Online Game Design Courses at Accredited Schools

Post University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its game design courses to be successful video game engineers, game designers, video game designers, game developers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 495,500 people employed as computer software engineers, applications alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $90,170. Computer software engineers, systems software make on average $96,620 per year and there are about 385,200 of them employed today.

Game Design Organizations Game Design Common Job Tasks
  • deciding how best to present a concept visually
  • providing codes for web designs
  • observeing the play and impose penalties for infractions
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Game Design Courses at Post University

Program Name: Certificate: Game Design and Animation
Introduction to Video Games
Course Number GAM217
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to the essential study of video games. The course surveys various perspectives in the field of game design and production. Topics include the history of video games and animation, human computer interaction, game theory, game genres, game engine architectures, and game culture. In addition, evolution of the video game industry will be examined. Students are required to complete a digital game to demonstrate rudimentary design principles discussed in the course. Prerequisite: CIS112


Interactive Computer Graphics
Course Number GAM247
Credits 3.0

This course introduces design and aesthetic foundations of 3-dimensional computer graphics and animation. Topics include rendering 3D geometric models, 2D and 3D transformations, color theory, illumination and shading, texture, special effects, and computer animation. Emphasis is on rendering interactive graphics for video games. The course culminates in a presentation of students’ final projects involving an original video game that incorporates basic elements of 3D animation. Prerequisite: CIS112


Fundamentals of Game Programming
Course Number GAM257
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Game Programming Principles And Techniques For Planning And Implementing 3d Interactive Games. In A Collaborative Fashion, Students Are Exposed To A Structured Process That Explains How To Develop 3d Games Incorporating Object-oriented Programming Statements, 3d Graphic Scripts, Character Animation, Sound, And Music. This Course Concludes With A Final Project Involving A Game Prototype That Exhibits 3d Graphics Programming And Animation Techniques Studied In This Course. Emphasis Is On Problem Solving And Collaboration. Prerequisites: Cis112 And Gam247


Game Design and Animation I
Course Number GAM301
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Students To Fundamental Principles Of Game Design And 3d Computer Animation. The Course Explores Methods Of Modeling, Rendering, And Animating 3d Objects For Video Games, Computer Simulations, And Virtual Worlds. Students Use 3d Modeling Software To Create Character Animation And 3d Environments Including Rigging, Key Framing Animation, Lighting, Camera Angles, Texture Formation, And Motion. Prerequisites: Cis112, Gam217, And Gam247


Game Design and Animation II
Course Number GAM401
Credits 3.0

This Course Builds Upon The Knowledge Gained In Game Design And Animation I. Advanced Methods Of Game Design, Including Drafting A Game Design Document, Are Covered In The Course. Students Gain Insight Into The Aesthetic Design And Technical Implementation Needed To Design High-quality 3d Interactive Video Games. Students Use 3d Modeling Software And Scripting Techniques To Create Character And Terrain Animation, And Artificial Intelligence For Games. Emphasis Is On Applying Problem-solving Skills And Refining The Game Design Document. Prerequisites: Cis112, Gam217, Gam247, And Gam301


Program description: Post University’s 15-credit Certificate in Game Design & Animation will help students turn their passion for gaming into a
career in the growing entertainment game industry. Video games, computer simulations, and virtual reality are playing and
will continue to play a prominent role in society. This certificate is geared for students who are seeking a way to enter the
exciting world of game design.
The curriculum provides students with the main concepts and skills needed to design 3-dimensional interactive games for
entertainment. Working in a collaborative environment, students are provided with theoretical knowledge and practical
methods that highlight game theory, game genres, design principles, 3D graphics programming, character animation,
game engine architectures, and artificial intelligence in games.

Game Design Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: B.S. in Game Design

Program description:

Game Design Courses at Westwood College

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Graphic Design: Major in Game Art
Game Design Process
Course Number GA330
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD260 This course analyzes the game development and design process and introduces game engines. Topics include manual and conceptual skills, material collection, research, interface planning, game structure, and fundamental game engine operation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to create a game design document and navigate a game engine


Texture Mapping for Games
Course Number GA340
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GA330, GD360 This course develops advanced skills in texture mapping for games. Topics include high resolution and low resolution texture mapping for game assets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply texture mapping to characters, environments, and other assets using industryrelevant software and techniques.


Character Animation for Games
Course Number GA361
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD150, GD395 This course develops advanced techniques in character animation. Topics include animation cycles and loops, acting,weight and balance, and interaction. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to complete animation cycles and import them into a game environment


Special Effects for Games
Course Number GA424
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD380 This course covers special effects as applied to games. Topics include particle systems, volumetric effects, sprites and animated textures, and dynamics for games. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to produce various effects for use in a 3D game engine


Level and Environment Design
Course Number GA445
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GA340 This course covers level and environmental design as applied for use in a 3D game engine. Topics include controlling level flow, technical limitations, environmental design/layout,troubleshooting, and playability. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to design, create and test a game level or environment in a 3D game engine


Game Art Project
Course Number GA480
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GA361, GD380 This course provides the opportunity to apply advanced game art design knowledge and skills to a portfolio quality game art project. Topics include enhancement and incorporation of game art assets to a portfolio quality product. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to effectively incorporate art assets into a working game level.


Game Art Portfolio Review
Course Number GA490
Credits 6.0

Prerequisite(s): Program Chair Or Dean Approval This Course Focuses On The Development And Critique Of A Professional Game Art Portfolio. Topics Include Industry Interviewing Techniques, Portfolio Refinement And Self-marketing Skills. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Their Personal Traits And Present Both A Print And Digital Portfolio And Résumé That Highlight Their Individual Game Art Skills In A Professional Manner.


Introduction to Game Development
Course Number SG110
Credits 3.0

This course covers the theoretical and practical considerations governing the development of a game, and how these considerations are manifested in the design and development of games. Topics include game history, terminologies, philosophies, and genres. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the basics of gaming.


Game Analysis and Playability
Course Number SG140
Credits 3.0

This course covers the concepts behind the development of games, conceptual reflection, genres, and the determination of what actually defines a game’s playability. Topics include game world concepts, game story development, game character development, and considerations for genre-specific game design.Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to document game playability through analysis of graphics, sound, artificial intelligence, and intended audience.


Introduction to Drawing and Perspective
Course Number GD110
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours This Course Introduces Fundamental Drawing Concepts And Terminology. Topics Include The Principles Of Drawing, Drawing Styles And Technique; Including Lighting, Perspective Fundamentals, Gesture, And Contour. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Demonstrate Effective Drawing Skills Using Fundamental Drawing Tools And Techniques, And Properly Use Industrystandard Terminology.


Digital Image Editing
Course Number GD120
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd110 This Course Covers The Basics Of Digital Image Editing And Compositing. Topics Include Digital Photography, Scanning Techniques, Photo Retouching And Manipulation, And Texture Creation. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Use Industry-standard Software To Create Seamless Textures, Prepare Digital Images, Work With Painted Textures, And Utilize Alpha Channels In A 3d Application.


Introduction to Animation
Course Number GD150
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd110 This Course Introduces The Fundamentals Of Traditional And Digital Animation. Topics Include The History And Principles Of Animating Key Poses, Timing Cycles, And The Mechanics Of Motion. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Present A Short Animation Using Traditional And Digital Techniques.


Life Drawing for Animation
Course Number GD240
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd110 This Course Covers Advanced Drawing Concepts As They Relate To Character Modeling And Animation. Topics Include Basic Human And Animal Anatomy And Form As It Relates To The Surrounding Environment, Spatial Relationships, And Introductory Sculpting Techniques. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Effectively Capture And Develop Gestures And Motion In Various Media For Use In 2d And 3d Animation.


