Online Human Services Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its human services courses to be successful human service workers, social workers, human services specialists, human services care specialists, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 344,050 people employed as social and human service assistants alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $29,880. Substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors make on average $40,420 per year and there are about 78,470 of them employed today.

Human Services Organizations Human Services Common Job Tasks
  • advising clients regarding food stamps, child care, food money management, sanitation, and housekeeping
  • visiting individuals in homes or attend group meetings to provide information on agency services requirements and procedures
  • overseeing day to day group activities of residents in institution
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Ranked by Excellence

Human Services Courses at Walden University

Program Name: Ph.D. in Human Services
Foundations of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8000
Credits 1.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement.


Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Counseling and Human Services Professionals
Course Number HUMN 8660
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of counselor educators to foster social change, provide leadership and service to the counseling and human service professional, and advocate for their community, clients, students, and profession. Students will use current research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling and human services profession. Students also will understand the processes of advocacy and social change. In addition, students will continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.


History and Development of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8150
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to provide a doctoral foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. It integrates information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students will review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments, students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. This course focuses on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.


Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8151
Credits 5.0

Understanding how theory, research, and practice are connected is a vital skill for the human services scholar-practitioner. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. The course culminates with the development of a conceptual framework to address a critical issue in human services practice.


Culture and Psychology
Course Number HUMN 8701
Credits 5.0

This course explores the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, this course focuses on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.


Human Services Administration
Course Number HUMN 8152
Credits 5.0

Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human service administrators need in order to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.


Advanced Social Work Theory and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8110
Credits 5.0

One of the primary focuses of social work is to promote social justice within a diverse society. This course focuses on an advanced exploration of traditional and contemporary clinical social work theories for providing culturally and contextually relevant services to individuals and families. Students examine social work theories in a way that informs clinical practice, and discuss the role of the social worker in social issues at the macro and micro levels. Students evaluate existing practices and policies with the goal of designing and implementing more effective practices and policies that positively impact the individual, the community, and society at large.


Theories and Techniques in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling
Course Number HUMN 8356
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with an advanced understanding of theories and techniques for working with couples, marriages, and families. The focus of this course is on empirically supported treatments and techniques for addressing prevention, intervention, development, and wellness of marriages, couples, and families. Systemic implications for conceptualization, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions will be addressed. Students will be exposed to procedures for critically evaluating relevant research and to methods for applying findings to their counseling with these groups. Methods of adapting models to meet the needs of a diverse society as well as legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area will be explored.


Psychology and Social Change
Course Number HUMN 8700
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on the theories of social and personal change. Topics include power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment and social change, issues related to gender and sexism, and homophobia. In addition, students are presented with impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. The concepts of change agent and change advocate are explored as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent.


Human Motivation
Course Number HUMN 8240
Credits 5.0

This course provides an overview of physiological, psychological, and social aspects in the study of motivation and includes an exploration of historical and contemporary theories and perspectives. The course emphasizes both conceptual understanding of theories associated with motivation and their applications to personal, professional, and social issues. Major topics include physiological, learned, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation. Themes of diversity are threaded throughout the course.


Organizational Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6420
Credits 5.0

Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. This course examines the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.


Research Theory, Design, and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans.


Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8200C
Credits 4.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Ethics and Social Justice
Course Number NPMG 6405
Credits 5.0

Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social-justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.


Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8300
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry; fieldwork strategies and the nature of observation; theoretical approaches to qualitative research; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical, legal, and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students use software to code data and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Writing a Quality Prospectus
Course Number COUN 8550
Credits 5.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8250C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis, and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding multivariate data analysis and applying more advanced statistical concepts. Students explore comprehensive quantitative research designs and suitable statistical tests, the importance of quality assurance, and ethical considerations and social social-change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. This course approaches statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting the appropriate research design and statistical tests for more complex research questions or problems. Students use statistical software to perform analyses and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a quantitative research plan.


Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8350C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Advanced Mixed Methods Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8450C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. The course emphasizes integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practice in data analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a truly mixed mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements.


Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector
Course Number MMPA 6431
Credits 5.0

Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Techniques of Counseling
Course Number COUN 6316
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.


Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories
Course Number COUN 6722
Credits 5.0

This course summarizes the history and explores the primary concepts of the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use. The empirical foundations of each theory are examined, and examples are supplied showing how each method is applied to clients. Limitations of each approach are also explored.


Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation
Course Number COUN 6785
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to prepare students for their roles as counselors in prevention, intervention, and consultation endeavors with specific populations in specific settings. Using an action research model, students will prepare a blueprint for a prevention, intervention, or consultation project for a community, agency, or organization.


Substance Abuse Counseling
Course Number COUN 6728
Credits 5.0

This course examines psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. Current research in the field of dependency and addiction is explored. Topics include diagnosis, models of treatment, treatment planning, use of group and family treatment plans, and efficacy of treatment. Strategies to promote change, including the transtheoretical model of behavior change, are discussed.


Program description: Make a positive impact in your community and your organization as you explore strategies to help those struggling with illness, addiction, violence, and poverty. Walden University’s Ph.D. in Human Services offers a large number of specializations that are designed to meet your needs and interests. Learn how effective policy and practice can improve the quality of life for underserved populations. Through original research, you can explore the theories, concepts, and strategies that are influential in the field today.

Specializations (in addition to the General Program)

  • Clinical Social Work
  • Criminal Justice
  • Disaster, Crisis, and Intervention
  • Family Studies and Intervention Strategies
  • Human Services Administration
  • Public Health
  • Social Policy Analysis and Planning

Program Name: B.S. in Human Services
Foundations of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8000
Credits 1.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement.


Organizational Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6420
Credits 5.0

Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. This course examines the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.


Research Theory, Design, and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans.


Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Counseling and Human Services Professionals
Course Number HUMN 8660
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of counselor educators to foster social change, provide leadership and service to the counseling and human service professional, and advocate for their community, clients, students, and profession. Students will use current research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling and human services profession. Students also will understand the processes of advocacy and social change. In addition, students will continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.


History and Development of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8150
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to provide a doctoral foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. It integrates information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students will review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments, students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. This course focuses on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.


Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8200C
Credits 4.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8151
Credits 5.0

Understanding how theory, research, and practice are connected is a vital skill for the human services scholar-practitioner. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. The course culminates with the development of a conceptual framework to address a critical issue in human services practice.


Ethics and Social Justice
Course Number NPMG 6405
Credits 5.0

Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social-justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.


Culture and Psychology
Course Number HUMN 8701
Credits 5.0

This course explores the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, this course focuses on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.


Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8300
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry; fieldwork strategies and the nature of observation; theoretical approaches to qualitative research; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical, legal, and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students use software to code data and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Human Services Administration
Course Number HUMN 8152
Credits 5.0

Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human service administrators need in order to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.


Writing a Quality Prospectus
Course Number COUN 8550
Credits 5.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8350C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector
Course Number MMPA 6431
Credits 5.0

Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.


Techniques of Counseling
Course Number COUN 6316
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Program description: Gain the skills you need to help individuals and communities in need with the B.S. in Human Services from Walden University. With coursework in crisis and intervention, conflict resolution, and case management, this program can position you to pursue a career advocating for people in need.

Concentrations

  • Child and Adolescent Development
  • Courts and the Legal System
  • Criminal Justice
  • Criminal Studies
  • Global Social Justice and Civic Engagement
  • Leadership and Administration
  • Psychology
  • Self-Designed

Program Name: Ph.D. in Health Services
Foundations of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8000
Credits 1.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement.


History and Development of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8150
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to provide a doctoral foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. It integrates information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students will review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments, students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. This course focuses on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.


Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8151
Credits 5.0

Understanding how theory, research, and practice are connected is a vital skill for the human services scholar-practitioner. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. The course culminates with the development of a conceptual framework to address a critical issue in human services practice.


Human Services Administration
Course Number HUMN 8152
Credits 5.0

Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human service administrators need in order to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.


Organizational Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6420
Credits 5.0

Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. This course examines the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.


Research Theory, Design, and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans.


Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Counseling and Human Services Professionals
Course Number HUMN 8660
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of counselor educators to foster social change, provide leadership and service to the counseling and human service professional, and advocate for their community, clients, students, and profession. Students will use current research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling and human services profession. Students also will understand the processes of advocacy and social change. In addition, students will continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.


Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8200C
Credits 4.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Ethics and Social Justice
Course Number NPMG 6405
Credits 5.0

Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social-justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.


Culture and Psychology
Course Number HUMN 8701
Credits 5.0

This course explores the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, this course focuses on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.


Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8300
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry; fieldwork strategies and the nature of observation; theoretical approaches to qualitative research; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical, legal, and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students use software to code data and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Writing a Quality Prospectus
Course Number COUN 8550
Credits 5.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8250C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis, and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding multivariate data analysis and applying more advanced statistical concepts. Students explore comprehensive quantitative research designs and suitable statistical tests, the importance of quality assurance, and ethical considerations and social social-change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. This course approaches statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting the appropriate research design and statistical tests for more complex research questions or problems. Students use statistical software to perform analyses and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a quantitative research plan.


Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8350C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Advanced Mixed Methods Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8450C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. The course emphasizes integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practice in data analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a truly mixed mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements.


Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector
Course Number MMPA 6431
Credits 5.0

Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Historical and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number MMPA 6450
Credits 5.0

This course looks at the evolution of crime—from lone criminals to worldwide syndicates—using the scientific rigor built into the selected readings and discussions.


Treatment of Forensic Populations
Course Number FPSY 6511
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.


Juvenile Justice, Delinquency, and Development
Course Number FPSY 6512
Credits 5.0

The focus of this course is on the various aspects of the juvenile justice system and the population that it serves. As such, a thorough understanding of normal juvenile development is provided as a backdrop in which to better apply current juvenile justice codes and case law. The changing landscape of the juvenile justice field based on current research with its population will be covered.


Forensic Applications in Community Settings
Course Number FPSY 6530
Credits 5.0

This course is directed at the application of forensic psychology to various community settings. An emphasis is placed on working with offenders upon re-entry to the community and offenders who receive nonincarceration community placements. However, this course will also explore less-common applications such as restorative justice and community crime prevention.


Policy Analysis in the Criminal Justice System
Course Number MMPA 6452
Credits 5.0

This course reviews key court decisions and explores the tension between constitutionally guaranteed individual rights and crime-prevention and public-safety efforts.


Leadership: Putting Theory into Practice in Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number MMPA 6453
Credits 5.0

This course introduces students to the problems that currently confront the administration of the criminal justice system, as well as problems predicted for the future. So that students are prepared to lead efforts to address these challenges, this course offers powerful models for strategic, critical, and reflective thinking.


Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness
Course Number MMPA 6346
Credits 5.0

This course provides participants with an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include, but are not limited to, terrorism overview, terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyberterrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure.


Program description: Through Walden’s Ph.D. in Health Services program you can prepare for a leadership role in the in-demand field of healthcare. Expand your understanding of current health legislation, policy, and ethics and how they affect the nation’s healthcare system. Combine your interests in health services and public health and broaden your career options in public and private healthcare organizations.

Specializations

  • Community Health Education and Advocacy
  • Healthcare Administration
  • Leadership
  • Public Health Policy
  • Self-Designed

Program Name: Ph.D. in Public Health
Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis / Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis / Advanced Mixed Methods Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8250 / RSCH 8350 / RSCH 8450
Credits 4.0

Rsch 8250: This Research Course Builds Upon Knowledge And Skills Acquired In Rsch 8200 Quantitative Reasoning And Analysis And Provides Experience Applying Them. It Provides Students With More Specialized Knowledge And Skills For Designing Quantitative Research At The Doctoral Level, Including Understanding Multivariate Data Analysis And Applying More Advanced Statistical Concepts. Students Explore Comprehensive Quantitative Research Designs And Suitable Statistical Tests, The Importance Of Quality Assurance, And Ethical Considerations And Social Change Implications Of Conducting Quantitative Research And Producing Knowledge. This Course Approaches Statistics From A Problem-solving Perspective With Emphasis On Selecting The Appropriate Research Design And Statistical Tests For More Complex Research Questions Or Problems. Students Use Statistical Software To Perform Analyses And Interpret And Present Results. Students Will Apply And Synthesize Their Knowledge And Skills By Developing A Quantitative Research Plan. (prerequisites: Rsch 8200.) Rsch 8350: This Research Course Builds Upon Knowledge And Skills Acquired In Rsch 8300 Qualitative Reasoning And Analysis And Provides Experience Applying Them. It Provides Students With More Specialized Knowledge And Skills Within Each Of The Common Qualitative Traditions For Designing Qualitative Research At The Doctoral Level. Students Explore More Complex Qualitative Research Designs And Analyses; Multiple Approaches To Coding And Organizing Data; Core Components Of A Qualitative Write-up; The Importance Of Quality Assurance; And The Ethical Considerations And Social Change Implications Of Conducting Qualitative Research And Producing Knowledge. Students Will Apply And Synthesize Their Knowledge And Skills By Developing A Qualitative Research Plan. (prerequisites: Rsch 8300.) Rsch 8450: This Research Course Builds Upon Knowledge And Skills Acquired In Rsch 8200 Quantitative Reasoning And Analysis And 8300 Qualitative Reasoning And Analysis. It Provides Students With More Specialized Knowledge And Skills For Designing Mixed-methods Research At The Doctoral Level. Students Gain An Understanding Of The Types Of Mixed-methods Designs And How To Select The Most Appropriate Approach For The Research Question. The Course Emphasizes Integrating Quantitative And Qualitative Elements Into True Mixed-methods Studies, Practice In Data Analysis, And Integration Of Qualitative And Quantitative Data Within A Research Write-up. Reliability And Validity In Mixed-methods Approaches Will Be Highlighted. Students Will Apply And Synthesize Their Knowledge And Skills By Developing A Truly Mixed-methods Research Plan That Appropriately Incorporates Qualitative And Quantitative Elements. (prerequisites: Rsch 8200 And Rsch 8300.)


Introduction to Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling
Course Number HUMN 8202
Credits 5.0

This course introduces students to the specialty area of marriage, couple, and family counseling. Students are provided an orientation to professional organizations, preparation standards, and credentials relevant to the specialty area. Through this course, students will be exposed to the history, philosophy, and trends in marriage, couple, and family counseling. A variety of theoretical perspectives, techniques, and related concepts (e.g., systems, family development, wellness, and family life cycle) are reviewed. Societal trends and treatment issues related to working with multicultural and diverse family systems are explored. Legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area are addressed.


Specialization Course
Course Number HUMN XXXX
Credits 4.0

no description


Foundations of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8000
Credits 1.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement.


Organizational Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6420
Credits 5.0

Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. This course examines the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.


Research Theory, Design, and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans.


Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Counseling and Human Services Professionals
Course Number HUMN 8660
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of counselor educators to foster social change, provide leadership and service to the counseling and human service professional, and advocate for their community, clients, students, and profession. Students will use current research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling and human services profession. Students also will understand the processes of advocacy and social change. In addition, students will continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.


History and Development of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8150
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to provide a doctoral foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. It integrates information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students will review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments, students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. This course focuses on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.


Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8200C
Credits 4.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8151
Credits 5.0

Understanding how theory, research, and practice are connected is a vital skill for the human services scholar-practitioner. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. The course culminates with the development of a conceptual framework to address a critical issue in human services practice.


