Online Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its hotel and hospitality management courses to be successful hotel and hospitality managers, hospitality managers, hotel managers, food service managers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 224,360 people employed as hotel, motel, and resort desk clerks alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $21,130. Lodging managers make on average $53,500 per year and there are about 31,660 of them employed today.

Hotel and Hospitality Management Organizations Hotel and Hospitality Management Common Job Tasks
  • using basic math
  • using customer service skills
  • marketing skills
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Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses at Penn Foster Career School

Program Name: Hotel/Restaurant Management
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies Identifying and implementing a successful study method; planning when, where, and how you'll study; creating effective and efficient study tools; using study tools to improve chances for success. The Hospitality Industry Origin and history; industry profile; job opportunities.


Instruction Set 2

Marketing and Sales Dressing professionally; building a support network; developing skills and a career portfolio. Managing People Theories and styles of management; motivating and communicating; planning and control; staff selection. The Front Office Levels of service; chain affiliation; staffing and scheduling; the guest process; forecasting; night audit.


Instruction Set 3

Housekeeping The cleaning process; the linen room and storage; Right-to-Know. Engineering and Maintenance Department functions; engineering systems: electricity, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration.


Instruction Set 4

Hospitality Accounting Terminology; accounting elements and methods; financial statements; computers. Legal Aspects and Insurance Legal responsibilities of personnel and guests; labor relations; insurance principles and types; selecting an insurer. Cost Controls Cost control for lodging and food service businesses; implementation of cost control strategies.


Instruction Set 5

Restaurant and Banquet Service Food service set-ups; effective management; elements of dining service; banquet and buffet catering. Menu Planning Clientele and customer preference; types of menus and menu items; personnel and kitchen facilities; nutritional and pricing considerations; Truth-in-Menu; menu design and layout. Food Preparation Kitchen contents; recipes and measurement; cooking processes; kitchen tools and equipment; flavorings and seasonings; non-alcoholic beverages; presentation.


Instruction Set 6

Purchasing and Storage Cost factors; government regulations; yield testing; purchase of perishable items; the "bidding" procedure; receiving operation; storage needs and guidelines; inventory control. Food Service Sanitation Bacteria; other infections and contaminants; personal hygiene; sanitary storage; cleansing and sanitation of equipment; rodent and insect control. Alcoholic Beverages Society and alcohol; effects of alcohol; alcohol and the law; the beverage operation; marketing beverages; controlling profit. Work Experience Option (available online) Learning Aid : "Food Service Sanitation" DVD


Program description: Learn the skills you need for a career as a Hotel/Restaurant Manager - at home, at your own pace, with Penn Foster Career School.

There are certain skills you need to begin a career in Hotel/Restaurant Management. The Penn Foster Career School Hotel/Restaurant Management Program helps you learn them quickly and conveniently.

You'll learn:

* Marketing and Sales
* Hospitality Accounting, Cost Controls,
and Legal Aspects and Insurance
* Menu Planning, Food Preparation,
and Restaurant and Banquet Service
* Food Service Sanitation, Purchasing and Storage

And you’ll learn it all at home — no classroom needed! You’ll get valuable information about food service set-ups, dining service, banquet and buffet catering, sales, advertising, and public relations.

Start a rewarding career in a growing field.
Why take a Hotel/Restaurant Management training program? With the right credentials, you can:

* Work for an established hotel or restaurant.
* Work for a chain of hotels or restaurants and have the opportunity to travel.
* Enjoy the fringe benefits that come with such an exciting job.

Demand for Hotel/Restaurant Managers is on the rise. The more people travel, the greater the need for Hotel/Restaurant Managers. As operations become more complex, employers are putting more emphasis on specialized training. The Penn Foster Career School Hotel/Restaurant Management Program can give you a real advantage over others without your training!

Contact Penn Foster Career School Today.
We’ll send you FREE information – with absolutely no obligation! Find out more about Penn Foster Career School's Hotel/Restaurant Management training that includes:

* All the books, lessons, and learning aids you need
* Unlimited instructional support
* Access to student services by website, phone, and mail

Get more information today and in as little as six months from enrollment, you can be on your way to a career as a Hotel/Restaurant Manager!

Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses at South University

Program Name: Masters of Business Administration - Hospitality Management Specialization
Organization Behavior and Communication
Course Number MBA5001
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the issues of motivation, leadership, and communications. Included are negotiation, conflict resolution, and teambuilding. 4 quarter hours


Law and Ethics for Managers
Course Number MBA5005
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Quantitative Analysis and Decision Making
Course Number MBA5008
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Managerial Finance
Course Number MBA6010
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Strategic Marketing
Course Number MBA6011
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Operations and Supply Chain Management
Course Number MBA6012
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Managerial Economics
Course Number MBA5004
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microeconomic concepts and their application to common business problems. Topics include supply and demand analysis, cost analysis, economies of scale, basic market types and their characteristics, pricing, risk analysis, and the government's role in economic affairs.


Contemporary Issues in Global Hospitality Management
Course Number MBA5710
Credits 4.0

Hospitality Finance and Revenue Management
Course Number MBA6120
Credits 4.0

Franchising and Chain Management within the Hospitality Industry
Course Number MBA6220
Credits 4.0

Consumer Behavior and Marketing within the Hospitality Industry
Course Number MBA6225
Credits 4.0

Hospitality Systems and Policy Formulation
Course Number MBA6230
Credits 4.0

Program description: Specialization in Hospitality Management is designed to prepare students
for first and second tier management employment within the hospitality
industry. The focus of the program is to develop a specific understanding
of the industry, while developing critical skills and management perspectives key to the hospitality industry.

Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses at Penn Foster College

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Hospitality Management
Introduction to the Hospitality Industry
Course Number HSP101
Credits 3.0

Origins and history of the hotel/restaurant business; job opportunities in the front and back office, and in restaurant and banquet services. PREREQ: None


Basics of the Catering Business
Course Number HSP110
Credits 3.0

Fundamentals of catering; fees; types of events; starting your own business; the caterer’s kitchen; storing staples. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Engineering Systems
Course Number HSP115
Credits 3.0

Function of the engineering and maintenance departments; electrical, plumbing, heating, refrigeration and ventilation systems; the housekeeping department; sanitation. PREREQ: None


Nutrition and Menu Planning
Course Number HSP122
Credits 3.0

The digestive process; essential nutrient groups and their sources; providing healthy daily menus. PREREQ: None


Beverage Operations
Course Number HSP124
Credits 3.0

Legal control of alcohol; types of wine and wine service; types of malt beverages and distilled spirits; purchase, storage, and control of alcoholic beverages. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Purchasing and Storage
Course Number HSP140
Credits 3.0

Buyers and their functions; the purchasing process; evaluating merchandise; storage areas for food and nonfood items; use and manufacture of storage areas. PREREQ: None


Quantity Food Production
Course Number HSP210
Credits 3.0

Management principles and procedures; facilities; tools and equipment; menus and recipes; purchasing and storage; sanitation and safety; preparation and service of food. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Accounting
Course Number HSP240
Credits 3.0

The balance sheet; income statement; recording transactions; trial balance; journal entries; cash versus accrual method of accounting; the work sheet; the accounting cycle; procedures for a merchandising business; special journals; payroll accounting. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Law and Insurance
Course Number HSP245
Credits 3.0

Law as it applies to the hospitality industry; contract law, bankruptcy and commercial paper; legal responsibilities of hotel personnel; basic insurance principles. PREREQ: None


Hospitality Marketing and Advertising
Course Number HSP250
Credits 3.0

Techniques of advertising; function of advertising in marketing area; role of advertising in marketplace; marketing and advertising applications in hospitality. PREREQ: None


Program description: You can earn your Hospitality Management Degree in the comfort of your own home. You will learn the skills needed to become a hotel manager, food and beverage manager, or sales manager.
In the Hospitality Management Degree program, you will be learning about:
Introduction to Hospitality.
Business and Basics of Catering Business.
Principles of Management and Hospitality.
Engineering Systems.
Beverage Operations.
Hospitality Purchasing and Storage.
Marketing and Advertising.
Hospitality Law and Insurance
Graduates of the Penn Foster college Hospitality Management program can use the Penn Foster Career Services to obtain that great career. This includes tips for interviewing, and how to make your cover letter. The Hospitality Management Program has a Certified Professional Resume Writer who assists students in preparing a resume that can be used to find employment upon completion of the program.

Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Business Administration - Hospitality Management
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190



Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Marketing
Course Number BUSN-319
Credits 3.0

In This Course Students Apply Principles And Strategies For Marketing Products And Services To Industrial, Commercial And Governmental Entities. Topics Include Ways In Which Market Information And Product Life Cycle Affect Product And Production Design; Forecasting Techniques; Interdependencies Between Marketing And Operations Functions; And Selling Skills. Prerequisites: Busn-115 And Math-114


Finance
Course Number BUSN-379
Credits 3.0

This course introduces corporate financial structure and covers basic capital budgeting techniques, including discounted cash flow analysis. Funds sources and financial resource allocation are analyzed. Spreadsheet software packages are used to analyze data and solve case-based problems. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGMT-303
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental management theories and traditional managerial responsibilities in formal and informal organizational structures. Planning, organizing, directing, controlling and staffing are explored. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Fundamentals of E-Commerce
Course Number ECOM-210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth overview of the issues, technology and environment of electronic commerce. Knowledge gained facilitates more comprehensive and contemporary exploration of future coursework in marketing, operations, finance, business law, and database and website management. Challenges and opportunities of electronic business are discussed. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Federal Tax Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-424
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the special tax issues of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, gift taxes, estates and trusts. Tax forms, tax software, the Internet, spreadsheets and word processing programs are used to research, solve and analyze tax problems relating to corporate and partnership income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT-324


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Data Analysis with Spreadsheets with Lab
Course Number BIS-155
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing business situations using current spreadsheet software. Using data derived from real-world business situations, students learn to use appropriate spreadsheet software features to organize, analyze and present data, as well as to make business decisions. Through personal database technology such as Access, the course also introduces basic database concepts. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 4-3


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Database Essentials for Business with Lab
Course Number BIS-245
Credits 5.0

Students in this course learn to design relational databases and to build database applications, including tables, queries, forms, reports and macros. Also addressed is implementation of basic database security, backup and recovery procedures. Generating reports and meeting business requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIS-155 / 5-4


Introduction to Hospitality Management
Course Number HMT-310
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major fields within the hospitality industry: lodging, meetings/events, restaurants, casinos and tourism. Operations and management are covered in the context of history, society and leadership.


Foundations of Hotel Management
Course Number HMT-320
Credits 4.0

This course examines the lodging industry – from its traditional roots to contemporary structures – and addresses management, economics and measurement of hotel operations. Reservation systems, staffing, housekeeping, security and facility maintenance operations are examined and related to management responsibilities.


