Online Homeland Security Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its homeland security courses to be successful homeland security specialists, police officers, security technicians, security officers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 1,028,830 people employed as security guards alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $26,430. Police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers make on average $36,470 per year and there are about 98,090 of them employed today.

Homeland Security Organizations Homeland Security Common Job Tasks
  • analyzing policy
  • adhering to the constitution
  • guarding the border
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Ranked by Excellence

Homeland Security Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice: Homeland Security and Emergency Management
English Composition (ENG115
Course Number (ENG115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics (MAT105)
Course Number (MAT105)
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Social Psychology (PSY110)
Course Number PSY110)
Credits 4.0

Focuses on major theories in social psychology and the most recent research in the field. Topics include gender, interpersonal attraction, aggression, and prosocial behavior.


Homeland Security Organization and Administration
Course Number SEC310
Credits 4.0

This course covers the structure of a homeland security organization at the local, regional, and national level. This course provides an explanation of the homeland security administration functions that must be performed at the different levels.


Emergency Management Procedures
Course Number (CRJ420)
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth review of the concepts of emergency management work. The operational aspects are discussed in relation to the skills needed to do emergency management work, as well as the analytical and critical thinking skills needed for incident command work. Emphasis is placed on the use of technologies, enhanced leadership skills, and the challenges of communications in disaster work.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the components and operations of the criminal justice system. It examines the three main components of that system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Issues and challenges within the criminal justice system and the system's future are also explored.


Introduction to Information Systems
Course Number CIS 105
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microcomputer applications including a brief introduction to computer concepts, computer operating systems, software and hardware. It introduces the student to word processing, spreadsheets, the Internet, graphics, and database software. Included is the creation of web pages, integration of the applications, and hands-on introduction to Microsoft Windows commands, files, features and functions.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Information Technology in Criminal Justice
Course Number CIS170
Credits 4.0

This course examines how information technology is used within the criminal justice system, Homeland Security, and private security. Topics covered include information systems and communication technologies used to prevent and investigate crime and manage security. Students will develop fundamental technical and research skills applicable to criminal justice.


Crime and Criminal Behavior
Course Number CRJ105
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers The Historical Development Of Social And Behavior Explanations Of Adult Crime, As Well As Juvenile Crime And New Evolutions In Crime, Including Cyber Crimes. Crime Causation Theories Are Explained In Relation To Policies Developed From These Theories And The Real And Intended Impact Of These Policies Are Discussed To Demonstrate Their Impact On Society In Regard To Crime Prevention And Criminal Rehabilitation. Prerequisites: Crj 100, Psy 100, Or Psy 105


Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
Course Number CRJ180
Credits 4.0

This course examines the criminal activity of juveniles and includes the study of gangs, status offenses, and the problems facing juveniles today. An overview of American juvenile justice is also provided, in terms of both system and practice. The causes of juvenile crime, the juvenile court system, and the institutionalization, rehabilitation, and treatment of juveniles are explored. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Ethics and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ220
Credits 4.0

This course exposes students to the various philosophical approaches for developing appropriate ethical decision-making tools for the criminal justice professional. Ethical decision-making tools are illustrated in actual application in police, courts, corrections, criminal justice policy, and criminal justice research scenarios. Emphasis is placed on professional integrity and leadership skills that support laws, policies, and procedures in criminal justice. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Criminal Law
Course Number LEG220
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with the origins of criminal law and explores its historical development into modern American crimes codes. Each lesson introduces the student to substantive criminal law and associated legal principles and terminology. This course contrasts elements of crimes against persons, crimes against property, cyber-crime, white collar crime, and other types of crime. Early and modern approaches to identifying, deterring, preventing, detecting, prosecuting, and punishing criminal behavior are also examined.


Society, Law and Government
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course examines the function of the American court system in its operational role within the government, the rule of law, and society. The criminal court process and the role of the judiciary are explained from a policy making perspective that reveals the impact of the courts on society and the rule of law in the evolution of social


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BSCJ) provides students with the knowledge, skills, and professional abilities relevant to the criminal justice field. Students will explore the theoretical, operational, and legal components of law enforcement and the prevention, adjudication, and correction of juvenile and adult crime. Graduates are prepared for careers in the public or private sector of criminal justice or cyber crime and security

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice: Homeland Security Technology
Disaster Recovery
Course Number CIS359
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with a foundation in disaster recovery principles including preparation of a disaster recovery plan, assessment of the risks in the enterprise, development of the policies and procedures, understanding the roles and relationships of the various players in an organization, implementation of the plan, testing and rehearsal of the plan, and actually recovering from a disaster


Security Strategy and Policy
Course Number CIS462
Credits 4.0

This course provides the knowledge necessary to implement network security policy based on established security strategy. It explores security procedures to protect the network. Investigates physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security, and database security


Information Warfare and Homeland Security
Course Number SEC402
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the threats and vulnerabilities to homeland security through information technology. The course focuses on the controls necessary to mitigate homeland security risks from IT


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Introduction to Information Systems
Course Number CIS 105
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microcomputer applications including a brief introduction to computer concepts, computer operating systems, software and hardware. It introduces the student to word processing, spreadsheets, the Internet, graphics, and database software. Included is the creation of web pages, integration of the applications, and hands-on introduction to Microsoft Windows commands, files, features and functions.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the components and operations of the criminal justice system. It examines the three main components of that system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Issues and challenges within the criminal justice system and the system's future are also explored.


English Composition
Course Number ENG 115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics
Course Number MAT105
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Social Psychology
Course Number PSY110
Credits 4.0

Focuses on major theories in social psychology and the most recent research in the field. Topics include gender, interpersonal attraction, aggression, and prosocial behavior.


Information Technology in Criminal Justice
Course Number CIS170
Credits 4.0

This course examines how information technology is used within the criminal justice system, Homeland Security, and private security. Topics covered include information systems and communication technologies used to prevent and investigate crime and manage security. Students will develop fundamental technical and research skills applicable to criminal justice.


Crime and Criminal Behavior
Course Number CRJ105
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers The Historical Development Of Social And Behavior Explanations Of Adult Crime, As Well As Juvenile Crime And New Evolutions In Crime, Including Cyber Crimes. Crime Causation Theories Are Explained In Relation To Policies Developed From These Theories And The Real And Intended Impact Of These Policies Are Discussed To Demonstrate Their Impact On Society In Regard To Crime Prevention And Criminal Rehabilitation. Prerequisites: Crj 100, Psy 100, Or Psy 105


Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
Course Number CRJ180
Credits 4.0

This course examines the criminal activity of juveniles and includes the study of gangs, status offenses, and the problems facing juveniles today. An overview of American juvenile justice is also provided, in terms of both system and practice. The causes of juvenile crime, the juvenile court system, and the institutionalization, rehabilitation, and treatment of juveniles are explored. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Ethics and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ220
Credits 4.0

This course exposes students to the various philosophical approaches for developing appropriate ethical decision-making tools for the criminal justice professional. Ethical decision-making tools are illustrated in actual application in police, courts, corrections, criminal justice policy, and criminal justice research scenarios. Emphasis is placed on professional integrity and leadership skills that support laws, policies, and procedures in criminal justice. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Criminal Law
Course Number LEG220
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with the origins of criminal law and explores its historical development into modern American crimes codes. Each lesson introduces the student to substantive criminal law and associated legal principles and terminology. This course contrasts elements of crimes against persons, crimes against property, cyber-crime, white collar crime, and other types of crime. Early and modern approaches to identifying, deterring, preventing, detecting, prosecuting, and punishing criminal behavior are also examined.


Society, Law and Government
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course examines the function of the American court system in its operational role within the government, the rule of law, and society. The criminal court process and the role of the judiciary are explained from a policy making perspective that reveals the impact of the courts on society and the rule of law in the evolution of social


Networking Security Fundamentals
Course Number CIS 333
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare students for an entry-level information security position in the IT field. The student learns basic security principles and then gains network security practice using lab exercises. This course should be considered a first step toward becoming a security professional.


Homeland Security Organization and Administration
Course Number SEC310
Credits 4.0

This course covers the structure of a homeland security organization at the local, regional, and national level. This course provides an explanation of the homeland security administration functions that must be performed at the different levels.


Senior Seminar in Information Systems
Course Number CIS 499
Credits 4.0

This course enables the student to complete an information systems project in, their concentration. The project will be monitored by a supervising faculty member and must be defended by the student as the final examination. This course represents the last course or next to last course in the Information Systems curriculum. Students may not fulfill the senior seminar requirement by completing another course. Based on the student's concentration, the project requirements will require students to develop an operational program or database, a detailed network/internetwork design, or a network security plan demonstrating mastery and comprehensive knowledge of the learning outcomes in a student's curriculum.


Research and Writing
Course Number ENG215
Credits 4.0

This course examines and implements the principles of argumentation. An argumentative paper is researched and developed based on the concept of writing as a process. The course focuses on the logical organization of ideas patterned on established structures of argument. The course reinforces the importance of the research process and critical evaluation of sources. Acknowledging the intellectual property of others through the proper documentation of sources is stressed.


Communication for Business and the Professions
Course Number ENG240
Credits 4.0

This course will enable students to communicate effectively in their professions. Students will learn to write a variety of documents characteristic of the business world including letters, memos, short reports, and formal reports. The course will focus on techniques for writing clearly, concisely, and persuasively. The course will also help students develop skills in oral presentations. Prerequisites ENG 215 Research and Writing


Introduction to Art, Music, and Literature
Course Number HUM100
Credits 4.0

Focuses on the interplay between art, music, and literature. Shows how different epochs exhibit unique cultural values and lifestyles, which are mirrored in the various art forms. Critically examines representative art throughout the world and history from cultural, social, and esthetic perspectives.


The Origins of Western Culture
Course Number HUM101
Credits 4.0

Studies civilizations and cultures such as ancient Egypt, Crete, Greece, and Rome which have given root to Western culture. Analyzes the artistic, intellectual, religious, political, and socioeconomic aspects of each culture and traces their development in Western civilization.


Logic
Course Number HUM200
Credits 4.0

Enables students to develop analytical, inductive and deductive reasoning through the study of syllogistic, symbolic, and informal logic. Provides methods of constructing arguments, evaluating statements, and recognizing fallacies in theory as well as in practice.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI110
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Physical Sciences introduces the student to basic concepts from the physical sciences such as motion, force, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism and the atomic theory of matter. Discusses the scientific principles that underlie everyday phenomena, modern technologies and planetary processes. Examines how the various branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, astronomy, relate to each other. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Introduction to Biology
Course Number SCI115
Credits 4.0

Provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biology, as well as the process of biological inquiry using the scientific method. Covers the properties and characteristics of living cells, organisms, and ecosystems, and the relevance of this knowledge for contemporary issues in medicine, agriculture and the environment. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Religion and Philosophy
Course Number HUM400
Credits 4.0

Offers an integrative approach to philosophical and religious world views in relation to such questions as the origin of all things, the limits of knowledge, and the role and responsibilities of the individual. Also examines the philosophical and religious views of the great thinkers throughout history.


