Online Humanities Courses at Accredited Schools

Tiffin University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its humanities courses to be successful humanities professors, journalists, teachers, writers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 344,050 people employed as social and human service assistants alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $29,880. Psychologists make on average $84,220 per year and there are about 10,260 of them employed today.

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Humanities Courses at Tiffin University

Program Name: Master of Humanities
Introduction to Graduate Humanities
Course Number HUM510

Course introduces students to the important questions and issues in the graduate study of the humanities through an overview of research methods and research analysis with an emphasis on appropriate writing style. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Humanities graduate program


Introduction to Graduate Research
Course Number HUM522

This class is an introduction to research methods used in the humanities at the graduate level. It is a hands-on class: students develop a research proposal in an area of their choice. The course will be valuable for masters students in the early stages of research as they begin to identify a potential research topic and plan their work. It will also be useful for anyone wanting to learn how scientific research is done in practice. Topics include research paradigms and methodologies, research question formulation, design of research approach, literature search and presentation of related work, analysis of results, verbal and written presentation skills, and research ethics. Students prepare a thesis proposal or project proposal in an area of their choice.


Philosophy of Communication
Course Number COM520

This course is a survey of the genealogy of communication and how communication creates shared experiences between people. Through a collection of readings, students will examine how and why society thinks about communication the way it does. Philosophy of Communication is generally concerned with analytical, theoretical and political issues that cross different discipline boundaries. It explores how people live their lives and deal with the conflicts that are inevitable whenever communication occurs in a society, whether in person, in groups, electronically or through the mass media. Throughout the course, students are exposed to the broader study of the field and how it relates to contemporary philosophical arguments, positions and concerns. By studying the historical and social contexts for communication, students will come to understand and appreciate how meaning is created through human interaction, more about themselves and how they relate to others.


Cybercultures and Issues in Cyberspace
Course Number COM630

This course explores the culture of Cyberspace and the wide range of social, legal, ethical, political and economic issues associated with the evolution of the online world. From its origins as a government sponsored communications network, the Internet has evolved to become the de facto center of information society. In the process, online communication is fundamentally changing how people relate to each other in a computer mediated world. We will also examine the environment that created the Internet and the issues that are emerging along with it. Through a series of readings, reflections, exploration of web sites and online exchanges, students will examine how the Internet is changing culture and society. This will include an exploration of online public spaces such as Facebook, YouTube, MySpace, blogs, online dating, virtual environments and identities, globalization and the legal issues surrounding privacy, anonymity, predatory online behavior, copyright, libel, indecency, obscenity, hate speech, cyberbullying and junk mail. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the boundaries of online behavior and freedom of expression in the complex, rabidly changing Internet environment.


Culture and Identity
Course Number CUL511

Course examines the creation and interplay of cultural identity. May draw on readings from sociology, philosophy, cultural studies, literary theory, and communication; students examine major intellectual approaches to the formation and consequences of culture.


Mythologies in Human Experience
Course Number CUL515

Selected readings in the nature of myth as a working hypothesis whose object is to explain the world and make its phenomena intelligible. Topics for study might include the purpose and nature of myth, the major perspectives used to analyze and understand myth, the role of myth as mediator between past and present, the spiritual quality of myth, the transformation of myth into objective reality, myth as symbol, etc. Texts may include Greek, Roman, Celtic, Nordic and other world mythologies.


Cult and Independent Films
Course Number CUL530

This course will examine and familiarize the students with various cult films and the cult film phenomenon. From the definition (or designation) of “cult”, to the unusual, yet vital role in society this non-genre fills, the cult film does not fit into traditional critical rhetoric. Instead, by being a marginalized area of film, the cult film and the audiences of this phenomenon deconstruct mainstream film entertainment and analysis.


Poetics of Western Drama
Course Number ENG583

Readings from ancient dramatic works including those of Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus, and Aristophanes. Exploration of the unique nature and continuing significance of Greek tragedy and Greek theater in the drama of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. All discussion will stem from Aristotle’s Poetics as the basis for western dramatic traditions and conventions. Topics of study from the texts will include such issues as the tragic voice, the role of women, the nature of heroism, human beings ’ relationship to the divine, and the role of fate in human affairs. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in the MA Humanities program


British History I: Prehistory to 1066
Course Number HIS521

This course examines the complex social and political history of the peoples of the British Isles from prehistory, to the Celtic migration, to the Roman Conquest, to the invasions of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes, ending immediately prior to the Norman Conquest. This study will encompass a history of the English language as well as an introduction to the artistic, literary, architectural, and legal developments of this period, with an eye toward how these developments have shaped the present world.