Meetings and Events Management
Course Number HMT-330
Credits 4.0

This course introduces event, meeting and convention management – one of the fastest growing segments of the hospitality industry. Coursework addresses the diverse demands of multiple stakeholders who plan, organize, lead and control organized functions. Models of events are introduced, enabling students to explore issues related to sponsorship, venues, staffing, finance, exhibit coordination, contracted services, legal implications, marketing and convention bureaus.


Restaurant Management
Course Number HMT-410
Credits 4.0

This course introduces operational and management practices of both startup and established restaurants. Concepts related to mission, marketing strategy and menu are addressed. Financial management of restaurants is examined, including pricing, budgets, cost control, payroll, fixed assets, leasing, and cash and revenue control, as are service and customer relations challenges.


Food Safety and Sanitation
Course Number HMT-420
Credits 4.0

This course covers fundamental aspects of food safety, sanitation and food service operations. Coursework is based on the 2001 FDA Food Code and focuses on management of sanitation, factors contributing to unsafe food, food-borne illnesses, food production flow, the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system, accident and crisis management, employee training, food safety regulations, and facilities and equipment cleaning and sanitation.


Tourism Management
Course Number HMT-450
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the many interdisciplinary aspects of the growing tourism industry, with emphasis on managerial challenges and responsibilities. The structure and function of major tourism delivery systems are covered, as are social and behavioral aspects of tourism. Additionally, supply and demand for products and services are analyzed, and forecasting demand, revenue and yield management approaches are explored.


Casino Management
Course Number HMT-440
Credits 4.0

This course introduces operating conditions and management responsibilities in casinos, and related properties and services. Gaming history and regulations are covered, as are modern gaming laws, controls, taxes, accounting, reporting, marketing, and the mathematics and statistics of games and casinos.


Program description: Qualified graduates of approved international three-year
business-related programs may select this option, which
provides a direct path to earning a recognized bachelor’s
degree. International credentials considered for approval –
from China, India, Singapore and the United Kingdom,
among others – include higher national diplomas, three-year bachelor’s degrees and the equivalent

Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Hospitality Management
Introduction to Computer Applications
Course Number ECM001
Credits 75.0

This is an introductory module designed to provide the student with a foundation in computer skills. This module will start with an overview of the Windows environment and desktop. Students will learn file management and customization concepts. Students will then learn to use Internet Explorer to browse the Web in search of information. The module then covers fundamentals topics in word processing, spreadsheets and presentations using MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Topical coverage includes Windows desktop and file management, Internet Explorer and research, MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint.


Introduction to Event Coordination
Course Number ECM002
Credits 25.0

This module introduces the field of event coordination. Students will gain insight into the typical duties of event planning. Students will learn about the role and scope of professional event coordination as well as the elements that constitute a well planned event. This course will try to explore these topics through the examination of the components of an event. Students will discover how the event coordinator should react to the various elements and considerations of an event.This course will also explore the professional and ethical guidelines that relate to the professional event coordinator as well as the possible professional recognitions that are available in this field.


Administration
Course Number ECM003
Credits 25.0

This module explores the administrative functions that are necessary to achieve the successful coordination of an event. Students will learn and apply the administrative, management and coordination skills that will allow them to implement strategies to ensure that all goals and objectives are met on time and on budget. Module topics include business plans, developing critical paths, coordinating of committees, reporting and monitoring, financial controls and procedures, budgets and contingency plans.


Human Resources Coordination
Course Number ECM004
Credits 25.0

Human resources are at the heart of all event planning processes. Event planning relies on both paid staff and volunteers all of whom must work in a concerted effort to guarantee the success of the event. The co-ordinator’s role is to ensure that the right people are used for the right tasks and that they are used to their fullest potential. This module will explore the processes of recruiting, training and motivating staff and volunteers. Topical coverage includes recruiting staff and volunteers, job descriptions, interviewing and selecting candidates, training and orientation, motivation and leadership, teamwork, conflict resolution and performance reviews.


Event Staging Project I
Course Number ECM005
Credits 25.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Event Administration
Course Number ECM006
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event. Module topics include researching events, developing business plans and critical paths, evaluating events, monitoring and reporting processes, developing event policies, developing budgets and funding and financial controls.


Human Resources Management
Course Number ECM007
Credits 25.0

The event manager has the responsibility of assembling the team of individuals who will plan and coordinate the event. Human resource management skills are therefore key to ensure the success of an event manager. In this module the student will learn how to establish a human resource plan, as well as implement policies and procedures for human resource management. Topical coverage includes guidelines for human resource management; policies and procedures; interviewing and selecting candidates; training and orientation; motivation and leadership; teamwork; conflict resolution and preformance reviews.


Professionalism
Course Number ECM008
Credits 75.0

As a key member of the event management team, the event coordinator is required to project a professional image of him or herself and the organisation. This module will explore the characteristics, attributes skills and behaviours that are important factors in leading to professional conduct and leadership. Topical coverage includes professionalism, leadership, problem resolution, managing multiple priorities, communication and effective presentaions.


Event Staging Project II
Course Number ECM009
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Event Coordination
Course Number ECM010
Credits 50.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes site plans; accomodations; decors and staging; performers, guest speakers and requirements; site setup and take down; environmental and social concerns; food and beverage coordination; security; controls and emergency services and transportation and parking.