Statistics
Course Number MAT300
Credits 4.0

This course examines the principles of probability and of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include probability concepts, measures of central tendency, normal distributions, and sampling techniques. The application of these principles to simple hypothesis testing methods and to confidence intervals is also covered. The application of these topics in solving problems encountered in personal and professional settings is also discussed. Prerequisites MAT 105 Introduction to College Mathematics


Economic Problems and Issues
Course Number ECO405
Credits 4.0

Applies conventional economic theory to national and international economic issues and events. Utilizes the policy ideas and stances of contemporary economists to provoke discussion of prevailing economic issues. Applies economic tools to the business decision making process.


Contemporary International Problems
Course Number POL300
Credits 4.0

Analyzes the origins and recent developments of major international problems in the Middle East, Central America, and Southern Africa, and their multi-dimensional impact on world events.


The Individual and Society
Course Number PSY100
Credits 4.0

Presents the various ways in which the individual constructs his self-awareness. Studies how social institutions, such as the family and religion, influence the psychological makeup of the individual.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

Introduces psychology as a human and scientific endeavor. Includes examination of concepts and methods in learning, motivation, development, personality, and social behavior.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC100
Credits 4.0

Provides a critical survey of contemporary social, political, and economic problems facing American society. Emphasizes the urban crisis, military-industrial complex, racism, and distribution of income.


Sociology of Developing Countries
Course Number SOC 300
Credits 4.0

Analyzes the main cultural strata in selected societies of the Third World. Emphasizes their unique historical background and development, their traditional ethos, national characteristics, family structures and religious beliefs, as well as their political, economic, and foreign policy views.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BSCJ) provides students with the knowledge, skills, and professional abilities relevant to the criminal justice field. Students will explore the theoretical, operational, and legal components of law enforcement and the prevention, adjudication, and correction of juvenile and adult crime. Graduates are prepared for careers in the public or private sector of criminal justice or cyber crime and security.

Homeland Security Courses at Everest University

Program Name: Homeland Security (Associate's)
Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Civil & Criminal Justice
Course Number CJL 1110
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Emergency Planning & Security Measures
Course Number DSC 2210
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Security: Principles, Planning & Procedures I
Course Number DSC 2008
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Security: Principles, Planning & Procedures II
Course Number DSC 2010
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Tactical Communication
Course Number DSC 1030
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Domestic & International Terrorism I
Course Number DSC 1011
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Domestic & International Terrorism II
Course Number DSC 1005
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Emergency Medical Services & Fire Operations I
Course Number HSSP 1610
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Business & Ethics for Security Specialist
Course Number SCC 1102
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Information Technology Security I
Course Number DSC 2812
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Emergency Planning & Security Measures II
Course Number DSC 2211
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Emergency Medical Services & Fire Operations II
Course Number HSSP 162
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CCJ 1610
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Spanish for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CCJP 2288
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Introduction to Victims Advocacy
Course Number CCJ 2679
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Information Technology Security II
Course Number HSSP 2820
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Composition II
Course Number ENC 1102
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Oral Communications
Course Number SPC 2016
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Principles of Sociology
Course Number SYG 2000
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


College Algebra
Course Number MAT 1033
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


General Psychology
Course Number PSY 2012
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Basic Critical Thinking
Course Number SLS 1505
Credits 2.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Environmental Science
Course Number EVS 1001
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Program description: Would you like to aid in the protection of our country? Due to recent terrorist events, there is an increased demand for trained safety and security employees throughout the nation. The Homeland Security program will provide you with a solid foundation in planning, implementing, and managing security operations for an organization.

This program evolved out of a need for increased protection and awareness of outside threats to national security. You can embark on a career in a new field with great employment potential.

The Homeland Security program includes:
• Civil & criminal justice
• Emergency planning and security measures
• Principles, planning and procedures of safety
• Tactical communications
• Domestic and international terrorism
• Emergency medical services and fire operations
• Business and ethics for security specialists

You will acquire the education and skills needed for a career in corporate or government security. Whether you aid in the prevention of terrorist attacks or the preparation of emergency procedures, you can apply your knowledge and expertise to the workplace.
Gain employment in security and public safety in a business, airport, home building association, stadium, amusement park, and other settings.

Some career opportunities include:
• Law enforcement
• Border patrol agent
• Homeland security officer

Program Name: Homeland Security (Bachelor's)
Civil & Criminal Justice
Course Number CJL 1110
Credits 4.0

Emergency Planning & Security Measures I
Course Number DSC 2210
Credits 4.0

Security: Principles, Planning & Procedures I
Course Number DSC 2008
Credits 4.0

Security: Principles, Planning & Procedures II
Course Number DSC 2010
Credits 4.0

Tactical Communications
Course Number DSC 1030
Credits 4.0

Domestic & International Terrorism I
Course Number DSC 1011
Credits 4.0

Domestic & International Terrorism II
Course Number DSC 1005
Credits 4.0

Emergency Medical Services & Fire Operations I
Course Number HSSP 1610

Business & Ethics for Security Specialists
Course Number SCC 1102
Credits 4.0

Information Technology Security I
Course Number DSC 2812

Critical Incident Management
Course Number HSSP 3100
Credits 4.0

Facilitating Psychological Support for Catastrophic Events
Course Number HSSP 3200
Credits 4.0

Case Study 1
Course Number HSSP 3301
Credits 1.0

Post Catastrophic Event Documentation and Reporting
Course Number HSSP 4100
Credits 4.0

Critical Issues in Hostage Negotiations
Course Number HSSP 4200
Credits 4.0

Current Events in Homeland Security Management
Course Number HSSP 4300
Credits 4.0

Case Study 2
Course Number HSSP 3302
Credits 1.0

Anti-Terrorism Risk Assessment
Course Number HSSP 3400
Credits 4.0

Communications and Technology Security
Course Number HSSP 4400

Weapons of Mass Destruction
Course Number HSSP 4500
Credits 4.0

Mass Casualty Management Planning
Course Number HSSP 4600
Credits 4.0

Capstone Simulation
Course Number HSSP 4700

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Workplace Relationships
Course Number SLS 1392
Credits 2.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Computer Crime
Course Number CJE 4668
Credits 4.0

Catastrophic Event Response Planning
Course Number HSS 3500
Credits 4.0

Program description: Homeland Security (Bachelor's)

Due to recent terrorist events, there is an increased
demand for trained safety and security employees throughout the
nation. The Homeland Security program will provide you with a
solid foundation in planning, implementing, and managing security
operations for an organization.

The Bachelor's of Science in Homeland Security degree program
focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations,
emergency services and crisis management. Students will learn how
to observe, assess and respond to a number of emergencies
including fire, natural disasters, terrorist strikes, and
corporate crime. Students will also learn legal and ethical
issues.

Program at a Glance:
Critical Incident
Management
Anti-Terrorism Risk
Assessment
Communications and Technology
Security
Catastrophic Event Response
Planning
Weapons of Mass
Destruction

Homeland Security Courses at South University

Program Name: Master of Science in Criminal Justice - Homeland Security Specialization
Resource and Agency Coordination
Course Number MCJ6601
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: None This course exposes students to large-scale coordination challenges involved in responding to critical incidents when dealing with the wide variety of resources and agencies involved. Topics may include identification, prioritization,and assessment of resources (including financial, human, information, and physical) and agencies (including local, state, national, and international). 4 quarter hours


Management of Critical Incidents
Course Number MCJ6505
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: None The course provides students the opportunity to recognize, classify, and manage a wide variety of emergency situations initiated through electronic, biological, nuclear, political, or other means. Topics may include emergency response planning, incident readiness documentation and testing, and communications strategies. 4 quarter hours


Criminal Justice Planning and Innovation
Course Number MCJ6004
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: None This course discusses the application of planning theory and techniques to the criminal justice system as well as to agency specific problems. The class emphasizes problem identification, goal setting, forecasting, and the selection of alternative courses of action. Students become familiar with computerized data analysis and case study simulation in order to illustrate suitable planning techniques as well as pitfalls that can be avoided by implementing such techniques. 4 quarter hours


Special Topics in Homeland Security
Course Number MCJ6620
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: Mcj6601, Mcj5002 This Course Exposes Students To Contemporary Topics In Homeland Security And Explores Pressing National And International Issues Within The Profession. 4 Quarter Hours


Foundations in Criminal Justice
Course Number MCJ5001
Credits 4.0

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the process and relationships between the components of the criminal justice system. Topics will include an evaluation of theoretical and applied criminal justice models, interactions between practitioners, defendants, victims, witnesses, the media and the public. Discussions also include a critical examination of the myths and misconceptions that surround the criminal justice system and the controversial issues and trends it produces. 4 quarter hours


Ethics and Moral Behavior in the Criminal Justice System
Course Number MCJ5003
Credits 4.0

This advanced course in ethics and moral behavior discusses, examines, considers, and critiques the various facets of justice, crime, and ethics within the criminal justice system. A major emphasis will be placed on the theoretical foundations of ethics as they apply to the fields of criminal justice practice. Students will examine the diverse values and ethical dilemmas that arise in law enforcement, the courts and corrections. In addition, we will explore the same concerns in the formulation of crime control policies at the federal, state, and local levels.


Criminological Theory
Course Number MCJ6003
Credits 4.0

This course provides a comprehensive analysis of major classical and current criminological perspectives including social, behavioral and biochemical theories of crime. Particular attention is given to sociological constructions of criminality. 4 quarter hours


Advanced Techniques of Basic and Applied Research in Criminal Justice
Course Number MCJ5002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj2060 Or Crj2061 This Course Focuses On The Application Of Advanced Scientific Methods Used As A Means For Inquiry, Description, And Analysis Of Crime And The Behavior Of The Criminal Justice System. 4 Quarter Hours


Political Terrorism
Course Number MCJ6404
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of the characteristics and causes of terrorism emerging in the 21st century. Students are exposed to the emergence of modern terrorism from several different areas of the world as well as an analysis from a criminal justice perspective of terror movements affecting the United States. Relevant issues include domestic terrorism undertaken for political purposes in liberal states, state-sponsored international and domestic terrorism, and the dilemmas of counterterrorism in a democracy.