Fundamentals of 3D
Course Number GD260
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd120 This Course Covers The Fundamentals Of A 3d Application. Topics Include Modeling, Rendering, Texturing, Animation, Lighting And Cameras. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply Fundamental Skills, Techniques, And Terms Toward Components Of A 3d Short.


Digital Color Theory
Course Number GD275
Credits 3.0

3.0 Credit Hours/20 Lecture Hours/20 Lab Hours This Course Explores The Principles Of Color As It Applies To Digital Media. Topics Include Rgb Versus Cymk, Digital Color Principals In The Game Environment, Color For Screen, Bit Depth, Color Pallets, Color Channels, Alpha Channels And File Formats. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Demonstrate An Understanding Of The Psychology Of Color And How To Properly Apply Digital Color Theory For Screen And Digital Media.


Advanced Drawing and Perspective
Course Number GD304
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd110 This Course Builds On Traditional Drawing Skills, Focusing On Advanced Drawing And Perspective Techniques. Topics Include Advanced Drawings And Perspective Terms And Techniques Used In Concept Design, Industrial Design, Storyboarding And Other Relevant Areas. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply Skills To Develop Effective Concept Art For, But Not Limited To, Organic Forms, Environments, Industrial Design And Buildings.


Sequential Art and Visual Narrative
Course Number GD305
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd304 This Course Covers The Elements And Techniques Of Sequential Storytelling. Topics Include Story Boarding And Scene Layout, Graphic Arts Publishing, Pencil Tests, And Animatics. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Create Dynamic And Effective Narrative Content For A Variety Of Visual Media.


Intermediate 3D
Course Number GD360
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd260 This Course Expands Upon Modeling And Texturing Skills And Concepts In A 3d Application. Topics Include Poly-modeling, Nurbs/spline Modeling, Sub-division Surfaces, Texture Mapping, Lighting, And Rendering. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Model, Texture, Light And Render A Complex 3d Object Or Environment.


Advanced 3D
Course Number GD380
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd360 This Course Covers Advanced 3d Methods And Techniques. Topics Include Rigging, Scripting, And Advanced Rendering Techniques; As Well As An Introduction To Particles, Dynamics, And Simulations. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply Advanced 3d Techniques Towards The Production Of A Professional 3d Short.


Character Development and Setup
Course Number GD395
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd240, Gd360 This Course Explores Character Design And Modeling. Topics Include Traditional Pencil Sketching And Drawing Techniques, Low Poly And High Poly Character Modeling, And Rigging Characters For Animation. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply Traditional Techniques To Design An Original Character And Then Model It In A 3d Software Application And Prepare It For Animation.


Art History
Course Number ART300
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Hum250 This Course Provides A Brief Overview Of Historical Ideas And Events In The Development Of The Arts. Topics Include A Review Of The Styles And Schools Of Art As Well As The Functions Of Art In Varying Cultures. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Describe Major Characteristics Of Art And Architecture, Analyze Visual Images, And Identify Historically Significant Artistic Styles, Individual Artists, And Works Of Art.


Communication Skills
Course Number COM112
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Foundational Course(s) If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Presents An Overview Of The Various Theories And Methods Of Personal And Professional Communications. Topics Include Written And Oral Communication Techniques, Presentation Skills, Intercultural Communication Skills,and Negotiation Skills.upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Communicate Effectively In Personal And Professional Environments And Be Able To Manage Personal And Professional Conflicts.


College Writing I
Course Number ENG121
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Foundational Course(s) If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Introduces Productive Writing Techniques With An Emphasis On The Writing Process. Topics Include Brainstorming,critical Reading And Thinking, Analyzing Audience And Purpose, Developing Clear Thesis Statements, Developing Effective Sentences And Paragraphs, Drafting, Revising, And Editing. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Use The Writing Process To Produce Effective Essays.


Ethical and Critical Thinking
Course Number HUM180
Credits 3.0

This course covers the principles and applications of ethical and critical thinking. Topics include argument construction and analysis, inductive and deductive reasoning, logical fallacies, perception, moral approaches, and social responsibility. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze ethical issues, evaluate and clarify their own thinking,create sound and valid arguments, and effectively weigh the arguments of others.


Science Fiction and Fantasy
Course Number LIT415
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Lit301 This Course Covers The Genres Of Science Fiction And Fantasy. Topics Include The Use Of Language, Composition, And Characterization Within Different Forms Of Science Fiction And Fantasy. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Major Authors And Analyze Significant Works Of Science Fiction And Fantasy.


American Government
Course Number POL107
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to present an overview of American government. Topics include the federal system; political parties; nominations and elections; the legislative, executive and judicial branches; and civil liberties and civil rights. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to trace the development of the U.S. Constitution, understand and analyze issues in American government, and discuss the policy-making process.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY101
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 This Course Is Designed To Present A General Overview Of Psychology As A Social Science. Topics Include Historical Perspectives, Research Methods, Therapies, Applied Psychology,and Other Current Issues. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Psychological Concepts And Methods As Used Commonly To Address Real-world Situations.


Introduction to Statistics
Course Number MTH340
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Mth107 Or Mth170 This Course Introduces Basic Concepts In Statistics With Emphasis On Quantitative Analysis. Topics Include Measures Of Center And Variation, Applications Of Normal Distribution, Interpretations Of Correlation Coefficients, Analyzing And Graphing Linear Regression Models And Fundamentals Of Probability. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Realworld Data, Interpret Graphs, Create Simple Linear Regression Models, And Form Valid Conclusions On The Basis Of Such Analysis.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI121
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 And Either Mth107 Or Mth170 This Course Is Designed As An Introduction To Physical Science.topics Include Motion, Conservation Laws, Gravity, Waves, And Thermodynamics. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course,students Will Be Able To Describe The Scientific Method, Explain And Define The Principles And Terminology Of Physical Science,and Use Formulas To Solve Related Problems.


Computer Applications
Course Number CA101
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to increase proficiency in the use of common word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation application software. Topics include the production of business documents and reports. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to prepare documents using word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.


Success Strategies
Course Number PDC111
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on providing the skills and strategies to achieve personal and educational goals. Topics include learning styles, accountability, self-directed learning, managing resources,goal setting, self-esteem, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate self-reliance and apply the tools for success.


Career Management
Course Number PDC200
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Student Must Have Completed 50% Of Degree Requirements This Course Provides The Foundation For Developing Long-term Career Management Skills. Topics Include Tips For Producing Quality Résumés And Cover Letters And Interactive Techniques For Interviewing Success. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course,students Will Be Able To Research Job Leads, Write A Résumé,prepare For A Job Interview, Follow Up On A Job Interview, And Apply Strategies To Keep A Job And Advance In A Career.


Program description: The Game Art Bachelor’s program is designed to provide students
with the ability to apply core knowledge of art and animation
techniques to the game and interactive software industry. The
program emphasizes traditional 2D artistry, 3D modeling, and
animation. In addition, general education courses assist students
in applying critical thinking, communication, and problem solving
skills in managing challenges that occur in a game development
environment.