British History II: 1066 to 1660
Course Number HIS522

This course examines the complex social and political history of the peoples of the British Isles from the Norman Conquest through the English Civil War era, ending at the Restoration. This study will encompass a political, economic, and social history of the British Isles as well as an introduction to the artistic, literary, architectural, and legal developments of this period, with an eye toward how these developments have shaped the present world.


British History III: 1660 to 1910
Course Number HIS523

This course examines the complex social and political history of the peoples of the British Isles from the Restoration through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, ending prior to WWI. This study will encompass a political, economic, and social history of the British Isles as well as an introduction to the artistic, literary, architectural, and legal developments of this period, with an eye toward how these developments have shaped the present world.


History of Africans in America
Course Number HIS640

This course offers a comprehensive review of African American history from the days of slave trade through today. Students will become familiar with the wide sweep of this history and the contributions of African Americans, particularly in United States history.


Special Topics in Human Experience
Course Number HUM592

Selected topics in the study of human experience. Topics may include ideologies, religion, literature, epistemology, scientific, or political belief systems. Prerequisite: None unless listed in the course schedule.


Aesthetics
Course Number ART623

This course provides students with an overview of aesthetics as it embraces a philosophy of are, beauty, and taste and further investigates the ways in which humans create, experience, and evaluate the fine arts. Class discussions will focus on artistic masterpieces from a number of disciplines including music, drama, literature, painting, and sculpture. Throughout the course students will analyze readings that explore philosophical issues and historical problems of various theoretical approaches to art and will include discussions on the nature and function of the artist, the intrinsic significance of an artistic object, and the concepts of aesthetic value, experience, attitude, and criticism. An emphasis will be placed on developing a personalized philosophy of art.


The Culture and Literature of Modernity 1880 – 1920
Course Number ENG530

Readings in cultural and literary identity: 1880-1920. Coming after Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, and Sigmund Freud, the style and traditions of literature, music, dance, and art took on a new reality that shattered old artistic conventions. The course will examine the novels of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, the music of Igor Stravinsky and American jazz artists, the art of the cubists, the dance forms of Isadora Duncan and the evolution of modernism.


History and Philosophy of Scientific Exploration
Course Number NAT517

A study of the history of how scientists described the methods and goals of science. Selected readings from Archimedes, Aristotle, Newton, Einstein and others.


Reasoning, Formal Logic and Persuasion
Course Number PHI522

A study of the development of reasoning and formal logic and its relationship to persuasion and argumentation which gives an overview of logical thinking, distinguishing rational inquiry from mythological inquiry and regulative thinking from associative thinking; articulates logical thinking or reasoning as a process of making logical argument; discusses three basic modes of reasoning in persuasion and argumentation: deduction, induction, and abduction explaining their practical applications in the studies of humanities; introduces possible world semantics and thought experiments, which help the participants to build logical foundations for developing rational, independent, critical, and creative thinking.


Atheism, Agnosticism, and Skepticism
Course Number PHI570

This course will examine the areas of thought in Atheism, Agnosticism, and Skepticism. While the purpose of the course is not to change anyone’s beliefs, logical methods of argument will be applied to religion, belief, and the question of a deity or deities. According to some studies, approximately 30% of the world population is agnostic or atheist. This course will explore the atheist and agnostic perspectives on ethics, creation, and other issues, while also examining the preconceptions society has about those who challenge the status quo by not following the popular beliefs. The common arguments for and against religion, existence of a deity or deities, and morality will be considered. Fringe belief systems from fairies to homeopathic medicine will be examined using the skeptical methodology.


Discovering the Golden Rule: Philosophers and Philosophies Of the Axial Age
Course Number PHI625

This course will examine the axial age, a period in history from 800 BC to 200 BC which, according to German philosopher Karl Jaspers, was a time when common precepts in philosophical principles appeared in China, India, the Middle East and the West. Jaspers saw this time as pivotal in human evolution in that the philosophical and spiritual principles emerging throughout these regions seeded the world’s major religions and contemporary philosophical beliefs: Confucianism and Taoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, philosophical rationalism in Greece, and monotheism in Israel that formed the basis of Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This was also a time of great violence and brutality, to which the axial sages spoke and uniformly called on people to be compassionate and ethical in their relations with others. The idea of the Golden Rule—do unto others as you would like done to yourself – became a universal cornerstone of religious and philosophical teaching.