Ethics and Social Justice
Course Number NPMG 6405
Credits 5.0

Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social-justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.


Culture and Psychology
Course Number HUMN 8701
Credits 5.0

This course explores the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, this course focuses on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.


Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8300
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry; fieldwork strategies and the nature of observation; theoretical approaches to qualitative research; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical, legal, and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students use software to code data and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Human Services Administration
Course Number HUMN 8152
Credits 5.0

Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human service administrators need in order to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.


Writing a Quality Prospectus
Course Number COUN 8550
Credits 5.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector
Course Number MMPA 6431
Credits 5.0

Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Program description: Gain an understanding of the medical, social, ethical, and economic factors that affect community health through Walden’s Ph.D. in Public Health program. This research-focused program gives you access to a diverse network of experienced faculty and students, preparing you with the tools you need to influence social policy. Position yourself to pursue leadership positions in academia or roles in the public or private sector.

Specializations (in addition to the General Program)

  • Community Health Education
  • Epidemiology

Program Name: Master of Healthcare Administration (M.H.A.)
Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis OR Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis OR Advanced Mixed Methods Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8250 OR RSCH 8350 OR RSCH 8450
Credits 4.0

This Research Course Builds Upon Knowledge And Skills Acquired In Rsch 8200 Quantitative Reasoning And Analysis And 8300 Qualitative Reasoning And Analysis. It Provides Students With More Specialized Knowledge And Skills For Designing Mixed-methods Research At The Doctoral Level. Students Gain An Understanding Of The Types Of Mixed-methods Designs And How To Select The Most Appropriate Approach For The Research Question. The Course Emphasizes Integrating Quantitative And Qualitative Elements Into True Mixed-methods Studies, Practice In Data Analysis, And Integration Of Qualitative And Quantitative Data Within A Research Write-up. Reliability And Validity In Mixed-methods Approaches Will Be Highlighted. Students Will Apply And Synthesize Their Knowledge And Skills By Developing A Truly Mixed-methods Research Plan That Appropriately Incorporates Qualitative And Quantitative Elements. (prerequisites: Rsch 8200 And Rsch 8300.)


Leadership Development
Course Number HUMN 8750
Credits 5.0

Great leadership is enhanced by an understanding of the psychological principles of leader development. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the psychology of leadership and leader development. Topics include psychological theories of leadership, leadership styles, qualities of great leaders, and instruments used to assess leadership and leadership potential. Students apply psychological theories to understanding their own capacity for leadership.


Strategic Talent Management and Development
Course Number HUMN 8213
Credits 5.0

This course explores how to leverage people in organizations to achieve business success and how to leverage business strategy to foster individual growth. Topics include talent acquisition and retention, workforce and succession planning, organizational communication, leadership, and performance management. Applications include the preparation of a strategic talent management and development audit and the development of an overall talent management and development strategy.


Leadership Coaching: Process and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8751
Credits 5.0

The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. Topics include coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students develop a plan for implementing coaching in a real-world setting.


Leadership Coaching: Application
Course Number HUMN 8752
Credits 5.0

Effective leadership coaches must be fully capable of working with clients immersed in different organizational cultures that present unique challenges. In this course, students apply models, approaches, and frameworks; individual and team coaching strategies; and ethical guidelines to case studies related to coaching for leadership development. Students also examine characteristics, factors, and conditions that influence the effectiveness of coaching; assessment and evaluation; diversity considerations; and professional issues and challenges.


Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World
Course Number HUMN 8776
Credits 5.0

This course engages students in collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students learn a pragmatic action learning process for learning from the experience of transformative change in complex systems. The dynamics of complex adaptive systems are studied to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change are studied and applied to a positive organizational change situation of special interest to the students. Students also develop professional action habits for pragmatic action learning in the practice of public administration.


Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership
Course Number HUMN 8785
Credits 5.0

This course engages learners in collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Learners apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise model of the public organization of their choice, as a way of understanding the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. This is an organization “mental model,” which is similar to a traditional “business model,” but which includes the three interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence. Emphasis in this course is on management and leading of the unknown—imagining and creating a future that works in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students apply strategic scenarios to organizational change for the public organization of special interest to them. Students also develop professional action habits for pragmatic action learning in the practice of public administration.


Foundations of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8000
Credits 1.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement.


Organizational Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6420
Credits 5.0

Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. This course examines the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.


Research Theory, Design, and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans.


Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Counseling and Human Services Professionals
Course Number HUMN 8660
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of counselor educators to foster social change, provide leadership and service to the counseling and human service professional, and advocate for their community, clients, students, and profession. Students will use current research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling and human services profession. Students also will understand the processes of advocacy and social change. In addition, students will continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.


History and Development of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8150
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to provide a doctoral foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. It integrates information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students will review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments, students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. This course focuses on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.


Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8200C
Credits 4.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8151
Credits 5.0

Understanding how theory, research, and practice are connected is a vital skill for the human services scholar-practitioner. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. The course culminates with the development of a conceptual framework to address a critical issue in human services practice.


Ethics and Social Justice
Course Number NPMG 6405
Credits 5.0

Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social-justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.


Culture and Psychology
Course Number HUMN 8701
Credits 5.0

This course explores the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, this course focuses on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.


Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8300
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry; fieldwork strategies and the nature of observation; theoretical approaches to qualitative research; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical, legal, and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students use software to code data and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Human Services Administration
Course Number HUMN 8152
Credits 5.0

Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human service administrators need in order to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.


Writing a Quality Prospectus
Course Number COUN 8550
Credits 5.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector
Course Number MMPA 6431
Credits 5.0

Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Specialization Course
Course Number HUMN XXXX
Credits 4.0

no description


Human Motivation
Course Number HUMN 8240
Credits 5.0

This course provides an overview of physiological, psychological, and social aspects in the study of motivation and includes an exploration of historical and contemporary theories and perspectives. The course emphasizes both conceptual understanding of theories associated with motivation and their applications to personal, professional, and social issues. Major topics include physiological, learned, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation. Themes of diversity are threaded throughout the course.


Leadership and Organizational Change
Course Number HLTH 8111
Credits 5.0

Successful public sector organizations require high-caliber leaders who are accountable to multiple constituencies. A rapidly accelerating rate of change and blurring of organizational boundaries contribute to the need for leaders who are equipped to meet the challenge. This course explores the theoretical underpinnings of leadership and the important role of the leader in organizational change. By exploring leadership theory, current research, and practice within an area of public administration or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, students will demonstrate their understanding of leadership in organizations that are increasingly complex in nature. Ethical dimensions, boundary-spanning functions, and how leaders influence positive social change are key factors of this course. The course draws on historical and current events, and the personal experiences of students, to examine the demands of leadership.


Program description: Gain insight into the laws, regulations, court decisions, and health policies that impact service providers through Walden’s Master of Healthcare Administration (M.H.A.) program. Learn the core competencies and best practices of the profession, including financial management, strategic planning, and economic analysis. Build a solid foundation in healthcare management through our high-quality, relevant curriculum developed in collaboration with leading healthcare experts.

Human Services Courses at Post University

Program Name: M.S. in Human Services
Introduction to Public Administration
Course Number MMPA 6200
Credits 5.0

Public administrators work to increase the effectiveness of government and organizations locally and internationally. This course explores the history, foundations, and theories of public administration and the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which they exist and builds an understanding of public policy and organizational environments. Topics include ethical and legal issues, governance, fiscal planning, and current topics and trends in public administration. Students choose a public organization, examine its overall history, purpose, and operation, and apply public administration theory to describe its operation and health.


Foundations for Graduate Study
Course Number MMPA 6115
Credits 1.0

This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals, development of the program of study, strategies for online success, introduction to the online library, and an introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence.


Ethics and Social Justice
Course Number MMPA 6405
Credits 5.0

Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.


Organizational Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6420
Credits 5.0

Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. This course examines the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.


Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector
Course Number MMPA 6431
Credits 5.0

Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.


Human Resource Management: Building a Capable Workforce
Course Number MMPA 6435
Credits 5.0

The acquisition, development, and retention of talent are critical to the success of any organization. This course examines theories, approaches, and systems related to the acquisition, management, development, and retention of employees in government and nonprofit organizations. Students explore topics including legal and ethical considerations, diversity, performance management, technology, conflict management, and the establishment and implementation of policies through the use of case studies. Students apply principles learned in this course to situations encountered in public, private, and nonprofit organizations.


Public Sector Economics
Course Number MMPA 6461
Credits 5.0

The economy affects every aspect of daily life. In this course students gain an understanding of public sector economics at the local, state, and national levels. Topics include the role of the government in the market economy including the government's redistributive role; factors affecting the economy; sources of government revenue; the relationship of public goods and the economy; programs and services funded by the government; alternative forms of delivery of programs and services; and the interaction and interconnectedness of the US and global economy. Students apply concepts, processes, and systems related to public sector economics to a specific government program or service.


Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination
Course Number MMPA 6465
Credits 5.0

In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in their planning in order to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. This course explores the role and process of strategic planning with an appreciation for collaboration, cooperation and coordination as they relate to the strategic planning process. Students will apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations and develop a strategic plan.


Public Policy Analysis
Course Number MMPA 6451
Credits 5.0

Public administrators today work in a hypercharged, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data. This challenging environment affords public administrators both extraordinary opportunities and severe constraints. This course examines in detail, the key stakeholders and actors in the public policy process with particular attention devoted to understanding the functions, impacts, and constraints of these stakeholders upon policy development and the policy making process. In addition the course explores professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and considers the significant social outcomes of public policy. It provides an introduction to the theories and strategies used by policymakers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. Students explore the impact and consequences of public policy and consider and evaluate policy in a social justice framework. . Students craft a policy memorandum to a decision maker of their choosing regarding a current public policy problem that examines and evaluates competing policy alternatives.


Applied Research and Evaluation Methods
Course Number MMPA 6480
Credits 5.0

Organizational credibility, community trust, and fundraising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration program effectiveness and success. This course introduces research and evaluation methods in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Students examine models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods; and the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity. Students critically evaluate sample research using these parameters.


Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6390
Credits 5.0

This course engages learners in collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Learners apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise model of the public organization of their choice, as a way of understanding the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. This is an organization “mental model,” which is similar to a traditional “business model” but which includes the three interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence. Emphasis in this course is on management and leading of the unknown—imagining and creating a future that works in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students apply strategic scenarios to organizational change for the public organization of special interest to them. Students also develop professional action habits for pragmatic action learning in the practice of public administration.


Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World
Course Number MMPA 6391
Credits 5.0

This course engages students in collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students are taught a pragmatic action learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. The dynamics of complex adaptive systems are studied to gain an understanding of how large scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change are studied and applied to a positive organizational change situation of special interest to the students. Students also develop professional action habits for pragmatic action learning in the practice of public administration.


The Language of Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6392
Credits 5.0

In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. Dynamic leadership requires understanding and use of techniques that affect both conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Effective communication connects at many different levels. This course provides both theoretical and practical information; demonstrates the necessary components for making such connections; and shows why stories, symbols, and metaphors are an essential element in the language of leadership.


Program description: With Post University Online, you can earn your Master of Science in Human Services in as little as 18 months. The Master of Science in Human Services is a 37-credit hour program designed to meet the educational needs of individuals who seek to advance their skills and career options or seek employment in a wide variety of human service positions.

Courses are offered in 8-week modules, six times a year, and students may complete their degree by taking courses completely online or during evening hours and weekends at one of four locations in Connecticut.

The program allows students to acquire the conceptual, analytical, and operational knowledge to assume new or more advanced positions in the field of human services. Course content is focused around an essential core of learning experiences and skill sets and provides three specializations:

Human Service Program Administration

Clinical Counseling within Organizational Settings

Alcohol & Drug Counseling

Program Name: M.S. in Human Services / Clinical Specialization
Sociology of Human Services
Course Number HSV500
Credits 3.0

An inquiry into the nature of social problems and a consideration of the efficacy of social service interventions and programs


Human Services Ethics and Diversity
Course Number HSV502
Credits 3.0

Consideration of theoretical and practical standards for ethically dealing with individuals and information about them in a multicultural framework within a variety of human service settings


Human Development through the Lifecycle
Course Number HSV504
Credits 3.0

Examination of theories that are important to the study of lifespan development. Approaches to physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development throughout the lifespan will be examined with a focus on the influence of context and culture on human development


Human Services Policy
Course Number HSV510
Credits 3.0

A current examination of the social and public policies that impact the human service organization. The course will address how human service organizations design, implement, and manage human service programs in response to the political environment and changes in the social environment


Applied Research Methods in Human Services
Course Number HSV512
Credits 3.0

An overview of frequently used research designs and quantitative and qualitative methods. Prepares students to apply theoretical understanding of methodology and measurement to develop analytical and research skills. Prepares students to evaluate relevant research studies in their field, analyze Human Service data with appropriate statistics and apply research methodologies to real world problems in their work settings


Field Practicum I
Course Number HSV593
Credits 3.0

A two-module field placement designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of specialization. In addition to working in two field settings for a total of 360 hours, students are required to attend three online seminars for the first module of each field practicum. You are also required to contact your academic advisor prior to registering for these courses to insure that you have taken the necessary steps to secure a field placement prior to beginning these courses


Field Practicum II
Course Number HSV594
Credits 3.0

A two-module field placement designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of specialization. In addition to working in two field settings for a total of 360 hours, students are required to attend three online seminars for the first module of each field practicum. You are also required to contact your academic advisor prior to registering for these courses to insure that you have taken the necessary steps to secure a field placement prior to beginning these courses


Readings, Research & Planning
Course Number HSV598
Credits 3.0

In this course, students will apply an action research approach to the development of an applied research project proposal. Students will be required to design practiced-based projects based on the application of human services principles to specific real-life problems to demonstrate theory applied to practice. Based on an “area of interests” statement created at the culmination of HSV512 and a comprehensive literature search, students will submit a research proposal for review and approval


Human Services Graduate Capstone Experience
Course Number HSV599
Credits 3.0

This course represents the final, capstone experience for students ready to complete requirements toward an MS degree in Human Services. It takes the form of a comprehensive examination covering material from all core and specialization track courses required by the program. Students will be asked to submit responses to eight items, five essay questions covering core courses and three case studies or essays in their area of specialization (i.e., clinical or management). Successful completion of this course will lead to graduation from the program


Theories of Counseling
Course Number HSV520
Credits 3.0

This course provides an overview of counseling theory and fosters the development of basic counseling skills. The focus is establishing a rapport, developing a therapeutic alliance, and conceptualizing strategies for intervention. The clinical application of theory will be explored through case studies, role-play, and class discussions


Family Systems Theory
Course Number HSV521
Credits 3.0

Introduces the student to the field of family therapy and systems thinking. Includes the skills necessary to begin clinical work with a family. Includes the major theoretical approaches to family intervention required to conceptualize, assess, and treat family systems


Group Theory
Course Number HSV522
Credits 3.0

This course presents a theoretical and experiential of group processes and counseling techniques. Students develop the skills and abilities required to facilitate cognitive, emotional, and behavioral change in-group settings


Psychopathology and Psychological Assessment
Course Number HSV524
Credits 3.0

Students will explore the emotional, cognitive, somatic, and behavioral symptoms of mental disturbances. This course includes the introduction of testing and measurement devices that emphasizes clinical assessment applications


Statistics
Course Number MAT220
Credits 3.0

This course acquaints students with the fundamentals of modern statistics. It includes basic concepts of descriptive statistics and inferences about the mean, proportion, and variance of one population. The course also includes an introduction to probability and to linear correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT120 or placement examination.