Game Design Courses at Full Sail University

Program Name: Game Design Bachelors - Online
Aesthetics and Immersion
Course Number GDN 4340
Credits 4.0

The Aesthetics and Immersion Course examines the latest research in immersion, addiction, and basic learning theories as they apply to game design. These techniques are a growing discipline within the game design world as they can influence sales and game enjoyment through paradigms such as the aesthetic usability effect. This course outlines the constructs of aesthetics and immersion as separate yet intertwined disciplines. In this course, the psychology of aesthetic design is traced back to its historic roots while also giving the student a current understanding of the field.


Design and Development Analysis
Course Number GDN 2130
Credits 3.0

The Design and Development Analysis Course teaches the student techniques used to deconstruct, reproduce, and improve existing games based on a thorough analytical process. The ability to critically analyze other’s work is essential to the design phase of any project, and the video game industry is no exception to this. By playing and deconstructing games, students will learn the complicated design systems running behind the scenes in games and will compose documents to support their findings.


Design Project
Course Number GDN 3140
Credits 4.0

The Design Project Course builds on the documentation skills gained in Game Design I and the critical and analytical techniques tested in courses such as Statistics, Economics, and Usability. This course challenges students to apply what they know. In teams, students generate ideas, design playable components around those ideas, and document their decisions through a collaborative and analytical process. Focus is placed on the mechanics, flow, and fun factor. The goal of the project is for students to appreciate the complexity of collaborative game design, to fine-tune the application of their technical design skills, and to ensure their design is well-suited to an intended market and meets all milestones.


Design Tools I
Course Number GDN 3430
Credits 3.0

In the Design Tools I Course, students examine the various development tools used to create games. Students explore game engines, asset libraries, graphic art tools, and level editing tools. The intention of the course is not to fine-tune the use of all the game creation tools discussed; it is to provide a working knowledge of the tools so that designers can bring their designs to life as well as create a single level in an actual game engine.


Design Tools II
Course Number GDN 3540
Credits 4.0

In the Design Tools II Course, students take a much closer look at the tools employed in the creation of game levels. Specifically, students are instructed in the use of state-of-the-art level editors employed by the game industry. Level editors are some of the most important tools a designer will encounter in the industry. Depending on the robustness of the editor, a designer can create entire environments—complete with audio and visual content, AI entities, and complex game objectives—from within the one tool. By learning these editors, students are bet ter prepared to apply the concepts they will learn in future level design courses.


Economics
Course Number GDN 1440
Credits 4.0

The Economics Course examines how people make choices and use resources. This course focuses specifically on game economics and will examine how markets are created and maintained in game worlds. Students will learn how players allocate their resources in a limited market, while trying to satisfy their wants and needs. This is maintained through economic balance and fluctuations that are controlled by the designer and must be maintained throughout the development process. Topics of study include basic economic theory, inflation, supply & demand, poverty & inequality, and market stability.


Game Design Final Project I
Course Number GDN 4630
Credits 3.0

In the Game DesignFinal Project I Course, students are placed into groups and will plan the genre and scope of their final projects. Students will assign roles and responsibilities, generate feature lists, and outline a production plan. Each team is responsible for composing a formal Design Document, detailing the process and tools that will be used to create the intended game prototype. Focus will be on originality, creativity, overall fun of the game, team collaboration, and work ethic.


Game Design Final Project II
Course Number GDN 4730
Credits 3.0

In the Game Design Final Project II Course, the final project serves as the culmination of skills developed during the Game Design Online program. Teams will focus on turning their Final Project I documented designs into full working prototypes. Prototypes can consist of multiple game levels, card games, pen & paper games, board games, and game mods. Students will be evaluated on their design decisions, creativity, and look and feel of the prototype, playability, and overall fun. Upon completion of this course, teams will have a working prototype that is ready to be tested and polished.


Game Design Final Project III
Course Number GDN 4840
Credits 4.0

In the Game Design Final Project III Course, the final project serves as the culmination of skills developed during the Game Design Online program. Teams will continue working on Final Project II prototypes, testing and polishing their game designs. Upon completion of this course, teams will have concrete examples of their designs that are polished and professionally format ted and ready to be presented and shared with prospective employers or investors.


Game Design I
Course Number GDN 1230
Credits 3.0

The Game Design I Course examines the common design approaches used in the game industry and examines the purpose and function of writ ten documentation. Providing a memorable experience for a player in any given game requires a thorough design, and for a design to be ef fectively communicated and adhered to during the development process, it must be well documented. Students will design and document an original game concept, beginning with traditional and creative brainstorming techniques, concept mapping, and outlining. They will further hone their descriptive and technical writing skills through composition, revision, and editing of their design documentation.


Game Design II
Course Number GDN 4240
Credits 4.0

The Game Design II Course teaches students how to prioritize game features and develop successful plans of implementation. Design is not only creating what is in a game but also deciding how and when certain features will be implemented and accomplished. The goal is to create a complete gaming experience for the player, and students will learn to appreciate this through a deeper examination of core aspects such as point of view, feedback, player challenge, and player choices.


Game History
Course Number GDN 1130
Credits 3.0

The Game History Course examines the history of game development, the changes in game systems, and the evolution of genres and interactivity elements. The course explores why people play games and which games revolutionized the various game genres. Important milestones in the industry’s history have resulted in changes to the way people create and play games, and designers need to understand these. Students will learn about influential and innovative titles and what impact they had or continue to have on the games of today.


Game Mechanics
Course Number GDN 3340
Credits 4.0

The Game Mechanics Course explores the theories and principles employed in game rule-based systems. Students will learn how pacing and thematic structures incorporate conflict resolution and generate a plausible challenge and reward system. Students will understand the use of feedback mechanisms by employing a heuristic testing process to determine which of the design elements may or may not be fun or unbalanced during actual play. Students leaving this course will have a bet ter idea about how to bet ter sync gameplay decisions to a specified target audience.


Leadership
Course Number GDN 2340
Credits 4.0

The Leadership Course is designed to facilitate students’ discovery, direction, development and demonstration of their leadership skills. Emphasis is placed on students constructing a personal leadership development plan for professional application. The importance of translating leadership theory into real-world practice is amplified throughout the course. The leadership principles and knowledge that will be acquired are transferable to any industry


Level Design I
Course Number GDN 3630
Credits 3.0

The Level Design I Course teaches students how to analyze game levels and break them down into their basic components. Students will learn to ask the right questions when designing a level. What purpose does a particular object in a level serve Is it functional, or is it there for purely aesthetic reasons What sort of guidance (if any) should a player receive Does this level have any ties to previous or future levels Students will also learn about such concepts as level pacing and flow, set ting clear goals for a player, and the importance of visuals. The ever-elusive fun factor will also be covered, as a way of tying the individual components together.


Level Design II
Course Number GDN 3740
Credits 4.0

The Level Design II Course teaches students how to create a level based on game interactions and features. Designing a level by interaction allows the game designer to map out the perfect game scenarios to give to the player. Since games allow a degree of free will, it is the designer’s responsibility to present the player with optimal situations to utilize and master game features. This is achieved by linking well thought out interactive scenarios. Using the tools learned in Level Design 1, students follow simple steps to creating an interaction-driven level. Advanced concepts such as modularity and combat scenarios are also covered in this class.


Programming Foundations
Course Number GDN 3240
Credits 4.0

The Programming Foundations Course examines the underlying technical details of a game. General knowledge of simple object-oriented concepts will help a designer plan out the various systems of a game. These skills will also help a designer break down aspects of a game into their core components. Scripting languages will also be introduced as a means of giving the designer higher-level access to the data and functionality of a game.