Marketing Plan Implementation
Course Number ECM011
Credits 25.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes marketing plans and strategies; advertising of information; public relations strategies; trade and consumer shows; expositions; marketing collateral materials; events promotion and incentives.


Risk Management Implementation
Course Number ECM012
Credits 25.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Topical coverage includes legislation and it's impact; risk management plans; contracts and negotiations; sourcing suppliers and developing sponsors/donors and partnerships.


Event Planning and Management
Course Number ECM013
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Learn to design and plan event programs; site selection criteria: contract entertainment, activities and attractions; develop food and beverage operations; develop site decor plans; develop systems of accreditation and draft guidelines for information and registration processes.


Marketing Planning
Course Number ECM014
Credits 50.0

Marketing an event goes beyond simple advertisement of the event. In order to properly market an event, the event manager needs to know and understand the needs and expectations of the customer and how the event can meet and exceed those needs and expectations. The key to this success is doing the proper research and then developing an appropriate marketing plan to ensure that all needs and expectations are addressed. In this module the student will learn how to develop a marketing plan and marketing strategies that can sell an event and create an excitement around an event. Topical coverage includes developing marketing plans and strategies; marketing materials; merchandising and souvenirs; publicity strategies and materials; media plans and media releases; hospitality arrangements and advertising strategies.


Risk Management Planning
Course Number ECM015
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus of this module will be the development of a risk management plan. Students will learn how to mitigate event risks by developing and event risk management plan, contingency plans. Topical coverage includes legislation and its impact; development of risk management plans and develop contingency plans.


Program description: There are many exciting career opportunities in Canada’s fast growing tourism industry. Adventure tourism and recreation, food and beverage services, events and conferences and accommodations are just some of the tourism sectors with great prospects.

Find the training you need to enter this industry through the Hospitality Diploma and Certificates Program at Vancouver Career College. The program covers a variety of tourism and hospitality skills. Students study staff management, office procedures, hospitality computer systems, housekeeping management, front of house procedures and human resource management. They also obtain B.C. Food Safe and Serving It Right certificates. Finally, students gain hands-on experience in the tourism industry with a five-week practicum.

There are multiple diplomas to choose from. Graduates can receive a Hospitality Management Diploma or a Hospitality Operations Diploma. Graduates will also be certified with an American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) Diploma. For those graduates who want to further their education, these Vancouver Career College programs are also transferable to colleges and universities.

Program Name: Hospitality Management Diploma (AHLA)
Administration
Course Number ECM003
Credits 25.0

This module explores the administrative functions that are necessary to achieve the successful coordination of an event. Students will learn and apply the administrative, management and coordination skills that will allow them to implement strategies to ensure that all goals and objectives are met on time and on budget. Module topics include business plans, developing critical paths, coordinating of committees, reporting and monitoring, financial controls and procedures, budgets and contingency plans.


Event Administration
Course Number ECM006
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event. Module topics include researching events, developing business plans and critical paths, evaluating events, monitoring and reporting processes, developing event policies, developing budgets and funding and financial controls.


Professionalism
Course Number ECM008
Credits 75.0

As a key member of the event management team, the event coordinator is required to project a professional image of him or herself and the organisation. This module will explore the characteristics, attributes skills and behaviours that are important factors in leading to professional conduct and leadership. Topical coverage includes professionalism, leadership, problem resolution, managing multiple priorities, communication and effective presentaions.


Event Coordination
Course Number ECM010
Credits 50.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes site plans; accomodations; decors and staging; performers, guest speakers and requirements; site setup and take down; environmental and social concerns; food and beverage coordination; security; controls and emergency services and transportation and parking.


Risk Management Implementation
Course Number ECM012
Credits 25.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Topical coverage includes legislation and it's impact; risk management plans; contracts and negotiations; sourcing suppliers and developing sponsors/donors and partnerships.


Event Planning and Management
Course Number ECM013
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus will be on the management of the risk through compliance with legislation, sticking to the risk management plan and the implementation of a contingency plan. As an event coordinator your role is to ensure that the plan is conveyed to the committees and that everyone shows a commitment to following the plan. Learn to design and plan event programs; site selection criteria: contract entertainment, activities and attractions; develop food and beverage operations; develop site decor plans; develop systems of accreditation and draft guidelines for information and registration processes.


Marketing Planning
Course Number ECM014
Credits 50.0

Marketing an event goes beyond simple advertisement of the event. In order to properly market an event, the event manager needs to know and understand the needs and expectations of the customer and how the event can meet and exceed those needs and expectations. The key to this success is doing the proper research and then developing an appropriate marketing plan to ensure that all needs and expectations are addressed. In this module the student will learn how to develop a marketing plan and marketing strategies that can sell an event and create an excitement around an event. Topical coverage includes developing marketing plans and strategies; marketing materials; merchandising and souvenirs; publicity strategies and materials; media plans and media releases; hospitality arrangements and advertising strategies.


Introduction to Computer Applications
Course Number ECM001
Credits 75.0

This is an introductory module designed to provide the student with a foundation in computer skills. This module will start with an overview of the Windows environment and desktop. Students will learn file management and customization concepts. Students will then learn to use Internet Explorer to browse the Web in search of information. The module then covers fundamentals topics in word processing, spreadsheets and presentations using MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Topical coverage includes Windows desktop and file management, Internet Explorer and research, MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint.