Program description: Post University's Master of Science in Human Services with a concentration in Clinical Counseling is designed to meet the educational needs of individuals who seek to advance their skills and career options or seek employment in this growing field

Program Name: M.S. in Human Services / Management Specialization
Statistics
Course Number MAT220
Credits 3.0

This course acquaints students with the fundamentals of modern statistics. It includes basic concepts of descriptive statistics and inferences about the mean, proportion, and variance of one population. The course also includes an introduction to probability and to linear correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT120 or placement examination.


Sociology of Human Services
Course Number HSV500
Credits 3.0

An inquiry into the nature of social problems and a consideration of the efficacy of social service interventions and programs


Human Services Ethics and Diversity
Course Number HSV502
Credits 3.0

Consideration of theoretical and practical standards for ethically dealing with individuals and information about them in a multicultural framework within a variety of human service settings


Human Development through the Lifecycle
Course Number HSV504
Credits 3.0

Examination of theories that are important to the study of lifespan development. Approaches to physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development throughout the lifespan will be examined with a focus on the influence of context and culture on human development


Human Services Policy
Course Number HSV510
Credits 3.0

A current examination of the social and public policies that impact the human service organization. The course will address how human service organizations design, implement, and manage human service programs in response to the political environment and changes in the social environment


Applied Research Methods in Human Services
Course Number HSV512
Credits 3.0

An overview of frequently used research designs and quantitative and qualitative methods. Prepares students to apply theoretical understanding of methodology and measurement to develop analytical and research skills. Prepares students to evaluate relevant research studies in their field, analyze Human Service data with appropriate statistics and apply research methodologies to real world problems in their work settings


Field Practicum I & II
Course Number HSV590 & 591
Credits 2.0

Two field placements designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of concentration. In addition to working a minimum of 120 hours per placement in a field setting, students are required to attend scheduled seminars.


Readings, Research & Planning
Course Number HSV598
Credits 3.0

In this course, students will apply an action research approach to the development of an applied research project proposal. Students will be required to design practiced-based projects based on the application of human services principles to specific real-life problems to demonstrate theory applied to practice. Based on an “area of interests” statement created at the culmination of HSV512 and a comprehensive literature search, students will submit a research proposal for review and approval


Human Services Graduate Capstone Experience
Course Number HSV599
Credits 3.0

This course represents the final, capstone experience for students ready to complete requirements toward an MS degree in Human Services. It takes the form of a comprehensive examination covering material from all core and specialization track courses required by the program. Students will be asked to submit responses to eight items, five essay questions covering core courses and three case studies or essays in their area of specialization (i.e., clinical or management). Successful completion of this course will lead to graduation from the program


Economic Foundations of Applied Accounting and Finance
Course Number BUS501
Credits 3.0

This Course Covers The Fundamental Concepts Of Finance, Financial Accounting, And Economics, Including Opportunity Cost, The Time Value Of Money, And Financial Analysis. This Course Also Includes An Investigation Of Financial Decision Making As It Applies To Business, Government, And Not-for-profit Organizations. Emphasis Is On The Application Of Financial And Nonfinancial Information To A Wide Range Of Management Decisions, From Product Pricing And Budgeting To Project Analysis And Performance Measurement. Students Will Learn Applications For A Variety Of Decision-making Tools (such As Break-even Analysis, Activity-based Costing Procedures, Linear Programming, Discounted Cash Flow Techniques, And The Balanced Scorecard). Contemporary Managerial Techniques Will Be Explored Such As Target Costing And Kaizen Costing As A Means Of Improving Operational Efficiency And Economies. Graduate Level Course To Supplement Fin301, Eco201, And Acc111


Organizational Creativity, Discovery, and Innovation
Course Number BUS505
Credits 3.0

Students explore the motivations involved in innovation both internal to the individual and external to the organization. The course provides strong focus on the creative process in a team environment, including managing and leading knowledge workers. Course content exposes students to the varied approaches and results of the creative process across disciplines such as psychology, marketing, leadership and general management.


The Future of Management and Leadership II
Course Number BUS508
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide an overview of, and insights into management and leadership. Distinguishing between these two important concepts, and then providing a historical perspective will provide context to current management and leadership models as well as best practices and trends for the future. The course will focus on necessary basics such as decision-making and the use of analytics, vision development and deployment, communication, empowerment, risk-taking, managing conflict and leading innovation. The course will also look into other critical areas of management and leadership such as leading in a hyper-connected society, emotional intelligence, and thinking systemically and strategically, all in pursuit of managing and leading for the future.


Financial Modeling
Course Number BUS510
Credits 3.0

This course examines the fundamental principles of financial modeling techniques and introduces practical tools for financial decision-making in both entrepreneurial and innovative business environments. Students will build flexible financial models, which allow in-depth analysis to evaluate options and make informed recommendations. The class sessions will include exercises and implementation of modeling techniques. Assignments will require students to evaluate a business situation and make and support their decision based on their analysis. Because of the hands-on nature of the course, it is assumed that participants have a general knowledge of finance and accounting as well as a basic knowledge of spreadsheets.


Business Strategy and Planning
Course Number BUS525
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on application of key strategic and managerial approaches necessary to implement the strategy of a firm in a changing world. It examines and discusses how firms develop and implement business, functional, and technology strategies. Emphasis is placed on the vision of the firm, the strategic planning process, and strategic management.


Project Management
Course Number BUS530
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on one of the major growth areas in the field of management, the topic of project management. Projects are defined as temporary endeavors undertaken to create a unique product or service. The course points out that recent interest in project management is based on recognition that many organizational tasks do not fit neatly into business-as-usual. The significant differences between project management and general management are overviewed. The three interrelated objectives of budget, schedule, and specifications are also introduced. The course emphasizes scheduling various projects and concludes with a discussion of monitoring control and learning from projects. The course will also cover benchmarking, quantitative analysis and the voice of the customer. The design of the course involves case discussion, lectures, and problem solving as the primary vehicle for learning. In addition, a project is due at the end of the term, to give the class a laboratory in which the critical thinking skills, which will be sharpened in the class, can be used to initialize and analyze various projects. The class will use computer tools to track projects.


Leadership and Change Management
Course Number BUS660
Credits 3.0

No description available.


Unleashing and Sustaining Innovation in Organizations
Course Number BUS665
Credits 3.0

No description available.


Program description: Post University's MS in Human Services is intended to prepare you for a wide variety of social and human services jobs. It is available online or at the Waterbury, CT campus. Designed for students who already have bachelor's degrees, the rigorous curriculum provides the theoretical, analytical, and practical knowledge that graduates need to obtain the human services careers of their choice. The program emphasizes fundamental skills in the field, and additionally offers two specializations:
Human service program administration
Clinical counseling in organizational settings
Regardless of specialization, all MHS graduates are expected to build an in-depth understanding of human behavior, ranging from individual and group interactions to the behavior of organizations, communities, and societies as a whole. The MHS coursework emphasizes the intricacy and interconnectedness of human problems, social and cultural pressures, national policies, and the demands of organized employment.
Core coursework in the program includes:

Sociology
Ethics & diversity
Human development
Policy
Applied research
Students in the clinical track will study theories of counseling, family systems, group therapy, and psychopathology. In the management track, students will learn about information technology, HR and financial management of human services organizations, as well as organizational development.
MHS students and alumni are committed to the core values of the human services industry. Students learn about its history and ethical standards; they develop awareness of their own personal principles and learn to develop a sympathetic understanding of their clients' values, everyday lives, and goals. Graduates are familiar with the primary methods of intervention, rehabilitation, and industry-competent problem analysis, and they have the skills to prepare, implement, and assess these strategies.
What particularly differentiates the MHS program from bachelor-level human services degrees is its focus on the organizational and managerial skills vital to the successful operation of human service programs. Graduate students will master the basics of grant writing, personnel management, budgeting, and relevant technology

Program Name: M.S. in Human Services - Alcohol and Drug Counseling
Biology of Addiction
Course Number HSV530
Credits 3.0

This course will cover the biological effects of alcohol and drugs on human organ systems, particularly the nervous, digestive, excretory and reproductive systems. The course will also discuss the psychopharmacology of addictions and related medical consequences, such as AIDS/HIV and Hepatitis C. In addition, the course will cover the psychological and sociological consequences associated with these conditions. Furthermore, the use of drugs in both therapeutic and pathologic situations will be explored and general modalities of recovery will be discussed.


Theories of Alcohol & Drug Counseling
Course Number HSV532
Credits 3.0

This course will cover the study of current treatment modalities essential in drug and alcohol abuse or dependency counseling. Current treatment modalities such as the Matrix Model, Motivational Interviewing, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will be explored. The course will also cover additional treatment theories, implications, and options that are critical to effective addictions treatment. The various stages of recovery and effective treatment methods based on length of sobriety will be explored.


Psychopathology of Addiction
Course Number HSV534
Credits 3.0

The course will provide a basic historical perspective of drug and alcohol abuse and/or dependence along with the descriptions of biological, psychological, and sociological factors that comprise the disease of addiction. This course will also cover the assessment and diagnosis of addictions in addition to exploring common psychological disorders which often complicate treatment efforts. Disorders such as depression, anxiety, in addition to personality disorders, will be explored in order to provide a general framework for working with often challenging cases.


Group and Family Treatment in Addictions
Course Number HSV536
Credits 3.0

This course will cover a variety of treatment modalities that are used in addictions treatment settings. Treatment modalities that are provided in both a restricted and unrestricted environment will be discussed. Present modalities that include group, family, and self-help treatment for both adults and adolescents will be explored. Differences in court-ordered and voluntary treatment will also be examined to provide for a basic understanding of the common treatment modalities being offered today.


Statistics
Course Number MAT220
Credits 3.0

This course acquaints students with the fundamentals of modern statistics. It includes basic concepts of descriptive statistics and inferences about the mean, proportion, and variance of one population. The course also includes an introduction to probability and to linear correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT120 or placement examination.


Sociology of Human Services
Course Number HSV500
Credits 3.0

An inquiry into the nature of social problems and a consideration of the efficacy of social service interventions and programs


Human Services Ethics and Diversity
Course Number HSV502
Credits 3.0

Consideration of theoretical and practical standards for ethically dealing with individuals and information about them in a multicultural framework within a variety of human service settings


Human Development through the Lifecycle
Course Number HSV504
Credits 3.0

Examination of theories that are important to the study of lifespan development. Approaches to physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development throughout the lifespan will be examined with a focus on the influence of context and culture on human development


Human Services Policy
Course Number HSV510
Credits 3.0

A current examination of the social and public policies that impact the human service organization. The course will address how human service organizations design, implement, and manage human service programs in response to the political environment and changes in the social environment


Applied Research Methods in Human Services
Course Number HSV512
Credits 3.0

An overview of frequently used research designs and quantitative and qualitative methods. Prepares students to apply theoretical understanding of methodology and measurement to develop analytical and research skills. Prepares students to evaluate relevant research studies in their field, analyze Human Service data with appropriate statistics and apply research methodologies to real world problems in their work settings


Field Practicum I
Course Number HSV593
Credits 3.0

A two-module field placement designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of specialization. In addition to working in two field settings for a total of 360 hours, students are required to attend three online seminars for the first module of each field practicum. You are also required to contact your academic advisor prior to registering for these courses to insure that you have taken the necessary steps to secure a field placement prior to beginning these courses


Field Practicum II
Course Number HSV594
Credits 3.0

A two-module field placement designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of specialization. In addition to working in two field settings for a total of 360 hours, students are required to attend three online seminars for the first module of each field practicum. You are also required to contact your academic advisor prior to registering for these courses to insure that you have taken the necessary steps to secure a field placement prior to beginning these courses


Readings, Research & Planning
Course Number HSV598
Credits 3.0

In this course, students will apply an action research approach to the development of an applied research project proposal. Students will be required to design practiced-based projects based on the application of human services principles to specific real-life problems to demonstrate theory applied to practice. Based on an “area of interests” statement created at the culmination of HSV512 and a comprehensive literature search, students will submit a research proposal for review and approval


Human Services Graduate Capstone Experience
Course Number HSV599
Credits 3.0

This course represents the final, capstone experience for students ready to complete requirements toward an MS degree in Human Services. It takes the form of a comprehensive examination covering material from all core and specialization track courses required by the program. Students will be asked to submit responses to eight items, five essay questions covering core courses and three case studies or essays in their area of specialization (i.e., clinical or management). Successful completion of this course will lead to graduation from the program


Program description: Post University's Master of Science in Human Services with a specialization in Alcohol & Drug Counseling is designed to meet the educational needs of individuals who seek to advance their skills and career options or seek employment in this growing field. Students can become certified Alcohol & Drug Counselors by completing the Master of Human Services degree program with a Alcohol & Drug Counseling specialization and fulfilling all state requirements.

The objectives of the program are to provide:

An understanding of the complex issues regarding alcohol and drug addiction within American society on both a micro and macro level including multicultural issues and ethical considerations.
Background on the biological, psychological, and sociological effects either short and/or long term use of substances has on the individual, family system, community, or society.
A comprehensive view of the most current assessment, diagnosis, and treatment modalities in the field of addictions including individual, group, self-help, and/or psychopharmacology methods.
Access to an array of educational experiences that help you meet the minimum educational requirements for licensure or certification specified by the state of Connecticut.

Program Name: M.S. in Human Services / Clinical Counseling
Field Practicum I & II
Course Number HSV590 & 591
Credits 2.0

Two field placements designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of concentration. In addition to working a minimum of 120 hours per placement in a field setting, students are required to attend scheduled seminars.


Statistics
Course Number MAT220
Credits 3.0

This course acquaints students with the fundamentals of modern statistics. It includes basic concepts of descriptive statistics and inferences about the mean, proportion, and variance of one population. The course also includes an introduction to probability and to linear correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT120 or placement examination.