Prototyping I
Course Number GDN 3840
Credits 4.0

The Prototyping I Course provides students with the theory and practices used to design and execute a testing process to both validate and improve a game during the preproduction phase of development. Simplified versions of the final product called prototypes allow for the proving and refinement of a game as well as reducing both costs and risks associated with the actual development cycle. Students will ultimately propose their own product in this course to be tested in the following course, Prototyping II.


Prototyping II
Course Number GDN 4140
Credits 4.0

The Prototyping II Course demonstrates the testing of viability and variation of the game concept, employing a heuristic process that provides personal insight for each student. This course utilizes the game concept proposed in the previous course (Prototyping I) to experience a testing and revision process that will improve the overall quality of a game. A range of testing methods will be employed to improve iterations of the game product.


Research and Marketing
Course Number GDN 4540
Credits 4.0

The Research and Marketing Course examines the marketing process and helps students develop the skills required to gather information, organize data, and deliver a concise and credible product. The billion-dollar video game industry is fueled by successful marketing campaigns that engage loyal enthusiasts as well as capture new customers. Topics of study will include consumer research, advertising, product planning, distribution, public relations, and media relationships. The materials and process in this course apply directly to final project development in this program.


Storytelling
Course Number GDN 1340
Credits 4.0

The Storytelling Course introduces students to the history of storytelling in all its manifestations: from ancient tribal performance and cave paintings to the modern impact of story in various entertainment media. Students will examine storytelling as a practical tool for communicating information and ideas, including storyboarding techniques. There will be particular at tention paid to how storytelling operates through modern technologies including cinema and games and how it can be used in video games to build narrative depth, emotional impact, and theme, which all work toward greater player immersion.


Team Building
Course Number GDN 2430
Credits 3.0

The Team Building Course investigates collaborative techniques designed to inspire teams to work together, delivering faster and more ef fective results and services. A strong team demonstrates critical skills in assessing and managing relationships with self and others. This course seeks to maximize individual strengths; leverage complementary skills and styles of team members; and optimize organization, planning, and implementation of team objectives. Through selfreflection and team-building exercises, students will learn to structure, measure, and tune performance in a team environment.


Testing and Play Balancing
Course Number GDN 4440
Credits 4.0

The Testing and Play Balancing Course provides students with the skills used to design and implement a testing program from the beginning of the development cycle to the end. Quality Assurance is an integral component of the game design process. The successful delivery of a game is dependent on the verification and validation of an ef fective quality assurance system. Topics will include function prototypes, test sets (which include defect testing and acceptance testing) and structural prototyping. Students will develop a continuous process improvement program that can be utilized in future projects.


Usability
Course Number GDN 2240
Credits 4.0

The Usability Course explores the theoretical and practical methods used to improve game interfaces. Usability inspection is aimed at finding usability problems and providing design relevant information to designers and engineers in the effort of making products easier to interact with and more ef ficient to use. In this course, students will understand usability and its considerations defining the usability trade-of fs involved in the game design world. Some of the topics will include generations of user interfaces, the usability engineering lifecycle, design process, usability heuristics, usability testing methodologies, four fun keys, and design of a game controller.


Anthropology and Sociology
Course Number GEN 2140
Credits 4.0

In the Anthropology and Sociology Course, students investigate the study of humanity, how groups of humans tend to interact, and the impact of these interactions on the individual. Technology has changed the shape of communication and commerce, creating the potential for a truly global economy. Understanding how culture is shaped—from the largest national identities to the smallest social groups—has become an absolute necessity for industries hoping to tap into broader world markets.


Developmental Psychology
Course Number DEP 2004
Credits 4.0

The Developmental Psychology Course examines the ways the basic elements of psychological development serve to either detract from or enhance personal growth. Students gain a basic understanding of developmental theories and identify ways that they impact personal growth. Current theory is combined with historical theory in order to give the students the broadest possible framework with which to enhance their understanding of developmental psychology.


Finite Math
Course Number MGF 1040
Credits 4.0

The Finite Math Course provides a foundation of mathematical analysis techniques used in the working world. Students will explore a collection of topics including Probability Theory, Linear Programming, Matrices & Determinates, Logic, and Number Theory. The topics explored will provide valuable experience with organizing information and analytical thinking. Students will use the skills gained in this course to successfully navigate future courses and projects that call on logical and analytical assessments.


Statistics
Course Number MGF 1340
Credits 4.0

The Statistics Course teaches students how to examine data, determine where things are, and predict where things will go. By determining market trends and behavioral trends, the student can leverage the data so that it connects directly with an intended target. Students will examine the central tendency, variability, and skew of data in ef fort to locate correlations and regressions and will use this information to predict trends or see where problems could arise.


Design and Development Analysis
Course Number GDN 2130
Credits 3.0

The Design and Development Analysis Course teaches the student techniques used to deconstruct, reproduce, and improve existing games based on a thorough analytical process. The ability to critically analyze other’s work is essential to the design phase of any project, and the video game industry is no exception to this. By playing and deconstructing games, students will learn the complicated design systems running behind the scenes in games and will compose documents to support their findings.


Design Project
Course Number GDN 3140
Credits 4.0

The Design Project Course builds on the documentation skills gained in Game Design I and the critical and analytical techniques tested in courses such as Statistics, Economics, and Usability. This course challenges students to apply what they know. In teams, students generate ideas, design playable components around those ideas, and document their decisions through a collaborative and analytical process. Focus is placed on the mechanics, flow, and fun factor. The goal of the project is for students to appreciate the complexity of collaborative game design, to fine-tune the application of their technical design skills, and to ensure their design is well-suited to an intended market and meets all milestones.


Design Tools I
Course Number GDN 3430
Credits 3.0

In the Design Tools I Course, students examine the various development tools used to create games. Students explore game engines, asset libraries, graphic art tools, and level editing tools. The intention of the course is not to fine-tune the use of all the game creation tools discussed; it is to provide a working knowledge of the tools so that designers can bring their designs to life as well as create a single level in an actual game engine.


Design Tools II
Course Number GDN 3540
Credits 4.0

In the Design Tools II Course, students take a much closer look at the tools employed in the creation of game levels. Specifically, students are instructed in the use of state-of-the-art level editors employed by the game industry. Level editors are some of the most important tools a designer will encounter in the industry. Depending on the robustness of the editor, a designer can create entire environments—complete with audio and visual content, AI entities, and complex game objectives—from within the one tool. By learning these editors, students are bet ter prepared to apply the concepts they will learn in future level design courses.


Economics
Course Number GDN 1440
Credits 4.0

The Economics Course examines how people make choices and use resources. This course focuses specifically on game economics and will examine how markets are created and maintained in game worlds. Students will learn how players allocate their resources in a limited market, while trying to satisfy their wants and needs. This is maintained through economic balance and fluctuations that are controlled by the designer and must be maintained throughout the development process. Topics of study include basic economic theory, inflation, supply & demand, poverty & inequality, and market stability.


Game Design Final Project I
Course Number GDN 4630
Credits 3.0

In the Game DesignFinal Project I Course, students are placed into groups and will plan the genre and scope of their final projects. Students will assign roles and responsibilities, generate feature lists, and outline a production plan. Each team is responsible for composing a formal Design Document, detailing the process and tools that will be used to create the intended game prototype. Focus will be on originality, creativity, overall fun of the game, team collaboration, and work ethic.


Game Design Final Project II
Course Number GDN 4730
Credits 3.0

In the Game Design Final Project II Course, the final project serves as the culmination of skills developed during the Game Design Online program. Teams will focus on turning their Final Project I documented designs into full working prototypes. Prototypes can consist of multiple game levels, card games, pen & paper games, board games, and game mods. Students will be evaluated on their design decisions, creativity, and look and feel of the prototype, playability, and overall fun. Upon completion of this course, teams will have a working prototype that is ready to be tested and polished.


