Online History Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its history courses to be successful historians, art history teachers, professor of histories, art history professors, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 21,810 people employed as history teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $69,280. Museum technicians and conservators make on average $41,330 per year and there are about 10,170 of them employed today.

History Organizations History Common Job Tasks
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  • writing research papers
  • attending conferences
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History Courses at Norwich University

Program Name: Master of Arts in Military History
Introduction to Military History
Course Number MH 510
Credits 6.0

The first seminar examines how military history developed as a distinct discipline, and will train you in the "tools of the trade": historiography and methodology. Historiography, or the art of practicing history as a distinct discipline, is an examination of the history of historical thought, from the first works of history in the classical world to the present time. The seminar will cover some of the varied historiographical schools and concepts that have evolved. Historical methodology — changes in the methods of "doing" history — will also be studied. How do historians gather information and formulate hypotheses The development of research methods, including the use of primary and secondary sources, are discussed. History involves interpretation; the role of objectivity, selectivity, and bias are examined. All readings and case studies are drawn from the field of military history.


The Western Way of War
Course Number MH 520
Credits 6.0

This seminar explores the military history of the United States and Europe from classical Greece to the 20th century. The emphasis is on the "Western Way of War" as defined by historians Geoffrey Parker and Victor Davis Hanson. In virtually every conflict between Western states and non-Western powers, from the Persian Wars through the colonial era, the west has emerged victorious. Are there experiences and characteristics that have distinguished warfare in the West from the rest of the world Other prominent military historians, including John Lynn, have challenged the notion that a distinct, continuous Western Way of War exists. The seminar consists of an in-depth examination of these conflicting interpretations of military history


Military Thought and Theory
Course Number MH 530
Credits 6.0

This seminar studies the most influential military theoreticians and strategists from the period of the Thirty Years War to the present day. You will examine the theories of Clausewitz, Jomini, Douhet, Mahan, Corbett, and Mao Tse-Tung. This seminar also examines theories of deterrence and nuclear war as well as post-Maoist revolutionary warfare


The Non-Western Way of War
Course Number MH 540
Credits 6.0

This seminar presents an introduction to non-Western military history, covering a wide range of topics including military thought, strategy and tactics, technologies, and cultural factors as they pertain to the waging of war. This seminar also introduces you to the latest scholarship and interpretations, which both challenge and complement aspects of the debates concerning Western superiority. This seminar devotes more attention to East Asia than to other parts of the non-Western world. Specific historical cases in non-Western military history will be examined to determine the military effectiveness of non-Western cultures and the efficacy of the "Western Way of War" thesis.


U.S. Military History
Course Number MH 550
Credits 6.0

You will examine America's unique experience of warfare and the development of military institutions and military policy in the United States. This seminar examines the military history of the United States from the colonial era to the present day with special emphasis on the Revolutionary War, Civil War, Frontier Wars, America's rise to Great Power status, the First and Second World Wars, and the conflicts of the Cold War era. Throughout this seminar, you examine the efficacy of the "American Way of War" thesis as well as American civil-military relations


Race and Gender in Military History
Course Number MH 551
Credits 6.0

This seminar covers the complex issues surrounding racial integration in military institutions, including intriguing questions around citizenship and ethnicity. You also examine the history of women's participation in warfare and issues of gender integration in the military


Capstone Seminar
Course Number MH 562
Credits 6.0

Instead of a master's "thesis", Norwich requires a "Capstone Paper" that must be written and submitted to complete your degree. The Capstone has many elements of a traditional thesis, including the following: * a program-approved topic of the student's own choosing to be explored in depth * the use of appropriate academic sources * an expected length of 45-50 pages * defense of the Capstone during the student's Residency


Program description: The Norwich University Master of Arts in Military History program is delivered conveniently online and designed to provide students with a base of historical knowledge within the field of military history, build an awareness of differing historical interpretations, and develop the ability to synthesize diverse types of historical knowledge. The program will build and refine students research, writing, analysis, and presentation skills to advance careers and gain an in depth knowledge of military history. The program provides a comprehensive overview and analysis of the theories, strategies and execution of warfare by examining conflict over the ages. Norwich is the birthplace of ROTC and the first private military college in the country; our graduates have fought in every war since its founding.

