Online Hospitality Management Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its hospitality management courses to be successful hospitality managers, hospitality professionals, hospitaly managers, hotel and hospitality managers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 334,310 people employed as hosts and hostesses, restaurant, lounge, and coffee shop alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $19,190. Food preparation and serving related employees make on average $20,880 per year and there are about 11,218,260 of them employed today.

Hospitality Management Organizations Hospitality Management Common Job Tasks
  • greeting customers
  • approving decor upgrades
  • recruiting and interviewing potential staff
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Hospitality Management Courses at South University

Program Name: Masters of Business Administration - Hospitality Management Specialization
Organization Behavior and Communication
Course Number MBA5001
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the issues of motivation, leadership, and communications. Included are negotiation, conflict resolution, and teambuilding. 4 quarter hours


Law and Ethics for Managers
Course Number MBA5005
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Quantitative Analysis and Decision Making
Course Number MBA5008
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Managerial Finance
Course Number MBA6010
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Strategic Marketing
Course Number MBA6011
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Operations and Supply Chain Management
Course Number MBA6012
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Managerial Economics
Course Number MBA5004
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microeconomic concepts and their application to common business problems. Topics include supply and demand analysis, cost analysis, economies of scale, basic market types and their characteristics, pricing, risk analysis, and the government's role in economic affairs.


Contemporary Issues in Global Hospitality Management
Course Number MBA5710
Credits 4.0

Hospitality Finance and Revenue Management
Course Number MBA6120
Credits 4.0

Franchising and Chain Management within the Hospitality Industry
Course Number MBA6220
Credits 4.0

Consumer Behavior and Marketing within the Hospitality Industry
Course Number MBA6225
Credits 4.0

Hospitality Systems and Policy Formulation
Course Number MBA6230
Credits 4.0

Program description: Specialization in Hospitality Management is designed to prepare students
for first and second tier management employment within the hospitality
industry. The focus of the program is to develop a specific understanding
of the industry, while developing critical skills and management perspectives key to the hospitality industry.

Hospitality Management Courses at Penn Foster College

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Hospitality Management
Introduction to the Hospitality Industry
Course Number HSP101
Credits 3.0

Origins and history of the hotel/restaurant business; job opportunities in the front and back office, and in restaurant and banquet services. PREREQ: None


Basics of the Catering Business
Course Number HSP110
Credits 3.0

Fundamentals of catering; fees; types of events; starting your own business; the caterer’s kitchen; storing staples. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Engineering Systems
Course Number HSP115
Credits 3.0

Function of the engineering and maintenance departments; electrical, plumbing, heating, refrigeration and ventilation systems; the housekeeping department; sanitation. PREREQ: None


Nutrition and Menu Planning
Course Number HSP122
Credits 3.0

The digestive process; essential nutrient groups and their sources; providing healthy daily menus. PREREQ: None


Beverage Operations
Course Number HSP124
Credits 3.0

Legal control of alcohol; types of wine and wine service; types of malt beverages and distilled spirits; purchase, storage, and control of alcoholic beverages. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Purchasing and Storage
Course Number HSP140
Credits 3.0

Buyers and their functions; the purchasing process; evaluating merchandise; storage areas for food and nonfood items; use and manufacture of storage areas. PREREQ: None


Quantity Food Production
Course Number HSP210
Credits 3.0

Management principles and procedures; facilities; tools and equipment; menus and recipes; purchasing and storage; sanitation and safety; preparation and service of food. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Accounting
Course Number HSP240
Credits 3.0

The balance sheet; income statement; recording transactions; trial balance; journal entries; cash versus accrual method of accounting; the work sheet; the accounting cycle; procedures for a merchandising business; special journals; payroll accounting. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Law and Insurance
Course Number HSP245
Credits 3.0

Law as it applies to the hospitality industry; contract law, bankruptcy and commercial paper; legal responsibilities of hotel personnel; basic insurance principles. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Marketing and Advertising
Course Number HSP250
Credits 3.0

Techniques of advertising; function of advertising in marketing area; role of advertising in marketplace; marketing and advertising applications in hospitality. PREREQ: None


Program description: You can earn your Hospitality Management Degree in the comfort of your own home. You will learn the skills needed to become a hotel manager, food and beverage manager, or sales manager.
In the Hospitality Management Degree program, you will be learning about:
Introduction to Hospitality.
Business and Basics of Catering Business.
Principles of Management and Hospitality.
Engineering Systems.
Beverage Operations.
Hospitality Purchasing and Storage.
Marketing and Advertising.
Hospitality Law and Insurance
Graduates of the Penn Foster college Hospitality Management program can use the Penn Foster Career Services to obtain that great career. This includes tips for interviewing, and how to make your cover letter. The Hospitality Management Program has a Certified Professional Resume Writer who assists students in preparing a resume that can be used to find employment upon completion of the program.

