domestic terrorism, arising from either religious or secular roots. It will examine the historical and philosophical underpinnings of terrorism in general, and identified terrorist organizations in particular. The course will examine exploitable weaknesses of terrorists; terrorist typology; human factors as applied to terrorists; modus vivendi of terrorists; conspiratorial association theorems; weaknesses of terrorist groups; and proactive measures in support of terrorist investigations. The course will address current efforts in counter-terrorism, with special emphasis on the federal and state responses. As a Criminal Justice course, this study will consist of a hybrid of historical information and political information, and current, relevant information on counter-terrorism objectives and methods.


Contemporary Issues in Community Corrections
Course Number CRJ 520
Credits 3.0

Underlying the community corrections movement has been an attempt to reduce the over-reliance on the use of incarceration by providing less serious offenders with community-based program alternatives. Proponents of community corrections argue that these alternatives are more humane, more cost effective, and generally more successful approaches to corrections than traditional incarceration. Some community based correctional programs operate on tradition instead of empirically based research on effective practices. The focus of this class will be to look outside the box, debunking common assumptions, and challenging students to look deeper into existing community-based programs to determine effective practices based upon sound research methodology.


Offender Treatment Methodology
Course Number CRJ 521
Credits 3.0

This course examines the "evidence-based practice" of the methodology of offender treatment and the evaluation of programs relevant to the administration of corrections and community-based programs. Emphasis is placed on risk assessment, treatment methodology, types of offender issues, and evaluation of treatment options.


Criminal Justice Policy Research and Evaluation
Course Number CRJ 525
Credits 3.0

This course will involve advanced exercises in assessing empirical research relevant to criminal justice policy making, the acquisition of sufficient research methodology skills and knowledge to assess the quality of such studies, and practice in the application of empirical findings to agency policies and procedures. Included in this course will be the principles and techniques of program evaluation and applications through focused case studies.


Research Methods in Criminal Justice I
Course Number CRJ 526
Credits 3.0

This course will expose the graduate student to the more common techniques and concepts used in criminal justice research and evaluation as these are applied to policy, procedures, practices, and programs. With the aim of creating an informed consumer of such information, the student will have the opportunity to practice the application of empirical findings to agency policies, procedures, practices, and programs as he or she is exposed to the principles and techniques of program evaluation and research. Such an understanding is critical for both the producer and consumer of data in the criminal justice system in order to critically evaluate new knowledge as it is generated and presented by others as well as themselves.


Research Methods in Criminal Justice II
Course Number CRJ 527
Credits 3.0

Because the bulk of what is done in the criminal justice area depends heavily on things that have been tried in the past (the "data"), it is important to know how to treat data. This course will expose the graduate student to the more common statistical techniques and concepts used in criminal justice research and evaluation to treat the data generated by that system. The concentration will be on psychological and sociological statistics, for that is what is common in the field. Such an understanding is critical for both the producer and consumer of data in the criminal justice system in order to critically evaluate new knowledge as it is generated and presented by others as well as themselves.


Management of Human Resources in Criminal Justice Agencies
Course Number CRJ 535
Credits 3.0

This course will examine the critical issues and strategic questions regarding managing human resources in criminal justice agencies. It will focus on human resource administration as a coherent, proactive management model. Current and future trends in personnel management will be examined in depth.


Planning and Financial Management in Criminal Justice Agencies
Course Number CRJ 540
Credits 3.0

This course is an examination of the interactive process of strategic planning and financial management within an agency. An emphasis will be placed upon this process as a system of organizational development, with program budgeting as the visible product. Topics will include identifying, developing, and securing fiscal resources; comparisons of levels of planning; distinguishing between operational and managerial plans; the political context of criminal justice planning/budgeting as it relates to preparation, presentation, executive and legislative approval, execution, and audit; and enhancements and alternatives to an agency's routine funding base.



Information Resource Management for Criminal Justice Management
Course Number CRJ 555
Credits 3.0

This course includes techniques of data processing and information technology, with emphasis upon their use and application to criminal justice information management. Most particularly, the curriculum will examine the changing technology and systems available to criminal justice agencies, especially those that enhance interagency communications and coordination.


Future Studies in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 570
Credits 3.0

Since Alvin Toffler's work in Future Shock, an increasing focus has been placed on "future studies," the analysis of trends and conditions affecting society or specific organizations. This course will examine the social, technological, economic, environmental, and political issues shaping Florida, its communities, and its criminal justice agencies now and in the future. A particular emphasis will be on preparing the student to anticipate and identify such future conditions, trends, and issues.


Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number CRJ 575
Credits 3.0

This course will provide in-depth informational coverage regarding various current issues relevant to the administration of criminal justice. The focus will be on the application of this knowledge to both public policy making and the effective management of criminal justice organizations


Impact of Terrorism on Homeland Security
Course Number CIM 581
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to political terrorism, ranging from low-level acts of threats and acts of violence that may represent significant risk to human life and property to large-scale acts of violence using "weapons of mass destruction" that may have devastating, long-term effects.