History Courses at Arizona State University

Program Name: BA in History
World History to 1500
Course Number HST 102
Credits 3.0

This course places our interconnected, contemporary world in historical context by examining the economic, political, social, religious, and demographic results of global contacts before 1500. Students explore the past from a global perspective, focusing on early civilizations and cross-cultural exchanges. This course meets HU, H, and G General Studies requirements.


United States to 1865
Course Number HST 109
Credits 3.0

This course provides a basic introduction to the political, economic, and social development of the United States from its beginnings through the Civil War. Students explore U.S. history chronologically and thematically and learn to analyze the past through practicing the skills historians use. This course meets (HU or SB) and H General Studies requirements.


Europe in World History since 1789
Course Number HST 304
Credits 3.0

This course examines several key political, economic, social, and cultural developments in the history of Europe since 1789 and looks at their global ramifications. Students explore themes such as revolution and revolutionary ideologies; social, technological, and scientific change; imperialism and resistance; total war in the twentieth century; and the struggles to create a new world and European order since 1945. This course meets SB and H General Studies requirements.


The Vietnam War
Course Number HST 456
Credits 3.0

This course traces U.S. military, diplomatic, and political involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975 and examines Vietnamese history, culture, and nationalism; French colonialism in Southeast Asia; and the role of dissent on the U.S. home front. Students explore the Vietnam War’s origins, course, and consequences from several different angles. This course meets SB, G, and H General Studies requirements.


World History since 1500
Course Number HST 101
Credits 3.0

This course traces the origins of our interconnected, contemporary world by examining the economic, political, social, religious, demographic, and environmental results of past global contacts since 1500. Students explore the past and present from a global perspective, focusing on cross-cultural contact, interaction, and conflict. This course meets HU, H, and G General Studies requirements.


Islam in World History
Course Number HST 302
Credits 3.0

This course explores global Islam from its origins to the present, situating it in the context of world history and religion. This course meets (HU or SB) and H General Studies requirements.


Women in United States History
Course Number HST 306
Credits 3.0

This course examines the history of American women of diverse racial, religious, and ethnic groups and classes, focusing on changing definitions of women's roles. Students discover and analyze the history of women in the United States through practicing the skills historians use. This course meets (HU or SB) and H General Studies requirements.


Immigration and Ethnicity in the United States
Course Number HST 325
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the history of immigration and ethnicity in the United States, tracing the development of the multiethnic nation from colonization to the present. Students examine and discuss conflicting perspectives on immigration and ethnicity and explore paths available to multiethnic societies. This course meets SB, H, and C General Studies requirements.


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Credits 0.0
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First-Year Composition II
Course Number ENG 102
Credits 3.0
More Info http://writing.asu.edu/?q=content/english-102-expanded-description

Like English 101, English 102 is designed to help students develop sophisticated, situation-sensitive reading and writing strategies. Students make arguments in formal and informal settings. Special attention is given to evidence discovery, claim support, argument response, and their applications to academic debate, public decision making, and written argument. During the 16-week semester students will complete four formal written projects. Combined the final drafts of these four projects should result in approximately 5,000 words (this is equivalent to about 20 pages using standard academic format). Additionally, a final reflection is required.


English for Foreign Students
Course Number ENG 107
Credits 3.0

English 107 is the first-semester writing course for students for whom English is a second language. It aims to increase students' ability to develop ideas, to express ideas effectively, and to engage different literacies. It gives special attention to expository and persuasive writing. Critical reading of articles, speeches, and other non-literary texts helps students to understand the rhetorical process, to analyze audience and its cultural contexts, and to foresee the audience's response. During the 16-week semester students will complete four formal written projects. Combined the final drafts of these four projects should result in approximately 5,000 words (this is equivalent to about 20 pages using standard academic format). Additionally, a final reflection is required. English 107 credits are equivalent of English 101 credits.