Applied Research Project I
Course Number MCJ6996
Credits 1.0

Prerequisites: Mcj5002 The Applied Research Project Will Consider A Problem In A Criminal Justice Agency Familiar To The Student. The Student Will Be Expected To Develop A Relationship With A Criminal Justice Agency In The Jurisdictional Area Where The Student Lives. The Project Will Culminate In A Comprehensive Analysis Of A Significant Case Problem, Incident, Or Policy Dilemma Identified By The Agency. By The End Of Mcj5002, Students Developed A Proposal Identifying The Problem, The Data To Be Collected And Analyzed, A List Of Viable Alternatives And A Set Of Evaluation Criteria Used In Selecting The Best Course Of Action To Resolve A Problem. The Objective Of The Four (4) Course Sequence (mcj6996, Mcj6997, Mcj6998, And Mcj6999) Is To Produce A Comprehensive Analytical Report Of The Students’ Research, Suitable For Submission To An Academic Journal. Part I (mcj6996) Will Introduce The Student Developing A Thesis Statement And Writing The Introduction Section Of The Paper. 1 Quarter Hour


Applied Research Project II
Course Number MCJ6997
Credits 1.0

Prerequisites: Mcj6996 The Applied Research Project Will Consider A Problem In A Criminal Justice Agency Familiar To The Student. The Student Will Be Expected To Develop A Relationship With A Criminal Justice Agency In The Jurisdictional Area Where The Student Lives. The Project Will Culminate In A Comprehensive Analysis Of A Significant Case Problem, Incident, Or Policy Dilemma Identified By The Agency. By The End Of Mcj5002, Students Developed A Proposal Identifying The Problem, The Data To Be Collected And Analyzed, A List Of Viable Alternatives And A Set Of Evaluation Criteria Used In Selecting The Best Course Of Action To Resolve A Problem. The Objective Of The Four (4) Course Sequence (mcj6996, Mcj6997, Mcj6998, And Mcj6999) Is To Produce A Comprehensive Analytical Report Of The Students’ Research, Suitable For Submission To An Academic Journal. Part Ii (mcj6997) Will Introduce The Student To Researching And Writing The Literature Review Section Of The Paper. 1 Quarter Hour


Applied Research Project III
Course Number MCJ6998
Credits 1.0

Prerequisites: Mcj6997 The Applied Research Project Will Consider A Problem In A Criminal Justice Agency Familiar To The Student. The Student Will Be Expected To Develop A Relationship With A Criminal Justice Agency In The Jurisdictional Area Where The Student Lives. The Project Will Culminate In A Comprehensive Analysis Of A Significant Case Problem, Incident, Or Policy Dilemma Identified Bythe Agency. By The End Of Mcj5002, Students Developed A Proposal Identifying The Problem, The Data To Be Collected And Analyzed, A List Of Viable Alternatives And A Set Of Evaluation Criteria Used In Selecting The Best Course Of Action To Resolve A Problem. The Objective Of The Four (4) Course Sequence (mcj6996, Mcj6997, Mcj6998, And Mcj6999) Is To Produce A Comprehensive Analytical Report Of The Students’ Research, Suitable For Submission To An Academic Journal. Part Iii (mcj6998) Will Introduce The Student To Writing The Methods And Results Section Of The Papers. 1 Quarter Hour


Applied Research Project IV
Course Number MCJ6999
Credits 1.0

Prerequisites: Mcj6998 The Applied Research Project Will Consider A Problem In A Criminal Justice Agency Familiar To The Student. The Student Will Be Expected To Develop A Relationship With A Criminal Justice Agency In The Jurisdictional Area Where The Student Lives. The Project Will Culminate In A Comprehensive Analysis Of A Significant Case Problem, Incident, Or Policy Dilemma Identified By The Agency. By The End Of Mcj5002, Students Developed A Proposal Identifying The Problem, The Data To Be Collected And Analyzed, A List Of Viable Alternatives And A Set Of Evaluation Criteria Used In Selecting The Best Course Of Action To Resolve A Problem. The Objective Of The Four (4) Course Sequence (mcj6996, Mcj6997, Mcj6998, And Mcj6999) Is To Produce A Comprehensive Analytical Report Of The Students’ Research, Suitable For Submission To An Academic Journal. Part Iv (mcj6999) Will Introduce The Student To Writing The Discussion And Conclusions Section Of Their Paper, An Abstract, As Well As Some Of The “book End” Requirements (e.g., Table Of Contents, Reference List, Etc.). Students Will Be Required To Turn In Their Final Product By The End Of This Class. 1 Quarter Hour


Critical/Controversial Issues: Law Enforcement
Course Number MCJ6401
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: None This course focuses upon contemporary critical and controversial issues confronting law enforcement organizations. Discussions may include such topics as police functions; discovery of crime; gender, sexual orientation and/or race ethnicity issues; the changing role of the police; police training and abuse of authority; local, State and Federal interagency relations; domestic terrorism; police/media relations; police/ community relations; civil liability; hazards of policing; and, progressive changes in law enforcement. 4 quarter hours


Critical/Controversial Issues: Corrections
Course Number MCJ6402
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: None This course presents an incisive discussion of diverse issues in corrections today by examining contemporary challenges facing corrections, such as the realities of prison life, the courts and corrections, the rehabilitation debate, and corrections in the community. Discussions will also include a critical overview of problems and issues confronting contemporary correctional institutions such as AIDS in prison, prison gangs, aging populations, physical and mental disabilities, women in prison, privatization, professionalism among correctional officers, and the use of technology and community rehabilitative options. 4 quarter hours


Special Topics in Criminal Justice Organizational Management
Course Number MCJ6403
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: Mcj 6001 & Mcj 5002 This Course Presents An In-depth Analysis Of The Latest Professional Literature In Criminal Justice Organizational Management. The Course Emphasizes Interrelationships Among Law Enforcement, Law/courts, Corrections And Juvenile Justice Components Of The Criminal Justice System. Discussions Will Challenge Current And Prospective Practitioners To Come Face-to-face With Critical Issues Confronting Today’s Criminal Justice Agency Administrators And Staffs. 4 Quarter Hours


Organizational Leadership
Course Number MCJ6405
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey overview of the major theories and research on leadership and managerial effectiveness in formal organizations with practical suggestions for improving leadership skills. Students will focus on the practical and theoretical applications of charismatic and transformational leadership, creating and communicating vision and values, inspiring others to act, risk management, empowerment, building trust and teamwork, mentoring, managing change, and converting crisis into opportunity.



Leadership and Innovation
Course Number LEA5100
Credits 4.0

Leading organization wide structural and cultural change is a significant challenge facing today’s organizations. This course will explore the nature of these changes, the basis for their adoption, and both the management and leadership of organizational change in the 21st century, including issues of managing growth, resistance to change, intervention phases, crisis management, inter and intra-group conflict/ power.


Program description: This program is for more in-depth knowledge, skills, and applications in areas of great national and international interest. Geared for law enforcement and other emergency personnel with responsibilities including homeland security matters, the concentration in Homeland Security will enhance graduates’ response and effectiveness in the event of terrorism and natural disaster. Studies specific to this concentration include resource and agency coordination, management of critical incidents, and special topics in homeland security.

Homeland Security Courses at Capella University

Program Name: BS - Homeland Security
Homeland Security in the 21st Century
Course Number PS4310
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the responsibilities of the Department of Homeland Security. Learners examine the roles and jurisdictions of the 22 federal agencies within the Department of Homeland Security and their relationships with local, county, and state agencies. Learners also identify the economic challenges associated with ensuring homeland security.


Homeland Security and Multijurisdictional Coordination
Course Number PS4320
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Focus On Nationally Recognized And Accepted Multijurisdictional Emergency Operations Systems. Learners Examine The National Incident Management System (nims) And The Incident Command System (ics) As Foundations For Modeling And Coordinating Effective Crisis Command And Communication Management Systems. Learners Also Evaluate Proper Techniques For Managing Rumor Control And Disseminating Information During Times Of Crisis.


Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number PS4325
Credits 4.0

This course presents the fundamentals of risk and asset analysis in the field of homeland security and emergency management. Learners examine physical, operational, economic, legal, and asset security risks and establish appropriate levels of preparedness for an operational system. Learners also study gap analysis measures and develop corrective action plans for both political and Incident Command systems.


Leadership in Homeland Security
Course Number PS4330
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of homeland security leadership strategies, including best practices for achieving leadership success. Learners study the organizational structure of the homeland security field and gain an understanding of leadership constraints and leadership autonomy.


Technology and Homeland Security
Course Number PS4340
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study integrative technology systems and application techniques used in the homeland security field. Learners examine technological resources and their applications in securing mission-critical data. Other course topics include data networking, data mining, intelligence gathering, forecasting models, and planning for tabletop exercises using conventional and virtual simulations.


Government, Media, and Civil Liberties
Course Number PS4350
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Evaluate The Effects Laws Such As The Antiterrorism And Effective Death Penalty Act (aedpa) And The Usa Patriot Act Have On Individuals, Organizations, And Governments. Learners Evaluate Information Affecting Individual Civil Liberties, Constitutionally Protected Freedoms, And Ethnic Relations. Learners Also Examine The Consequences Of Detainment, Internment, Interrogation, And Torture.


Domestic and International Terrorism
Course Number PS4360
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is on the mission of protecting the United States from domestic or international threats. Learners identify and interpret social, cultural, and psychological threats and stressors that can result in terrorist acts. Other course topics include terrorist organizations, political threats, and regional conflicts.


World Conflict
Course Number PS4365
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners identify and evaluate the causes of world conflict. Learners examine and interpret social, cultural, and psychological threats and stressors that can result in global fear and world conflict. Other course topics include the historical evolution of terrorism; geopolitical threats; and past, current, and potential regional and world conflicts.


Diplomatic Approaches to National Security
Course Number PS4370
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the issues involved with maintaining national security while respecting citizens’ individual freedoms. Learners study the art of diplomacy and examine other nations’ approaches to democracy and their relationships with the U.S.


Intelligence Role in Homeland Security
Course Number PS4380
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course evaluate threats to homeland security and identify the intelligence-gathering methods used to address them. Learners also use the intelligence process model to assess and properly allocate the resources needed to maintain homeland security.


Multijurisdictional Approaches to Investigations
Course Number PS4390
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the intricacies of conducting successful multijurisdictional investigations. Learners study crime scene evaluation and preservation practices, crime-specific investigation strategies, and the different investigation standards of various federal agencies.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number PS3100
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system and its evolution in response to the continually changing forces that influence crime control. Learners gain an understanding of criminal justice theory and its relation to criminality, the criminal justice system, and the principles of the adjudication process.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number PS3200
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the growing field of emergency management. Learners study various hazard threats and examine strategies for determining and reducing vulnerability. Learners also analyze disaster response and recovery behaviors and activities. Course topics include local, state, and federal emergency management organizations and the impact of various stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, on the emergency management process.


Principles of Security Management
Course Number PS3300
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Course topics include security department management and operations, emergency and disaster management, the role of security in risk management, and integrating security with local law enforcement organizations and the role of security management in the business environment.


Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Number PS3400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the essential concepts of the emerging field of homeland security. Learners study a range of threats to U.S. security, including specialty weapons, cyber attacks, and smuggling. Learners also examine current issues related to large-scale refugee flow and civil liberties, and evaluate homeland security domains, including strategy, fear management, and crisis communications. This course helps learners build a foundational vernacular upon which to critically analyze homeland security.


Applied Public Safety Theory
Course Number PS3500
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major theoretical approaches to threats to public safety from the eighteenth century and the Enlightenment period through the present. Learners study the work of experts associated with the historical, international body of criminology knowledge. Learners explore a range of issues and apply public safety theory and research to analyze them, further developing their critical thinking and writing skills.