Game Design Final Project III
Course Number GDN 4840
Credits 4.0

In the Game Design Final Project III Course, the final project serves as the culmination of skills developed during the Game Design Online program. Teams will continue working on Final Project II prototypes, testing and polishing their game designs. Upon completion of this course, teams will have concrete examples of their designs that are polished and professionally format ted and ready to be presented and shared with prospective employers or investors.


Game Design I
Course Number GDN 1230
Credits 3.0

The Game Design I Course examines the common design approaches used in the game industry and examines the purpose and function of writ ten documentation. Providing a memorable experience for a player in any given game requires a thorough design, and for a design to be ef fectively communicated and adhered to during the development process, it must be well documented. Students will design and document an original game concept, beginning with traditional and creative brainstorming techniques, concept mapping, and outlining. They will further hone their descriptive and technical writing skills through composition, revision, and editing of their design documentation.


Game Design II
Course Number GDN 4240
Credits 4.0

The Game Design II Course teaches students how to prioritize game features and develop successful plans of implementation. Design is not only creating what is in a game but also deciding how and when certain features will be implemented and accomplished. The goal is to create a complete gaming experience for the player, and students will learn to appreciate this through a deeper examination of core aspects such as point of view, feedback, player challenge, and player choices.


Game History
Course Number GDN 1130
Credits 3.0

The Game History Course examines the history of game development, the changes in game systems, and the evolution of genres and interactivity elements. The course explores why people play games and which games revolutionized the various game genres. Important milestones in the industry’s history have resulted in changes to the way people create and play games, and designers need to understand these. Students will learn about influential and innovative titles and what impact they had or continue to have on the games of today.


Game Mechanics
Course Number GDN 3340
Credits 4.0

The Game Mechanics Course explores the theories and principles employed in game rule-based systems. Students will learn how pacing and thematic structures incorporate conflict resolution and generate a plausible challenge and reward system. Students will understand the use of feedback mechanisms by employing a heuristic testing process to determine which of the design elements may or may not be fun or unbalanced during actual play. Students leaving this course will have a bet ter idea about how to bet ter sync gameplay decisions to a specified target audience.


Leadership
Course Number GDN 2340
Credits 4.0

The Leadership Course is designed to facilitate students’ discovery, direction, development and demonstration of their leadership skills. Emphasis is placed on students constructing a personal leadership development plan for professional application. The importance of translating leadership theory into real-world practice is amplified throughout the course. The leadership principles and knowledge that will be acquired are transferable to any industry


Level Design I
Course Number GDN 3630
Credits 3.0

The Level Design I Course teaches students how to analyze game levels and break them down into their basic components. Students will learn to ask the right questions when designing a level. What purpose does a particular object in a level serve Is it functional, or is it there for purely aesthetic reasons What sort of guidance (if any) should a player receive Does this level have any ties to previous or future levels Students will also learn about such concepts as level pacing and flow, set ting clear goals for a player, and the importance of visuals. The ever-elusive fun factor will also be covered, as a way of tying the individual components together.


Level Design II
Course Number GDN 3740
Credits 4.0

The Level Design II Course teaches students how to create a level based on game interactions and features. Designing a level by interaction allows the game designer to map out the perfect game scenarios to give to the player. Since games allow a degree of free will, it is the designer’s responsibility to present the player with optimal situations to utilize and master game features. This is achieved by linking well thought out interactive scenarios. Using the tools learned in Level Design 1, students follow simple steps to creating an interaction-driven level. Advanced concepts such as modularity and combat scenarios are also covered in this class.


Programming Foundations
Course Number GDN 3240
Credits 4.0

The Programming Foundations Course examines the underlying technical details of a game. General knowledge of simple object-oriented concepts will help a designer plan out the various systems of a game. These skills will also help a designer break down aspects of a game into their core components. Scripting languages will also be introduced as a means of giving the designer higher-level access to the data and functionality of a game.


Project Management and Assessment I
Course Number PMA 101
Credits 1.0

The Project Management and Assessment Courses are concurrent courses taken alongside core curriculum in order to assist students with the development, management, and assessment of program projects. The courses provide an opportunity for students to apply analysis skills, create strategic plans, and foster professional workflow practices.


Project Management and Assessment II
Course Number PMA 102
Credits 1.0

The Project Management and Assessment Courses are concurrent courses taken alongside core curriculum in order to assist students with the development, management, and assessment of program projects. The courses provide an opportunity for students to apply analysis skills, create strategic plans, and foster professional workflow practices.


Project Management and Assessment III
Course Number PMA 203
Credits 1.0

The Project Management and Assessment Courses are concurrent courses taken alongside core curriculum in order to assist students with the development, management, and assessment of program projects. The courses provide an opportunity for students to apply analysis skills, create strategic plans, and foster professional workflow practices.


Prototyping I
Course Number GDN 3840
Credits 4.0

The Prototyping I Course provides students with the theory and practices used to design and execute a testing process to both validate and improve a game during the preproduction phase of development. Simplified versions of the final product called prototypes allow for the proving and refinement of a game as well as reducing both costs and risks associated with the actual development cycle. Students will ultimately propose their own product in this course to be tested in the following course, Prototyping II.


Prototyping II
Course Number GDN 4140
Credits 4.0

The Prototyping II Course demonstrates the testing of viability and variation of the game concept, employing a heuristic process that provides personal insight for each student. This course utilizes the game concept proposed in the previous course (Prototyping I) to experience a testing and revision process that will improve the overall quality of a game. A range of testing methods will be employed to improve iterations of the game product.


Research and Marketing
Course Number GDN 4540
Credits 4.0

The Research and Marketing Course examines the marketing process and helps students develop the skills required to gather information, organize data, and deliver a concise and credible product. The billion-dollar video game industry is fueled by successful marketing campaigns that engage loyal enthusiasts as well as capture new customers. Topics of study will include consumer research, advertising, product planning, distribution, public relations, and media relationships. The materials and process in this course apply directly to final project development in this program.


Storytelling
Course Number GDN 1340
Credits 4.0

The Storytelling Course introduces students to the history of storytelling in all its manifestations: from ancient tribal performance and cave paintings to the modern impact of story in various entertainment media. Students will examine storytelling as a practical tool for communicating information and ideas, including storyboarding techniques. There will be particular at tention paid to how storytelling operates through modern technologies including cinema and games and how it can be used in video games to build narrative depth, emotional impact, and theme, which all work toward greater player immersion.


Team Building
Course Number GDN 2430
Credits 3.0

The Team Building Course investigates collaborative techniques designed to inspire teams to work together, delivering faster and more ef fective results and services. A strong team demonstrates critical skills in assessing and managing relationships with self and others. This course seeks to maximize individual strengths; leverage complementary skills and styles of team members; and optimize organization, planning, and implementation of team objectives. Through selfreflection and team-building exercises, students will learn to structure, measure, and tune performance in a team environment.


Testing and Play Balancing
Course Number GDN 4440
Credits 4.0

The Testing and Play Balancing Course provides students with the skills used to design and implement a testing program from the beginning of the development cycle to the end. Quality Assurance is an integral component of the game design process. The successful delivery of a game is dependent on the verification and validation of an ef fective quality assurance system. Topics will include function prototypes, test sets (which include defect testing and acceptance testing) and structural prototyping. Students will develop a continuous process improvement program that can be utilized in future projects.