Special topics in Human Thought
Course Number HUM593

Selected topics in the study of human thought. Topics may include ideologies, religion, literature, epistemology, scientific, or political belief systems. Prerequisite: None unless listed in the course schedule.


Creativity and Its Development
Course Number ART524

A study of how artists, writers, composers, and scientists develop creativity and how to generate new ideas, considered from psychological, educational, and artistic points of view. Readings from psychologists, philosophers, and artists, broadly defined.


History of Photography
Course Number ART525

This is a survey course of topics in the histories and cultural uses of photography in Europe and the US in the 19th and 20th centuries. It starts with the origins of photography in Enlightenment and early Industrial Revolution Europe. The course examines the role of the daguerreotype in the US, and photography’s role with war, western expansion, and social Darwinism. There will be discussions on the establishment of elite art organizations in Europe and the US by the 1890s, concurrent with the flood of mass consumer photography and commercial production. From there the course will examine major developments and uses of photography such as magazine journalism, advertising and fashion, social documentary, as well as photographic practices linked to art movements like constructivism, surrealism, documentary realism, and formalism. It will conclude with a look at the more contemporary postmodern practices which foreground the question of photography’s social and psychic operations. Special attention will be paid to the interrelations among photography’s diverse cultural uses and the terms in which debates about the medium’s unstable art status have played out.


Politics and the News
Course Number COM580

This course will critically analyze how the news media influenced public discussion of political and social issues in the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as examine how these issues were debated in the news. Drawing on readings from political science, communications, and history, students will also examine how political powers in mass democracies use the news media as a mechanism of persuasion and social control. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in the MA Humanities program


Creative Writing: The Short Story
Course Number ENG541

The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online. Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of short fiction.


Creative Writing: The Novel
Course Number ENG542

The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online. Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of a novel.


Creative Writing: Poetry
Course Number ENG543

The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online. Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of poetry.


Development of Government Systems
Course Number HUM550

This course will examine governments from feudal systems, communist systems, and capitalist systems, and how these systems influence society and the public opinion. Students will compare various types of government from the theoretical to the historic and examine the influences of these systems on theory and actuality.


Social Practice: How people behave and shy
Course Number HUM554

This is a course about exploration and discovery of ideas and the world in an everchanging society. Through the examination of a variety of readings of classical and contemporary humanistic readings in social practice, the course explores a complex social world in which locations, pathways, and boundaries are not fixed. The course also allows students to seek connections between “private troubles and public issues.”


Special Topics in Human Practice
Course Number HUM594

Selected topics in the study of human practice. Topics may deal with historical, economic, sociological, or aesthetic practice. Prerequisite: None unless listed in the course schedule.


Program Electives

Choose two of any courses offered in the Master of Humanities Program


Thesis Project
Course Number HUM680

This course requires that the student, with the support and guidance of a faculty member, carry out an independent research project, detailed position paper, or creative project dealing with the human focus of the program. Prerequisite: Permission


Program description: The Master of Arts in Humanities offers an interdisciplinary program that provides a flexible, integrated course of study designed to lead students to breadth of knowledge spanning the liberal arts. The program encourages students to make connections between different areas of human thought, expression, and experience in such fields as art history, history, literature, creative writing, music, religion, philosophy, and political theory.

Humanities Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BA in English Literature
Analysis of World Literature
Course Number ENG 250
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


English Literature I
Course Number ENG 260
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


English Literature II
Course Number ENG 270
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


American Literature I
Course Number ENG 350
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


American Literature II
Course Number ENG 353
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Introduction to English Grammar and Linguistics
Course Number ENG 358
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Shakespeare
Course Number ENG 450
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Major Author
Course Number ENG 425
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Literary Movement
Course Number ENG 424
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


The Short Story
Course Number ENG 356
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


The Novel
Course Number ENG 460
Credits 4.0

Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching. Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.


Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in English Literature program is designed to provide its majors
with a general knowledge of the history of English and American literature and specific knowledge of selected
authors, periods, and genres. Students will acquire skills and practice in written and oral communication, critical
thinking about literary and other texts, and grammar and linguistics relevant to primary and secondary teaching.
Students will gain a critical appreciation for literature and recognize the broad value of literature and its
potential to expand students’ perspectives and transform their visions of the world.

Humanities Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Humanities Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
California Institute of Technology
Total Programs 38
Number of Subjects 41
Rank in USA 21st
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Rice University
Total Programs 74
Number of Subjects 72
Rank in USA 28th
Emory University
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 30th