Management of Critical Incident Operations
Course Number CIM 582
Credits 3.0

This course will explore the role of various public safety personnel in managing disaster response operations. The nature of disaster, the complexities of disaster response operations, and the roles and responsibilities of various emergency management personnel will be examined. Students will gain an understanding of common post-disaster problems and how the emergency management community may overcome these challenges.


Risk Identification and Assessment
Course Number CIM 583
Credits 3.0

The overall goal of this course is to contribute to the reduction of the growing toll (deaths and injuries, property loss, environmental degradation, etc.) of disasters in the United States by providing an understanding of a process (the hazards risk management process) that provides a framework that may be applied at all levels of communities and governments to identify, analyze, consider, implement, and monitor a wide range of measures that can contribute to their well-being.


Psychological Aspects of Critical Incidents
Course Number CIM 584
Credits 3.0

This Course Is An Examination Of The Psychological Trauma That One Experiences When Involved In A Catastrophic Event. The Learner Will Examine Terrorism And Natural And Man-made Disasters. The Learner Will Also Examine How The Aforementioned Catastrophic Events Cause Psychological Trauma, Related Psychological And Physiological Disorders, Sense Of Community Trauma And Loss, And The Impact Of Such Incidents On The First Responder. In Addition, The Course Will Examine Preparedness And The Role Of The Mental Health Profession, Community Response Teams, Peer Support Groups, Critical Incident Stress Management (cism), And Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (ptsd). The Study Of This Phenomenon By First Responders And Emergency Managers Is Essential In Understanding The Impact Of Trauma And Allows For The Development Of Treatment Strategies That Can Effectively Combat The Debilitating Effects Of Catastrophic Events.


Program description: The Blended Master of Science in Criminal Justice Program is for those professionals who wish to complete the graduate program by delivery modes other than traditional campus classes. The blended program offers classes in a variety of delivery formats—for example, online, VTT (video conferencing), and campus, including the Institute for Excellence in Criminal Justice Administration. The capstone course, CRJ 590, is not offered in an online format. This specialization introduces the student to how
forensic science is used in the field of criminal justice.

Forensic Science Courses at Ashworth College

Program Name: Forensic Science Offline
Getting Started in Electronics
Course Number Lesson 1

How to set up a lab; common test equipment and electronics supplies; starting a parts and materials inventory; getting components at low or no cost.


Basic Electrical Concepts
Course Number Lesson 2

Resistors, potentiometers, rheostats, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; color coding; voltage, current, resistance, AC and DC, conductance, and power; circuits; the laws of electricity.


Alternating Current and Transformers
Course Number Lesson 3

Understanding AC waveshapes, frequency, amplitude, and calculations; inductance; DC resistance; sine waves; transformers; soldering for the first time; desoldering techniques; safety concerns.


Diodes and Rectification
Course Number Lesson 4

Solid-state devices explained; basic operational principles of diodes; the common types of diodes; referencing; full-wave and half-wave rectifiers; testing bridge rectifier modules.


Capacitors and DC Filtering
Course Number Lesson 5

Kinds of capacitors and their construction; important capacitor operating principles; filter capacitors; designing raw DC power supplies.


Transistors and Voltage Regulation
Course Number Lesson 6

Operating principles of transistors; common transistor types and configurations; transistor-amplifier comparisons; impedance matching.


Special-Purpose Diodes and Opto-Electronic Device
Course Number Lesson 7

Zener, Schottky, and varactor diodes; diacs; tunnel and fast recovery diodes; noise and transient suppression diodes; a brief look at quantum physics; practical circuit projects.


Audio Amplification
Course Number Lesson 8

Transistor biasing and load considerations; amplifier classes; audio amplifier output configurations and operational basics; high-quality audio systems.


Power Control Devices and Circuits
Course Number Lesson 9

Silicon-controlled rectifiers; the triac; UJTs; diacs; neon tubes; using thyristors in power-control circuits; how to build a soldering iron controller.


Field-Effect Transistors (FET) and Batteries
Course Number Lesson 10

FET operational principles; how to build a high-quality mosfet audio amplifier; additional practical circuit projects; battery types; how to build a general-purpose battery charger.


Integrated Circuits
Course Number Lesson 11

Operational amplifiers; IC or hybrid audio amplifiers; IC voltage regulators; special-purpose ICs; improving the lab-quality power supply; how to build a quad-outputpower supply; additional practical circuit projects.


Fingerprints; Document Examination
Course Number Lesson 12

The three classes of fingerprints as defined by patterns of loops, whirls and arches; the automated fingerprint identification system; methods used to detect fingerprints; techniques for preserving fingerprints; document and voice examination; handwriting analysis and comparisons; methods used to compare copiers, printers and fax machines; analyzing alterations, erasures and virtual obliteration of documents; analyzing voice data with the sound spectrograph.


Forensic Science Today and Tomorrow
Course Number Lesson 13

The impact of the Internet on forensic science; global networks and databases; researching forensic science on the Web; the Internet as a research tool in criminal investigations; the future of forensic science; the broadening applications of forensic methodology as an integral component of investigation.