Usability
Course Number GDN 2240
Credits 4.0

The Usability Course explores the theoretical and practical methods used to improve game interfaces. Usability inspection is aimed at finding usability problems and providing design relevant information to designers and engineers in the effort of making products easier to interact with and more ef ficient to use. In this course, students will understand usability and its considerations defining the usability trade-of fs involved in the game design world. Some of the topics will include generations of user interfaces, the usability engineering lifecycle, design process, usability heuristics, usability testing methodologies, four fun keys, and design of a game controller.


Anthropology and Sociology
Course Number GEN 2140
Credits 4.0

In the Anthropology and Sociology Course, students investigate the study of humanity, how groups of humans tend to interact, and the impact of these interactions on the individual. Technology has changed the shape of communication and commerce, creating the potential for a truly global economy. Understanding how culture is shaped—from the largest national identities to the smallest social groups—has become an absolute necessity for industries hoping to tap into broader world markets.


Developmental Psychology
Course Number DEP 2004
Credits 4.0

The Developmental Psychology Course examines the ways the basic elements of psychological development serve to either detract from or enhance personal growth. Students gain a basic understanding of developmental theories and identify ways that they impact personal growth. Current theory is combined with historical theory in order to give the students the broadest possible framework with which to enhance their understanding of developmental psychology.


English Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

The English Composition I Course is designed to introduce students to the writing process. Special at tention is given to selecting and refining topics, identifying the audience, developing a purpose, and formulating thesis statements. Grammatical conventions and their applications are heavily stressed. Students will learn to compose mature, logical sentences, and paragraphs in order to create rhetorical cohesion.


Finite Math
Course Number MGF 1040
Credits 4.0

The Finite Math Course provides a foundation of mathematical analysis techniques used in the working world. Students will explore a collection of topics including Probability Theory, Linear Programming, Matrices & Determinates, Logic, and Number Theory. The topics explored will provide valuable experience with organizing information and analytical thinking. Students will use the skills gained in this course to successfully navigate future courses and projects that call on logical and analytical assessments.


Fundamentals of Physics
Course Number PHY 1000
Credits 4.0

The Fundamentals of Physics Course examines real-world physics and how those rules can be modeled in mathematical theories. Students will explore the fundamentals of momentum and energy, force and motion, gravity, particles, temperature, electricity, magnetism, and light. Students will use the learned concepts to design mathematical models representing the physics environments. The students will use this knowledge to communicate concisely the behavioral characteristics of the natural phenomena.


Historical Archetypes and Mythology
Course Number GEN 251
Credits 4.0

The Historical Archetypes and Mythology Course explores how myths, fairy tales, folklores, gods, heroes, and monsters link cultures together in today’s entertainment marketplace. Mythology’s cross- cultural themes are frequently represented in a variety of contemporary media, such as computer animation, video games, game art, and movies. The intent of this class is to provide a foundation for understanding the connections between culture, mythology, history, color symbolism, and iconic archetypes relative to the development of various forms of visual media and entertainment. Students apply course concepts through assignments that demonstrate mastery of archetypal character creation, preproduction planning, applying media localization, and the ef fective use of cultural color symbolism. Additionally, class discussions, activities, homework, and assignments will pertain to understanding the contribution of a culture’s mythology relative to a culture’s ideas, beliefs, entertainment, and destiny


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number SPC 2140
Credits 4.0

The Interpersonal Communications Course examines the nature of the communication process, variables affecting the process, and the individuals involved. Additionally, this course includes individual analysis of behavior processes that may impede and/or enhance communication processes. Topics include perception, nonverbal behavior, persuasive communication, identity management, intercultural communication and computer mediated communication. This course also enhances students’ ability to analyze and evaluate information.


Statistics
Course Number MGF 1340
Credits 4.0

The Statistics Course teaches students how to examine data, determine where things are, and predict where things will go. By determining market trends and behavioral trends, the student can leverage the data so that it connects directly with an intended target. Students will examine the central tendency, variability, and skew of data in ef fort to locate correlations and regressions and will use this information to predict trends or see where problems could arise.


Historical Archetypes & Mythology
Course Number GEN 251
Credits 4.0

The Historical Archetypes and Mythology Course explores how myths, fairy tales, folklores, gods, heroes, and monsters link cultures together in today’s entertainment marketplace. Mythology’s cross- cultural themes are frequently represented in a variety of contemporary media, such as computer animation, video games, game art, and movies. The intent of this class is to provide a foundation for understanding the connections between culture, mythology, history, color symbolism, and iconic archetypes relative to the development of various forms of visual media and entertainment. Students apply course concepts through assignments that demonstrate mastery of archetypal character creation, preproduction planning, applying media localization, and the effective use of cultural color symbolism. Additionally, class discussions, activities, homework, and assignments will pertain to understanding the contribution of a culture’s mythology relative to a culture’s ideas, beliefs, entertainment, and destiny.


Interpersonal Communication
Course Number SPC 2140
Credits 4.0

The Interpersonal Communications Course examines the nature of the communication process, variables affecting the process, and the individuals involved. Additionally, this course includes individual analysis of behavior processes that may impede and/or enhance communication processes. Topics include perception, nonverbal behavior, persuasive communication, identity management, intercultural communication and computer mediated communication. This course also enhances students’ ability to analyze and evaluate information.


Program description: By focusing our training on the specific needs of the gaming industry, Full Sail’s
Game Art Bachelor of Science Degree
Program is designed to open the gaming
world to you, helping you develop the skills
to become part of a specialized group of
artists. These artists help to create the next
generation of video games, innovating in
visuals as well as in game play, and helping
to shape the future of one of the world’s
fastest-growing forms of entertainment.

Game Design Courses at Rasmussen College

Program Name: Game and Simulation Production Bachelor Degree
Human Geography
Course Number G146
Credits 4.0

A systematic or regional introduction to the basic concepts of human geography, including the causes and consequences of the uneven distribution of human activity. Prerequisite: none


Visual Communication in the Media
Course Number G332
Credits 4.0

This course examines how people understand their world through visual images. Students will examine how people visually gather, process, and interpret information presented through media sources. Prerequisite: none


Gender in Math and Science
Course Number G434
Credits 4.0

This course examines the personal and collective educational experiences, career paths, and discoveries of female researchers, teachers, and practitioners in the fields of mathematics and science. Prerequisite: none


Social Problems
Course Number G365
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to acquaint students with the causes, consequences and solutions surrounding current social problems in the US. Issues such as crime, poverty, prejudice and discrimination, pollution and environmental despoliation, drug abuse, mental illness and others will be explored. Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology


Programming I
Course Number N137
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to teach the student C++ programming utilizing object oriented terminology. C++ expressions, decisions, and loops within the C++ realm are explored and practiced. This first course in a two course sequence ends with an analysis of functions and classes and how these elements are used in different programming projects. Prerequisite: none


Game Preproduction
Course Number N138
Credits 4.0

This course has been designed to teach you the fundamental philosophies of game design and apply them in a hands-on manner using a stepby- step process that develops problem solving strategies. The techniques taught in this course exist to provide the practical resources needed to build a firm understanding of game development from a production standpoint. In addition, the information this course provides is a grounded study for any real life application where inspiration must combine with practical knowledge and application to create a marketable product. Prerequisite: none


Game Design Theory I
Course Number N139
Credits 4.0

The goal of this course is to study the design process for digital games as it pertains to social and structural issues within games and gameplaying behavior. The course covers many topics, including social and cultural elements of games, games as a global commodity, games as instigators for technical innovation, and emerging gaming areas such as mobile games. Prerequisite: none


