Online Law Enforcement Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its law enforcement courses to be successful police officers, detectives, sargents, law enforcerss, etc. and connect them to future employers.

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  • maintaining meticulous records
  • investigating individuals to prove
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Law Enforcement Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: BSCJ in Law Enforcement

Program description:

Program Name: BS in Fire Science
Eight Skills of the Effective Fire Science Student
Course Number FS 100
Credits 5.0

Eight Skills of the Effective Fire Science Student is an important component of the new student experience in the undergraduate fire science and emergency management programs at Kaplan University. It is designed to ensure students’ successful social and academic transition into and pursuit of academic excellence within the University community, and provide a foundation for success within the profession. Students will be introduced to eight key skills (reading, writing, research, planning, observing, thinking, interviewing, and communicating) of professionals through dynamic and engaging interactions and presentations by practicing professionals in many areas. Real-life examples and interactions with practicing professionals will provide students with a sense of the culture and nuances of the field. The goal of this course is for students to become academically, personally, and socially successful within and beyond this intellectual community.


Fire Behavior and Combustion
Course Number FS 101
Credits 5.0

This course investigates the basic concepts of fire, its spread, and its control. The course discusses the nature and properties of the three states of matter, explains the components of fire, and describes the physical and chemical properties of fire.


Building Construction for Fire Protection
Course Number FS 102
Credits 5.0

This course explores the fundamentals of building construction, types of structures, and structure designs, as well as the impact of building construction of firefighting. Students will study the forces that impact these structures and the codes applied to buildings and fire safety. The will also learn how buildings are constructed and how fire behaves with various building materials.


Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply
Course Number FS 103
Credits 5.0

This course explores the fundamentals of water usage in fire protection and explains how hydraulic principles are employed in the resolution of water supply problems. The course also discusses the methods used to effectively deliver water, foam, and other extinguishing agents to the fire scene.


Fire Protection Systems
Course Number FS 104
Credits 5.0

This course describes the principles of the fire protection and system design, Students will explore fire control and suppression methods, including sprinkler, water spray, water mist, standpipe, and ultra high-speed water spray systems. The course also provides an overview of recent fire protection and suppression developments.


Fire Prevention Practices
Course Number FS 105
Credits 5.0

This course examines fire avoidance measures, including fire prevention education, fire safety inspection, fire code enforcement, and fire investigation. Students will gain an overview of the procedures and principles of inspections commonly conducted for control of structures, occupancy, or combined purposes.


Strategy and Tactics
Course Number FS 201
Credits 5.0

This course explores firefighting strategy and tactics, methods of fire attack, and prefire planning. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of fire control principles as well as how to utilize personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the fire ground. This course also discusses special situations such as transportation emergencies and fires, high-rise fires, below-ground incidents, and confined space incidents.


Principles of Emergency Services
Course Number FS 202
Credits 5.0

h is course provides students with an overview of i re protection as well as the philosophy and history of i re protection. Students will gain an understanding of career opportunities in i re protection and related i elds, i re loss analysis, and the organization and function of public and private i re protection services. This course discusses the role of i re departments as part of local governments, as well as i re service laws, regulations, and terminology. Students will also be introduced to multiagency planning and operations as related to multialarm incidents, target hazards, and major disasters. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: FS 101


Fire Investigation and Analysis
Course Number FS 301
Credits 6.0

This course analyzes fire ignition dynamics, flame spread, and room fire growth. Students explore all aspects of incident investigation, financial management, and other functions related to fire analysis and investigation.


Advanced Principles of Firefighter Safety and Survival
Course Number FS 302
Credits 6.0

Fire Protection Structures and Systems
Course Number FS 303
Credits 6.0

This course explains the in-depth principles of fire protection system design. Students will explore fire systems and their components, such as sprinkler, water spray, water mist, standpipe, and ultra high-speed water spray systems, as well as other methods of fire extinguishment such as foam systems, dry chemical agents, and clean agent systems. Also, this course will provide a comprehensive review of special hazard detection and fire alarm systems.


Community Rish Reduction for Fire and EMs
Course Number FS 304
Credits 6.0


Safety Risk Management for Fire and EMS
Course Number FS 412
Credits 6.0

Research Analysis for Fire Emergency Services
Course Number FS 413
Credits 6.0

This course explores current research methods utilized in the analysis of fire-related data. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of methods used to conduct and evaluate independent research in fire dynamics, test standards, safety, modeling, structural safety, fire fighter health and safety, automatic detection and suppression systems, and transportation fire hazards. The course also introduces research methods for risk analysis and trend identification.