Program description: Ashworth College's Career Diploma in Forensic Science program is designed to teach students how to analyze hair, fiber, fingerprints, chemicals, and bloodstains. Students also have the opportunity to learn about examining DNA samples, drug and alcohol testing, using forensic equipment, reconstructing a crime scene, and preparing a lab report. This program is also intended to teach about physical evidence, fire, firearms, document examination, and identifications. Ashworth College provides students in this program with two illustrated textbooks, study guides, and a career search and time management guide.

Program Name: Forensic Science Online
Getting Started in Electronics
Course Number Lesson 1

How to set up a lab; common test equipment and electronics supplies; starting a parts and materials inventory; getting components at low or no cost.


Basic Electrical Concepts
Course Number Lesson 2

Resistors, potentiometers, rheostats, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; color coding; voltage, current, resistance, AC and DC, conductance, and power; circuits; the laws of electricity.


Alternating Current and Transformers
Course Number Lesson 3

Understanding AC waveshapes, frequency, amplitude, and calculations; inductance; DC resistance; sine waves; transformers; soldering for the first time; desoldering techniques; safety concerns.


Diodes and Rectification
Course Number Lesson 4

Solid-state devices explained; basic operational principles of diodes; the common types of diodes; referencing; full-wave and half-wave rectifiers; testing bridge rectifier modules.


Capacitors and DC Filtering
Course Number Lesson 5

Kinds of capacitors and their construction; important capacitor operating principles; filter capacitors; designing raw DC power supplies.


Transistors and Voltage Regulation
Course Number Lesson 6

Operating principles of transistors; common transistor types and configurations; transistor-amplifier comparisons; impedance matching.


Special-Purpose Diodes and Opto-Electronic Device
Course Number Lesson 7

Zener, Schottky, and varactor diodes; diacs; tunnel and fast recovery diodes; noise and transient suppression diodes; a brief look at quantum physics; practical circuit projects.


Audio Amplification
Course Number Lesson 8

Transistor biasing and load considerations; amplifier classes; audio amplifier output configurations and operational basics; high-quality audio systems.


Power Control Devices and Circuits
Course Number Lesson 9

Silicon-controlled rectifiers; the triac; UJTs; diacs; neon tubes; using thyristors in power-control circuits; how to build a soldering iron controller.


Field-Effect Transistors (FET) and Batteries
Course Number Lesson 10

FET operational principles; how to build a high-quality mosfet audio amplifier; additional practical circuit projects; battery types; how to build a general-purpose battery charger.


Integrated Circuits
Course Number Lesson 11

Operational amplifiers; IC or hybrid audio amplifiers; IC voltage regulators; special-purpose ICs; improving the lab-quality power supply; how to build a quad-outputpower supply; additional practical circuit projects.


Fingerprints; Document Examination
Course Number Lesson 12

The three classes of fingerprints as defined by patterns of loops, whirls and arches; the automated fingerprint identification system; methods used to detect fingerprints; techniques for preserving fingerprints; document and voice examination; handwriting analysis and comparisons; methods used to compare copiers, printers and fax machines; analyzing alterations, erasures and virtual obliteration of documents; analyzing voice data with the sound spectrograph.


Forensic Science Today and Tomorrow
Course Number Lesson 13

The impact of the Internet on forensic science; global networks and databases; researching forensic science on the Web; the Internet as a research tool in criminal investigations; the future of forensic science; the broadening applications of forensic methodology as an integral component of investigation.


Program description: Go from the crime scene to the laboratory to the courtroom
in this exciting course. You’ll learn the step-by-step
procedures for analyzing hair, fiber, fingerprints, chemicals
and blood stains, examining DNA samples; drug and
alcohol testing, and much more. You’ll also learn how to
use forensic equipment, reconstruct a crime scene and
prepare a lab report for presentation in court.

Forensic Science Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Forensic Science Schools (campus and online)

University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
University of California-Davis
Total Programs 160
Number of Subjects 114
Rank in USA 41st
Michigan State University
Total Programs 220
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 45th
University of California-Irvine
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 90
Rank in USA 49th
George Washington University
Total Programs 194
Number of Subjects 171
Rank in USA 52nd
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
University of Miami
Total Programs 177
Number of Subjects 151
Rank in USA 69th
North Carolina State University at Raleigh
Total Programs 175
Number of Subjects 137
Rank in USA 70th
University of Central Florida
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 71st
University of Delaware
Total Programs 159
Number of Subjects 128
Rank in USA 95th
Drexel University
Total Programs 125
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 108th
Marquette University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 111th
Auburn University Main Campus
Total Programs 131
Number of Subjects 128
Rank in USA 115th
Ohio University-Main Campus
Total Programs 183
Number of Subjects 158
Rank in USA 128th
University of Utah
Total Programs 176
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 129th
University of South Florida
Total Programs 140
Number of Subjects 131
Rank in USA 138th
Towson University
Total Programs 114
Number of Subjects 109
Rank in USA 141st