Principles of Public Safety Investigation
Course Number PS3600
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing breaches in physical, information, or personnel security. Learners examine the principles and procedures used for crime scene investigation and protection from security and law enforcement perspectives. Learners also study methods of collecting and preserving evidence; interviewing and interrogating complainants, witnesses, suspects, and victims; and employing scientific applications in criminal justice and private security investigations.


Justice, Crime, and Ethics
Course Number PS3700
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ethical dimension of law enforcement practice and acquire the critical knowledge and skills that support ethical, on-the-job decision making. Learners examine major ethical problems such as discrimination, corruption, deception, racial profiling, and excessive force using material drawn from commissions of inquiry, internal affairs investigations, published literature, human rights documentation, and observed police-community relations. Learners explore the bases for developing personal and professional ethics, guided by professional codes of practice and human rights standards.


Applied Public Safety Research Methods
Course Number PS3800
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners are introduced to the principles of social research in the field of public safety. Learners use the scientific method to collect data and analyze research questions specific to crime prevention, emergency planning, information security, and hazard assessment. Learners also explore the ethics of public safety research techniques and practical applications of research.


History of Violence in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS3900
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners review the history of violence in U.S. society, focusing on war, terrorism, hostility, and conquest. Course content emphasizes the roles of local, state, and federal public safety agencies in addressing violence issues in the post-9/11 era.


Introductory Public Safety Statistical Research
Course Number PS3950
Credits 6.0

This course introduces learners to basic statistical language and procedures related to crime phenomena data. Learners practice basic skills such as reading and calculating formulas and analyze the effects of measurement techniques, distribution shapes,and other factors of the statistic-selection process. Learners also examine two-variable relationships, including correlation and prediction measures. Prerequisite(s): MAT2050, PS3800.


Public Safety Capstone Project
Course Number PS4990
Credits 6.0

The capstone project is the culmination of the bachelor’s degree program in Public Safety and is intended to demonstrate the technical and applied public safety knowledge and the critical-thinking and communication skills learners gain during their program. Learners formulate ideas for a new public safety approach, create a vision, and develop a strategic plan that describes how to implement their concept. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Statistical Literacy
Course Number MAT2050
Credits 3.0

This course emphasizes the learner as a consumer of statistics rather than a producer of statistical calculations. Learners apply critical-thinking skills to arguments involving statistics and interpret and evaluate statistics used in real-world situations.


General Education Classes
Credits 45.0

General Education Requirements are 45 quarter credits with a minimum of 6 quarter credits from each category: Communications, Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, Social Science.


Elective Courses CJ
Credits 37.0

Choose 37 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


Program description: Undergraduate learners in the Homeland Security specialization examine the fundamentals of the homeland security profession and acquire knowledge and skills needed to manage public security in conjunction with federal resources. Specialization topics include world conflict and the geopolitical roots of terrorism, terroristic threat analysis, domestic and international terrorism, and the role of diplomacy and intelligence in homeland security. Successful graduates of this specialization are prepared to pursue careers as Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) program specialists, Department of Homeland Security policy analysts or criminal investigators, or U.S. Department of Transportation security screening analysts. Learn about completion rates, affordability, and more at www.capellaresults.com.

Homeland Security Courses at Virginia College

Program Name: Bachelor's - Criminal Justice - Homeland Security
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 1010
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CRJ 1050
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CRJ 1400
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Courts in America
Course Number CRJ 1500
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Criminal Justice Ethics
Course Number CRJ 1600
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Criminology
Course Number CRJ 2010
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Juvenile Justice
Course Number CRJ 2030
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Police in America
Course Number CRJ 2050
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Business, Corporate, and Industrial Security
Course Number CRJ 2490
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Introduction to Forensic Science
Course Number CRJ 2900
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Criminal Investigations
Course Number CRJ 3000
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


White Collar Crime
Course Number CRJ 3030
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Research Methods in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 3150
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Criminal Justice Management and Administration
Course Number CRJ 3470
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Comparative Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJ 4000
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Terroris
Course Number CRJ 4060
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Community-Oriented Policing and Problem Solving
Course Number CRJ 4215
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Gang
Course Number CRJ 4320
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Organized Crime.
Course Number CRJ 4340
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Crime Scene Investigation
Course Number CRJ 4400
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Criminal Law
Course Number LGA 1800
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Keyboarding.
Course Number AOM 1010
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Word Processing
Course Number AOM 1100
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Learning Framework
Course Number EDU 1010
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Career Exploration/Planning
Course Number EDU 1020
Credits 4.0

The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to provide a multidimensional framework in law enforcement, criminal law, corrections, the criminal court system, and private security that will allow successful students to select from a wide range of employment opportunities upon completion


Program description: The Criminal Justice – Homeland Security program at Virginia College teaches critical-thinking, program-management, and leadership skills needed within homeland security, as well as an understanding of its history, domestic crime, substantive & procedural law within the criminal justice system, current homeland security policies, operational theories, functions and issues from domestic perspectives, and the ethical, political, social, environmental and economic issues related criminal investigations. Students will be able to differentiate the various threats to domestic security (including technological and political forms of terrorism) and the various phases of intelligence operations.

* Education requirements range from a high school diploma to a college degree or higher.
* Many agencies pay all or part of the tuition for officers to work toward degrees in criminal justice, police science, administration of justice, or public administration and pay higher salaries to those who earn one of those degrees.
* Federal agencies require a bachelor's degree, related work experience, or a combination of the two.
* The Departments of Defense and Homeland Security alone are expected to offer more than 83,000 new jobs.
* More than 15,000 new Customs and Border Patrol agents and 22,000 Transportation Security Agency airport screeners are expected to be hired over the coming three years.

As the population grows and national security remains a priority, many new law enforcement officers, such as detectives and criminal investigators will be needed.

Homeland Security Courses at Saint Joseph's University

Program Name: Online Homeland Security Certification
Forensic Financial Analysis
Course Number SOC4375
Credits 3.0

This course covers the detection of illegal financial transactions. Major topics include money laundering, fraud, embezzlement, and illicit accounting practices. Students will learn data gathering and analysis techniques for financial transactions, records, legitimate businesses, illegal organizations, and individuals. The course will include preparation for trial.


Homeland Security
Course Number CRJ 641
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the consolidation of responsibilities and functions across agencies, at various jurisdictional levels, that have the charge of mitigating hostilities, threats, hazards, and consequences. Further, this course incorporates the pillars of robust response systems. This course is designed to develop analytical skills that will prepare students to identify, evaluate and resolve complex policy issues and initiate practical actions. Though the range of relevant issues extends from local matters to national security, this course will concentrate on preparedness strategies for state, urban and local areas.


Terrorism
Course Number SOC4415
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the concepts of terrorism, both domestic and international. Lecturer will address the causes and effects of terrorism as they relate to political structures from both religious and historical perspectives; noting its impact on the world today.


Risk Assessment
Course Number SOC4785
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Multiculturalism and Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number SOC4515

The purpose of this course is to present a conceptual framework to provide understanding of the special conditions of minorities in the context of the criminal justice system and encourage the development of culturally and gender specific compatible skills and practical approaches to more adequately meet the challenges presented by working with minority population concerns, problems and needs.


Sociology of Disasters
Course Number CRJ 645
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Program description: The safety of the United States and its inhabitants from terrorists became a top priority for the government after the attacks on the World Trade Center towers in 2001. Consequently there is a growing need for professionals skilled in the creation, implementation, and execution of plans and strategies to respond to terrorist threats and natural disasters.

Saint Joseph University's Post Master's Certificate in Homeland Security offers you the opportunity to enhance your professional development in the criminal justice field or shift the focus of your career to national security issues. The certificate program offers immersion in the subject of homeland security at a graduate level without the time commitment or expense of a master's degree.

The post master's certificate program is made up of six courses that cover the fundamentals of homeland security issues and procedures, including the detection and analysis of illegal financial transactions; an overview of terrorism and its historical, political and religious underpinnings; risk assessment; and the responsibilities and roles of the various government agencies involved in homeland security initiatives and programs.

The online format of the certification in Homeland Security offers you the flexibility and convenience of earning a degree while continuing to fulfill your professional obligations. Courses are taught by faculty with extensive experience who stress the real-world applications of learning concepts.

Program Name: Post-Master Certificate in CJ with Homeland Security Specialization
Homeland Security
Course Number CRJ 641
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the consolidation of responsibilities and functions across agencies, at various jurisdictional levels, that have the charge of mitigating hostilities, threats, hazards, and consequences. Further, this course incorporates the pillars of robust response systems. This course is designed to develop analytical skills that will prepare students to identify, evaluate and resolve complex policy issues and initiate practical actions. Though the range of relevant issues extends from local matters to national security, this course will concentrate on preparedness strategies for state, urban and local areas.


Sociology of Disasters
Course Number CRJ 645
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Terrorism: Threats and Strategies
Course Number CRJ 640
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the concepts of terrorism, both domestic and international. Lecturer will address the causes and effects of terrorism as they relate to political structures from both religious and historical perspectives; noting its impact on the world today.


Risk Assessment
Course Number CRJ 646
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Program description: The safety of the United States and its inhabitants from terrorists became a top priority for the government after the attacks on the World Trade Center towers in 2001. Consequently there is a growing need for professionals skilled in the creation, implementation, and execution of plans and strategies to respond to terrorist threats and natural disasters.

Saint Joseph University's Post Master's Certificate in Homeland Security offers you the opportunity to enhance your professional development in the criminal justice field or shift the focus of your career to national security issues. The certificate program offers immersion in the subject of homeland security at a graduate level without the time commitment or expense of a master's degree.

The post master's certificate program is made up of six courses that cover the fundamentals of homeland security issues and procedures, including the detection and analysis of illegal financial transactions; an overview of terrorism and its historical, political and religious underpinnings; risk assessment; and the responsibilities and roles of the various government agencies involved in homeland security initiatives and programs.

The online format of the certification in Homeland Security offers you the flexibility and convenience of earning a degree while continuing to fulfill your professional obligations. Courses are taught by faculty with extensive experience who stress the real-world applications of learning concepts.

Learn More About the Online Homeland Security Post Master's Certificate Curriculum

Program Name: Homeland Security Certification
Homeland Security (SOC 4425)
Course Number CRJ 641

This program enhances the leadership, management, and administrative skills, knowledge, and ability of present and future senior and mid-level managers. The core courses develop cognitive skills at the graduate level. The specialized courses address the critical areas in the management of a contemporary criminal justice agency


Sociology of Disasters
Course Number CRJ 645
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Terrorism: Threats and Strategies
Course Number CRJ 640
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the concepts of terrorism, both domestic and international. Lecturer will address the causes and effects of terrorism as they relate to political structures from both religious and historical perspectives; noting its impact on the world today.