Math for Game and Simulation Production I
Course Number N180
Credits 4.0

This course has been designed to teach concepts in linear algebra. The course covers linear equations and matrices, and how these can be applied in various situations. In addition, topics will include determinants, vectors in the plane, and how to calculate cross determinants. Prerequisite: College Algebra


Platform Design and Human-Computer Interaction
Course Number N205
Credits 4.0

How a person interacts with a game is one of the more crucial aspects in determining the success of the game among consumers. This course will emphasize the details and planning process that must be followed to ensure a successful interface for the game that is to be played. Various techniques of creating buttons, menus, and other types of interfaces will be explored to give the student a wide exposure to this important element in creating games. Prerequisite: Console Development


Data Structures
Course Number N206
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to be an introduction to data structures using C++. Topics to be covered include lists, stacks, and queues. In addition, additional time is spent on templates and algorithmic analysis as it relates to recursion. Prerequisite: Programming I


Programming II
Course Number N207
Credits 4.0

This course is a continuation of Programming I. Topics that will be covered in this course include design analysis, inheritance, and the use of templates in programming. Input/output issues are discussed, along with advanced topics in C++ programming and a brief look at how C++ can start to be utilized in game programs. Prerequisite: Programming I


Console Development
Course Number N266
Credits 4.0

One aspect of creating games is determining how they will work with different consoles from various manufacturers. This course guides the student through the various parts of a console that will have an impact on the game (memory, processing, storage, and debugging to name a few). This systematic approach will allow the game programmer to determine what modifications and changes need to be made as games become part of the game libraries for different vendors. Prerequisite: Programming II


Applied Game and Simulation Theory
Course Number N276
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the dissection and application of interfaces for video games and simulations in regards to the fundamentals of design. Studies include a range of simulation styles including: basic manual simulation, real time monitoring (graphic displays during simulation); and state-of-the-art object-oriented software that includes two and three dimensional animation. Students are expected to create many small simulations relevant to their environment and to create at least one major simulation for final assessment purposes. Prerequisite: Platform Design and Human-Computer Interaction


Graphics Development with DirectX
Course Number N280
Credits 4.0

During this course the fundamentals of DirectX are examined and backed up by a solid foundation in software engineering practices. The student will gain a professional game developer understanding of how DirectX (the most current version) works. The student will also be able to deliver a programming knowledge of DirectX and will have a practical, Software Engineering approach to creating software. Prerequisite: none


Game Design Theory II
Course Number N281
Credits 4.0

During this course we will explore the more advanced aspects of gaming and the history and cultural impact of interactive simulations and video games. As an advanced theory course discussions will cover researching the cultural, business, and technical perspectives involved with game and simulation production. Insights into design, production, marketing, and sociocultural impacts of interactive entertainment and communication will also be considered. Prerequisite: Game Design Theory I


Game and Simulation Marketing
Course Number N285
Credits 4.0

This course examines the combination of art, science, commerce and culture and its effects on shaping the production, marketing, distribution, and consumption of contemporary media. It combines perspectives on media industries and systems with an awareness of the creative process, the audience, and trends shaping content. The focus of this course is on the rapidly growing segment of entertainment media known as computer gaming. Prerequisite: none


Math for Game and Simulation Production II
Course Number N286
Credits 4.0

This course builds on topics introduced in Math for Game and Simulation Production I. These topics include graphing and solving equations; polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions; analytic geometry; and determining equations from the shape of a graph. Prerequisite: Math for Game and Simulation Production I


Fundamentals of Programming
Course Number W114
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to computer concepts, logic, and programming. It includes designing, coding, debugging, testing, and documenting programs using a high-level programming language. The course provides the beginning programmer with a guide to developing structured program logic. Prerequisite: none


Graphics Development with OpenGL
Course Number N302
Credits 4.0

The goal of the course is to teach fundamental principles of computer graphic algorithms in relation to video game and simulations. The focus is on graphics methods used to render realistic images of scenes applied to the OpenGL system. Much of this involves solutions to problems such as how we represent 3D models, describe their position and motion in 3D, project them into 2D images, and render these 2D projections with pixels. We will also consider photometric problems, such as how we represent light, model the way objects reflect light, and the path that light takes as it refracts through the scene. Prerequisite: none


Game and Simulation Lighting Techniques
Course Number N311
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to 3D programming, with an emphasis on using realtime shaders with DirectX 9.0. The fundamentals of DirectX 9 is covered along with how to do the shader programming to achieve more realistic “looks” in games. 3D lighting, texturing, alpha blending, and stenciling are covered in detail in this course. Prerequisites: 3D Content Creation, Graphics Development with DirectX


3D Content Creation
Course Number N321
Credits 4.0

During this course, students will learn about the primary industry software tools used in the creation of 3D objects and textures. Students will work with industry standard 3D applications in order to create and manipulate two-dimensional texture mapping and three-dimensional models for video game production. Through the use of this software and programming experience a student will be able to bridge the gap between the programming and designer cohorts. Prerequisite: Game Preproduction


Practical Game Development
Course Number N346
Credits 4.0

This course approaches the study of computer games from different viewpoints. First is an example of media that can be analyzed and critiqued for their thematic elements, formal structure, plot and interactive appreciation. The next step is a study of complex software subjects to technology constraints and the product of a professional design and implementation process. The last is a study of behaviors and associations comparable to other popular art forms. Students will study the principles of game design and use them both to analyze existing games and to develop their own original game ideas. Prerequisite: Game Design Theory II


Game Planning and Development Strategies
Course Number N355
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce students to the production, managerial and business issues of digital games. Students will learn how to manage a game production project including pipeline assignment, projected release dates and distribution of work load. They will also decide how to effectively plan and execute a game production cycle. Students will begin the writing of game development documents, game production teams, game development tools and techniques; play testing and the game publication process. Prerequisite: Game and Simulation Marketing


Mobile Platform Development
Course Number N360
Credits 4.0

As more devices become smaller and more mobile, the need to have games to entertain users in downtime increases. This course looks at how to create games for mobile platforms using a systematic approach. The java programming language is utilized in creating these games. How to weave in audio and video is also addressed along with considering factors such as user inputs involved in playing the game. Prerequisite: Programming II


The Physics of Gaming
Course Number N365
Credits 4.0

This course has been designed to teach the foundations of physics. In order to accurately depict events in a “game environment”, the game/simulation programmer must understand the underlying physics principles that determine resultant actions in the physical world and have those principles conveyed in the “game world.” Among the topics that will be covered in this course include Newton’s Laws of Motion, kinematics, and the conservation of momentum in physical systems. Where appropriate some hands-on activities will be done to help illustrate important principles for the students. Prerequisite: Math for Game and Simulation Production II


Artificial Intelligence
Course Number N401
Credits 4.0

60 hours, 4 credits This course provides the foundation for incorporating artificial intelligence (AI) into games. The C++ programming language is used to provide the framework for creating intelligent agents for games. Students will step through the design and programming aspects of creating AI for various games. Various topics including state driven agents and steering behaviors are covered which help provide the AI basis for many games. Prerequisite: Programming II


Software Engineering for Game and Simulation Production
Course Number N421
Credits 4.0

In order to create games or simulations an effective approach needs to be taken to the design and overall strategy of creating these products. Development strategies, risk analysis, and process improvement are some the big topics that will be tackled in this class. In addition, this course will delve into how to conduct testing on new games and simulations and the purpose and method for producing documentation that can be used in the overall development cycle. Prerequisite: Programming II