Bachelor’s Capstone in Fire Science
Course Number FS 498
Credits 6.0

This course is designed as the culminating experience of the bachelor™s degree program in fire science. This course consists of a series of assignments that integrate concepts from the fire science curriculum. The assignments are designed to test application and critical thinking skills as students work through fact-based scenarios and analyze issues affecting contemporary practice.


Program description: If you are looking to enhance your career in fire services or pursue a career in the field, Kaplan University’s Bachelor of Science in Fire Science may be the right choice to help you reach your goal.* Modeled on the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) national curriculum, this degree program is designed to provide you with foundational skills in firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection, and firefighting strategy and tactics

Program Name: MS in Fire and Emergency Services
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

n/a


Program description: The Master of Science in Fire and Emergency services is modeled on the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) national curriculum and is designed for practicing or aspiring emergency services professionals seeking to develop skills and techniques in the areas of strategic planning, leadership, financial administration, and emergency services management. As a student in the Master of Science in Fire and Emergency Services program, you will study current administration issues that affect first-response organizations and their strategic operations. In addition, the program is designed to provide you with the communication skills, critical thinking abilities, and technical competencies to help you pursue executive management and leadership positions.†

† Kaplan University's programs are designed to prepare graduates to pursue employment in their field of study, or in related fields. However, the University does not guarantee that graduates will be placed in any particular job, eligible for job advancement opportunities, or employed at all. Additional fire academy training may be required for these positions.

Law Enforcement Courses at Post University

Program Name: B.S. in Criminal Justice
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ101
Credits 3.0

The student will be introduced to the American Criminal Justice System from the perspective of the criminal justice professional. The course examines the historical development and role of the police, prosecution, corrections, probation, parole, and rehabilitation.


Introduction to Law Enforcement
Course Number CRJ102
Credits 3.0

This course studies the role of police in society with attention to the history of law enforcement, the organization of police forces, centralized police power, community policing, and the recruitment and training of police officers.


Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CRJ103
Credits 3.0

This course studies the history of corrections, including imprisonment and other forms of punishment, both institutional and non-institutional. The philosophy and rationale for various sentencing alternatives are considered.


Juvenile Justice
Course Number CRJ201
Credits 3.0

The student is introduced to the juvenile justice process. While the focus is on the criminal court system’s handling of the juvenile offender, additional areas of study include the forces that contribute to juvenile delinquency, as well as prevention rehabilitation. Prerequisite: CRJ101


Introduction to Security
Course Number CRJ202
Credits 3.0

This course is an introductory survey of the security field, including private, corporate, industrial, and retail applications. Comparisons are made between private and public policing.


Foundations of Terrorism
Course Number CRJ207
Credits 3.0

This is a survey course on the study of terrorism. The social, political, economic, and religious foundations of terrorism will be explored. Specific terrorist organizations and tactics will be studied. The role of intelligence gathering and counterterrorist activities will be addressed. Finally, the role of the media will be explored in terms of how it reports on terrorist activities and why terrorists need the media to be successful.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJ211
Credits 3.0

The student is introduced to the principles of criminal investigation. These include techniques and methods used in searching the crime scene, locating and interviewing witnesses, interrogating witnesses, and developing suspects. Attention is given to the basics of forensic science, including photography. Prerequisite: CRJ102.


Crime Mapping and Analysis
Course Number CRJ212
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Practice Of Gathering, Analyzing, And Plotting Crime Data To Determine Crime Patterns, Crime Trend Correlations, Hot Spots And The Forecast Of Future Crimes. Emphasis Is On The Use Of The Gis Systems With Various Models And Techniques Of Crime Data Research. Prerequisite: Crj102.


Fingerprinting
Course Number CRJ213
Credits 3.0

This Course Studies The History And Application Of Fingerprint Science. It Assumes Knowledge, Skills, And Ability To Recognize And Identify Fingerprint Pattern, Including Topics Like Latent Print Identification And Classification, The Henry System, Afis, And Court Testimony On Fingerprint Identification. A Lab Is Required On Fingerprint Identification. Prerequisite: Crj102.