Introduction to Event Coordination
Course Number ECM002
Credits 25.0

This module introduces the field of event coordination. Students will gain insight into the typical duties of event planning. Students will learn about the role and scope of professional event coordination as well as the elements that constitute a well planned event. This course will try to explore these topics through the examination of the components of an event. Students will discover how the event coordinator should react to the various elements and considerations of an event.This course will also explore the professional and ethical guidelines that relate to the professional event coordinator as well as the possible professional recognitions that are available in this field.


Human Resources Coordination
Course Number ECM004
Credits 25.0

Human resources are at the heart of all event planning processes. Event planning relies on both paid staff and volunteers all of whom must work in a concerted effort to guarantee the success of the event. The co-ordinator’s role is to ensure that the right people are used for the right tasks and that they are used to their fullest potential. This module will explore the processes of recruiting, training and motivating staff and volunteers. Topical coverage includes recruiting staff and volunteers, job descriptions, interviewing and selecting candidates, training and orientation, motivation and leadership, teamwork, conflict resolution and performance reviews.


Event Staging Project I
Course Number ECM005
Credits 25.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Human Resources Management
Course Number ECM007
Credits 25.0

The event manager has the responsibility of assembling the team of individuals who will plan and coordinate the event. Human resource management skills are therefore key to ensure the success of an event manager. In this module the student will learn how to establish a human resource plan, as well as implement policies and procedures for human resource management. Topical coverage includes guidelines for human resource management; policies and procedures; interviewing and selecting candidates; training and orientation; motivation and leadership; teamwork; conflict resolution and preformance reviews.


Event Staging Project II
Course Number ECM009
Credits 50.0

In this final module, the student will integrate all the skills acquired throughout the program. Students will be provided with a choice of events to plan and stage. Students will then proceed to apply their knowledge and skills to plan and stage the event.


Marketing Plan Implementation
Course Number ECM011
Credits 25.0

This module explores the processes that allow the event coordinator to bring all aspects of the event planning together. Students will learn to assess and develop site plans, coordinate accommodations, performances decor and production staging, food and beverage services, special needs and security. Topical coverage includes marketing plans and strategies; advertising of information; public relations strategies; trade and consumer shows; expositions; marketing collateral materials; events promotion and incentives.


Risk Management Planning
Course Number ECM015
Credits 50.0

Every event is subject to possible risk. This module will explore some of the potential risks that may impact an event. The focus of this module will be the development of a risk management plan. Students will learn how to mitigate event risks by developing and event risk management plan, contingency plans. Topical coverage includes legislation and its impact; development of risk management plans and develop contingency plans.


Program description: There are many exciting career opportunities in Canada’s fast growing tourism industry. Adventure tourism and recreation, food and beverage services, events and conferences and accommodations are just some of the tourism sectors with great prospects.

Find the training you need to enter this industry through the Hospitality Diploma and Certificates Program at Vancouver Career College. The program covers a variety of tourism and hospitality skills. Students study staff management, office procedures, hospitality computer systems, housekeeping management, front of house procedures and human resource management. They also obtain B.C. Food Safe and Serving It Right certificates. Finally, students gain hands-on experience in the tourism industry with a five-week practicum.

There are multiple diplomas to choose from. Graduates can receive a Hospitality Management Diploma or a Hospitality Operations Diploma. Graduates will also be certified with an American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) Diploma. For those graduates who want to further their education, these Vancouver Career College programs are also transferable to colleges and universities.

Program Name: Hotel & Restaurant Management
Microsoft Outlook
Course Number MO3E
Credits 25.0

Students work with basic and more advanced features of Microsoft Outlook to manage messages for efficient communication, maintain personal and business contacts, and organize appointments and tasks


Windows Fundamentals
Course Number WIXE
Credits 25.0

This course offers a case-oriented approach to Windows. Students will explore the fundamentals of Windows to develop the skills necessary to work effectively within this operating system.


Keyboarding
Course Number KBDE
Credits 30.0

Students practice basic touch-typing techniques to develop skills in using the keyboard correctly


Microsoft Word
Course Number MW3E
Credits 50.0

This course offers a case-oriented, problem-solving approach for learning Microsoft Word. Students work with both basic and advanced features while creating a variety of documents such as letters, memos, forms, and reports.


Microsoft Excel
Course Number ME3E
Credits 50.0

This course offers a case-oriented, problem-solving approach for learning Microsoft Excel. Students explore both basic and advanced features while creating a variety of documents such as budgets, marketing and sales reports, forecasts, and statistical tables.


Microsoft Access
Course Number MCSE
Credits 50.0

This course offers a case-oriented, problem-solving approach for learning Microsoft Access. Students explore basic and more advanced features of this powerful database management system.


Microsoft PowerPoint
Course Number MP3E
Credits 25.0

Students will explore both basic and more advanced features of Microsoft PowerPoint while creating visually attractive and effective presentations.


Business Essentials
Course Number BESE
Credits 50.0

Business Essentials provides an overview of business management today, including forms of ownership and the ways managers carry out their basic management functions in a skillful and inventive way.


Human Resources
Course Number HREE
Credits 50.0

Employees are the most valuable asset of a business and all aspects from hiring to performance appraisal are examined utilizing the case study approach.


Marketing
Course Number MKGE
Credits 50.0

Marketing and sales are the key elements in the success of a business. This course provides an overview of the many elements of marketing, including developing, pricing, promoting, selling, and distributing various types of goods and services nationally and internationally


Bookkeeping and Financial Accounting - Level 1
Course Number BF1E
Credits 50.0

Emphasis is placed on analyzing and recording business transactions using the rules of double-entry bookkeeping. In addition, adjusting journal entries and everyday transactions for both service and retail businesses are recorded coupled with the preparation of basic financial statements.