English for Foreign Students II
Course Number ENG 108
Credits 3.0
More Info http://english.clas.asu.edu/wp-eng108

English 108 is second-semester composition course for students for whom English is a second language. It is designed to help students develop sophisticated, situation-sensitive reading and writing strategies. Students make arguments in formal and informal settings. Special attention is given to evidence discovery, claim support, argument response, and their applications to academic debate, public decision making, and written argument. During the 16-week semester students will complete four formal written projects. Combined the final drafts of these four projects should result in approximately 5,000 words (this is equivalent to about 20 pages using standard academic format). Additionally, a final reflection is required.


Advanced First-Year Coomposition
Course Number ENG 105
Credits 3.0

An intensive, one-semester writing course that folds the work of our two semester sequence into one. The course emphasizes that research is not merely mechanical or abstract: it contributes to the goals of the entire course. That is, rather than emphasizing the mere ability to find evidence to support a given argument, the course emphasizes the ability to judge the merit and appropriateness of that evidence, to weigh different pieces of evidence against one another and to engage in intellectual dialogue with the authorities represented by that evidence. During the 16-week semester students will complete four formal written projects. Combined the final drafts of these four projects should result in approximately 5,000 words (this is equivalent to about 20 pages using standard academic format). Additionally, a final reflection is required.


College Mathematics (MA)
Course Number MAT 142

This Class Is Specifically Designed For Students Whose Majors Do Not Require College Algebra (mat 117). It Is Designed To Satisfy The Mathematics Requirement For These Students And Is Not Designed As A Prerequisite For Higher Level Mathematics Courses. Students Should Check With Their Departmental Advisors To Verify That This Class Is Accepted For Credit. Mat 142 Is A Three Hour Course Designed To Be A Terminal Math Course For Students Who Are In, Or Plan To Be In, Non-technical Majors. Individual Colleges Determine If Mat 142 Is Sufficient For Their Major Requirements Or If Other Courses Are Required. Mat 142 Fulfills The Ma Requirement.


World History to 1500
Course Number HST 102
Credits 3.0

This course places our interconnected, contemporary world in historical context by examining the economic, political, social, religious, and demographic results of global contacts before 1500. Students explore the past from a global perspective, focusing on early civilizations and cross-cultural exchanges. This course meets HU, H, and G General Studies requirements.


United States to 1865
Course Number HST 109
Credits 3.0

This course provides a basic introduction to the political, economic, and social development of the United States from its beginnings through the Civil War. Students explore U.S. history chronologically and thematically and learn to analyze the past through practicing the skills historians use. This course meets (HU or SB) and H General Studies requirements.


Europe in World History since 1789
Course Number HST 304
Credits 3.0

This course examines several key political, economic, social, and cultural developments in the history of Europe since 1789 and looks at their global ramifications. Students explore themes such as revolution and revolutionary ideologies; social, technological, and scientific change; imperialism and resistance; total war in the twentieth century; and the struggles to create a new world and European order since 1945. This course meets SB and H General Studies requirements.


The Vietnam War
Course Number HST 456
Credits 3.0

This course traces U.S. military, diplomatic, and political involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975 and examines Vietnamese history, culture, and nationalism; French colonialism in Southeast Asia; and the role of dissent on the U.S. home front. Students explore the Vietnam War’s origins, course, and consequences from several different angles. This course meets SB, G, and H General Studies requirements.


World History since 1500
Course Number HST 101
Credits 3.0

This course traces the origins of our interconnected, contemporary world by examining the economic, political, social, religious, demographic, and environmental results of past global contacts since 1500. Students explore the past and present from a global perspective, focusing on cross-cultural contact, interaction, and conflict. This course meets HU, H, and G General Studies requirements.