Hospitality Management Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Business Administration - Hospitality Management
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190



Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Marketing
Course Number BUSN-319
Credits 3.0

In This Course Students Apply Principles And Strategies For Marketing Products And Services To Industrial, Commercial And Governmental Entities. Topics Include Ways In Which Market Information And Product Life Cycle Affect Product And Production Design; Forecasting Techniques; Interdependencies Between Marketing And Operations Functions; And Selling Skills. Prerequisites: Busn-115 And Math-114


Finance
Course Number BUSN-379
Credits 3.0

This course introduces corporate financial structure and covers basic capital budgeting techniques, including discounted cash flow analysis. Funds sources and financial resource allocation are analyzed. Spreadsheet software packages are used to analyze data and solve case-based problems. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGMT-303
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental management theories and traditional managerial responsibilities in formal and informal organizational structures. Planning, organizing, directing, controlling and staffing are explored. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Fundamentals of E-Commerce
Course Number ECOM-210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth overview of the issues, technology and environment of electronic commerce. Knowledge gained facilitates more comprehensive and contemporary exploration of future coursework in marketing, operations, finance, business law, and database and website management. Challenges and opportunities of electronic business are discussed. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Federal Tax Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-424
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the special tax issues of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, gift taxes, estates and trusts. Tax forms, tax software, the Internet, spreadsheets and word processing programs are used to research, solve and analyze tax problems relating to corporate and partnership income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT-324


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Data Analysis with Spreadsheets with Lab
Course Number BIS-155
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing business situations using current spreadsheet software. Using data derived from real-world business situations, students learn to use appropriate spreadsheet software features to organize, analyze and present data, as well as to make business decisions. Through personal database technology such as Access, the course also introduces basic database concepts. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 4-3


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Database Essentials for Business with Lab
Course Number BIS-245
Credits 5.0

Students in this course learn to design relational databases and to build database applications, including tables, queries, forms, reports and macros. Also addressed is implementation of basic database security, backup and recovery procedures. Generating reports and meeting business requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIS-155 / 5-4


Introduction to Hospitality Management
Course Number HMT-310
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major fields within the hospitality industry: lodging, meetings/events, restaurants, casinos and tourism. Operations and management are covered in the context of history, society and leadership.


Foundations of Hotel Management
Course Number HMT-320
Credits 4.0

This course examines the lodging industry – from its traditional roots to contemporary structures – and addresses management, economics and measurement of hotel operations. Reservation systems, staffing, housekeeping, security and facility maintenance operations are examined and related to management responsibilities.


Meetings and Events Management
Course Number HMT-330
Credits 4.0

This course introduces event, meeting and convention management – one of the fastest growing segments of the hospitality industry. Coursework addresses the diverse demands of multiple stakeholders who plan, organize, lead and control organized functions. Models of events are introduced, enabling students to explore issues related to sponsorship, venues, staffing, finance, exhibit coordination, contracted services, legal implications, marketing and convention bureaus.


Restaurant Management
Course Number HMT-410
Credits 4.0

This course introduces operational and management practices of both startup and established restaurants. Concepts related to mission, marketing strategy and menu are addressed. Financial management of restaurants is examined, including pricing, budgets, cost control, payroll, fixed assets, leasing, and cash and revenue control, as are service and customer relations challenges.


Food Safety and Sanitation
Course Number HMT-420
Credits 4.0

This course covers fundamental aspects of food safety, sanitation and food service operations. Coursework is based on the 2001 FDA Food Code and focuses on management of sanitation, factors contributing to unsafe food, food-borne illnesses, food production flow, the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system, accident and crisis management, employee training, food safety regulations, and facilities and equipment cleaning and sanitation.


Tourism Management
Course Number HMT-450
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the many interdisciplinary aspects of the growing tourism industry, with emphasis on managerial challenges and responsibilities. The structure and function of major tourism delivery systems are covered, as are social and behavioral aspects of tourism. Additionally, supply and demand for products and services are analyzed, and forecasting demand, revenue and yield management approaches are explored.