Business Law
Course Number LAW250
Credits 3.0

This introductory law course will provide the students with an over view of business law and how it applies to business. It will also enhance some of the topics covered in courses such as entrepreneurship, where they learn about different types of companies and how to decide what best suits their needs. Most importantly students learn about their legal obligations and the obligations of firms and directors as they prepare to embark on a business career


Business Math
Course Number BSME
Credits 50.0

An introduction to the fundamental principles and concepts of business mathematics. Students will be shown how to apply these principles and concepts to solve practical business problems in regards to marketing and finance.


Economics
Course Number ECNE
Credits 75.0

Major economic variables affecting a business including interest rates, GDP growth, and forces of supply and demand are examined


Project Management
Course Number PMAE
Credits 50.0

Project management is of paramount importance to all organizations to improve effectiveness and efficiency. This course utilizes the popular Microsoft Project applications program with realistic case studies and step-by-step guidance.


Effective Business Writing
Course Number EFBE
Credits 40.0

The workplace of the twenty-first century demands excellent communications skills. The focus of this course is on learning writing techniques that ensure effective business communication.


Professional Business Skills
Course Number PBSE
Credits 40.0

This course is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for dealing effectively with both customers and colleagues in the business world. Using a variety of instructional methods including role-plays, case studies, group exercises, simulated situations, and discussion, students learn and practice the customer service and interpersonal skills necessary for success in today’s business environment.


Career and Employment Strategies
Course Number CESE
Credits 25.0

his course looks at the planning, preparation, execution, and follow-up stages of an interview.


Student Success Strategies
Course Number SSSE
Credits 25.0

This course will introduce students to skills and concepts that will help them achieve personal, academic, and career success.


Practicum
Course Number PRAC
Credits 100.0

This program includes a practicum component consisting of a specified number of weeks of work at a job site. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the business organization does not pay for the services of the student during the practicum. The number of practicum hours varies between programs. To learn more about the specific practicum hours for a specific program, speak with an Admissions Representative.


Program description: Hotel management is a challenging job in which you work behind the scenes ensuring that your facility runs smoothly and efficiently at all times. You oversee staff training, food services, cleaning, recruitment, marketing, budgeting, and all of the other components necessary for an enjoyable and relaxing stay. And when problems do arise (as they inevitably do), your job is to diffuse the situation and implement fast and expedient service recovery to ensure that customers remain loyal and satisfied. There are some hotel managers who learn all of their day-to-day responsibilities through on-the-job training and experience. This approach works well for some, but given how competitive the industry has become in recent years, many hotels prefer to hire graduates of hotel management courses at the associate's level or higher.

Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses at Ashworth College

Program Name: Hotel/Restaurant Management Offline
Banquets and Functions
Course Number Lesson 18:

Personal and business banquets; catering vs. banquets; staffing; manager qualifications; weddings; banquet styles; function room setup; table shapes and layouts; meetings; cocktail parties; podiums, lecterns, and microphones; advance booking tips; deposits; guarantees.


The Banquet Function Sheet
Course Number Lesson 19:

The banquet sheet: key to success; getting the right information; communicating policies; understanding the function; menu planning; detail planning; types of meals; special menus; beverage service; open bar; cash bar; á la carte drinks; guarantee and set; confirming the schedule and arrangements; distributing the sheet and meeting with staff; preparing the kitchen; checking details; seating arrangements.


Managing Functions
Course Number Lesson 20:

Arranging staff, equipment, and duties; planning place settings; the station, follow-up, and combination methods; cocktail parties; serving and clearing; preparing the chef; choosing entrees; buffets; traffic control; chafing dishes; keeping food hot; checkbacks; presenting the bill.


Providing a Safe Learning Environment
Course Number Lesson 1:

Options and approaches to providing child care: the differences between custodial, developmental and comprehensive care; quality issues in child care


Providing a Healthy Learning Environment
Course Number Lesson 2:

Developing a safety policy; removing hazards; dealing with medical, fire, and weather emergencies; assembling an effective first aid kit; monitoring illnesses; health problems caused by weather, abuse, and emotion


Providing a Developmentally Appropriate Learning Environment
Course Number Lesson 3:

Planning good environments for children; types of learning centers; selecting equipment, materials, and toys; evaluation.


Early Care & Education: Past, Present & Future
Course Number Lesson 4:

Physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development; promoting maturation and responsibility; how temperament affects personality; the two-year-old stage; impact of play on social development.


Stages of Early Childhood Development
Course Number Lesson 5:

Recognizing signs of development; the role of accomplishment in developing a child's self-esteem; motor and perceptual skills; how competition, fear, stress, and rules affect a child.


Expectations of the Early Childhood Professional
Course Number Lesson 6:

Important workplace skills; ethics for child care professionals; promoting communication, cooperation and teamwork; facing day-to-day challenges; managing your time and solving problems effectively.


Children Don't Come with Directions
Course Number Lesson 7:

Why understanding child development is important; child development theories and principles; developmental stages; self-esteem; observing children.


Creating & Evaluating & Early Childhood Environment
Course Number Lesson 8:

Qualities of a strong curriculum; how children learn; effective teaching techniques; stages of artistic development; guiding a child's art experiences; planning and leading art activities.