Multiplayer Game Programming
Course Number N431
Credits 4.0

The trend in games is to have many people simultaneously playing a game utilizing the Internet or some other network. Topics included in this course include scripting, server cluster architecture, data transfer, and how to prevent cheating in MMOG situations. Prerequisite: Programming II


Game Assets
Course Number N450
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the development of visual elements and programming used in the development of a video game. It covers areas such as performance tuning, debugging, designing for test, pipeline management and distribution, study of software architecture design between platforms, object oriented practices for game play, asset management and coding best practices. It also covers areas like cross-platform porting and multilingual techniques. Prerequisite: Programming II


Game Audio Assets
Course Number N455
Credits 4.0

60 hours, 4 credits In this course, we will cover the fundamentals of audio programming for games. Topics covered include basics such as audio formats and common hardware configurations and loading sounds in ADPCM format. Students will explore play back “one shot” and looping sounds; and stream audio from an external device. They will then use these building blocks to write a low-level sound engine that will be implemented into a game engine. Prerequisite: Programming II


Applications of Physics for Game and Simulation Production
Course Number N460
Credits 4.0

An important aspect in a game or simulation is to be able to render what is happening in the game in realistic terms based on standard real physics principles. This course is designed to allow the game or simulation programmer to be able to translate the ideas and sequences of a game into realistic actions. Key components in this class will be the opportunity for students to develop tools, demos, and working games that utilize and follow real physics. Prerequisites: Programming II, The Physics of Gaming


Industrial Simulation Project
Course Number N465
Credits 4.0

This course is designed around a final project in Industrial Simulation. We will focus on design and research issues pertinent to design exploration and presentation through simulations. Throughout the course we will explore concepts in modeling, simulation, and design common to many domains, and investigate specific applications from a variety of fields ranging from weather to ecology to traffic management and architectural interactivity. Prerequisites: Graphics Development with Open GL, Game and Simulation Lighting Techniques


Video Game Production Project
Course Number N470
Credits 4.0

This course will provide an understanding of advanced techniques for electronic game design and programming. Topics will include techniques in graphics game engines, motion generation, behavioral control for autonomous characters, interaction structure, and social and interface issues of multi-user play. Students will culminate these skills into a final project that will demonstrate their understanding of proper game creation techniques. Prerequisites: Graphics Development with DirectX, Graphics Development with OpenGL, Applications of Physics in Game and Simulation Production


English Composition
Course Number G124
Credits 4.0

This course is intended to help students develop their ability to write and express ideas in an organized, unified, coherent manner that reflects an appropriate awareness of purpose and audience. Through writing, reading, and discussion, students will learn to synthesize their thoughts as they communicate more effectively. Course concepts are applied to essays, research projects, and specialized writing. Regular writing and revision will improve students’ grammar, punctuation and usage skills. Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundations of English II or placement determined by STEP assessment score.


Introduction to Communication
Course Number G141
Credits 4.0

The course will introduce students to basic models and theories of the communication process. Students will learn about a variety of elements involved in communication. They will also explore how factors such as race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, and gender influence communication. Students will focus on developing an awareness of the effects of various types of communication on themselves and others. They will also develop practical skills for improving their ability to communicate in personal, social and professional contexts. Specific topics will include perception, selfconcept, verbal and non-verbal communication, effective listening and communicating in culturally diverse settings. Prerequisite: none


Film Appreciation
Course Number G145
Credits 4.0

Conversational Spanish
Course Number G238
Credits 4.0

College Algebra
Course Number G233
Credits 4.0

40 hours, 4 credits This course provides students with the skills to achieve mastery of algebraic terminology and applications including, but not limited to, real number operations, variables, polynomials, integer exponents, graphs, factoring, quadratic equations, and word problems. Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundations of Math or placement determined by STEP assessment score.


Structure and Function of the Human Body
Course Number G150
Credits 4.0

This course provides a working knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. A general introduction to cells and tissues is followed by study of the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal and muscular systems. The student is introduced to the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: none


General Psychology
Course Number G148
Credits 4.0

A survey of the study of human and animal behavior with emphasis on the scientific nature of contemporary psychological investigation. Topics may include the biology of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, cognition, motivation, emotion, life-span development of behavior, personality, abnormal behavior and its therapies, social behavior and individual differences.


Foundations of English II
Course Number B098
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes mastery of grammar and punctuation usage, paragraph structure, and strategy. Prerequisite: Placement determined by placement test score.


Foundations of Math
Course Number B099
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the fundamentals of mathematics in the following areas: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, decimals, and percentages. Prerequisite: Placement determined by placement test score.


Computer Applications and Business Systems Concepts
Course Number D132
Credits 3.0

40 hours, 3 credits This course teaches students basic to advanced computer concepts and skills, including creating and modifying Word documents, designing databases, spreadsheet creation and analysis, using the Internet and e-commerce tools, and creating presentations with enhanced features and web tools. Prerequisite: none


Success Strategies
Course Number E150
Credits 4.0

This course will enable students to develop positive skills that ensure success in the college setting and workplace. Specific topics in learning and study strategies will lead students to develop and utilize appropriate study techniques, ensuring academic success. Topics in life skills will lead to a better understanding of self and others in our diverse world, and encourage the development and utilization of strategies to promote positive relationships, self-management, and professionalism.


Career Development
Course Number E242
Credits 2.0

The course is designed to study the personal and professional characteristics necessary for obtaining and maintaining suitable employment. The student will assemble a complete job-seeking portfolio including his/her resume and references, letters of application and appreciation, documentation of work and educational history, and demonstration of skills through examples of student work. The course includes an in-depth study of selfmarketing approaches, job interviewing techniques and professionalism as well as participation in a mock interview. Prerequisite: none


Program description: Video games have evolved since the original Pong, continually changing and becoming more innovative and entertaining every day. After you earn your Online Game and Simulation Production Bachelor's Degree, you will be prepared to be a part of that evolution and work to make games better.
No matter which aspect of gaming you decide to tackle, you will have confidence in the skills you have earned from your Online Game Design degree coursework.
In the Online Game and Simulation program, you will understand and be able to apply the technical concepts and knowledge needed to develop games and simulation projects from concept to finished product. This Online Bachelor's degree will enhance your critical thinking and reasoning abilities, information literacy, and communication skills. The knowledge you gain will enable you to begin a career in the game and simulation production industry.

Game Design Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Game Design Schools (campus and online)

University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Texas A & M University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 135
Rank in USA 36th
Carnegie Mellon University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 115
Rank in USA 44th
University of California-Irvine
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 90
Rank in USA 49th
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
University of Miami
Total Programs 177
Number of Subjects 151
Rank in USA 69th
North Carolina State University at Raleigh
Total Programs 175
Number of Subjects 137
Rank in USA 70th
Rhode Island School of Design
Total Programs 23
Number of Subjects 25
Rank in USA 85th
American University
Total Programs 118
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 97th
Temple University
Total Programs 210
Number of Subjects 158
Rank in USA 105th
Drexel University
Total Programs 125
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 108th
Ohio University-Main Campus
Total Programs 183
Number of Subjects 158
Rank in USA 128th
University of Utah
Total Programs 176
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 129th
Appalachian State University
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 130th
Rochester Institute of Technology
Total Programs 1
Number of Subjects 108
Rank in USA 137th
Chapman University
Total Programs 91
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 139th
Texas Christian University
Total Programs 124
Number of Subjects 117
Rank in USA 142nd