Sociology of Human Services
Course Number HSV500
Credits 3.0

An inquiry into the nature of social problems and a consideration of the efficacy of social service interventions and programs


Human Services Ethics and Diversity
Course Number HSV502
Credits 3.0

Consideration of theoretical and practical standards for ethically dealing with individuals and information about them in a multicultural framework within a variety of human service settings


Human Development through the Lifecycle
Course Number HSV504
Credits 3.0

Examination of theories that are important to the study of lifespan development. Approaches to physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development throughout the lifespan will be examined with a focus on the influence of context and culture on human development


Human Services Policy
Course Number HSV510
Credits 3.0

A current examination of the social and public policies that impact the human service organization. The course will address how human service organizations design, implement, and manage human service programs in response to the political environment and changes in the social environment


Applied Research Methods in Human Services
Course Number HSV512
Credits 3.0

An overview of frequently used research designs and quantitative and qualitative methods. Prepares students to apply theoretical understanding of methodology and measurement to develop analytical and research skills. Prepares students to evaluate relevant research studies in their field, analyze Human Service data with appropriate statistics and apply research methodologies to real world problems in their work settings


Readings, Research & Planning
Course Number HSV598
Credits 3.0

In this course, students will apply an action research approach to the development of an applied research project proposal. Students will be required to design practiced-based projects based on the application of human services principles to specific real-life problems to demonstrate theory applied to practice. Based on an “area of interests” statement created at the culmination of HSV512 and a comprehensive literature search, students will submit a research proposal for review and approval


Human Services Graduate Capstone Experience
Course Number HSV599
Credits 3.0

This course represents the final, capstone experience for students ready to complete requirements toward an MS degree in Human Services. It takes the form of a comprehensive examination covering material from all core and specialization track courses required by the program. Students will be asked to submit responses to eight items, five essay questions covering core courses and three case studies or essays in their area of specialization (i.e., clinical or management). Successful completion of this course will lead to graduation from the program


Theories of Counseling
Course Number HSV520
Credits 3.0

This course provides an overview of counseling theory and fosters the development of basic counseling skills. The focus is establishing a rapport, developing a therapeutic alliance, and conceptualizing strategies for intervention. The clinical application of theory will be explored through case studies, role-play, and class discussions


Family Systems Theory
Course Number HSV521
Credits 3.0

Introduces the student to the field of family therapy and systems thinking. Includes the skills necessary to begin clinical work with a family. Includes the major theoretical approaches to family intervention required to conceptualize, assess, and treat family systems


Group Theory
Course Number HSV522
Credits 3.0

This course presents a theoretical and experiential of group processes and counseling techniques. Students develop the skills and abilities required to facilitate cognitive, emotional, and behavioral change in-group settings


Psychopathology and Psychological Assessment
Course Number HSV524
Credits 3.0

Students will explore the emotional, cognitive, somatic, and behavioral symptoms of mental disturbances. This course includes the introduction of testing and measurement devices that emphasizes clinical assessment applications


Program description: N/A

Program Name: M.S. in Human Services / Program Administration
Introduction to Human Services
Course Number HSV101
Credits 3.0

This course studies the history of the theory and practice of social welfare. It examines the development and function of social work services in residential treatment, income maintenance, psychiatric services, correctional services, medical services, services for the aged, and community services


Social Welfare
Course Number HSV260
Credits 3.0

This course examines human needs and the resources made available to assist families and individuals in need. The historical and philosophical roots of social welfare from ancient cultures to contemporary America are considered. The course provides an analysis of social welfare systems including their basic concepts and economic and political determinants. Cross listed with SOC260.


Interviewing Methods
Course Number HSV301
Credits 3.0

This course provides an opportunity to learn basic communication skills and interviewing techniques essential for working with people. An emphasis is placed on developing skills in listening, intake, assessment and evaluation, referral and report writing. Case studies will be used to explore typical presenting problems and appropriate responses.


Introduction to Counseling
Course Number HSV303
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles, skills, methods and techniques employed in the counseling process. The focus is on establishing rapport, developing a therapeutic alliance, assessment, conceptualizing strategies for intervention, and the planning and delivering counseling services. The course will also promote exploration into personal values and professional ethics.


Group Counseling
Course Number HSV330
Credits 3.0

This course presents a theoretical foundation for group process and counseling techniques. Students are introduced to the skills and requirements needed for effective group counseling including communication, leadership, problem solving, decision-making, and establishing group membership, norms and goals.


Interventions Methods of Human Services
Course Number HSV365
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the theories, principles, and skills of the generic helping process in social work practice. Students learn how to engage a client, along with assessment, treatment planning, intervention, and follow-up as applied to individuals and families. Prerequisites: HSV101 and at least 3 additional hours in Human Services.


Crisis Intervention
Course Number HSV368
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and strategies of crisis theory and practice carried out in a social-psychological and cultural framework. Effective crisis management is explored to learn how people feel, think, and behave during periods of crisis, and what strategies and resources are available to them.



Human Service Administration
Course Number HSV405
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to the principles of Human Service administration. Emphasis is on the basic skills required to effectively manage agency staff and other resources in human service organizational settings. The focus of the course is on the unique needs of human service managers in planning, organizing, budgeting, and supervising their programs and organizations within an every-changing social environment. Prerequisite: HSV 101 or permission of the instructor.


Senior Seminar in Human Services Administration
Course Number HSV450
Credits 3.0

This is a capstone course in which students will analyze their personal and professional development during their college experience. They will be required to engage in a scholarly investigation of some aspect of human services, which will then be presented and discussed in a seminar environment. Prerequisite: HSV Senior majors only or permission of instructor.


Human Services Practicum
Course Number HSV460
Credits 6.0

This course provides prospective human services workers with an opportunity to learn experientially at a human service agency in the community. The focus of this internship is for the student to learn how an agency functions and experience being a part of that agency. Requires a minimum of forty hours in the agency environment for each hour of academic credit earned. Human Services majors and required to complete internships at two separate agencies. You must speak with your academic advisor as well as the Career Services Office before registering.


Theories of Counseling
Course Number HSV520
Credits 3.0

This course provides an overview of counseling theory and fosters the development of basic counseling skills. The focus is establishing a rapport, developing a therapeutic alliance, and conceptualizing strategies for intervention. The clinical application of theory will be explored through case studies, role-play, and class discussions


Human Behavior in the Social Environment
Course Number SOC364
Credits 3.0

This course traces the development of human behavior in primary groups throughout the life cycle. It follows maturational, emotional, cognitive, and social systems theory from early life development through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood into old age, with a focus on the individual and primary groups.


Program description: Post University's MS in Human Services is intended to prepare you for a wide variety of social and human services jobs. It is available online or at the Waterbury, CT campus. Designed for students who already have bachelor's degrees, the rigorous curriculum provides the theoretical, analytical, and practical knowledge that graduates need to obtain the human services careers of their choice. The program emphasizes fundamental skills in the field, and additionally offers two specializations:

* Human service program administration
* Clinical counseling in organizational settings

Human Services Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Human Services/Management
Introduction to Human Services
Course Number BSHS302
Credits 24.0

This course is designed to give adult learners an overview of expectations for academic success in the Bachelor of Science in Human Services program. The course examines learning theory and the application of adult learning principles. Students will gain knowledge of skills needed to do critical thinking, make oral presentations, function in learning teams, conduct research, and write academic papers. Students will be introduced to the university library and learn how to access its resources successfully. An introduction to the human services profession will be accomplished by studying roles and responsibilities of human services workers. (3 credits) Prerequisite: 24 credits.


Communication Skills for the Human Services Professional
Course Number BSHS322
Credits 3.0

This course explores the theory and practice of professional communication skills, including active listening, interviewing, verbal and nonverbal communications, exploration and goal setting skills, and various techniques for helping people change. Students will develop an understanding of the relationship dynamics between clinicians, clients, and human service staff through application of communication techniques and strategies. (3 credits) Prerequisite: BSHS 302.íÒ»2!


Organizational Behavior
Course Number MGT331
Credits 3.0

This course in organizational behavior encompasses the study of individual and group behavior in organizational settings. Managing organizational behavior challenges individuals to understand and embrace workforce diversity, elements of change, effective communication, and performance systems. A comprehensive review of these processes, as well as others, will allow students to examine their role in organizations in the new millennium.


Models of Effective Helping
Course Number BSHS312
Credits 3.0

This course presents an exploration of the major theoretical areas in the helping professions: cognitive, behavioral, affective/humanistic, and systems. Students learn the theoretical bases for each of the major theories, the approach to change, and the techniques and interventions used by practitioners of these theories. The course emphasizes the development of a personal theory and approach to human services and the creation of a resource file containing practical applications of theory-based techniques for use by the human services worker. (3 credits) Prerequisite: BSHS 302.0U5


Management: Theory, Practice, and Application
Course Number MGT330
Credits 3.0

This course explores the rich field of management in theory and practice, and as both a science and an art. The course also addresses the role of managers in the current world of rapid change, increased competitive forces, and increased expectations for the successful performance of employees and organizations. The focus is on some of the ways and means of achieving desired goals. The student will leave this course with a solid background in the nature and work of management and managers. Applications of concepts to current workplace issues will be stressed. (3 credits)


Human Lifespan Development
Course Number BSHS342
Credits 3.0

This course presents students with empirical research findings and theoretical frameworks to foster an understanding of the various stages and dimensions of human development across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on biological, cognitive, emotional, and social development in a timeframe extending from prenatal development through the elder years and on toward eventual end of life and bereavement processes. (3 credits)


Critical Thinking: Strategies in Decision Making
Course Number MGT350
Credits 3.0

This course provides students opportunities for analysis, synthesis, prescription, and application of critical thinking and decision making within the organization. Emphasis is placed on preparing managers who can deal clearly, rationally, and creatively with a diverse workforce and dynamic workplace. This course equips students with concrete skills in critical thinking and decision making that will allow them to identify and solve organizational problems, as well as provide strategic direction. (3 credits)


Case Management
Course Number BSHS402
Credits 3.0

This Course Covers Principles, Practices, And Issues In Case Management. The Diagnosis And Treatment Of Developmental, Psychological, And Psychiatric Problems And Treatment Resources In Lease Restrictive And Most Cost Effective Settings Will Be Examined. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Bshs 302, Mth 208, Mth 209, And Comm 215.



Quality Management and Productivity
Course Number MGT449
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Concepts Of Continuous Improvement And Quality Management, Viewing Quality As A Systematic Process That Improves Customer Satisfaction. The Course Covers Methodologies That Will Aid Managers In Assuring That The Organization’s Quality System Is Effectively Meeting The Organization’s Continuous Improvement Goals. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Mth 208 And Mth 209.


Financial Analysis for Managers I
Course Number FIN324
Credits 3.0

This Course Is Designed To Frame Financial Issues For Non-financial Managers. Basic Accounting And Financial Terminology And Concepts Are Introduced And Practiced. Topics Covered Include The Accounting Environment, Financial Statements, Financial Markets, Working Capital Management And Financial Planning, And Internal Controls. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Bshs 302, Mth 208, And Mth 209.


Advocacy and Mediation
Course Number BSHS442
Credits 3.0

This Course Is Designed To Explore The Potential Use And Benefits Of Mediation As A Part Of The Advocacy Process. Attention To Overcoming Barriers Of Effective Service Delivery Will Be Examined. Students Will Experience The Roles Of Mediator, Advocate, And Agency Representative. Workshops Will Include Role-plays In Dyads And Small Groups. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Bshs 302, Mth 208, Mth 209, And Comm 215.


Organizational Psychology
Course Number PSY428
Credits 3.0

This course is concerned with analyzing the external and internal system dynamics that maximize performance excellence of individual and work groups in an organization. Organizational Psychology focuses on the human factor of business. This course applies Organizational Psychology theories and techniques to the features/dimensions of corporate structure that are transforming in order to accommodate the changes in the modern world. An understanding of external and internal customer relations in the transformed organizations is discussed. (3 credits)


Technology in Human Serviceses
Course Number BSHS352
Credits 3.0

This Course Is A Survey Of The Use Of Communications Technology In Human Services. It Examines How Technology Affects The Delivery Of Human Services And How Technology Is Used In Delivering The Service. Students Are Required To Have Access To The Internet And Have A Valid E-mail Address To Take This Course. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Bshs 302, Mth 208, Mth 209, And Comm 215.


Research and Statistics
Course Number BSHS382
Credits 3.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of Research Methods And Appropriate Use Of Statistics In The Social Sciences. The Scientific Method, Research Tools, Data Collection, And Analysis Will Be Reviewed. Understanding Research And Developing The Ability To Critically Evaluate Published Research Reports Will Be Emphasized. Statistical Concepts Will Be Reviewed, And Students Will Gain A Conceptual Understanding Of Underlying Principles Of Research And Statistical Analysis. Statistics Software Will Be Introduced, And Students Will Compute Descriptive And Inferential Statistical Data. Students Will Practice Developing Research Designs And Conducting Statistical Analyses. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Bshs 302, Mth 208, Mth 209, And Comm 215.


Building Community in Organizations
Course Number BSHS462
Credits 3.0

This Course Will Examine The Characteristics And Comprehensive Functions Of Effective Human Service Organizations That Are Client-based And Mission-driven. The Course Material Identifies The Challenges Of Assessing Environmental Factors, While Developing And Managing Human And Financial Resources. It Stresses The Importance Of Leadership In The Design And Evaluation Of Best Practice Programs And Organizations That Are Outcome-based. Students Will Learn About Organizational Structures, Have Opportunities To Explore The Concepts Of Organizational Change And Excellence, And Develop Their Own Framework For Achieving And Maintaining The Individual Competencies Needed To Manage Human Service Organizations. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Bshs 302, Mth 208, Mth 209, And Comm 215.


Marketing
Course Number MKT421
Credits 3.0

This course involves an integrated analysis of the role of marketing within the total organization. Specific attention is given to the analysis of factors affecting consumer behavior, the identification of marketing variables, the development and use of marketing strategies, and the discussion of international marketing issues. (3 credits) Prerequisite: COMM 215.


Program Design and Proposal Writing
Course Number BSHS452
Credits 3.0

This Course Covers Finding Federal, State, And Private Funding For Human Services Programs And Agencies And Writing Proposals To Secure Funding. Students Will Practice Designing And Evaluating Programs. Students Will Use The Internet To Explore Funding Sources And To Identify Suggestions For Developing Successful Grant Proposals. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Bshs 302, Mth 208, Mth 209, And Comm 215.


Interdisciplinary Capstone Course
Course Number GEN480
Credits 3.0

This is the capstone course for business, health and human services, and information technology undergraduate students. The course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their professional programs of study in a comprehensive manner. Students will also assess the impact of their educational experiences on their ethical perspectives and critical thinking skills. Students will reflect on and evaluate their personal and professional growth, the benefits of lifelong learning, and the impact of these elements on their future. (3 credits) Prerequisite: All previous courses.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Human Services/Management program is designed to provide the knowledge and basic skills needed by managers in today-s human services industry. The program combines academic instruction in the foundations of human services, such as counseling, social work, and psychology, with the management skills of planning, organizing leading, assessing and evaluating.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Associate's - Human Services Management
Human Services in the United States
Course Number HSM210
Credits 3.0

This course is a foundation for the study of human services in the United States. It provides an overview of the evolution of American human services delivery systems, including historical perspectives, as well as current and future trends. It covers the role of human services workers, how needs are determined and met, and factors that affect the delivery of services such as theoretical perspectives, social policies, and government regulations. Community advocacy, prevention techniques, and contemporary issues in the human services industry are also examined. (3 credits)


Human Services Administration: So You Want To Help People
Course Number HSM220
Credits 3.0

This course discusses the roles and responsibilities of administrators in human services organizations. It covers recent studies related to the changing contexts of human services delivery, leadership, organizational culture, human resource management, financial management, strategic planning, working with boards, marketing and public relations, social entrepreneurship, partnership, and collaboration. (3 credits)


Ethical Issues in Human Services Organizations
Course Number HSM230
Credits 3.0

This course explores the ethical environment of human service organizations. Students will consider tools and techniques for ethical decision-making, the roles of the leader and organizational culture in sustaining a moral vision, and the design of and need for legal and ethical oversight. Students will analyze current ethical and legal dilemmas and controversies through case studies and debate. (3 credits)


Public Policy Development in Human Services
Course Number HSM240
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the formation and execution of public policy and programs by government and private organizations within human services. Emphasis is placed on evaluative and analytical approaches for determining positive and negative characteristics of policies and programs. Students will learn to analyze and critique organizations and the policies and programs within those organizations. (3 credits)


Financial Management for Human Service Managers
Course Number HSM260
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on conceptual understanding and practice of financial management as it applies to human service agencies. Students complete the course with a better understanding of basic accounting concepts, budgets and budgeting systems, how to create performance measures, and the ability to analyze financial statements for the purpose of cost analysis and forecasting. Aspects of setting fees, funding, and risk management are also covered. (3 credits)


Program Planning and Grant Proposal Writing in Human Services
Course Number HSM270
Credits 3.0

This course provides practical knowledge in program planning, grant proposal writing, and program evaluation. Students will examine the planning process from conceptualization to implementation and evaluation. Also discussed is how to locate private and public funding for human service programs and agencies. (3 credits)


Program description: Students enrolled in University of Phoenix's Associate of Arts programs have the opportunity to learn about various areas of the liberal arts and sciences, including communications, mathematics, physical/biological science, and literature. The Human Services Management concentration is designed to teach students about the different types of organizations that specialize in human services. Students learn about the role of workers and the issues impacting human services agencies. These issues include public policy, funding, and multicultural awareness. The Associate of Arts with a concentration in Human Services Management is offered on two tracks; students who choose Track A have earned 24 or more transfer credits while those on Track B have earned fewer than 24 credits.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Administration - Human Services
Skills for Professional Development
Course Number GEN300
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Skills Necessary For Successful Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Research, And Communication. The Course Is Designed To Aid Adult Learners In Acquiring And Improving The Core Competencies That Are Necessary At University Of Phoenix. Students Examine Their Reasons For Returning To School And Develop Strategies For Achieving Educational Goals In School, Work, And Personal Settings. Students Are Also Introduced To The University Library And Learn How To Access Its Resources Successfully. (3 Credits) *for Flexibility In Scheduling, Campuses Are Permitted To Schedule Gen/200 To Satisfy Gen/300 Requirements.