Casino Management
Course Number HMT-440
Credits 4.0

This course introduces operating conditions and management responsibilities in casinos, and related properties and services. Gaming history and regulations are covered, as are modern gaming laws, controls, taxes, accounting, reporting, marketing, and the mathematics and statistics of games and casinos.


Program description: Qualified graduates of approved international three-year
business-related programs may select this option, which
provides a direct path to earning a recognized bachelor’s
degree. International credentials considered for approval –
from China, India, Singapore and the United Kingdom,
among others – include higher national diplomas, three-year bachelor’s degrees and the equivalent

Hospitality Management Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Hospitality Management
Introduction to Computer Applications
Course Number ECM001
Credits 75.0

This is an introductory module designed to provide the student with a foundation in computer skills. This module will start with an overview of the Windows environment and desktop. Students will learn file management and customization concepts. Students will then learn to use Internet Explorer to browse the Web in search of information. The module then covers fundamentals topics in word processing, spreadsheets and presentations using MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Topical coverage includes Windows desktop and file management, Internet Explorer and research, MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint.


Introduction to Event Coordination
Course Number ECM002
Credits 25.0

This module introduces the field of event coordination. Students will gain insight into the typical duties of event planning. Students will learn about the role and scope of professional event coordination as well as the elements that constitute a well planned event. This course will try to explore these topics through the examination of the components of an event. Students will discover how the event coordinator should react to the various elements and considerations of an event.This course will also explore the professional and ethical guidelines that relate to the professional event coordinator as well as the possible professional recognitions that are available in this field.


Administration
Course Number ECM003
Credits 25.0

This module explores the administrative functions that are necessary to achieve the successful coordination of an event. Students will learn and apply the administrative, management and coordination skills that will allow them to implement strategies to ensure that all goals and objectives are met on time and on budget. Module topics include business plans, developing critical paths, coordinating of committees, reporting and monitoring, financial controls and procedures, budgets and contingency plans.


Human Resources Coordination
Course Number ECM004
Credits 25.0

Human resources are at the heart of all event planning processes. Event planning relies on both paid staff and volunteers all of whom must work in a concerted effort to guarantee the success of the event. The co-ordinator’s role is to ensure that the right people are used for the right tasks and that they are used to their fullest potential. This module will explore the processes of recruiting, training and motivating staff and volunteers. Topical coverage includes recruiting staff and volunteers, job descriptions, interviewing and selecting candidates, training and orientation, motivation and leadership, teamwork, conflict resolution and performance reviews.


Event Staging Project I
Course Number ECM005
Credits 25.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Event Administration
Course Number ECM006
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event. Module topics include researching events, developing business plans and critical paths, evaluating events, monitoring and reporting processes, developing event policies, developing budgets and funding and financial controls.


Human Resources Management
Course Number ECM007
Credits 25.0

The event manager has the responsibility of assembling the team of individuals who will plan and coordinate the event. Human resource management skills are therefore key to ensure the success of an event manager. In this module the student will learn how to establish a human resource plan, as well as implement policies and procedures for human resource management. Topical coverage includes guidelines for human resource management; policies and procedures; interviewing and selecting candidates; training and orientation; motivation and leadership; teamwork; conflict resolution and preformance reviews.


Professionalism
Course Number ECM008
Credits 75.0

As a key member of the event management team, the event coordinator is required to project a professional image of him or herself and the organisation. This module will explore the characteristics, attributes skills and behaviours that are important factors in leading to professional conduct and leadership. Topical coverage includes professionalism, leadership, problem resolution, managing multiple priorities, communication and effective presentaions.


Event Staging Project II
Course Number ECM009
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Event Coordination
Course Number ECM010
Credits 50.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes site plans; accomodations; decors and staging; performers, guest speakers and requirements; site setup and take down; environmental and social concerns; food and beverage coordination; security; controls and emergency services and transportation and parking.


Marketing Plan Implementation
Course Number ECM011
Credits 25.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes marketing plans and strategies; advertising of information; public relations strategies; trade and consumer shows; expositions; marketing collateral materials; events promotion and incentives.


Risk Management Implementation
Course Number ECM012
Credits 25.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Topical coverage includes legislation and it's impact; risk management plans; contracts and negotiations; sourcing suppliers and developing sponsors/donors and partnerships.


Event Planning and Management
Course Number ECM013
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Learn to design and plan event programs; site selection criteria: contract entertainment, activities and attractions; develop food and beverage operations; develop site decor plans; develop systems of accreditation and draft guidelines for information and registration processes.