Criminal Law
Course Number CRJ301
Credits 3.0

The Course Examines Substantive And Procedural Criminal Law Including The Common Law And Statutory Offenses. Law Of Evidence, Burden Of Proof, The Jury System, And Pre-trial Dispositions Are Also Studied. Prerequisite: Crj101 Or Law 101.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CRJ302
Credits 3.0

This course is a survey and analysis of the due process rights of individuals in the criminal process. Emphasis is on the impact of the Bill of Rights on the practices of police, prosecutors and judges and the remedies available for the violation of those rights. Prerequisite: CRJ301.


Police Administration and Management
Course Number CRJ309
Credits 3.0

The student is introduced to the basics of administering and managing law enforcement professionals. The focus is on particular issues faced in managing police officers–federal, state, or local. The course addresses relations with nongovernmental community leaders. Budgeting and planning are also covered. Prerequisite: CRJ102.


Effective Communication for Criminal Justice Professionals
Course Number CRJ311
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to impart communication skills specifically geared toward the criminal justice professional. This course provides both a theoretical and practical study of the role of communication as it relates to law enforcement. Subjects include: thinking before speaking, oral and written communications, use of presentation and visual aids, purposes of speech, public speaking including extemporaneous style speaking, non-verbal communication, grammar, making reports on the job, departmental records and record keeping, proper communication in the courtroom, interviewing and interrogating witnesses and suspects, communication technology, communicating with ethnic groups, and much more.


Community Corrections
Course Number CRJ331
Credits 3.0

This course surveys the origins and development of contemporary practices in probation, parole, and other forms of community corrections, including the impact of these practices on other elements of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJ103.


White-Collar Crime
Course Number CRJ332
Credits 3.0

This course provides an analysis of crimes committed by persons in a position of trust, including embezzlement, fraud, false advertising, price fixing, black market activities, and governmental corruption. Crimes against one’s employer and crimes committed by corporate executives for their corporation are studied. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Organized Crime
Course Number CRJ333
Credits 3.0

The course is an historical and contemporary review of the development and operation of organizations committed to criminal conduct both in the United States and the rest of the world. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Crime Scene Investigation
Course Number CRJ342
Credits 3.0

This course offers a methodical and detailed approach to crime scene investigation, including crime scene processing, identification and collection of physical evidence and chain of custody. Students will be able to successfully recognize, document, collect and preserve physical evidence. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Fire & Arson Investigations
Course Number CRJ344
Credits 3.0

This course studies the compilation and analysis of information related to fires and explosions. The primary focus of this course is to understand how to conduct, determine and document the area of origin and cause of a fire and the factors that contribute to the ignition and subsequent growth. . Laws pertaining to burning, arson, and search and seizure are discussed. Attention is given to the basics of fire science, forensic science, including photography. Prerequisite: CRJ211 or permission of the Instructor


Electronic Investigations
Course Number CRJ346
Credits 3.0

This course studies the vast amount of information available to investigators through public records and the internet. The focus is on how to understand, obtain, discern and utilize public record information for investigatory purposes. This course is relevant to both public and private investigators. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Research Methods in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ355
Credits 3.0

This course will review the basic techniques of research methodology, especially as applied to the field of criminal justice. Major topics will include the purposes of research, types of research design, data collection techniques, and the ethics of research. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Statistical Methods in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ356
Credits 3.0

Elementary Review Of Probability Theory And Its Application To Data Analysis. Covered Topics Include: Descriptive Statistics, Inferential Statistics And Focusing On Tests Of Significance, Tests Of Association And Casual Analysis. This Course Will Be Heavily Based On Use Of Computer Software, Such As Spss. Prerequisite: Crj355.


Ethics and Discretion in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ401
Credits 3.0

The student is asked to consider the ethical issues involved in a criminal justice career. The concepts of integrity, honesty, and trustworthiness are examined as they bear upon the criminal justice professional’s relationship to his or her colleagues, superiors, and community. Prerequisite: CRJ101.


Comparative Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ402
Credits 3.0

This is a survey course, the purpose of which is to introduce the student to foreign criminal justice systems.


Theoretical Criminology
Course Number CRJ404
Credits 3.0

This course will review the wide range of theoretical explanations for criminal behavior. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary, biological, psychological, sociological, economic, and integrated theories of behavior.


Advanced Seminar in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ405
Credits 3.0

This is a capstone course that draws together the principles learned in previous CRJ courses. The seminar topic is at the discretion of the program director. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the Program Director.