Foundations of Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA303

This course is a survey of the criminal justice system, including the agencies and processes involved in the administration of criminal justice. It provides an overview of police, prosecution, courts, and the correctional system. The problems of the administration of justice in a democratic society are also discussed. Topics and Objectives What is Criminal Justice * Identify the major components of the criminal justice system and provide an overview of the criminal justice process. * Recognize the different perspectives of individual rights and public-order advocates. * Differentiate between the consensus and conflict models of the criminal justice process. Statistics * Explain the differences between major crime reporting programs in the United States. * Describe crime rates, arrest rates, and clearance rates in the United States. Causes of Crime * Explain the manner in which theories of crime are constructed. * Identify the major theories of criminal behavior. Criminal Law * Discuss modern criminal law, including its sources. * Recognize the types of defenses that may be acceptable under the United States legal system. Policing and Police Issues * Recognize the role of the police in contemporary society and be familiar with concepts such as community policing. * Examine the issues facing police departments in today's society, including the legal constraints faced by the police. Media Portrayal of Crime and Criminal Justice * Explore the influence of media on public perception of crime. * Assess the role of politics and entertainment in selective media coverage. * Evaluate the causes of inaccurate reporting. The Courts and the Criminal Trial * Outline the dual court system in the United States. * Describe the historical development of United States courts. Sentencing * List the goals of criminal sentencing. * Identify the alternatives available to today's sentencing authorities. Community Corrections * Distinguish between probation and parole and examine the purposes of each. * Identify the nature and purposes of community corrections. Institutional Corrections * Discuss the history of prisons and jails in Western society. * Explore prison society and the nature of inmate values and roles. * Identify the issues facing prisons and prison administrators today. The Death Penalty, the War on Drugs, and the War on Crime * Evaluate arguments for and against the death penalty. * Define and describe the War on Drugs. * Compare the impact of the Drug Wars to the potential impact of the drug legalization. * Define and describe the War on Crime. * Debate the influence of the criminal justice system in achieving justice and reducing crime. The Future of Criminal Justice * Explore the issue of multinational crimes and criminal justice. * Identify and analyze obstacles to fighting international crime and terrorism. * Compare and contrast the United States' criminal justice system to other systems. * Examine high-technology crimes, including computer crime. * Recognize the terminology associated with high-tech crime and computer crime. * Identify some of the challenges faced by the criminal justice system in the face of modern technology.


Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA313

This Course Explores Developments And Changes In The Practice Of Criminal Justice Brought About By The War On Terrorism, As Well As Rapid Technological Change, And Other Social Dynamics. Specific Topics Include: Homeland Security, The Police Response To Terrorism, Police Accountability, Racial Profiling, And The Expanded Participation Of The Community In Ensuring Public Safety. Students Also Learn About How Technology Has Altered The Way Crimes Are Committed As Well As The Ways That Law Enforcement And The Communities They Serve Confront The Problem And Address Emerging Public Safety Issues. Topics And Objectives Security And Liberty * Understand How The Duties And Responsibilities Of Those In Law Enforcement Have Expanded Since The September 11th Terrorist Attacks. * Discuss The Competing Claims Of Security Versus Privacy, Personal Autonomy, And Convenience In Waging A War Against Terrorism And Other Criminal Activity That Is Increasingly Both International In Scope And Leading Edge In Its Level Of Technological Sophistication. * Understand The Application Of The Exclusionary Rule To Violations Of The Fourth Amendment. * Understand The Increased Security Provided By The Usa Patriot Act, As Well As Its Implications To Fourth Amendment Liberty. * Explain How Police Agencies, Both Domestic And International, Are Being Restructured And Transformed In The Modern World. Homeland Security * Describe How Disparate Agencies And Institutions At The National, State And Local Level Are Working Individually And Collectively To Prevent And Respond To Acts Of Terrorism. * Describe The National Strategy To Combat The Use Or Threatened Use Of Weapons Of Mass Destruction (wmd) By Terrorists. * Recognize Some Of The Technical And Legal Barriers, Attitudes, And Prevailing Cultural Values That Add To The Challenge Of Effectively Prosecuting The War On Domestic Terrorism. * Identify Some Of The Policies, Programs, And Initiatives That Have Been Implemented And Proposed On A National Level To Combat The Terrorist Threat. Counterterrorism * Identify The Role Of Law Enforcement As Emergency First Responders In A Terrorist Incident. * Understand The Motivations And Operations Of Terrorist Groups And How This Understanding Contributes To Effective Enforcement Strategies. * Discuss The Term "critical Infrastructure" And The Potential Vulnerability Of A Complex Technological Society Like The United States To Attacks On A Variety Of Potential Targets. * Identify Interagency Communication Problems That Existed Before September 11, 2001 And The Strategies For Reducing These Problems In The Future. Technology And Crime * Analyze How The Internet Can Be Used By Terrorists, Crime Syndicates, And Other Criminal Organizations. * Discuss The Methods And Motivations Of Internet Hackers. * Understand How The Reliance On Information Technology For A Vast Array Of Everyday Activities Has Contributed To The Exponential Growth In The Crime Of "identity Theft." * Describe The Most Common Forms Of Online Criminality, Including Cyber Identity Theft, Hacking And Phishing, Cyber Stalking, Cyber Terrorism, Cyber Pornography, And Cyber Gambling. Contemporary Issues * Identify Contemporary Issues Currently Facing The Criminal Justice System. Law Enforcement Technology * Explore How The Prevalence Of Information Technology Has Led To Changes In The Way Police Now ...show more »


Criminology
Course Number CJA323

Criminology is an introductory course in the study of crime and criminal behavior, focusing on the various theories of crime causation. This course highlights the causes of crime, criminal behavior systems, societal reaction to crime, and criminological methods of inquiry. Topics and Objectives What Is Criminology * Define crime and deviance and explain the relationship between deviance and criminality. * Explain the purpose of criminology and the functions of criminologists. * Examine how crime control social policy is related to public perceptions of crime. Research Methods, Theory Development, and Patterns of Crime * Discuss the history of statistical data collection about crime and the analysis of such data. * Describe and explain the major contemporary sources of crime data and their limitations. * Examine the economic and social dimensions of crime. Classical and Neoclassical Thought * Identify the major principles of the classical school of criminological thought. * Differentiate between classical and neoclassical criminology. * Describe the policy implications of the classical school. Biological Roots of Criminal Behavior * Identify the fundamental assumptions of crime causation made by biological theorists. * Explain constitutional factors of crime causation. * Discuss the policy implications of biological theories. Psychological and Psychiatric Foundations of Criminal Behavior * Identify the central principles of psychological criminology. * Describe the various psychological and psychiatric theories about crime. * Explore the impact of psychological and psychiatric theories on the law and social policy. Social Structure , Social Process, and Social Development Theories * Identify the central tenets of social structure and social process theories. * Discuss the core principles of social process theories. * Describe the essential beliefs of social development theories, including life course theories. * Explore the policy implications of social structure, social process, and social development theories. Conflict Theories * Identify the central tenets of conflict theory. * Differentiate between the various forms of conflict theory


Policing Theory and Practice
Course Number CJA333

This Course Is Designed To Provide Students The Opportunity To Gain A Better Understanding Of Policing In The United States. It Offers The Foundations Of Policing, From Police Roles To The Issues That Police Officers Are Facing Today. Topics And Objectives The Role Of Police In Our Society * Understand The Difference Between Perceptions, Media Portrayals And Reality. * Discuss Role Conflicts. * Describe The Development Of The Police Role In The United States. * Identify Means Of Controlling The Police Role. Policing From A Systems Perspective * Analyze Policing From A Systems Perspective. * Identify The Components Of The Police System And Its Subsystems. * Examine The Interactions Of Police With Other Components Of The Criminal Justice System. Patrol * Understand Patrol As A Division And As A Function. * Analyze How The Patrol Component Is Organized And How Services Are Delivered. * Identify And Describe The Activities And Dominant Features Of Patrol. Criminal Investigations And Other Support Units * Understand Criminal Investigations As A Division And As A Function. * Identify The Phases Of Preliminary And Follow-up Investigations. * Recognize Investigative Tools. * Examine Support Units And The Need For Them. Organization And Management * Understand Organizational Theories And Their Application To Police Agencies. * Identify The Elements And Characteristics Of An Organization. * Recognize The Importance Of Management. * Describe The Elements Of Accountability. * Analyze The Implications Of Policy And Change. Police And The Law * Explain The General Relationship Of Policing And The Law. * Recognize The Relationship Of The Police To The U.s. Constitution. * Identify Constitutional Amendments Related To Policing And Describe Their Relationship To Policing. * Define Corruption And Its Related Components. The Use Of Discretion * Define Discretion. * Analyze Typical Uses Of Discretion. * Identify The Sources Of Discretion. * Examine Methods For Control Of The Use Of Discretion. Relating To The Community * Define Police-community Relations. * Identify Special Groups And Explain Their Interactions With Police. * Recognize The Difference Between Perceptions And Evidence Of Certain Police Behaviors. * Discuss The Effects Of The Media And Police-community Relations (pcr) Units. Community-oriented Policing * Define Community-oriented Policing (cop). * Identify The Various Funding Sources For Cop. * Discuss The Implementation Of Cop. * Recognize Barriers To The Success Of Cop. Quality Police Personnel * Identify Police Officer Selection Criteria. * Examine The Issues Related To Police Officer Training. * Analyze Career Paths Available To Police Officers. Female Police Officers * Examine The Role Development Of Women In Policing. * Identify Obstacles And Barriers For Female Police Officers. * Discuss The "firsts" And Future Of Women In Policing. The Personality Of Police Officers * Examine Why People Become Police Officers. * Discuss Attitudes And Personality Changes In Police Officers. * Analyze The Issues Of Stress And The Police Subculture. * Identify And Describe Styles Of Policing. Current And Future Issues * Identify The Issues Associated With The Use Of Force. * Understand Health Issues Faced By Police. * Discuss Possible Future ...show more »


Criminal Law
Course Number CJA343

This is an introductory course in the study of criminal law, general legal principles, and how the criminal law functions in and affects modern society. This course highlights a variety of key topics, including the concept of crime and the development of criminal law, defenses to criminal charges, and a number of specific types of crimes, including personal crimes, property crimes, public order crimes, and offenses against public morality. Legal issues affecting punishment will also be discussed, as will ways the criminal law impacts victims of crime. Topics and Objectives Criminal Law, the Concept of Crime, and Criminal Liability * Explore the sources and purposes of criminal law. * Explain jurisdiction to create and enforce criminal law. * Discuss the adversarial system and standards of proof in criminal cases. * Discuss the concept of criminal liability. * Define accomplice liability. * Define inchoate offenses: Solicitation, conspiracy and attempt. * Analyze essential elements of selected criminal offenses. Criminal Responsibility and Defenses * Explain the nature of and types of defenses to criminal liability. * Distinguish justification from excuse. * Explore the concept of criminal capacity. * Discuss the differences between legal and medical perspectives on mental illness and insanity. Personal, Property, and Computer Crimes * Define the different types of homicide. * Distinguish Assault, Battery, and Mayhem. * Explain the differences between Rape and Statutory Rape. * Define Kidnapping and False Imprisonment. * Differentiate Robbery, Burglary, and Theft. * Explore computer and high-technology crimes. Public Order Crimes * Define crimes against public order. * Define DWI crimes. * Identify crimes against the administration of government. * Discuss prostitution, obscenity and lewdness. * Analyze federal and state anti-drug legislation and asset forfeiture. Crime Victims and Crime Punishment * Understand the concept of “victim”. * Explain victims’ assistance programs. * Evaluate “Problem Solving Courts” and restorative justice. * Define plea bargaining and intermediate sanctions. * Analyze forms of sentencing and their rationale. * Discuss the Eighth Amendment and its relationship to capital punishment.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJA353

This course explores the basic core knowledge of constitutional criminal procedure. Emphasis is placed on the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments, searches and seizures, interrogations and confessions, identifications, pre-trial and trial processes. In addition, the United States Constitution as interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court is examined along with philosophical policy considerations. Application of core knowledge is developed through simulation exercises and examination of homeland security issues. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Criminal Procedure * Review Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments of the United States Constitution. * Discuss the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. * Analyze the applicability of The Bill of Rights to the states via the Fourteenth Amendment. * Examine the competing Due Process and Crime Control Models of the criminal justice system and their impact on Criminal Procedure. The Fourth Amendment and the Exclusionary Rule * Explore the common law background of the Fourth Amendment. * Analyze the rationale and purpose of the Exclusionary Rule. * Discuss exceptions to the Exclusionary Rule. * Examine alternative remedies to the Exclusionary Rule. * Identify the costs and benefits of the Exclusionary Rule. Essential Fourth Amendment Concepts * Define Search, Seizure, Arrest, and Reasonableness. * Examine the expectation of privacy. * Analyze the requirement that search and arrest warrants be based on probable cause. * Discuss exceptions to warrant requirements. * Re-examine automobile search rules. * Explore the concept of “Stop and Frisk”. * Understand border and regulatory searches. Right to Council * Define the role of lawyers in the criminal justice system. * Analyze the development of the right to counsel. * Identify when the right to counsel attaches. * Explore the right to self-representation. Interrogation and Identification * Discuss the concept of self-incrimination. * Explore the Miranda decision. * Examine eyewitness identification procedures. * Distinguish Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights during interrogation and identification procedures Pretrial Procedures * Explain the pretrial process. * Discuss pretrial detention and the concept of bail. * Explore the right to a preliminary examination and the role of the grand jury. * Analyze the prosecutor’s duty to disclose exculpatory information. * Discuss prosecutorial misconduct. The Trial Process * Discuss the steps in a jury trial. * Analyze constitutional trial rights. * Discuss the selection of a fair and unbiased jury


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number SEC360
Credits 3.0

This Course Prepares The Student To Communicate Effectively In Written And Verbal Form. It Provides Principles For Effective Investigative Reporting And Incident Documentation As Well As Techniques For Interviewing And Understanding Verbal And Non-verbal Communication. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Comm 215, Mth 209, Sec 310, Sec 320, And Sec 340.