Planning to Play
Course Number Lesson 9:

Language skill development; assessing books; reading stories; reading and writing exercises; language arts and dramatic play; how dramatic play encourages growth; using puppets.


Planning for the Mind
Course Number Lesson 10:

Goals of science and math curricula; the teacher's role; planning and leading science, math and active play activities; active play learning centers; safety during active play; creative resources.


Planning for the Heart & Soul
Course Number Lesson 11:

Planning a social studies curriculum; helping children become responsible citizens; learning about one's self, family, and community; adding an effective music program; planning music and creative movement activities; the teacher's role in music.



Resonance and IC Filters
Course Number Lesson 13:

Inductive and capacitive reactance; reflected impedance; resonance; passive filters; integrator and differentiator circuits; waves; harmonics.


Diagnosing Analog and Audio Circuits
Course Number Lesson 14:

Troubleshooting digital and analog equipment and audio-amplifier consumer chips; narrowing the problem; block diagrams; using a bench power supply; signal tracing; output devices; troubleshooting basic low-frequency amplifier circuits; audio distortion problems.


In-Circuit DiscreteSemi-Conductor and Troubleshooting
Course Number Lesson 15:

How To Troubleshoot The Pn Junction Diode And Bipolar And Fet Circuits; How Transistor Circuits, Diodes, Zener Diodes, Ujt Oscillators, And Thyristors Operate; Transistor And Resistor Arrays; Voltage Regulator Ics And Consumer Ic Chips; Understanding Analog Switches; Optical Isolators.


AM, FM, TV and RF Troubleshooting Techniques
Course Number Lesson 16:

Modulation; transmission and reception of RF signals; watts, transmitters, and components; radio receivers; TV; AM and FM detectors; microvolt signals in receivers.


Diagnosing Pulse and Digital Circuits
Course Number Lesson 17:

Pulsed waveforms; source and load instruments; the originating pulse and processing pulse circuits; digital IC references; understanding digital schematic diagrams; digital gates; how to troubleshoot digital circuits.


Program description: Ashworth College's Career Diploma in Hotel and Restaurant Management program is designed to teach front and back office management. Students have the opportunity to learn about guest and banquet services coordination, housekeeping, staffing and scheduling, and customer service. Courses are also intended to teach hotel industry structure, reservations, determining room rates, table service, staff training, and managing functions. Ashworth College provides students in this program with a customized lesson book, study guide, calculator, cost versus profit calculation wheel, and time management and career search guides.

Program Name: Hotel/Restaurant Management Online
Lesson 1: The Traditional Hotel Industry

Evolution of the hospitality industry; the service culture; counting and measuring occupancy and sales; perishability; location; seasonality; classifying by size, type, and number of employees; rating systems; extended-stay hotels; resorts; European, American, and Continental plans; inns; bed-and-breakfasts.


Lesson 2: The Hotel Industry Today

Trends; marketing strategies; package plans including travel, events, and tourist activities; trade shows; guest profiles; group plans; marketing to individuals, families, and businesses; global operations; condominiums and time-sharing; seasonality; chains; franchises; referral systems; all-suite hotels; budget hotels; casinos; conference centers; amenities.


Lesson 3: Hotel Industry Structure

A typical hotel's organizational chart; the general manager and general staff; food and beverage staff; front office; front desk; reservations; cashiers; concierge; housekeeping; uniformed services; telephone services; security and safety; retail, concession, business, and athletic services; special and VIP services; lobby, building, and room design; scheduling work shifts.


Lesson 4: Reservations

The components of a reservation; special requests; entering, acknowledging, storing, and altering the reservation; cancellations; denying reservations; the price-occupancy mix; yield management; sales and marketing tools; working with travel agencies; in-house vs. consolidated reservations systems; last room availability; independent reservation services; computer and voice recognition systems; guest history databases; group bookings; conventions, trade shows, and tour groups; handling overflow.


Lesson 5: Forecasting

Knowing room count and availability; traditional and contemporary tracking systems; automated/computerized systems; adjusted room count; stayovers; under- and over-stays; no-shows; periodic recounts; resolving overbooking problems; legislative implications; deposits; guarantees.


Supplement: Time Management Guide

How to be more productive and efficient as a student now—and in your career later.


Lesson 6: Managing Guest Services

Concepts in quality management; guest expectations; leadership style; empowering the staff; employee relations; setting realistic house regulations; measures of guest service; quality control techniques; guarantees; working with the Americans With Disabilities Act; handling complaints; comment cards; anticipating and preventing problems.


Lesson 7: Guest Arrivals

First impressions; valet parking; door staff; registration; blocking rooms; early registrations; the registration card; collecting guest information; promoting hotel activities; liability; assigning rooms; upgrades; VIPs; arranging payment; establishing credit; bell department; luggage; room inspection.


Lesson 8: Determining Room Rate

Rack rate; discounting; daily, weekly, seasonal, commercial, corporate, senior, and complimentary rates; weather factors; single and double occupancy; setting arrival and departure times; the American Plan Resort; the Hubbard Room Rate Formula; square foot calculations; the Building Cost Formula; the Ideal Average Room Rate; up-selling.


Lesson 9: The Hotel Revenue Cycle

Receivables; ledgers; transient ledger; city ledger; what is and isn't included in the bill; recording charges; preparing, updating, and storing the folio; master accounts; split billing; casino accounts; preferred guest programs; the billing procedure; presenting the bill; taxes; allowances; transferring funds; cash transactions; advance payments; refunds; cashier procedures; foreign currency; checks; minimizing fraud.