Marketing Planning
Course Number ECM014
Credits 50.0

Marketing an event goes beyond simple advertisement of the event. In order to properly market an event, the event manager needs to know and understand the needs and expectations of the customer and how the event can meet and exceed those needs and expectations. The key to this success is doing the proper research and then developing an appropriate marketing plan to ensure that all needs and expectations are addressed. In this module the student will learn how to develop a marketing plan and marketing strategies that can sell an event and create an excitement around an event. Topical coverage includes developing marketing plans and strategies; marketing materials; merchandising and souvenirs; publicity strategies and materials; media plans and media releases; hospitality arrangements and advertising strategies.


Risk Management Planning
Course Number ECM015
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus of this module will be the development of a risk management plan. Students will learn how to mitigate event risks by developing and event risk management plan, contingency plans. Topical coverage includes legislation and its impact; development of risk management plans and develop contingency plans.


Program description: There are many exciting career opportunities in Canada’s fast growing tourism industry. Adventure tourism and recreation, food and beverage services, events and conferences and accommodations are just some of the tourism sectors with great prospects.

Find the training you need to enter this industry through the Hospitality Diploma and Certificates Program at Vancouver Career College. The program covers a variety of tourism and hospitality skills. Students study staff management, office procedures, hospitality computer systems, housekeeping management, front of house procedures and human resource management. They also obtain B.C. Food Safe and Serving It Right certificates. Finally, students gain hands-on experience in the tourism industry with a five-week practicum.

There are multiple diplomas to choose from. Graduates can receive a Hospitality Management Diploma or a Hospitality Operations Diploma. Graduates will also be certified with an American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) Diploma. For those graduates who want to further their education, these Vancouver Career College programs are also transferable to colleges and universities.

Program Name: Hospitality Management Diploma (AHLA)
Administration
Course Number ECM003
Credits 25.0

This module explores the administrative functions that are necessary to achieve the successful coordination of an event. Students will learn and apply the administrative, management and coordination skills that will allow them to implement strategies to ensure that all goals and objectives are met on time and on budget. Module topics include business plans, developing critical paths, coordinating of committees, reporting and monitoring, financial controls and procedures, budgets and contingency plans.


Event Administration
Course Number ECM006
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event. Module topics include researching events, developing business plans and critical paths, evaluating events, monitoring and reporting processes, developing event policies, developing budgets and funding and financial controls.


Professionalism
Course Number ECM008
Credits 75.0

As a key member of the event management team, the event coordinator is required to project a professional image of him or herself and the organisation. This module will explore the characteristics, attributes skills and behaviours that are important factors in leading to professional conduct and leadership. Topical coverage includes professionalism, leadership, problem resolution, managing multiple priorities, communication and effective presentaions.


Event Coordination
Course Number ECM010
Credits 50.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes site plans; accomodations; decors and staging; performers, guest speakers and requirements; site setup and take down; environmental and social concerns; food and beverage coordination; security; controls and emergency services and transportation and parking.


Risk Management Implementation
Course Number ECM012
Credits 25.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Topical coverage includes legislation and it's impact; risk management plans; contracts and negotiations; sourcing suppliers and developing sponsors/donors and partnerships.


Event Planning and Management
Course Number ECM013
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Learn to design and plan event programs; site selection criteria: contract entertainment, activities and attractions; develop food and beverage operations; develop site decor plans; develop systems of accreditation and draft guidelines for information and registration processes.


Marketing Planning
Course Number ECM014
Credits 50.0

Marketing an event goes beyond simple advertisement of the event. In order to properly market an event, the event manager needs to know and understand the needs and expectations of the customer and how the event can meet and exceed those needs and expectations. The key to this success is doing the proper research and then developing an appropriate marketing plan to ensure that all needs and expectations are addressed. In this module the student will learn how to develop a marketing plan and marketing strategies that can sell an event and create an excitement around an event. Topical coverage includes developing marketing plans and strategies; marketing materials; merchandising and souvenirs; publicity strategies and materials; media plans and media releases; hospitality arrangements and advertising strategies.


Introduction to Computer Applications
Course Number ECM001
Credits 75.0

This is an introductory module designed to provide the student with a foundation in computer skills. This module will start with an overview of the Windows environment and desktop. Students will learn file management and customization concepts. Students will then learn to use Internet Explorer to browse the Web in search of information. The module then covers fundamentals topics in word processing, spreadsheets and presentations using MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Topical coverage includes Windows desktop and file management, Internet Explorer and research, MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint.