Criminal Court Systems
Course Number CJA373

Institutional and Community Corrections
Course Number CJA383

This course is a survey of the punishment phase of the criminal justice system, including the history, evolution, and process of American corrections. It provides an overview of corrections, including the persons, agencies, and organizations that manage criminals. Jails and prisons are described, including portrayals of inmates and their characteristics, and administrative operations. Other issues examined include overcrowding, inmate rights, privatization, the emergence of community corrections, female prisoners, and juveniles. Topics and Objectives Purposes and Philosophies of Corrections * Learn the meaning of corrections. * Review philosophies of punishment. * Understand the the role of criminal theory. * Discuss various corrections programs. History of Punishment and Corrections * Review early history and the Age of Enlightenment. * Learn about prison reform and penitentiaries. * Discuss the Pennsylvania and Auburn Systems. * Understand penitentiary reform in the 19th Century. Sentencing and Criminal Sanctions * Understand sentencing decisions. * Learn sentencing strategies. * Discuss what comes after the verdict and the appeals process. * Identify special sentencing considerations for juveniles. Jails and Detention Facilities * Discuss the history of jails. * Examine contemporary jails and detention facilities * Understand the issues related to jails and women. * Explore the variations in jail use. * Learn the physical plant of jails. * Understand the administration process for jails. * Learn about jail employees. * Determine the major issues with jails and detention facilities. * Identify other local detention facilities. Prison Systems * View prisons as total institutions. * Discuss prisoner management and related issues. * Learn the types of functions of prisons. * Understand the issues of women and prison. * Discuss the concept of labor in prisons. * Review the federal prison system. * Learn about state prisons. * Understand the issues related to juvenile corrections. Inmates * Identify prison inmate characteristics. * Contrast jail inmate characteristics. * Understand prison and jail cultures. * Discuss violence in correctional institutions. * Understand juvenile inmate characteristics and issues. Probation and Parole * Learn the history of probation and parole. * Discuss the administration of probation and parole. * Understand the violations of probation and parole. * Discuss the duties of probation and parole officers. * Describe contemporary probation and parole services. * Understand issues related to probation for juvenile offenders. Community Corrections * Define community corrections and intermediate punishments. * Discuss "reentry programs" as community based corrections. * Understand the concept of diversion. * Learn about fines, forfeitures, and restitution. * Review the concepts of community service. * Discuss house arrest and electronic monitoring. * List community alternatives for juveniles. The Staff Work World and Corrections Careers * Review the responsibilities of institutional corrections officers, probation and parole officers, correctional counselors, community corrections personnel, and other correctional positions. * Identify workplace challenges * Learn how to find about jobs, internships, and cooperative education experiences. * Discuss correctional job prospects. Administration of Corrections Programs * Understand concepts of correctional administration and management. * Conduct an overview of the bureaucracy. * Learn various leadership styles. * ...show more »


Criminal Organizations
Course Number CJA393

This course is a survey of the origins and development of organized crime in the United States. It examines the structure and activities of organized criminal enterprises, considers different models that have been employed to describe organized crime groups, and explores theories that have been advanced to explain the phenomenon. Major investigations of organized crime and legal strategies that have been developed to combat it are also considered. Topics and Objectives Understanding Organized Crime * Define organized crime. * Compare the various models that explain the structure of organized crime groups. * Describe the attributes of organized crime and its common behavior categories. Theories of Organized Criminal Behavior * Evaluate empirical and speculative theories that have been used to explain organized criminal behavior. * Explain the perspective of organized crime as a social institution. The Evolution of Organized Crime and the Drug Business * Analyze the social disorganization in mid-19th-century American history that created the climate for certain types of organized crime. * Explain the evolution of organized crime. * Describe the history, structure, and multi-national operating methods of the drug business. * Analyze the relationship between organized crime, prohibition, and early drug syndicates. * Identify changes in the various business interests of organized crime over the last 150 years. * Explain the role of corrupt political machines in fostering organized crime. A Comparative Perspective on Organized Crime * Analyze the scope of domestic organized crime groups and identify their interrelationships. * Explain the relationship between early ethnic or racially organized crime and contemporary youth gangs. * Compare and contrast the political, ideological, and religious origins of organized crime groups. * Analyze the relationship between organized crime and terrorist activity. * Identify the prominent terrorist organizations worldwide. * Explain the political, social, and financial motivations of terrorist groups. Organized Crime's Political and Corporate Alliances * Explain the relationship of organized crime to politics, business, and the law. * Describe the legal limitations of law enforcement and intelligence agencies in dealing with organized crime. * Critique major federal laws and strategies that have been developed to combat organized crime. * Assess the effectiveness of organized crime prosecutions. * Hypothesize possible future trends in organized crime at national and international levels.


Juvenile Justice Systems and Processes
Course Number CJA403

This course is a general orientation to the field of juvenile justice, including causation theories and the development of system responses to delinquent behavior. The problems facing juveniles today are addressed, and adult and juvenile justice systems are compared, including initial apprehension, referral, and preventive techniques. Specific issues examined include chemical dependency, mental illness, and compulsive and habitual offenders. Special attention is given to the problems inherent in the police handling of juveniles and the function of juvenile courts. Topics and Objectives Overview of Juvenile Justice in the United States * Review and discuss the history and development of the juvenile court system. * Compare and contrast the roles of the juvenile and adult courts. * Assess the impact of national initiatives, case law, and legislation on state juvenile justice systems. * Critically examine and assess methods and information sources used in the measurement of delinquency. * Explore and be able to discuss the various theories of delinquency causation. Police and the Community * Review and describe the role of the police in the juvenile justice system. * Explore the use of prevention and intervention strategies in the community. Juvenile Court Process * Review and describe the juvenile court process in the handling of juvenile offenders. * Discuss the role and authority of the judge, prosecuting attorney, Court Appointed Special Advocate, public defender, and probation officers. * Examine and critically analyze the action of remanding juveniles to adult court. * Review and be able to describe various models of risk-needs assessment tools in assessment and classification of juvenile offenders. * Explore and be able to articulate the effectiveness and appropriateness of a variety of dispositional alternatives. Juvenile Corrections * Compare and contrast correctional objectives for juvenile treatment and public safety. * Explore the types of institutions, programs, and services available to juveniles. * Examine the role and effectiveness of juvenile aftercare. * Evaluate the dual standards that may be applied by the juvenile justice system. Future Trends * Explore the ramifications of US Department of Justice involvement in state juvenile correctional facilities. * Discuss the potential for national accreditation and standards for the juvenile justice system. * Critically analyze the role of privatization in the juvenile justice system. * Explore the role of existing and new research in determining the future of the juvenile justice system.


Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA413

This course explores the standards and codes of professional responsibility in criminal justice professions (e.g., Law Enforcement Code of Ethics, ABA Standards of Professional Responsibility, American Jail Association Code of Ethics for Jail Officers, and the American Correctional Association Code of Ethics). It also explores analysis and evaluation of ethical dilemmas, roles of professional organizations and agencies, ethics and community relations, ethics in criminal justice laws and procedures and civil liability in law enforcement and correctional environments. Topics and Objectives Ethics and the Criminal Justice Practitioner * Explain the importance of ethics as applied to the criminal justice practitioner. * Discuss the goals of the study of ethics. * Distinguish between morality, ethics, duties and values. * Explain deontological and teleological ethical systems including ethical formalism, utilitarianism, religion, natural law, ethics of virtue and ethics of care. * Understand how to analyze ethical dilemmas. * Explore the origins and components of the concept of justice. * Explore the paradigms of law. Ethics in Policing * Understand the dual roles of law enforcement and law enforcement subculture. * Explore the limits of discretion and corresponding duties for law enforcement. * Identify and discuss the primary forms of corrupt law enforcement practices. * Identify and discuss ethical issues involved in police procedures. * Explore methods to reduce corruption and unethical police procedures including training, supervision, protection for whistle blowers and citizen review boards. Ethics of Courts * Explain the roles of criminal defense attorney and prosecutors from an ethical perspective. * Discuss the codes of professional ethics that lawyers are bound to by the various statutes and regulations. * Identify and discuss the duties of the criminal defense attorney. * Identify and discuss the duties of the prosecutor. * Compare and contrast the duties and roles of the defense attorney and prosecutor. Ethics of Prosecutors and Defense * Determine what judicial ethics are imposed upon members of the judiciary and why. * Identify situations where judges should recuse themselves from proceedings. * Understand judicial use of discretion and its abuses. Ethics of Corrections * Explore the roles of probation, parole, and correctional officers from an ethical perspective. * Identify the code of ethical behavior for probation, parole, and correctional officers. * Understand the correctional subculture. * Understand the conflicting duties between having to protect society and protecting the interests of offenders. * Analyze the problems of and possible solutions to the victimization of offenders. * Identify and discuss ethical issues in the punishment of offenders. * Define and explain cruel and unusual. * Determine whether the death penalty is defensible in view of established ethical frameworks established by the law or religious or social contract theory. Ethics of Criminal Justice Policy and the Future * Assess the ethical arguments for and against personal revenge. * Identify the rights of victims. * Determine whether victim participation in criminal court proceedings supplants the need for personal revenge. * Examine enforcement of laws and their relationship to ethics in criminal justice. * Evaluate the level ...show more »


Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA423

This course offers a comprehensive, critical and balanced examination of the issues of crime and justice with respect to race and ethnicity. Procedures and policy in a pluralistic and multicultural society are examined relative to law enforcement, courts and corrections environments. Topics and Objectives Race, Ethnicity, Social Structure and Crime * Define race, ethnicity, disparities and discrimination. * Examine racial and ethnic categories in the statistical data reported by criminal justice agencies in the United States. * Understand explanations for disparity and causes of discrimination. * Analyze the relationship between race, ethnicity, social structure and crime. Victims and Offenders * Compare victimization and offender rates for racial and ethic minorities to the rates for whites. * Examine the role of ethnic youth gangs and the occurrence of hate crimes in the United States. * Examine the relationship between the police and racial and ethnic minority youth. The Police and Racial and Ethnic Minorities * Examine public opinion about the police, comparing the attitudes of Whites, African Americans and Hispanics. * Identify specific concerns relative to policing particular ethnic communities. * Examine racial and ethnic disparity and discrimination in police use of force, detentions, searches and seizures. * Understand officer attitudes, police corruption and citizen complaints relative to race and ethnicity. * Discuss police employment practices and the law of employment discrimination. Race, Ethnicity and the Courts * Understand considerations of race and ethnicity by prosecutors in pretrial decision making and plea bargaining practices. * Examine disparity and discrimination in bail proceedings and appointment of counsel. * Explore issues of race and ethnicity in jury selection, trial arguments to the jury and jury nullification. * Identify explanations for racial disparities in sentencing and effects of sentencing discrimination. Race, Ethnicity and Corrections * Understand the issue of racial discrimination in the application of the death penalty. * Examine ethnic, racial and gender overrepresentation of American correctional populations. Contemporary Cultural Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice * Debate the efficacy of jury nullification when premised on race and ethnicity considerations. * Debate whether the Criminal Justice System discriminates against racial and ethnic minorities. * Examine contemporary issues raising disparity and discrimination of racial and ethnic minorities in the Criminal Justice System.


Research Methods in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA433

Students learn and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology within the criminal justice system and become acquainted with the range and scope of quantitative and qualitative tools available to the criminal justice researcher. Topics and Objectives The Research Enterprise in Criminal Justice and Criminology * Explore the research enterprise and its major components. * Differentiate between pure and applied research. * Distinguish between qualitative and quantitative research. * Specify the various functions of the research process. * Identify assumptions made by researchers about the phenomena they study. * Describe the differences between primary and secondary research. * Summarize the meaning of research ethics and examine the codes of ethics in criminal justice research. * Assess the nature and diversity of ethical dilemmas in criminological research. * Describe the rights of human subjects and the nature of informed consent. Theory, Research, Problem Formulation and Research Question * Identify how frames of reference influence research choices. * List the components and functions of theory (theoretical and practical). * Contrast ideal and real research. * Distinguish between deductive and inductive theory. * Explain the role of variables in hypothesis testing. * Describe how hypotheses are derived and constructed so that theories may be tested. * Explore the purposes of null hypotheses and hypothesis formulation. * Identify the functions, strengths and weaknesses of different hypotheses. * Assess the relationship between theory verification and hypothesis testing. Research Designs and Data Collection Methods * Differentiate between types and functions of research designs. * Explore surveys, case studies, and the classical experimental design. * Distinguish between probability and non-probability sampling plans. * Differentiate between populations and their parameters and samples. * Identify the criteria used to make the decision to sample. * Explore the assumptions underlying certain statistical tests. * Examine features, functions, construction, and administration of questionnaires and their strengths and weaknesses. * Evaluate features, functions, construction and administration of interviews and their strengths and weaknesses. * Assess features and functions of observation and its strengths and weaknesses as a data-gathering tool. * Analyze secondary sources. Data Coding, Measurement, Validity, Presentation and Descriptive Techniques * Describe the purposes of scientific measurement. * Determine the relationship between measurement and theory verification. * Distinguish between nominal and operational definitions. * Discuss graphic presentation and its value as a descriptive tool in criminological research. * Explore scales and their applications, strengths and weaknesses. * Examine the determination and measurement of validity. * Describe validity checks. * Define reliability and the different kinds of reliability checks. Conclusions, Results and Recommendations * Discuss the importance of project replication. * Classify common errors in presentation and interpretation of research findings. * Detail the importance of anonymity and confidentiality in research. * Address the functions, strengths and weaknesses of research conclusions.


Organizational Behavior and Management
Course Number SEC390
Credits 3.0

This Course Encompasses The Study Of Individual And Group Behavior In Organizational Settings, With Special Emphasis On Those That Are Securityoriented. Management Methods For Organizational Processes And Change Are Presented Along With Leadership Applications. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Comm 215, Mth 209, Sec 310, Sec 320, And Sec 340.


Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number CJA453

This course applies management and financial principles to criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is placed on budgets, financial accounting principles and assessing the effectiveness of the activities of criminal justice organizations. Constitutional requirements, court decisions, and legislation (such as EEOC requirements) as they impact management in criminal justice organizations are discussed. Basic accounting and financial terminology, and purposes and formats of financial statements are introduced: depreciation of assets, capital budgeting, cash management, lease versus purchase, and inventory management. Topics and Objectives Police Administration * Define the scope of justice administration. * Explore police organization and operation. * Assess police personnel roles and functions. * Understand police issues and practices. Court Administration * Understand court organization and operation. * Define court personnel roles and functions. * Explore court issues and practices. Corrections Administration * Analyze corrections organization and operation. * Define corrections personnel roles and functions. * Examine community corrections. * Assess corrections issues and practices. Budgeting in the Criminal Justice Organization * Examine budgeting in the public sector. * List the elements of a budget. * Explore budget formats. * Identify pitfalls in budgeting. * Explore the influence of politics and fiscal realities in budgeting. Administrative Challenges and Practices * Evaluate the rights of criminal justice employees. * Understand discipline, labor relations and liability in criminal justice organizations. * Examine current uses of technology in criminal justice administration.