Risk Assessment
Course Number CRJ 646
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Program description: Saint Joseph University's Post Master's Certificate in Homeland Security offers you the opportunity to enhance your professional development in the criminal justice field or shift the focus of your career to national security issues. The certificate program offers immersion in the subject of homeland security at a graduate level without the time commitment or expense of a master's degree.

The program is made up of six courses that cover the fundamentals of homeland security issues and procedures, including the detection and analysis of illegal financial transactions; an overview of terrorism and its historical, political and religious underpinnings; risk assessment; and the responsibilities and roles of the various government agencies involved in homeland security initiatives and programs.

Program Name: Master's in CJ with Homeland Security Specialization
Terrorism
Course Number SOC4415
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the concepts of terrorism, both domestic and international. Lecturer will address the causes and effects of terrorism as they relate to political structures from both religious and historical perspectives; noting its impact on the world today.


Homeland Security
Course Number CRJ 641
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the consolidation of responsibilities and functions across agencies, at various jurisdictional levels, that have the charge of mitigating hostilities, threats, hazards, and consequences. Further, this course incorporates the pillars of robust response systems. This course is designed to develop analytical skills that will prepare students to identify, evaluate and resolve complex policy issues and initiate practical actions. Though the range of relevant issues extends from local matters to national security, this course will concentrate on preparedness strategies for state, urban and local areas.


Risk Assessment
Course Number SOC4785
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Sociology of Disasters
Course Number CRJ 645
Credits 3.0

This course description is currently being revised.


Research Methods and Analysis (SOC 4005)
Course Number CRJ 550

The Master’s program in Criminal Justice is designed to meet the graduate educational needs of practitioners and students pursuing careers in criminal justice, in both the public and private sectors. While the 30-credit curriculum requires degree candidates to take four core courses, the student selects the remainder. This arrangement allows individuals to create unique plans of graduate study that are compatible with their interests and career objectives in the field of criminal justice


Criminological Theory (SOC 4015)
Course Number CRJ 560

The Master’s program in Criminal Justice is designed to meet the graduate educational needs of practitioners and students pursuing careers in criminal justice, in both the public and private sectors. While the 30-credit curriculum requires degree candidates to take four core courses, the student selects the remainder. This arrangement allows individuals to create unique plans of graduate study that are compatible with their interests and career objectives in the field of criminal justice


Ethics and Criminal Justice (SOC 4095)
Course Number CRJ 565

The Master’s program in Criminal Justice is designed to meet the graduate educational needs of practitioners and students pursuing careers in criminal justice, in both the public and private sectors. While the 30-credit curriculum requires degree candidates to take four core courses, the student selects the remainder. This arrangement allows individuals to create unique plans of graduate study that are compatible with their interests and career objectives in the field of criminal justice


Professional Writing for Law Enforcement (SOC 4585)
Course Number CRJ 570

The Master’s program in Criminal Justice is designed to meet the graduate educational needs of practitioners and students pursuing careers in criminal justice, in both the public and private sectors. While the 30-credit curriculum requires degree candidates to take four core courses, the student selects the remainder. This arrangement allows individuals to create unique plans of graduate study that are compatible with their interests and career objectives in the field of criminal justice


Program description: This course focuses on the consolidation of responsibilities and functions across agencies, at various jurisdictional levels, that have the charge of mitigating hostilities, threats, hazards, and consequences. Further, this course incorporates the pillars of robust response systems. This course is designed to develop analytical skills that will prepare students to identify, evaluate and resolve complex policy issues and initiate practical actions. Though the range of relevant issues extends from local matters to national security, this course will concentrate on preparedness strategies for state, urban and local areas.

Homeland Security Courses at Tiffin University

Program Name: Master of Science in Criminal Justice- Homeland Security Administration
Administration of Strategic and Actionable Intelligence
Course Number ENF535
Credits 3.0

This course will analyze the definition and functions of intelligence in a law enforcement environment. Students will analyze the utilization of criminal and non-criminal intelligence by law enforcement personnel developing responses to a potential or real terrorist threat. The flow of information from raw data to actionable or strategic intelligence will be analyzed. A comprehensive analysis will be conducted regarding military and law enforcement intelligence, with an analysis of significant similarities and differences between the two methodologies and data collection. A case study exercise will involve a synthesis of collecting facts, analyzing the facts that are discovered, discriminating between strategic and actionable intelligence, and then preparing a briefing report for senior operational staff of a law enforcement agency .


Continental United States (CONUS): Border/Transportation Security
Course Number ENF540
Credits 3.0

This course provides a student with an in-depth analysis of issues that concern the protection of the borders of the United States, and U.S. policies regarding the safety the U.S. transportation system. Additionally , the course analyses the changes in secuity arrangements from pre to post 9-11 policies, relative to border and transportation security , with a synthesis of the impact of the formation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security , on the issues concerning internal CONUS security relative to these two security concerns.


Continental United States (CONUS): Counter-Terrorism
Course Number ENF645
Credits 3.0

This course will analyze the history and role of terrorism in world politics over the last two centuries. Particular attention will be given to modern (U.S. and foreign) left and right wing groups who use terrorism as a means to effect political change accept- able to that group. Political, social, economic and religious factors will be analyzed concerning the reasons such groups exist. Additionally , issues such as recruiting, training, ideology , and tactics will be analyzed to determine their role in terrorism. State sponsored terrorism will be analyzed, with particular attention to those countries recognized by the U.S. State Department as sponsors of terrorism.


Critical Infrastructure Protection
Course Number ENF650
Credits 4.0

This course analyzes the infrastructure of CONUS with particular attention to trans- portation, medical, electronic, education, agriculture, electrical, water & sewer, bank- ing and others. Each of these critical features will be analyzed to determine potential areas of vulnerability to threats, as well as potential counter-measures that can be uti- lized to neutralize the vulnerabilities. Students will conduct an evaluation of a selected infrastructure; prepare a vulnerability study , and protective response plan, for a cho- sen infrastructure.


Response: Natural Catastrophic Events-Emergency Preparedness
Course Number ENF660
Credits 3.0

This course will provide the student with an analysis of the history of U.S. natural dis- asters and their consequences on the citizens who experienced them. Public policy concerning relief efforts will be analyzed. Relief agency charters will be examined to determine their role in such catastrophic events (American Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency – FEMA). Critical elements in catastrophic event plans will be analyzed. Students, with an analysis of common factors affecting response issues, will conduct evaluation of methodologies concerning community and regional assets.



Statistical Applications in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 520
Credits 3.0

Explores and applies practical statistical methods to the relevant work of criminal justice agents, managers, and executives. The course will focus on statistical methods to prepare students to be intelligent consumers of reported research, to apply appropriate statistical analysis to various types of research designs, to report criminal justice agency performance results, and to identify and use various criminal justice statistical data sources in print and electronic form.


Research Design and Analysis
Course Number JUS515
Credits 3.0

Examines various research design models applied to crime, criminal justice, and agency administration issues. Includes discussion of the philosophy of science, sampling, and various research designs such as historical, legal, action, quasiexperimental, experimental, and program evaluation. Students will construct, implement, report, and analyze the results of a research project important to criminal justice practice.



Program description: The highlights of the MSCJ curriculum are an interdisciplinary curriculum, an experienced and accomplished faculty, the latest thinking in the field, and professional
development. A Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) assembles practitioners
from the various components of the criminal justice system. The diversity in background and experience provides synergy in the classroom. The MSCJ faculty contribute their expertise and professional experience to the educational experience.
The Master of Science in Criminal Justice has five concentrations: Crime Analysis,
Criminal Behavior, Homeland Security Administration, Justice Administration and
Forensic Psychology. Fall semester begins in late August, Spring semester begins in
early January, and Summer semester begins in mid-May. Each semester lasts for 15
weeks and students may enroll on a full-time or part-time basis.

Homeland Security Courses at Utica College

Program Name: MS in Criminal Justice Administration - Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Quantitative Analysis for Management
Course Number ECN 607
Credits 3.0

Scientific approaches to decision making; descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis and hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and process control


Law And Public Policy
Course Number CRJ615
Credits 3.0

Addresses the intersection of law and public policy and the impact those disciplinary areas present for the management of criminal justice agencies. Topical areas include: the structure of criminal and civil law, including criminal and civil procedure; the impact of civil and criminal liability principles on leadership and planning in criminal justice agencies; and development and trends in public policy as applied to the criminal justice system. Case study method will be applied for much of the course material


Ethical Leadership
Course Number CRJ616
Credits 3.0

Examines the main approaches to ethics and the issues of social justice. Through readings and case studies, the course presents a number of models for individual and organizational ethical behavior. This is presented with the view that criminal justice organizations and participants are part of enforcers of rules within a social order


Research For Decision Making
Course Number CRJ623
Credits 3.0

Designed to serve as a basic overview to criminal justice research methods with emphasis on evaluative research. Research presents multifold challenges regarding access to sample, measurement reliability, complex and ever changing socio-cultural environment that affects human behavior as well as ethical issues. Nonetheless, the research findings in this field often lead to policy implications that have an impact (direct and indirect) on people’s daily lives especially with the growing global nature of crime. The course would also include discussions on ethics of conducting research, data analysis and report writing


Technological Challenges In Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ677
Credits 3.0

Provides criminal justice administrators with an overview of management issues related to technology in criminal justice organizations and operations. The course offers a technical primer of terms and operations involving informational technology, network security, information security, and contingency planning. A case study approach will be used to simulate leadership and planning situations that administrators may face


Leadership And Planning Project I
Course Number CRJ691
Credits 3.0

The first part of the major project series related to leadership and planning. Following the identification of a topic, each student will further develop an original project that deals with leadership and planning in an organizational context. During the course, the following elements will be presented: statement of the problem, definition of terms, issue identification, review of the topic from a historical, legal, economic and operational basis


Leadership And Planning Major Project Ii
Course Number CRJ692
Credits 3.0

The second part of the major project series related to leadership and planning. Based on Part I, each student will continue with the completion of project, which may include an analyses of a course of action and evaluation of outcomes


Homeland Security And Emergency Management
Course Number CRJ602
Credits 3.0

This course provides an in-depth review of homeland security and emergency management concepts within the framework of criminal justice administration. As this is a graduate course for in-service professions, there will be applied field applications in terms of emergency planning and problem solving. Included in the course are a review of leadership competencies needed for administrators in these important areas


Homeland Security Leadership In Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ612
Credits 3.0

The study of Homeland Security Leadership in Criminal Justice will be, initially, via duel studies of the actions and mindset necessary for personal leader, as well as the fundamentals on where federal, state, and local criminal justice agencies fit in the nation’s overall homeland security efforts. The course culminates with the two topics of leadership and homeland security merging to create effectiveness, the barometer with which a leader is truly measured


Terrorism And Counter-terrorism
Course Number CRJ675
Credits 3.0

Evolution of terrorism; organization and tactics of terrorist organizations and rogue states; and legal and operational issues of counterterrorism. Objectives of the course include: 1) Define terrorism and describe the principal types of terrorist organizations; 2) Recall the tactics and methodologies utilized by terrorist organizations; 3) Comprehend the various types of countermeasures (counterterrorism) and the limitations on use in free society; and 4) Apply the various legal and regulatory restrictions in various countermeasures


Program description: This challenging program will provide you with the tools to move up the ranks in the changing and challenging criminal justice field. While intended primarily for working professionals seeking to further their careers with advance knowledge of the criminal justice process, the online MS in Criminal Justice Administration also features a Homeland Security and Emergency Management elective sequence that serves the needs of both a variety of criminal justice practitioners as well as individuals with bachelor's degrees looking to build upon their credentials to enter the field. The program offers two specializations:

Homeland Security and Emergency Management: Proactively protect people, organizations, and your country by learning methods of assessing, mitigating, and preventing attacks and disasters. Students will be trained in key elements of FEMA’s National Incident Management System (NIMS), as well as the Incident Command System (ICS). Unit coursework covers topics that help students develop a base level of knowledge that is important to local and federal emergency management operations.