Introduction to Event Coordination
Course Number ECM002
Credits 25.0

This module introduces the field of event coordination. Students will gain insight into the typical duties of event planning. Students will learn about the role and scope of professional event coordination as well as the elements that constitute a well planned event. This course will try to explore these topics through the examination of the components of an event. Students will discover how the event coordinator should react to the various elements and considerations of an event.This course will also explore the professional and ethical guidelines that relate to the professional event coordinator as well as the possible professional recognitions that are available in this field.


Human Resources Coordination
Course Number ECM004
Credits 25.0

Human resources are at the heart of all event planning processes. Event planning relies on both paid staff and volunteers all of whom must work in a concerted effort to guarantee the success of the event. The co-ordinator’s role is to ensure that the right people are used for the right tasks and that they are used to their fullest potential. This module will explore the processes of recruiting, training and motivating staff and volunteers. Topical coverage includes recruiting staff and volunteers, job descriptions, interviewing and selecting candidates, training and orientation, motivation and leadership, teamwork, conflict resolution and performance reviews.


Event Staging Project I
Course Number ECM005
Credits 25.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Human Resources Management
Course Number ECM007
Credits 25.0

The event manager has the responsibility of assembling the team of individuals who will plan and coordinate the event. Human resource management skills are therefore key to ensure the success of an event manager. In this module the student will learn how to establish a human resource plan, as well as implement policies and procedures for human resource management. Topical coverage includes guidelines for human resource management; policies and procedures; interviewing and selecting candidates; training and orientation; motivation and leadership; teamwork; conflict resolution and preformance reviews.


Event Staging Project II
Course Number ECM009
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Marketing Plan Implementation
Course Number ECM011
Credits 25.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes marketing plans and strategies; advertising of information; public relations strategies; trade and consumer shows; expositions; marketing collateral materials; events promotion and incentives.


Risk Management Planning
Course Number ECM015
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus of this module will be the development of a risk management plan. Students will learn how to mitigate event risks by developing and event risk management plan, contingency plans. Topical coverage includes legislation and its impact; development of risk management plans and develop contingency plans.


Program description: There are many exciting career opportunities in Canada’s fast growing tourism industry. Adventure tourism and recreation, food and beverage services, events and conferences and accommodations are just some of the tourism sectors with great prospects.

Find the training you need to enter this industry through the Hospitality Diploma and Certificates Program at Vancouver Career College. The program covers a variety of tourism and hospitality skills. Students study staff management, office procedures, hospitality computer systems, housekeeping management, front of house procedures and human resource management. They also obtain B.C. Food Safe and Serving It Right certificates. Finally, students gain hands-on experience in the tourism industry with a five-week practicum.

There are multiple diplomas to choose from. Graduates can receive a Hospitality Management Diploma or a Hospitality Operations Diploma. Graduates will also be certified with an American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) Diploma. For those graduates who want to further their education, these Vancouver Career College programs are also transferable to colleges and universities.

Hospitality Management Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Hospitality Management Schools (campus and online)

New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
Purdue University-Main Campus
Total Programs 122
Number of Subjects 104
Rank in USA 81st
University of Delaware
Total Programs 159
Number of Subjects 128
Rank in USA 95th
Drexel University
Total Programs 125
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 108th
Rochester Institute of Technology
Total Programs 1
Number of Subjects 108
Rank in USA 137th
Texas Tech University
Total Programs 183
Number of Subjects 154
Rank in USA 150th
Grand Valley State University
Total Programs 103
Number of Subjects 101
Rank in USA 159th
College of Charleston
Total Programs 75
Number of Subjects 74
Rank in USA 162nd
Central Michigan University
Total Programs 186
Number of Subjects 145
Rank in USA 239th
The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Total Programs 57
Number of Subjects 71
Rank in USA 267th
Endicott College
Total Programs 44
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 288th
Rutgers University-Camden
Total Programs 57
Number of Subjects 64
Rank in USA 299th
University of Memphis
Total Programs 115
Number of Subjects 113
Rank in USA 404th
Florida Southern College
Total Programs 79
Number of Subjects 80
Rank in USA 413th
University of New Haven
Total Programs 118
Number of Subjects 106
Rank in USA 438th
Fairleigh Dickinson University-College at Florham
Total Programs 56
Number of Subjects 62
Rank in USA 476th
North Carolina Central University
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 85
Rank in USA 545th
University of Minnesota-Crookston
Total Programs 48
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 551st