Criminal Justice Policy Analysis
Course Number CJA463

This course examines the history of federal- and state-level crime control initiatives and explores the development of effective anticrime policies. The analysis of contemporary crime control policies is included. Topics and Objectives Public Policy Foundations and Views in Criminal Justice * Evaluate the role of the United States constitution in relationship to the development of contemporary criminal justice policy. * Differentiate between the roles of federal and state government in the development and implementation of criminal justice policy. * Distinguish between legislatively based policy and administrative regulatory policy as they relate to crime and criminal justice. * Compare and contrast the rights of the accused with the policy mission of protecting the public from criminal behavior. * Differentiate between factors that affect criminal justice policy making. Policy Differences in Approach for Policing, Judicial Action, and Correctional Practices * Differentiate between policy perspectives among the police, courts, and corrections at the federal and state level. * Analyze the historical evolution of criminal justice policy relating to policing, the courts, and corrections over the past 50 years. * Identify opportunities for cooperation between elements of the criminal justice system in the implementation of criminal justice policy. Effective and Ineffective Policy Making in Response to Crime * Analyze effective and ineffective criminal justice initiatives at the local, state, and federal levels that have had historical significance. * Describe goals in the criminal justice system that policy attempts to achieve. Political Impact upon Criminal Justice Policy * Determine the impact of politics on the budgetary process. * Evaluate the relationship between fiscal resources and the development and implementation of criminal justice policy. Globalization of Criminal Justice Policy * Explain the globalization of criminal justice policy in relationship to contemporary issues. * Predict the effects of globalization on the development of criminal justice policy in the future.


Managing Criminal Justice Personnel
Course Number CJA473

This course is a survey of important personnel issues inherent to organizations and, especially, to criminal justice organizations. Problems, procedures and solutions to common personnel issues will be explored. Topics and Objectives Values * Explain the nature and importance of human values in the workplace. * Describe how people acquire and change values. * Identify your core values. * Explain what values do for and to us. Motivation and Empowerment * Define motivation and empowerment and understand the similarities and differences between the two. * Apply theories of motivation to managing criminal justice personnel. * Define the components of empowerment. * Analyze the implications of empowerment and delegation in a criminal justice organization. * Analyze the role of trust in personnel issues. Organizational Effectiveness * Define Organizational Effectiveness. * Apply theories of Organizational Effectiveness to the management of criminal justice personnel. * Review several methods for exerting control in an organizational setting. * Explore the differences between bureaucratic and agile organizations. * Identify the elements of managing by objective (MBO). Occupational Socialization * Define occupational socialization. * Define organizational culture. * Identify the socialization process - stages and models of influence. * Discuss problems in the socialization process. * Identify socialization issues in police and correctional agencies and in community expectations. * Examine strategies for socialization. Personnel Supervision and Evaluation * Define models of employee supervision. * Apply guidelines for supervision and evaluation to managing criminal justice personnel. * Review types of problem employees. * Consider various disciplinary actions. * Differentiate between problem employees and problem situations.


Futures of Criminal Justice
Course Number CJA483

This Course Examines Possible Criminal Justice Futures And The Broader Topic Of Global Justice. Students Will Research And Discuss Issues That Police, Corrections, And Courts Are Likely To Confront In The 21st Century And Beyond And Will Examine Established Predictive Techniques In The Field Of Futures Research. Students Will Critically Examine The Varied Criminal Justice Systems That Exist In The Global Community. This Is A Capstone Course Requiring Students To Apply All They Have Learned Throughout The Program To The Issues That Will Define Possible Criminal Justice Futures. Topics And Objectives Criminal Justice System Assessment * Review The Concept Of Justice And The System Designed To Dispense That Justice. * Examine The Criminal Justice System As A Component Of A Larger National And Global Social Structure. * Explain The Value Of The Criminal Justice System In A Changing Society. * Discuss Recent And Future Trends And Issues Affecting The Criminal Justice System. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems * Examine The Criminal Justice Systems Of The Global Community Including The Common Law, Civil Law, Socialist And Islamic Systems. * Compare And Contrast The Criminal Justice Systems Of Six Model Nations: England, France, Germany, China, Japan And Saudi Arabia With The American Criminal Justice System. Contemporary Injustice * Examine Domestic Terrorism And Its Projected Future Impact On The Criminal Justice System. * Review Organized Crime, Emerging Organized Crime Groups, And Future Trends In Enforcement. * Explore The Ethical Obligations Of The Criminal Justice System To Combat Contemporary Slavery. * Discuss The Role Of The Criminal Justice System In Combating And Preventing Genocide. * Discuss The Responsibility Of The Criminal Justice System In Protecting The Environment. Strategies For Achieving Justice * Discuss The Role Of Education As A Strategy For Achieving Justice. * Examine Civil Disobedience And Evaluate Its Effectiveness As A Strategy For Achieving Justice. * Explore Civil Avenues Available To Remedy Injustice. * Discuss The Use Of Guerilla Tactics As An Approach To Achieve Justice. * Explore The Challenge Of Achieving Global Justice. Review Of The Bscja Program * Review The Curriculum Of The Bscja Program. * Consider The Benefits Of Completing The Bscja Program. * Analyze Current Trends In Police Operations. * Discuss Recent Changes In The Court System. * Explore Current Issues In Corrections.


Interdisciplinary Capstone Course
Course Number GEN480
Credits 3.0

This is the capstone course for business, health and human services, and information technology undergraduate students. The course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their professional programs of study in a comprehensive manner. Students will also assess the impact of their educational experiences on their ethical perspectives and critical thinking skills. Students will reflect on and evaluate their personal and professional growth, the benefits of lifelong learning, and the impact of these elements on their future. (3 credits) Prerequisite: All previous courses.


Program description: The mission of the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Administration is to provide students with a strong foundation in criminal justice principles, concepts, and theories, as well as a practice orientation to justice administration. The degree offers a global perspective, as well as specific concentration areas of criminal justice services delivery. Students will receive core instruction in criminal justice as it is represented in the domains of police, courts, and corrections and then advance to concentrations related to specific areas of criminal justice within those domains.

The BS/CJA Human Services concentration is intended to give graduates knowledge and basic skills to work in the human services and helping areas of the criminal justice system. This particular concentration represents an integrated program combining academic instruction in criminal justice with applied skills for students whose goal is a career in the areas of the system where basic skills in interviewing, case management, mental health interventions, advocacy and mediation are required. Human Services graduates are prepared to provide services in a variety of institutional and community settings within the criminal justice domains of policing, the courts, institutional and community corrections.

This undergraduate degree program includes 45 credits in the required course of study and 15 credits in the concentration. Some courses have prerequisites. In addition, students must satisfy general education and elective requirements to meet the 120-credit minimum (124 for Kansas students) including a minimum of 45 upper division credits required for completion of the degree. At the time of enrollment, students must choose a concentration.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Human Services Courses at Capella University

Program Name: MS - General Human Services
Social Systems
Course Number HS5317
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course review basic features and factors of social systems theory as it applies to groups, families, agencies, institutions or corporations, and government entities. The course addresses problems inherent in the operation of these systems and explores resolution of these problems from a systemic viewpoint. Additionally, learners in the course study issues of social policy making and decision making that affect conditions of social change.


Integrative Project for Human Services Learners
Course Number HS5990
Credits 4.0

In this course, master’s learners demonstrate proficiency in their specialization area by applying learning from required and elective courses to complete an analysis of a human services organization or system, or propose a new application in their professional field. For MS in Human Services learners only. Prerequisite(s): All required and elective course work. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Survey of Research in Human Development and Behavior
Course Number COUN5003
Credits 4.0

This Course Presents Theories Of Human Development And Behavior Throughout The Lifecycle. Learners Examine Approaches For Researching Human Development, Including Personality And Moral Development Theory. Learners Also Focus On The Developing Person Using The Theoretical Lenses Of Disciplines Such As Psychology, Anthropology, And Biology. Must Be Taken By Master’s Learners In Their First Quarter. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5003 Or Cst5003 Or Hs5002 Or Shb5003. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Survey of Research Methodology
Course Number COUN5006
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of Graduate-level Approaches To Research Methodology. Learners Study Major Research Methodologies And Quantitative And Qualitative Approaches To Needs Assessment, Program Evaluation, And Program Design. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5006 Or Cst5006 Or Hs5006 Or Shb5006.


Ethnic and Linguistic Minorities in the Workplace
Course Number CST5304
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of ethnic and linguistic minorities found in the American workplace. Learners synthesize current theories, methods, and research related to diversity and cross-cultural awareness and apply them to linguistic and ethnic minorities in the workplace. Learners examine employer codes of ethics and the ways minorities have been able to achieve success despite barriers. Learners also analyze the influence ethnic and linguistic minorities have on the success of individuals, organizations, and the labor industry.


Professional and Scientific Ethics
Course Number CST5315
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the evolution of professional ethics and analyze the effect of ethics on education, psychotherapy, law, and institutional guidelines protecting human subjects in research. Learners also identify current ethical issues in the human services field and explore methods used to effectively address them.


Scope of Human Services
Course Number CST5318
Credits 4.0

This course presents learners with contemporary social problems addressed by human service professionals in the field. Learners examine theories of human service delivery, management, culture, and diversity to gain a broad understanding of the human services profession in diverse delivery settings. Learners also use the knowledge, skills, and methods acquired during the course to address a contemporary social problem.


Program description: The master’s General Human Services specialization is designed for professionals seeking graduate education in a flexible, inclusive academic curriculum. Included in this specialization is required course work that provides a foundation upon which a distinctive program of study can be positioned. Learners are provided the maximum level of elective courses so that course selection may be based on personal areas of interest, unique professional areas of concentration, and traditional as well as contemporary areas of study and research within the human services field.

Program Name: PhD - General Human Services
Advanced Research in Adult Human Development and Behavior
Course Number HS8002
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course critically analyze theory and research in adult development and behavior with an emphasis on contemporary research and application issues. In addition, learners study adult development from biological, psychological, social, and multicultural perspectives and apply principles of adult development to professional practice.


Families, Systems, and Health Care
Course Number HS8120
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is on issues surrounding children with health care needs and their families. The importance of family-centered care is emphasized. Learners discuss the use of collaborative, interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary practice as well as the contributions of different health care professionals, including occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech language pathologists, social workers, dieticians, psychologists, nurses, developmental pediatricians, dentists, and health care administrators. Learners in the course also explore legislative and policy issues such as Individuals with Disability Act, section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Olmstead Decision, the Americans with Disability Act, and community-based care.


Health Care Strategic Planning and Management
Course Number HS8502
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course focus on strategic analysis of the mission and goals of an institution; its governance, services, operational and fiscal components, market, and clients. Learners evaluate these elements within a strategic management framework that links planning to operations. In addition, learners examine the role of strategic thinking and planning in enhancing organizational effectiveness in the context of increased competition for health care dollars and the wide range of challenging issues requiring solutions.


Diversity in the Workplace
Course Number HS8300
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners analyze contemporary theories of diversity in the workplace. Learners compare and contrast inclusion theories, research and apply best practices for a diverse workplace, and integrate professional and ethical codes, standards, and laws in the human services work setting


Ethics and Decision Making in Health Care
Course Number BUS4121
Credits 6.0

This course focuses on the use of ethics in the health care field. Learners analyze various ethical dilemmas encountered in the operation of a health care organization, including those associated with health care access, patient care and safety, transparency, finance, reimbursement, human resources, and legal and regulatory constraints. Learners also examine personal ethics and the ways a personal ethical perspective may influence a health care administrator’s decision making. Prerequisite(s): BUS3025.


Epistemology of Practice Knowledge
Course Number HS8106
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine theories that guide the acquisition of knowledge within human services professions. Learners critically analyze and evaluate the methods used to develop social science theory as a precursor to examining and applying the scientific method. Learners also study theory derivation, the link between research methods and theory, and the ways scholar-practitioners apply the scientific method.


Fundamentals of Social Science Research
Course Number HS8100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to social science research, particularly in the context of human services. Learners focus on becoming educated consumers of research and examine major concepts and techniques of social science research, including problem formulation, identification of variables, literature review, research design, sampling, definition and measurement of study variables, instrument construction, and data collection and analysis. Learners also critically evaluate published research, apply research findings to professional practice, and practice designing research studies in their field of interest.


Quantitative Research Methods in the Human Services
Course Number HS8111
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the research methods and designs human service professionals use to solve specific social problems. Topics include human subjects protection, measurement, development of instruments, data collection and management, and initial phases of data analysis. Learners also consider methodological adaptations when conducting research with vulnerable and diverse populations.


Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Course Number HS8112
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate qualitative research methods and designs. Learners focus on developing the skills used to synthesize information related to qualitative research methodology and examine ethical issues associated with the qualitative research process


Advanced Study in Research Methods
Course Number HS8113
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the relevance and appropriateness of specific research methodologies in preparation for using them in the dissertation. The course emphasizes conceptualizing, planning, and designing a doctoral research proposal and includes topics such as planning and sampling; measurement; statistical and qualitative analytic models; results planning, analysis, and interpretation; and ethical considerations


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number ED9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number ED9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number ED9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number ED9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Fourteen Elective Courses
Credits 56.0

Choose any graduate course(s).


Program description: The General Human Services doctoral specialization is designed for professionals in a wide range of human services and health care leadership roles. The core courses expose learners to the field’s most relevant content, including adult development, diversity, ethics, and strategic planning. The specialization also integrates key content from today’s changing health care industry and its considerable impact on the human services profession. The elective courses allow learners the flexibility to focus on a specific area of human services such as counseling, family therapy, criminal justice, or social services. This specialization prepares learners to teach, consult, conduct research, and contribute to a range of professions and disciplines.

Human Services Courses at Rasmussen College

Program Name: Human Services Associates Degree
Introduction to Human Services
Course Number HS100
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Human Services exposes the student to the many facets of human services work. Topics to be explored include programs, policies, history, politics, and how current economics shape programs. Human service intervention strategies utilized in daily practice are examined along with stresses faced in the workplace. Comparisons of human services systems from a variety of countries will also be examined.


Cultural Diversity in Human Services
Course Number HS110
Credits 4.0

This course will examine diversity in many communities and the cross-cultural service delivery available in those communities. Specific client populations will be explored, with an understanding of what cultural, physical, and mental diversity is and why it is important. Special attention will be paid to working with people of both mental and physical disabilities. Those disabilities include, but are not limited to, mental retardation, autism, and Asperger’s Syndrome.


Introductory Strategies to Crisis Intervention
Course Number HS115
Credits 4.0

40 hours, 4 credits This course sets the foundation for students to develop the morals, ethics, and attitude necessary to strategically help those in crisis situations. The values and ethics intrinsic to the human services profession will be explored, as well as developing interpersonal communication skills. Students will explore how human services professionals function as change agents and must therefore attain and develop a core of intervention knowledge, theory, and skills to effectively deal with people in crisis. The ability to create genuine and empathetic relationships with others is central to those entering the human services field. Intervention strategies are also explored.