Homeland Security Courses at Keiser University

Program Name: AA Homeland Security
Introduction to Psychology
Credits 3.0

Speech
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Computer
Credits 3.0

Microeconomic
Credits 3.0

Macroeconomics
Credits 3.0

English Composition I
Credits 3.0

English Composition II
Credits 3.0

American Literature
Credits 3.0

English Literature
Credits 3.0

College Algebra
Credits 3.0

College Mathematics
Credits 3.0

General Biology
Credits 3.0

General Biology Laboratory
Credits 1.0

Environmental Science
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Homeland Security
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Cyber-Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Domestic and International Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Organizing the War on Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Bio-Terrorism: Hazardous Materials and Weapons of Mass Destruction
Credits 3.0

Emergency Planning and Security Measures
Credits 3.0

Constitutional Law for the Homeland Security Professional
Credits 3.0

Program description: Keiser University's Associate of Arts degree in Homeland Security provides a comprehensive review of the major components of the Department of Homeland Security, the agencies that comprise the Department and the laws, authorities and actions of the Department. Hazardous materials identification and handling, acts of terrorism and the response and recovery actions of Homeland Security agencies are detailed, including laws and legislative actions that give authority to the multiple agencies involved.

Program Name: BA Homeland Security
Introduction to Psychology
Credits 3.0

Speech
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Computer
Credits 3.0

Microeconomic
Credits 3.0

Macroeconomics
Credits 3.0

English Composition I
Credits 3.0

English Composition II
Credits 3.0

American Literature
Credits 3.0

English Literature
Credits 3.0

College Algebra
Credits 3.0

College Mathematics
Credits 3.0

General Biology
Credits 3.0

General Biology Laboratory
Credits 1.0

Environmental Science
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ1020
Credits 3.0

Evaluates courts, police and correctional organizations in the United States. The history of these criminal justice organizations is studied. Contemporary problems and their solutions are discussed


Introduction to Homeland Security
Credits 3.0

Constituional Law For the H.S. Professional
Credits 3.0

Bio Terrorism: Hazardous Material & Weapons of Mass Destruction
Credits 3.0

Domestic & International Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Cyber-Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Emergency Planning & Security Measures I
Credits 3.0

Organizing the War on Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Preparation and Response for Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Recognition and Investigation of Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Issues in Disaster Response
Credits 3.0

Emergency Planning and Security Measures II
Credits 3.0

Homeland Security Policy and Law
Credits 3.0

Tactical Communications
Credits 3.0

Catastrophic Event Response Planning
Credits 3.0

Critical Infrastructure Protection
Credits 3.0

Homeland Security Threat Strategy
Credits 3.0

Current Topics in Public Safety/Capstone
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Management and Organizational Behavior
Credits 3.0

Cross-Cultural Management
Credits 3.0

Criminal Justice Managment
Credits 3.0

Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Computers In Criminal Justice
Credits 3.0

Critical Thinking
Credits 3.0

Sociology of the Urban Community
Credits 3.0

Writing for Managers
Credits 3.0

Research and Statistical Analysis
Credits 3.0

Workforce Diversity
Credits 3.0

Program description: Keiser University's Bachelor of Arts degree in Homeland Security focuses on management-level skills needed in the critical field of Homeland Security. The program provides an understanding of essential management skills and addresses unique proficiencies needed to understand Homeland Security at the Local, State, and Federal levels. Topics include cross cultural management, emergency management planning and critical infrastructure protection.

Homeland Security Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Doctorate of Management in Homeland Security (Executive Format)
Contemporary Issues in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS820
Credits 5.0

Using Large Scale Systems Thinking This Course Will Explore The Current Reality Of Hls Challenges That Embraces Tribal, State, Municipal, National, And Private Efforts. This Team-taught Class Uses A Diverse Cohort Across Representative Organizations, Enabling Knowledge Sharing And Complex Problem Solving. The Role Is To Create Practitioners Who Not Only Create Theory In Hls But Understand The Immediate Application Of Large Scale Change Techniques To Complex Crises That Have No Clear Solutions And Span Numerous Organizations.


Network Organizations and Other Large Scale Interventions
Course Number HLS825
Credits 5.0

Network Organizations are developing quickly throughout the world and are becoming increasingly important in how work gets accomplished. Network organizations have been growing in the modern world because traditional organizations cannot respond to the complexity and speed of change facing today’s organization. In the case of Homeland Security, where many interagency and inter-organizations must work together to respond to crisis, understanding Network Organizations and how to work between and with them is no longer a nicety but is absolutely essential. The problems of working with diverse organizational cultures, communicating across organizations, communities, and social groups including rural versus urban and metropolitan cultures will be addressed. Unique planning, intervention, and communication problems involving case studies and simulations will be used to create an active learning involvement. Students will be expected to build and develop their leadership skills necessary for working within and between Network Organizations while examining various methods used for operating within a parent organization as well as cooperatively with outside Homeland Security partners.


Policy & Governance in Trans-Organizational Collaboration
Course Number HLS830
Credits 5.0

The purpose of this course is to understand field operations and integrating trans-organizational operations planning and execution. The primary focus of the course is on communication and the importance of a detailed trans-organizational operations plan that has been shared and collaboratively developed before the crisis happens. A good operations plan and subsequent training is critical for timely response during an actual crisis. The course will also address how to: effectively respond to a crisis as it erupts; manage the initial response; organize at the point of crisis for the short run; and establish critical on-the-spot contingencies as the crisis unfolds.


Crisis Planning & Operations Management
Course Number HLS835
Credits 5.0

The course will explore how trans-organizational policy is formed and created. Using the case study method, students will analyze multiple cases from diverse perspectives. The course utilizes an intentional interdisciplinary focus (sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, and political science) and requires students to do a project with a client organization engaged in Homeland Security.


Strategic Thinking for HLS
Course Number HLS850
Credits 5.0

Develops and expands students’ ability to think strategically within the discipline of HLS. This will involve various typologies and methods of exploration and an examination of heuristics and biases. Students will develop the capacity for concurrent action and ‘birds-eye’ perspectives of ongoing organizational activity.


Futuring and Innovation in HLS
Course Number HLS855
Credits 5.0

This course develops skills in futuring via Delphi, Future Search, scenario building and other techniques. Students will talk with futurists and futures organizations, becoming involved in the World Futures Society and tech trending with leading electronics and aerospace companies. They will develop a socio-technology plan for the future of their division of HLS and will also look at formal models of innovation and diffusion of innovation.


Fundamentals of Management
Course Number MGMT800
Credits 5.0

The purpose of this course is to prepare new doctoral candidates for doctoral studies in management. The course design focuses on four critical aspects of a successful manger-leader – personal identity as a manager-leader, ability to embrace ambiguity, problem identification, and problem solving. Besides developing essential habits and skills necessary for success at the doctoral level the course will utilize readings in Organizational Behavior and Management Theory developing critical thinking and reflection in the context of action. Building on historical foundations in the field of organizational studies, students will enter into examination and conversations with a wide variety of contemporary management thinkers and researchers.


Research and Writing I
Course Number CS801
Credits 3.0

This course is one of a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses) is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research Methods and Design
Course Number MGMT805
Credits 5.0

This course is an examination of ‘full cycle research’ starting with a qualitative examination of an organizational phenomenon and then addressing how to measure it via survey, experiments, or other designs. It concludes with issues of verification and implementation based on the outcome of the quantitative phase. Also focuses on scale development skills involving reliability and validity measures, as well as confirmatory factor analysis, and issues of survey development and implementation.


Research and Writing II
Course Number CS806
Credits 3.0

This course is the second in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Qualitative and Ethnographic Methods
Course Number MGMT810
Credits 3.0

Instills and examines the fundamental principles of inquiry through active experimentation with ethnographic and quasi-ethnographic methods. Analysis of ethnographic descriptions and data via live, large datasets using automated methods


R&W III: Action Research Theory
Course Number MGMT811
Credits 3.0

Action Research explores various methods and contexts for all fields of research. Students will examine their historical experience with research in a wide variety of forms, understanding their personal biases and values in the process. Drawing on readings and conversations with contemporary practitioner researchers, students will explore and understand the use of this methodology for solving complex problems in their own field.


Quantitative Methods
Course Number MGMT815
Credits 5.0

Students Will Learn Fundamental Concepts Of Parametric And Non-parametric Statistics And Develop A Thorough Understanding Of The Primary Theorems Of Statistics. The Course Covers Measures Of Central Tendency, Various Forms Of Probability, Anova, And Glm. Exploration Of Multivariate Statistics Will Be Practiced Via Large Datasets In Live Research Projects. Particular Attention Is Given To Scale & Survey Development.


R&W IV: The Practice of Action Research
Course Number MGMT816
Credits 3.0

This Class Will Lead The Student Through The Implementation Of The Action Research Proposal That Was Developed And Irb Approved In R&w Iii. Data Will Be Collected, Analyzed And A Report For The Organization Prepared.


R&W V: Process Consulting & Intervention Theory
Course Number MGMT821
Credits 3.0

Starting with readings from classic authors, students will develop the models and thinking behind process interventions and tacit skill development of self-as-instrument. They will also explore various methods and techniques of consulting through active conversations with practicing consultants. The course covers the use of quantitative and qualitative methods to provide feedback and guidance in the management and leadership within their field.


R&W VI: The Practice of Process Consulting & Intervention
Course Number MGMT826
Credits 3.0

Students will be involved in live interventions in an organization within their field from entry and planning through delivery and follow-up based on the approved proposal developed in R&W V. These will start with basic interventions such as interview and feedback/action planning to Future Search, Appreciative Inquiry and related techniques.


Research and Writing VII
Course Number CS831
Credits 3.0

This course is the seventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VIII
Course Number CS836
Credits 3.0

This course is the eighth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Philosophy of Science, Values, and Ethics
Course Number MGMT840
Credits 5.0

Starting with classic readings, and supplemented by contemporary readings in socio-technical systems from the global perspectives including; Eastern, Western, and indigenous approaches to appropriate technology, students will also look at moral dilemmas and choices in organizational life and professional careers. Examines how one can build or contribute to the development of the good, true and beautiful in organizations and careers.