Lesson 10: Credit & the City Ledger

Understanding the city ledger; accepting credit cards; master accounts; groups; packages; travel agencies; late charges; delinquent accounts; executive accounts; due bills; banquet charges; managing, extending, and monitoring credit; credit alerts; transferring funds from travel agencies; frequent guest programs; electronic drafts; handling bad debt.


Lesson 11: The Night Audit

Hiring night auditors; night audit duties; reconciling receivables; closing out; posting charges; anticipating errors; the transcript; proving room charges; housekeeper's report; balancing the math; reporting exceptions, credit, reservations, rooms management, room status, and receivables.


Lesson 12: Service, Sanitation & Appearance

Customer service for today and tomorrow; "management by wandering around"; the effect of poor service; the psychology of service; being ubiquitous; the nine "musts" of good service; monitoring cleanliness; handling and storing dinnerware and utensils; the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point.


Lesson 13: Place Settings and Table Service

Establishing service standards; French, American, and Russian service models; table setting layouts; placemats; tablecloths; banquets; buffets; loading, lifting, carrying, delivering, and unloading food and trays; serving order and techniques; clearing food.


Lesson 14: Styles of Service

Individual servers; team servers; the captain method; basics of waiting; wine stewards; bus personnel; establishing wait stations; room layout and mixing table sizes; preparing food at the table; ensuring staff competency; taking care of many tables at once; seniority; side duties for wait staff.


Lesson 15: Staff Training

Preparing for guests; taking the order; serving; learning the menu; working with the room layout; substitutions; cooking methods and times; serving alcohol; suggestive selling; dessert tables; where to stand; avoiding "who's the beef and who's the shrimp"; guest checks; coding; giving the order to the kitchen; timing and serving sequence; computerized systems.


Lesson 16: Dining Room Management and Organization

The host; attentiveness; courtesy; dependability; knowledge; sensitivity; skill; tact; productivity; persuasiveness; organizing the dining room; forecasting; scheduling; work shifts; menus and checks; accepting vs. not accepting reservations; blocking space; special events; call-ahead or priority seating; alleviating no-shows.


Lesson 17: Managing the Dining Experience

The seven deadly sins of dining service: apathy, the brush-off, coldness, condescension, robotism, "rule book excuses", and the runaround; greeting guests; assigning tables; reservations list; turnsheet; table check; waiting list; leading and seating guests; reciting specials; accommodating disabled customers; the log book; the perfect host.


Lesson 18: Banquets and Functions

Personal and business banquets; catering vs. banquets; staffing; manager qualifications; weddings; banquet styles; function room setup; table shapes and layouts; meetings; cocktail parties; podiums, lecterns, and microphones; advance booking tips; deposits; guarantees.


Lesson 19: The Banquet Function Sheet

The banquet sheet: key to success; getting the right information; communicating policies; understanding the function; menu planning; detail planning; types of meals; special menus; beverage service; open bar; cash bar; á la carte drinks; guarantee and set; confirming the schedule and arrangements; distributing the sheet and meeting with staff; preparing the kitchen; checking details; seating arrangements.


Lesson 20: Managing Functions

Arranging staff, equipment, and duties; planning place settings; the station, follow-up, and combination methods; cocktail parties; serving and clearing; preparing the chef; choosing entrees; buffets; traffic control; chafing dishes; keeping food hot; checkbacks; presenting the bill.


Supplement: Career Search Guide

Helpful techniques for pursuing careers in the carpentry field.


Program description: Ashworth College's Career Diploma in Hotel and Restaurant Management program is designed to teach front and back office management. Students have the opportunity to learn about guest and banquet services coordination, housekeeping, staffing and scheduling, and customer service. Courses are also intended to teach hotel industry structure, reservations, determining room rates, table service, staff training, and managing functions. Ashworth College provides students in this program with a customized lesson book, study guide, calculator, cost versus profit calculation wheel, and time management and career search guides.

Hotel and Hospitality Management Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Hotel and Hospitality Management Schools (campus and online)

New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
Purdue University-Main Campus
Total Programs 122
Number of Subjects 104
Rank in USA 81st
University of Delaware
Total Programs 159
Number of Subjects 128
Rank in USA 95th
Drexel University
Total Programs 125
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 108th
Rochester Institute of Technology
Total Programs 1
Number of Subjects 108
Rank in USA 137th
Texas Tech University
Total Programs 183
Number of Subjects 154
Rank in USA 150th
Grand Valley State University
Total Programs 103
Number of Subjects 101
Rank in USA 159th
College of Charleston
Total Programs 75
Number of Subjects 74
Rank in USA 162nd
Central Michigan University
Total Programs 186
Number of Subjects 145
Rank in USA 239th
The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Total Programs 57
Number of Subjects 71
Rank in USA 267th
Endicott College
Total Programs 44
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 288th
Rutgers University-Camden
Total Programs 57
Number of Subjects 64
Rank in USA 299th
University of Memphis
Total Programs 115
Number of Subjects 113
Rank in USA 404th
Florida Southern College
Total Programs 79
Number of Subjects 80
Rank in USA 413th
University of New Haven
Total Programs 118
Number of Subjects 106
Rank in USA 438th
North Carolina Central University
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 85
Rank in USA 545th
University of Minnesota-Crookston
Total Programs 48
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 551st
Paul Smiths College of Arts and Science
Total Programs 35
Number of Subjects 41
Rank in USA 571st