Organization and Leadership in Human Services
Course Number HS250
Credits 4.0

Working and managing within a human services organization takes high morals, standards, and ethics. Through this course, students will consider the complexity of moral and ethical dilemmas in navigating and managing in the human service industry. Students will learn decision-making techniques to include the necessary components for an ethical reasoning process. In order to have a strong foundation of practice, students will learn to how to build a strong ethical organization through culture, climate, and structure.


Human Services Internship
Course Number HS290
Credits 4.0

Field experience is a key learning experience in a human services delivery organization. It is a process of experiential learning that integrates the knowledge, theory, skills, and professional behaviors that are concurrently being taught within the classroom. It is an integral part of the total educational process.


Community Psychology
Course Number HS260
Credits 4.0

Community Psychology focuses on the four systems which function in a community: the mental health system, the educational system, the criminal justice system, and the social service system. As human service professionals, students will analyze problems in these communities and will evaluate individuals functioning in these systems, offering both answers and proactive models of prevention. Community psychology works toward the empowerment of members within a community, while appreciating diversity and understanding human behavior. Social change will be examined as well as understanding that setting or environment is as important as the individual in it. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology


Abnormal Psychology
Course Number HS280
Credits 4.0

In this course students will understand the applied discipline of abnormal psychology. In order to understand and change abnormal patterns of functioning humans in their communities, thoughts and behavior will be examined. Students will explore what is abnormal behavior and what is not in current society and cultures. Numerous applications will be examined, including a variety of mental health disorders, individuals who have difficulty functioning effectively in everyday life, the impact of family dysfunction on the individual, and the influence of mental illness on criminal behavior. Variables that may affect a person’s ability to adapt and function in a community will be considered, such as one’s genetic makeup, physical condition, learning, reasoning, and socialization. Prerequisite: General Psychology


Customer Service
Course Number B119
Credits 4.0

This course covers the basic concepts of essential communication skills needed in business to interact/work effectively with individuals and/or groups. Special areas of emphasis include solving problems, developing a customer service strategy, coping with challenging customers, increasing customer retention and surveying customer satisfaction. Prerequisite: none


Computer Applications and Business Systems Concepts
Course Number D132
Credits 3.0

40 hours, 3 credits This course teaches students basic to advanced computer concepts and skills, including creating and modifying Word documents, designing databases, spreadsheet creation and analysis, using the Internet and e-commerce tools, and creating presentations with enhanced features and web tools. Prerequisite: none


Success Strategies
Course Number E150
Credits 4.0

This course will enable students to develop positive skills that ensure success in the college setting and workplace. Specific topics in learning and study strategies will lead students to develop and utilize appropriate study techniques, ensuring academic success. Topics in life skills will lead to a better understanding of self and others in our diverse world, and encourage the development and utilization of strategies to promote positive relationships, self-management, and professionalism.


Career Development
Course Number E242
Credits 2.0

The course is designed to study the personal and professional characteristics necessary for obtaining and maintaining suitable employment. The student will assemble a complete job-seeking portfolio including his/her resume and references, letters of application and appreciation, documentation of work and educational history, and demonstration of skills through examples of student work. The course includes an in-depth study of selfmarketing approaches, job interviewing techniques and professionalism as well as participation in a mock interview. Prerequisite: none


Case Management*
Course Number J116
Credits 4.0

Students will learn how to manage caseloads of clients, document casework, and use strategies for clients’ rehabilitation. They will learn how to write effective court reports, case entries, recommendations and violation summaries. Students will explore client-interview skills and motivation techniques. Examination of special populations of diverse clients, such as substance abusers and the mentally ill are reviewed.


Juvenile Justice
Course Number J205
Credits 4.0

An overview of the juvenile justice system including the nature and extent of delinquency, explanatory models and theories, the juvenile justice system, juvenile court practices and procedures. The role of law enforcement and juvenile correctional officer will be explored as well as juvenile training schools, probation and aftercare treatment.


Counseling Clients
Course Number J211
Credits 4.0

Students will examine the process and effects of counseling. Assessment tools, methods of evaluation, and case plans are explored. They will consider a variety of counseling settings, including prisons, jails, group homes, inpatient and outpatient treatment centers, and halfway houses, as places of rehabilitation and counseling. Students will explore diverse clients including juveniles and adults, men and women, and people from various cultures.


Program description: The online Human Services Associate’s degree will prepare you for a career where you help people in need. The Human Services program is perfect for someone who finds joy in helping others and seeing their work directly benefits those around them. Your focus on psychology will really help you in your future career working with people who need your help.

Once you graduate with a Human Services degree, you will have the skills to provide people with the assistance they need to live a stable life.

When you complete Rasmussen College's Human Services Associate’s degree, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills in the following areas:

•Participant empowerment
•Community and service networking
•Education, training and self-development
•Crisis intervention
•Facilitation of services
•Organizational participation
•Community living skills and support
•Vocational, education and career supports
•Proper documentation techniques
People who work in human services are continually giving back to the communities they serve. Some of their tasks may include:

•Working with a diverse population of individuals and groups
•Understanding family structures, human development, and psychology
•Analyzing client needs, developing client goals, and designing and implementing a plan of action for rehabilitation and progress of services
•Completing intake interviews
Human Services Courses
You will learn how to provide services to individuals or groups of people with diverse problems and help them overcome their obstacles. A degree in Human Services will provide you with the knowledge and skills you need to make an impact in your community.

Some key courses include:

Organization and Leadership in Human Services
You will examine the organizational structures of community organizations and systems that are affected and the populations that are served.

Introduction to Strategies in Crisis Intervention
You will examine the different crisis situations (stress, assault, substance abuse, and loss) involving a variety of people (victim, police officer, nurse, and counselor).

Community Psychology
You will examine the benefits and problems of having the four systems (mental health, education, criminal justice, and social service) functioning independently in one community, and offer suggestions on how to move toward a more interdependent system.

Human Services Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice - Human Services
English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


Interview and Interrogation
Course Number CJUS460
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge base of general issues regarding effective techniques which apply to both accusatory and non-accusatory intake/interviews/interrogations. The course includes information on the legal aspects of interrogations and the admissibility of confessions. In addition to methods of achieving successful outcomes, topics include physiological and psychological aspects of interviews and interrogations, detecting deception, non-verbal behavior, and persuasion. Students will train via recorded practicum of mock interviews and interrogations in an interrogation room setting.


Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

Grant Writing Basics
Course Number PBAD301
Credits 4.0

Students will learn the essential skills of researching a proposal, identifying stakeholders, incorporating the necessary drafting steps, and crafting a perfect match between a funder’s and solicitor’s needs. The course provides guidance on writing proposals for a variety of types of organizations.


Human Service Practice in the Criminal Justice Setting
Course Number CJHS300
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the work of helping professionals in the context of the criminal justice system along with identifying the theory base and skills involved in Human Services.


Study of Alcohol Use and Abuse
Course Number CJHS311
Credits 5.0

This course surveys the use, abuse, and addictive nature of ethyl alcohol, and the treatment of alcoholism. The student will gain a basic knowledge of alcohol use and abuse, alcoholism, and the broad range of current approaches to prevention and treatment.


Child Abuse
Course Number CJHS315
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth study of child abuse in the context of the criminal justice and social welfare systems. Students will learn to identify risk factors, signs and symptoms of child abuse as well as the legal requirements for interventions in child abuse cases. Students will use case studies to analyze the problems in child abuse investigations and the treatment methods and services available to abused children.


Alcohol & Drug Treatment Continuum
Course Number CJHS320
Credits 5.0

In this course, the student will gain a basic knowledge of a range of therapeutic interventions involved in alcohol and other drug abuse in society, in families and with individuals, as well as how these interventions address a variety of problems. Students will be introduced to the continuum of care covers care from prevention through rehabilitation.


Drug Use and Abuse
Course Number CJHS325
Credits 5.0

This course provides a survey of use, abuse and the addictive nature of mood altering chemicals outside the use and abuse of alcohol. Students will gain a working knowledge of factors affecting the abuse of a wide variety of legal and illegal drugs along with the influence of drug use on behaviors. Approaches to prevention and treatment and available resources will be discussed.


Ethics for the CD Counselor
Course Number CJHS337
Credits 5.0

This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they related to the practice of counseling and client/counselor relationships. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for counselors, client rights and legal implications, and what defines quality client care.


Chemical Dependency Elective - Special Topics
Course Number CJHS399
Credits 5.0

This course will be specifically devoted to addiction- related contemporary issues. Appropriate topics may include: special populations; diagnosis, assessment, advanced counseling for individuals, groups, or families; theory, research, and practice in addictions; practice or policies relating to addictions; scientifically supported models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention; continuing care for addiction and substance-related problems; dual diagnosis issues; addictions and domestic violence, violence in the workplace, criminal activity, sexual abuse, child abuse and neglect; counselor wellness, and professional development.


Foundations of Individual Counseling
Course Number CJHS411
Credits 5.0

This course serves as an introduction to a variety of counseling theories, therapeutic approaches and counseling skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of the theoretical and foundations of counseling and basic counseling skills.


Foundations of Group Counseling
Course Number CJHS421
Credits 5.0

Foundations of Group Counseling provides an introduction to the dynamics of group counseling theories, therapeutic approaches and facilitative skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of, and experience with, the theoretical foundations of group counseling and group counseling skills.


Introduction to Family Counseling
Course Number CJHS425
Credits 5.0

This course provides an introduction to family systems theories, therapeutic approaches and counseling skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of the theoretical foundations of family counseling and specific family counseling skills.


Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Course Number PSYC301
Credits 5.0

Students will explore the assessment and treatment of child and adolescent psychopathologies and discuss evidence-based treatments. Case studies will provide an opportunity to analyze case formulations and the complexities in the nature of childhood disorders.


Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Art and Music Appreciation
Course Number HUMN200
Credits 4.0

Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice Capstone
Course Number CJUS480
Credits 4.0

English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.


Anatomy and Physiology
Course Number BIO122
Credits 4.0

English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


Professional Speaking
Course Number ENGL210
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations


Creating Academic and Professional Success
Course Number INTD111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for academic, professional, and life related success. The course helps students acquire, develop, and utilize basic learning tools. The course also teaches critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation methods and practices which will allow them to formulate reasonable alternatives, hypotheses, and/or premises for academic, social, and professional use. A clear, precise, fair, and unbiased approach to analysis, evaluation, problem-solving, and decision-making activities is emphasized and promoted.


Information and Technology Literacy
Course Number IT105
Credits 4.0

Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSYC100
Credits 4.0

Taking this course will enable the student to have a better understanding of the basic principles of human behavior. The course also includes a foundation in the background of the field of Psychology, the workings of the human mind and senses, the disciplines and modes of treatment, and the way that Psychology affects our everyday lives. Additional emphasis will be in areas of perception, emotion, learning, motivation, and development.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOCL101
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the organization of social behavior and the relationship of society and social conditions. Emphasis will be placed on culture, norm, stratification, systems, structure, social institutions and social change in different cultures.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CJUS141
Credits 4.0

Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing
Course Number CJUS201
Credits 4.0

Homeland Security
Course Number CJUS250
Credits 4.0

American Corrections
Course Number CJUS263
Credits 4.0

Victimology
Course Number CJUS300
Credits 4.0

Juvenile Delinquency
Course Number CJUS342
Credits 4.0

Criminology
Course Number CJUS343
Credits 4.0

Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior.


Criminal Law
Course Number CJUS365
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure
Course Number CJUS375
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendant’s Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.


The Laws of Evidence
Course Number CJUS440
Credits 4.0

In this course, the student will be provided a thorough examination of the laws of evidence for criminal justice professionals. Topics include circumstantial and opinion evidence, hearsay, character evidence, relevancy and materiality, privileged communications, expert witness testimony, objections to and exclusion of evidence, and chain of custody.


Internship
Course Number CJUS475
Credits 4.0

An internship in criminal justice provides the student with the opportunity to work in the criminal justice field under the supervision of a criminal justice professional. The student will synthesize the experience by completing weekly logs and assignments designed to complement the internship experience.


American Government
Course Number PBAD200
Credits 4.0

Provides the student with an overview of the framework and basic functions of the various branches of government, the role of politics in democracy, and the relationship of government and public policy. Students will also consider the similarities and differences between national, state, and local governments.


Public Administration
Course Number PBAD201
Credits 4.0

Provides an introduction to the field of public administration. The course is focused on the structure, functions and processes of the executive branch; agencies of national, state and local governments; and emphasizes nonprofit organizations as co-actors with government in the policy-making/policy-implementation area.


Abnormal Psychology
Course Number PSYC336
Credits 4.0

Students will learn to identify and describe major mental disorders and discuss different approaches to treating mental illness. Students will also explore legal issues, research methods used by psychologists, and the factors that influence the etiology and progression of mental disorders. This course will allow students to apply the principles of abnormal psychology to a forensic setting while addressing issues such as psychological /psychiatric evaluations and reports, and court testimony.


Social Psychology
Course Number SOCL350
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study examples of individual persons interacting with the social environment. Specific topics include conformity, aggression, prejudice and interpersonal attraction.


American Diversity
Course Number SOCL356
Credits 4.0

The student will explore race, class, and gender in a global context with a special emphasis on American society and the multicultural experience. Descriptions and analysis of relevant historical context along with discussion of pertinent societal events are also included. The student will be introduced to principal terms, concepts and theories in the field.


Program description: With this Criminal Justice program you can gain a solid knowledge base in the triad areas of the courts, corrections, and law enforcement in addition to the management skills needed for career advancement. CTU's Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice degree program is unique in that it offers a component of forensic study not usually available at the undergraduate level. It's designed to help prepare you for a wide range of careers in the criminal justice system at the local, state or federal level and can provide a strong foundation if your long-range goal is to pursue a law degree.

For students with eligible college or military experience, Colorado Technical University's Bachelor's Degree Completion Program is designed to enable completion of a Bachelor's degree in as little as 17 months.*

*The 17-month Bachelor's degree assumes that all Associate-level requirements have been met through an Associate degree or the equivalent. Program length varies by program.

Human Services Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Human Services Schools (campus and online)

University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Swarthmore College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 37th
George Washington University
Total Programs 194
Number of Subjects 171
Rank in USA 52nd
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
Brandeis University
Total Programs 1
Number of Subjects 46
Rank in USA 62nd
University of Central Florida
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 71st
Syracuse University
Total Programs 152
Number of Subjects 133
Rank in USA 89th
University of Richmond
Total Programs 78
Number of Subjects 70
Rank in USA 90th
University of Delaware
Total Programs 159
Number of Subjects 128
Rank in USA 95th
American University
Total Programs 118
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 97th
Marquette University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 111th
Elon University
Total Programs 76
Number of Subjects 80
Rank in USA 122nd
Rochester Institute of Technology
Total Programs 1
Number of Subjects 108
Rank in USA 137th
Western Washington University
Total Programs 153
Number of Subjects 121
Rank in USA 143rd
Loyola University Chicago
Total Programs 160
Number of Subjects 125
Rank in USA 144th
Stevens Institute of Technology
Total Programs 47
Number of Subjects 58
Rank in USA 149th
Valparaiso University
Total Programs 117
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 188th