Internship in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ460
Credits 1.0

The student is placed in an internship requiring hands-on involvement in an area of the criminal justice system of interest to the student. This may occur in a federal, state, or local agency. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. You must speak with your academic advisor as well as the Career Services Office before registering.


Program description: Post University's Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program provides a comprehensive curriculum that emphasizes creative thinking and writing skills while developing an understanding of the criminal justice system. Students will be prepared to take positions in local, state, and federal justice systems. You will take a variety of courses covering a diversity of relevant areas such as, forensic science, criminal procedure, criminal law, and ethics and discretion in criminal justice. This program provides an excellent education for those entering a criminal justice career and those who are seeking to advance their current careers within their department or agency.

Law Enforcement Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Bachelor's (BSCJ) - Law Enforcement
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Comparative Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJS 305
Credits 4.5

This course gives students a rationale for understanding and appreciating the different ways justice is conceived and administered internationally. This course serves as a basis for comparing various justice systems as they relate to the American justice system. Students will explore how various countries organize their law enforcement, judicial systems and corrections agencies, and compare them with the American criminal justice system.


Crime Victim Studies
Course Number CRJS 310
Credits 4.5

This course presents the scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to victims and their situations. It also looks at the different types of victimizations, how victimization rates are measured, and what attempts the government has made to increase the involvement of victims’ role in the criminal justice system.


Constitutional Law
Course Number CRJS 400
Credits 4.5

This course examines the United States Constitution, its history, evolution and influence on the criminal justice system, including the structure of government and our system of checks and balances. Additionally, students will analyze doctrinal shifts in the court’s decisions, and critique the role of individual jurisprudential viewpoints in judicial decision making.


Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 410
Credits 4.5

This course offers a social historical overview of issues of race, class, gender, crime, and justice. The impact of the criminal justice system on culturally diverse groups is the primary theme of all class activities.


Ethics and Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 420
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of ethical conduct in the administration of justice. This course explores moral choices associated with individuals in the criminal justice field, and examines consequences associated with various choice options.


Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Number CRJS 430
Credits 4.5

This course teaches students the theoretical aspects of conducting and investigating research problems in criminology and criminal justice. It explores the entire research process from beginning to end including the following techniques: problem identification, data collection, measurement, reliability, and validity issues. Students will also examine the ethical issues in the research process and how to analyze and document the research findings in a written assignment.


Applied Statistics
Course Number CRJS 440
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to teach students basic inferential statistical computations and analyses. The course focuses on practical applications rather than advanced statistical analysis. Students will develop skills in statistical application related to criminal justice policies and this course prepares students for the work place or those who are interested in pursuing graduate studies involving research.


Advanced Topics in Corrections
Course Number CRJS 450
Credits 4.5

This course examines the theories and practices involved in probation and parole processes and decision-making. Topics include pre-sentence and pre-parole investigations, probation and parole supervision, the administration of corrections services including treatment and release decision making processes. Finally this course examines juvenile corrections and the use of intermediate methods of treatment including electronic monitoring, community service, and the use of restitution.


Senior Capstone in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 499
Credits 4.5

This course offers a comprehensive and systematic analysis of key contemporary criminal justice issues through a close review of the theories and policies guiding many crime fighting strategies. By applying critical thinking and analytical skills, oral and written communication skills, and information systems skills, students will learn of the complex nature of crime and society’s response to criminality. This course serves as the CJ capstone class and involves the student preparing a project agreed upon between the student and the instructor. Each project will require research, report writing, oral presentation, and interactive teamwork.


Administration of Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 345
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on the challenges administrators face in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will examine the various organizational frameworks in the criminal justice system and the concepts, organizational principles, and models associated with these criminal justice agencies.


Community Oriented Policing
Course Number CRJS 320
Credits 4.5

This course examines the relationship between police agencies and the communities they serve. Topics will include traditional relations and public policy as well as new programs designed to involve the community in resolving crimes in the community. Students will also examine issues involving police ethics and the public image of police agencies in the media.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJS 455
Credits 4.5

This course explores the elements of investigation including crime scenes, witnesses and evidence, and includes such topics as investigative techniques, evidence documentation, interrogation and arrest. The course addresses the particulars of investigating major crimes.