Research and Writing IX
Course Number CS841
Credits 3.0

This course is the ninth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Leadership
Course Number MGMT845
Credits 5.0

This is an active course in leadership, building on critical and creative thinking. Students will be expected to build and develop their leadership with new doctoral students via cooperative research projects and programs of research.


Research and Writing X
Course Number CS846
Credits 3.0

This course is the tenth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XI
Course Number CS851
Credits 3.0

This course is the eleventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XII
Course Number CS856
Credits 3.0

This course is the final one in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members, and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Program description: The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Homeland Security (HLS) degree program is designed to provide candidates with the theoretical, research and application capabilities necessary to pursue a rewarding career in their chosen field, with specific applications in Homeland Security. The first year focuses on research and studying classic and current management literature. In the second year, the student begins to form a personal understanding of the management research and methods used in Homeland Security. The final year is reserved for the development of leadership skills, resulting in the production of four publishable papers or a dissertation that must be approved by a three-member committee.

Course content is geared towards teaching students how to assess trans-organizational structures for the management of Homeland Security. Students are also challenged to develop a plan for coordinating networked Homeland Security organizations, analyze how crises unfold and evaluate contingencies for dealing with complications as they arise. Instruction is provided in framing policy agendas for creating inter-organizational collaboration among businesses, government and advocacy organizations.

The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Homeland Security includes twelve 5-credit classes and twelve 3-credit research and writing courses. One research and writing course is taken each quarter in conjunction with one formal course over a three year period. Courses are taught using Colorado Technical University's Professional Learning Model™ in an executive format: each course combines an active online component with an intensive residential session lasting four and a half days. Students are required to attend two of the quarterly residential sessions held throughout the year based on their start date.

Program Name: Masters of Science in Management in Homeland Security
Homeland Security Fundamentals
Course Number HLS600
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the essential ideas that constitute the emerging discipline of homeland security. It has two central objectives: to expand the way participants think, analyze, and communicate about homeland security; and to assess knowledge in critical homeland security knowledge domains. These domains include strategy, history, terrorism, fear management, crisis communication, conventional and unconventional threats, network leadership, weapons of mass destruction, lessons learned from other nations, civil liberties and security, intelligence and information, homeland security technology, and analytics.


Dynamics of Terrorism
Course Number HLS610
Credits 4.0

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the operational and organizational dynamics of terrorism. It considers those who act as individuals, in small groups or in large organizations. It also considers indigenous actors as well as those who come to the United States to raise money, recruit or commit their acts of violence. In every instance, its focus is on violent, clandestine activity that, whatever its motivation, has a political purpose or effect. The course addresses such specific topics as suicide terrorism, the role of the media, innovation and technology acquisition, the decline of terrorism, and ways of measuring the effect of counterterrorism policies and strategies. The course also looks briefly at sabotage. By the end of the course, students should be able to design effective measures for countering and responding to terrorism based on an understanding of its organizational and operational dynamics.


Technology Solutions for HLS
Course Number HLS620
Credits 4.0

In Today’s Information Age, Homeland Security (hls) Professionals And The Agencies They Lead Are More Dependent Than Ever On Technology And Information-sharing To Strengthen National Preparedness. The Need To Share Information Through The Use Of Interoperable Technologies And To Collect And Synthesize Data In Real Time Has Become Critical To Our National Security. This Course Provides Hls Professionals With The Requisite Knowledge To Be Able To Leverage Technology To Prevent, Protect Against, Respond To, And Recover From Terrorist And Natural-born Incidents. It Also Provides An In-depth Understanding Of: Inspection, Detection, And Surveillance Technologies; Information Sharing And Knowledge Management Systems; And Communication Systems. Students Explore And Analyze Management Challenges Currently Facing Hls Professionals, Such As: Information Assurance; Voice, Data And Sensor Interoperability; And Technology Implementation And Acceptance. This Knowledge Will Facilitate Hls Professionals To Become More Effective Technology Consumers And Help Them To Recognize Opportunities Where The Application Of Technology Solutions Can Provide A Strategic Advantage. The Ultimate Objective Of The Course Is To Enable Hls Professionals To Effectively Evaluate, Select, And Implement Technology To Better Strengthen Capability-specific National Priorities.


Organizational and Policy Changes
Course Number HLS630
Credits 4.0

The War on Terror has focused the nation's attention on homeland security. This course examines key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community and its role in homeland security and homeland defense. Students will have the opportunity to fully address policy, organizational and substantive issues regarding homeland intelligence support. Course reference materials will provide an overview of diverse intelligence disciplines and how the intelligence community operates. Course emphasis will be on issues affecting policy, oversight, and intelligence support to homeland defense/security and national decision-making. The 2004 Intelligence Reform and Prevention of Terrorism Act is addressed and the course is shaped to focus on homeland intelligence support issues at the State/Local/Tribal levels.


Vulnerability Analysis and Protection
Course Number HLS640
Credits 4.0

Critical Infrastructure Protection (cip) Is One Of The Cornerstones Of Homeland Security. Hspd-7 Lists The Following Critical Infrastructure And Key Resource Sectors: Agriculture And Food, Banking And Finance, Chemical, Commercial Facilities, Communications, Dams, Defense Industrial Base, Emergency Services, Energy, Government Facilities, Information Technology, National Monuments And Icons, Nuclear Reactors, Materials And Waste, Postal And Shipping, Public Health And Healthcare, Transportation Systems, And Water. The Course Begins With An Overview Of Risk, Its Definition And Application To Critical Infrastructures As It Relates To The National Infrastructure Protection Plan (nipp). We Then Investigate Measures, Tools, And Techniques For Cip Assessment. The Course Develops A Network Theory Of Vulnerability Analysis And Risk Assessment Called Model-based Risk Assessment (mbra) Used To Extract The Critical Nodes From Each Sector, Model The Nodes' Vulnerabilities By Representing Them In The Form Of A Fault-tree, And Then Applying Fault And Financial Risk Reduction Techniques To Derive The Optimal Strategy For Protection Of Each Sector. The Sectors Are Studied In Detail In Orderto Learn How They Are Structured, How Regulatory Policy Influences Protection Strategies, And How To Identify Specific Vulnerabilities Inherent To Each Sector And Its Components. At The Completion Of The Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply Cip Techniques (mbra And Others) To Any Critical Infrastructure Within Their Multi-jurisdictional Region, And Derive Optimal Strategies And Draft Policies For Prevention Of Future Terrorist Attacks Or Natural Disasters.


Homeland Security and Government
Course Number HLS650
Credits 4.0

The purpose of this course is to provide participants with an insight into the structural, conceptual and intellectual underpinnings and implications of the homeland security project. Looking at a wide range of topics and problems, the course seeks to stimulate a comprehensive discussion of how homeland security professionals and the general public think about homeland security; whether/why there may be significant differences in professional and public perceptions of homeland security; and how those differences constrain/leverage various elements of the homeland security effort. By incorporating a selection of key texts in Western political and social thought alongside current topical writings, the course seeks to equip participants with a deeper understanding of the prevailing discourse and its impact on the homeland security project.


Psychology of Fear Management
Course Number HLS660
Credits 4.0

This course serves as an introduction for homeland security professionals to terrorism as a psychological phenomenon. Government agencies involved in homeland security need to understand the psychological consequences of mass-casualty terrorist attacks and other disasters. This course provides a broad overview of psychological effects of terrorism; the status of and fallacies related to the interventions applied to victims of terrorism and the generalized fear and anxiety experienced by the public at large; current government strategies used to disseminate information to terrorist groups; psychological phenomena related to media coverage of terrorism; misconceptions and inaccuracies about the socio-political and religious motivations of terrorist groups; "profiling" and the typical psychological and cultural makeup of modern terrorists; and the social and cultural psychology of public conceptions of terrorists and acts of terror.


Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments
Course Number EMBA690
Credits 4.0

Students will master analytical and integrative tools to perform in-depth analyses of industries, firms, and competitors. Course material includes methods to predict competitive behavior and develop and implement strategic plans to achieve and sustain a competitive profile in the emerging global marketplace.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Applied Managerial Decision-Making
Course Number MGMT600
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the practical application of descriptive and inferential statistics to decisions made in a managerial role. The following subjects are addressed in the course: data summarization and presentation, data analysis, test of hypotheses, discrete and continuous distributions, estimation theory, simple and multiple correlation and regression, analysis of variance, multivariate statistics and non parametric methods. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a data aggregation and reduction exercise report and by accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of applied statistics from either the academic or professional literature.


Graduate Research Methods
Course Number MGMT605
Credits 4.0

This course will provide a working knowledge of quantitative, qualitative, mixed, and action research approaches. It covers the entire research process for each of these methods to include: formulating research questions; developing research proposals; performing a literature search and analysis; sampling and measurement; research design; data analysis; and writing and presenting the research report will be analyzed.


Program description: The War on Terror has focused the nation's attention on homeland security, which has become a concern at all levels of government and in a wide variety of organizations. In this industry-current Homeland Security degree concentration, students have an opportunity to fully address policy, organizational and substantive issues regarding homeland security. Students learn how to analyze models of Homeland Security and effectively communicate them, demonstrate an understanding of terrorism and the psychology of fear, evaluate technological solutions to problems of Homeland Security and much more.

When you graduate, you can pursue career opportunities such as:

Homeland Security Coordinator
Homeland Security Acquisition Specialist
Homeland Security Operations Specialist
Homeland Security Logistics Professional
Law Enforcement Management
Emergency Management Administrator
Emergency Management Planner
Emergency Management Coordinator
Emergency Management Director
Emergency Medical Response Planner
Emergency Operations Center Director
Program Manager
Risk Management Specialist
Senior Exercise Planner
Senior Exercise Evaluator
Business Continuity Consultant
Business Resilience Consultant
Disaster Recovery Specialist
Senior Analyst
Intelligence Analyst
Intelligence Professional
Military Planner
Department of Safety Coordinator

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice - Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS14
Credits 4.0

This course surveys the agencies that comprise the criminal justice system which are primarily law enforcement, the courts and corrections. The student will learn the processes of these components and their relationship to one another as well as the roles of related agencies


Criminal Justice Ethic
Course Number CJUS26
Credits 4.0

This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they relate to the field of criminal justice. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for criminal justice professionals, and the student will apply ethical standards to different situations they may encounter working in the criminal justice professions


Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS29
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the general principles of criminal law. Specifically it includes both the policy and procedure of criminal law, giving students the ability to apply the essential elements of general criminal law principles to specific substantive crimes


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS375
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendant’s Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.


Terrorism: Origins, Ideologies and Goals
Course Number HLS110
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the study and history of terrorism. Students will learn the ideologies of many of the terrorist organizations that have impacted the United States and other nations. Students will also gain an understanding of the motivations and goals of many terrorist organizations.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number HLS120
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to give the student an introduction to emergency management – an all-hazards approach: definitions of important terms; types and history of hazards; and organizational responses to natural, accidental, and man-made hazards. Students will be introduced to the concepts of preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery.


Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy
Course Number HLS200
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Strategy. This is the process an organization uses to determine its direction, and make decisions to pursue this direction. Students will be introduced to resource allocation, including capital, technology, and human resources.


Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies and Applications
Course Number HLS210
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the technology and systems utilized by Homeland Security and Emergency Management organizations. This course also looks at how terrorist organizations have and do use technology to their benefit.


HR and Administrative Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS300
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the many human resource and administrative issues as they relate to Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about diversity in the Homeland Security workplace, as well as how diversity impacts how homeland security and emergency management personnel do their jobs.


Understanding Critical Infrastructures
Course Number HLS305
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the protection of critical infrastructures, one of the core functions of Homeland Security. In this course, the student will learn how to identify the different sectors of critical infrastructure, and the assets within various sectors that must be protected. The student will also be introduced to strategies utilized to protect various key assets.


Comparative Approaches to Event Management
Course Number HLS310
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the role of Emergency Management in dealing with both natural disasters and man-made attacks. In this course, the student will learn the similarities and differences in dealing with different types of catastrophes, and the challenges faced by each type. Students will also consider the implications for strategic planning presented by both natural disasters and manmade attacks.


Interagency Relationships in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS315
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the nature of the relationships that exist between the various agencies involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Federal, state, and local agencies all play a role in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and this course helps the student to understand how the various agencies interact with each other and work together to protect this nation from all types of hazards and threats. Students will also develop their leadership skills, a vital component to successful communication and coordination with other agencies.


Private Sector Role in Homeland Securit
Course Number HLS320
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the role of the private sector in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about the functions of private organizations involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, including collaboration between public and private agencies. The student will also develop a strategic plan for a private agency.


Research Methodology and Policy Analysis
Course Number HLS325
Credits 4.0

Understanding the role of research and policy analysis in homeland security and emergency management is incredibly critical. Students will learn and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology within the homeland security and emergency management system and become familiar with the range and scope of quantitative and qualitative tools available to the criminal justice researcher. This course will assess the homeland security and emergency management system including research theory, inquiry structure, and modes of observation, data interpretation, program evaluation, and policy analysis. This course is designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of statistical analysis, developing and constructing a research plan, and evaluating the results of said research in the context of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.


Advanced Application of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies
Course Number HLS330
Credits 4.0

This course takes a practical look at the limitations presented by current technology. Also, this course introduces the student to the concept of interoperability, which addresses the ability of diverse agencies and jurisdictions to communicate, to exchange data, and to use that information effectively.


Emergent Topics in Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS340
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to topics on the forefront of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. This course is designed to reflect the most current state of discourse on topics relating to Homeland Security and Emergency Management.


Introduction to Intelligence
Course Number HLS350
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the principles of intelligence, the different intelligence disciplines, the intelligence cycles, and the intelligence community.


Counterintelligence
Course Number HLS360
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to counterintelligence concepts, such as counterintelligence basic principles, concepts, missions, and functions. Students will also be introduced to counterintelligence operations and techniques. Students will also learn the history and evolution of counterintelligence in the United States.


Constitutional Law and Public Policy Analysis
Course Number HLS400
Credits 44.0

In this course the student will discuss and analyze concepts of Constitutional Law and Public Policy as they apply to Homeland Security. The student will evaluate homeland security policies in terms of their effects on civil liberties, and the public’s involvement in homeland security.


The Psychology of Fear Management and Terrorism
Course Number HLS410
Credits 4.0

This course looks at the motivations of terrorist groups, and the psychological impact of terrorist attacks. It will aid the student in understanding the role of government and the media in shaping the public perception of, and response to, terrorist events.


Strategic Planning and Budgeting for Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS420
Credits 4.0

This course further develops the student’s knowledge base for strategic planning and budgeting, building on the concepts learned in HLS200, Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy, taking a more in-depth look at the strategic planning process.


Planning for Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number HLS430
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the planning process for Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Students will be introduced to the “how-to” aspects of planning.


Local Emergency Management and Civil Preparedness
Course Number HLS450
Credits 4.0

This course develops the student’s knowledge in the area of local emergency management. Students will learn of the challenges faced by local agencies, such as communication and coordination. The student will develop strategies to implement at the local level to enhance civil preparedness.


Advanced Application of Intelligence in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS460
Credits 4.0

This course looks at the relationship between local law enforcement and the intelligence community. It introduces the student to state and local intelligence activities, and it discusses policing and actionable intelligence.


Evaluating Risk in Critical Infrastructure
Course Number HLS470
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of risk assessment. At the completion of the course, students will be able to understand the value of various risk tools, and apply those tools to any critical infrastructure to reduce the risk associated with future terrorist attacks. The aim of this course is to show how to analyze critical infrastructure systems, their weaknesses, and how to formulate strategies that allocate resources in the most efficient and effective manner.


Knowledge Into Practice: Communications and Emergency Planning
Course Number HLS480
Credits 4.0

This course integrates many of the primary areas of focus in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, such as: intelligence, strategic planning, critical infrastructure, research and analysis, technology and strategic communications. The student will develop an emergency plan in one of the four primary areas of preparedness, response, mitigation, or recovery.


Homeland Security
Course Number CJUS250
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CJUS343
Credits 4.0

Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior.


Professional Communications
Course Number ENG210
Credits 4.0

This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process.


Real World Writing
Course Number ENGL125
Credits 4.0

This Is One Of The Most Important Courses You Can Take—it Will Lay The Foundation For Your Entire College And Professional Career As An Educated Person. In It, We Will Address How To Write And Speak To Make A Point; How To Use Good Grammar, Vocabulary And Logical Thinking; As Well As How To Find A Suitable Topic For Your Writing Assignments. We Will Start With The Basics: Reviewing Sentences And Paragraphs, And Then Move On To The Classic Five-part College Essay Or Theme. 321 Effective November 15, 2010 For Students Starting On Or After January 2, 2011 There Are Different Rules Of The Game For Writing Academically Than Writing For Business. We Want To Teach Students The “culture” Of Being Solid College-level Communicators And Successful Professionals. This Workshop Course Is Highly Experiential, Supportive, And Collaborative, As Students Read And Critique Each Others’ Work. This Is The First In A Sequence On Composition And Writing Skills. The Second Course, Engl126, In This Series Will Build Upon This One—addressing How To Research And Use Resources Without Plagiarizing, How To Utilize The Apa Formatting For Documentation And How To Make A Persuasive Argument. Our View Of The Required Composition Sequence Is That It Is Essential For All Who Want To Become Skilled Critical Thinkers And Educated People.


Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose
Course Number ENGL126
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Workshop That Builds Upon Engl125—real World Writing. It Is A Workshop Format—highly Experiential And Hands On. Students Practice Drafting Progressively Complex Papers, Demonstrating The Capacity To Do College Level Research And Write Essays That Convey Information, Make A Point Or Provide An Opinion. They Will Study The Apa Handbook, Learn To Do Research (beyond Wikipedia!) And Cite Resources Without Plagiarizing Them. In Addition, This Course Uses Readings To Demonstrate Excellence And Eloquence In Speaking And Writing, Emphasizing The Crucial Synergy Between Learning To Write And Developing The Practice Of Intelligent Reading Of Texts. This Will Be A Highly Collaborative Course, With Students Reading And Critiquing Others’ Work, As A Means To Create A Learning Community As Well As Develop Critical Capacities.


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


American Culture in Transition
Course Number HIS120
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural “isms,” and America’s relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society.


World Literature
Course Number LTR215
Credits 4.0

This literature course examines a wide range of stories, poems, and plays. Students learn how to interact with and respond to literature.


Real World Math
Course Number MATH105
Credits 4.0

In this course, students explore how to survive in a number-driven world, to increase their mathematical knowledge for making logical decisions, and to begin to develop connections with mathematics in their related field of study and daily lives.


Math for Professionals
Course Number MATH140
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better understand and appreciate the study of mathematics. Specifically, this course focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope toward business applications.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Principles of Business
Course Number MGM110
Credits 4.0

This survey course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled.


Organizational Behavior Principles
Course Number MGM335
Credits 4.0

In this course students examine individual and group behavior within the context of the organizational design and culture. This course provides theoretical and practical knowledge for understanding topics such as motivation, leadership, managerial decision-making, group processes, and conflict resolution.


American Government
Course Number PBAD200
Credits 4.0

Provides the student with an overview of the framework and basic functions of the various branches of government, the role of politics in democracy, and the relationship of government and public policy. Students will also consider the similarities and differences between national, state, and local governments.


Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

This course surveys major areas of psychological science, including human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, learning, memory, and biological influences.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Sociology
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students will develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Building Your Success Strategy Plan
Course Number UNIV101
Credits 4.0

UNIV101 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students learn effective tools and skills necessary for academic success, integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.


Career Planning and Management
Course Number UNIV201
Credits 4.0

This course provides the framework for effective career management as students gain insight into themselves and potential career fields, acquiring knowledge and skills needed to successfully plan career transitions.


Program description: Homeland Security encompasses a broad range of disciplines that play vital roles in the protection of our nation. Developed with guidance provided by the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security, this program is designed to help students acquire an in-depth understanding of emergency management, technology, communications, intelligence, critical infrastructure, terrorism and other knowledge needed in a wide range of government and private organizations. Upon successful completion of this program, graduates can be prepared to apply the fundamentals of homeland security and emergency management to create plans, analyze risk and propose solutions.

Homeland Security Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Homeland Security Schools (campus and online)

University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
George Washington University
Total Programs 194
Number of Subjects 171
Rank in USA 52nd
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
Washington State University
Total Programs 2
Number of Subjects 93
Rank in USA 131st
Stevens Institute of Technology
Total Programs 47
Number of Subjects 58
Rank in USA 149th
University of Dallas
Total Programs 71
Number of Subjects 73
Rank in USA 163rd
Saint Joseph's University
Total Programs 27
Number of Subjects 27
Rank in USA 175th
Texas State University-San Marcos
Total Programs 164
Number of Subjects 152
Rank in USA 204th
Harding University
Total Programs 105
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 224th
Rowan University
Total Programs 84
Number of Subjects 92
Rank in USA 226th
Roberts Wesleyan College
Total Programs 72
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 296th
Oklahoma City University
Total Programs 102
Number of Subjects 97
Rank in USA 310th
Midway College
Total Programs 35
Number of Subjects 46
Rank in USA 327th
Saint Xavier University
Total Programs 123
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 348th
East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 70
Number of Subjects 86
Rank in USA 385th
Hardin-Simmons University
Total Programs 108
Number of Subjects 100
Rank in USA 390th
High Point University
Total Programs 69
Number of Subjects 79
Rank in USA 394th
Suffolk University
Total Programs 139
Number of Subjects 118
Rank in USA 410th
Cedar Crest College
Total Programs 94
Number of Subjects 86
Rank in USA 414th
Muskingum College
Total Programs 92
Number of Subjects 84
Rank in USA 429th