Islam in World History
Course Number HST 302
Credits 3.0

This course explores global Islam from its origins to the present, situating it in the context of world history and religion. This course meets (HU or SB) and H General Studies requirements.


Women in United States History
Course Number HST 306
Credits 3.0

This course examines the history of American women of diverse racial, religious, and ethnic groups and classes, focusing on changing definitions of women's roles. Students discover and analyze the history of women in the United States through practicing the skills historians use. This course meets (HU or SB) and H General Studies requirements.


Immigration and Ethnicity in the United States
Course Number HST 325
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the history of immigration and ethnicity in the United States, tracing the development of the multiethnic nation from colonization to the present. Students examine and discuss conflicting perspectives on immigration and ethnicity and explore paths available to multiethnic societies. This course meets SB, H, and C General Studies requirements.


Pro-Seminar (L)
Course Number HST 498

Small-group study and research for advanced students within their majors. Major status in the department or instructor approval is required.


Program description: This program encourages students to develop their historical awareness, and their ability to use historical knowledge to make informed decisions. The program stresses cultural and information literacy. It encourages the study of historical events in their cultural context, and stresses the role of media and technology in historical study. This track equips students with the knowledge of history and culture necessary to become secondary school teachers.

History Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BA in History
Themes in U. S. History
Course Number HIS 221
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of U.S. history from the Colonial era to the present. Topics include the American Revolution, the early national period, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian America, the Civil War and the Reconstruction, industrialization, the World Wars, the Great Depression, and the Cold War and the post-Cold War eras


World Civilization
Course Number HIS 109
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of the major events, trends, personalities, movements, and ideas that have shaped world history from the beginnings of civilization to the present


History and Historians
Course Number HIS 247
Credits 4.0

This course is an examination of the meaning and interpretation of history and its methodology. This course is required for history majors


Civil War and Reconstruction
Course Number HIS 310
Credits 4.0

This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of the Civil War and the Reconstruction


Near-Eastern History
Course Number HIS 318
Credits 4.0

The course presents students with a survey of the history of Ancient Greece and Rome, covering more than 2,500 years of civilization in Southern Europe and the Near East. The initial part of the course discusses the Ancient Greeks, beginning with the early Greek civilizations of the Minoans and Mycenaeans during the Bronze Age and concluding with the Age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Empires of Greece and the Near East. The remainder of the course then examines Ancient Rome, beginning with the Etruscans and concluding with the collapse of the Western Roman Empire and the continuation of the Eastern Empire/Byzantine Empire


Modern Middle East
Course Number HIS 320
Credits 4.0

This course provides a political, cultural, and economic history of the Middle East since 1914


20 th Century World
Course Number HIS 331
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the 20th century world, focusing on major trends, events, and personalities of the era


Colonial and Revolutionary America
Course Number HIS 344
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the social, political, intellectual, and cultural life of the American republic from 1607 to 1783


England to 1688
Course Number HIS 354
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the political, social, cultural, economic, and religious history of England from prehistoric times to the Glorious Revolution of 1688


Russian History
Course Number HIS 460
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the Russian nation and people, emphasizing the Soviet era of Russian history


History of Modern East Asia
Course Number HIS 465
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the major themes that have influenced the history of East Asia from 1644 to the present, with an emphasis on the history of modern China and Japan. Topics will include imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, revolution, the world wars, and the Cold War in Asia


Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in History program entails the study of diverse world cultures. The
degree allows students to develop the skills and knowledge associated with a liberal arts degree, while giving
graduates the analytical skills necessary to compete in a global economy. The degree also prepares students for
graduate studies in history, law, and related fields.

History Courses by State & City

Top 20 US History Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Princeton University
Total Programs 56
Number of Subjects 59
Rank in USA 8th
Brown University
Total Programs 135
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 9th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th