Crime Mapping and Analysis
Course Number CRJS 465
Credits 4.5

This course introduces basic concepts in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications in criminal justice. The class provides an overview of the use of maps in policing. Emphasis is on learning how to properly design, construct, manipulate, and interpret maps.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice
provides students with a broad based education in criminal
justice studies. The curriculum is designed to give students
a professional education in the criminal justice field, with
particular emphases in policing, courts, criminology,
corrections, juvenile justice, and the field of forensic
science. The focus is to provide students with an
education that will help them master the skills and
expertise needed to work in the field of criminal justice.

Program Name: Associate's (AABA) - Criminal Justice Administration
English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: None In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN 105
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed, and controlled.



Principles of Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 205
Credits 4.5

"This course introduces students to financial accounting. Students can learn the fundamentals of the accounting cycle."


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON 220
Credits 4.5

"This course focuses on Economic theory of the firm, resource allocation and price determination, the free market supply/demand mechanism, and pure and imperfect competition models are analyzed."


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON 224
Credits 4.5

"Presents basic economic concepts emphasizing the part the United States plays in a global economy. Foundations of economic theory are presented, using topics from television news and mass media. Topics introduced are GDP, National Income Accounting, United States fiscal policy and economic growth."


Business Management and Leadership
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

"Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix."


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix.


Lower Division Capstone
Course Number BUSN 300
Credits 4.5

This course requires students completing their AABA degree to demonstrate knowledge learned throughout the program and apply the theories to real world issues. Students are expected to synthesize and integrate learning experiences acquired throughout their program and to evaluate research and current topics relative to their area of concentration.


Foundations of Criminal Justice Systems
Course Number CRJS 101
Credits 4.5

This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be on crime in America, the criminal justice process, law enforcement, adjudication, punishment, corrections, and prisons. Students will also learn about crime, law and justice, as well as special issues in the criminal justice system.


Theories of Crime Causation
Course Number CRJS 105
Credits 4.5

This course is an overview of theoretical perspectives in criminology. This entails the nature, causation and etiology of criminal behaviors in offenders.


Introduction to Criminal Law
Course Number CRJS 205
Credits 4.5

This course furnishes a concise but comprehensive introduction to the substantive criminal law. It offers an understanding of the legal environment in which criminal justice professionals must function and helps students to gain a clear understanding of the principles of the law that will be vital to success in the field of criminal justice.


Proseminar in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 300
Credits 4.5

This course provides a comprehensive review of the criminal justice system focusing on how the system functions in theory and practice. Analyses of specific policies relevant to crime and the administration of justice is used to explore the process of forming public policy and the impact criminal justice professionals have upon the policy implementation. It is an in-depth study of the American criminal justice system including the history, theories, responsibilities, and functions of primary parts of the system.


Program description: The Associate of Arts in Business Administration (AABA) program with a concentration in Criminal Justice allows students to develop essential critical thinking and communication skills. Coursework is structured to assist them in the development of their goals as they acquire focused knowledge and skills common to many entry-level criminal justice professionals.

Law Enforcement Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Associate in Arts in Criminal Justice
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the components and operations of the criminal justice system. It examines the three main components of that system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Issues and challenges within the criminal justice system and the system's future are also explored.


Information Technology in Criminal Justice
Course Number CIS170
Credits 4.0

This course examines how information technology is used within the criminal justice system, Homeland Security, and private security. Topics covered include information systems and communication technologies used to prevent and investigate crime and manage security. Students will develop fundamental technical and research skills applicable to criminal justice.


Crime and Criminal Behavior
Course Number CRJ105
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers The Historical Development Of Social And Behavior Explanations Of Adult Crime, As Well As Juvenile Crime And New Evolutions In Crime, Including Cyber Crimes. Crime Causation Theories Are Explained In Relation To Policies Developed From These Theories And The Real And Intended Impact Of These Policies Are Discussed To Demonstrate Their Impact On Society In Regard To Crime Prevention And Criminal Rehabilitation. Prerequisites: Crj 100, Psy 100, Or Psy 105


Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
Course Number CRJ180
Credits 4.0

This course examines the criminal activity of juveniles and includes the study of gangs, status offenses, and the problems facing juveniles today. An overview of American juvenile justice is also provided, in terms of both system and practice. The causes of juvenile crime, the juvenile court system, and the institutionalization, rehabilitation, and treatment of juveniles are explored. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Ethics and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ220
Credits 4.0

This course exposes students to the various philosophical approaches for developing appropriate ethical decision-making tools for the criminal justice professional. Ethical decision-making tools are illustrated in actual application in police, courts, corrections, criminal justice policy, and criminal justice research scenarios. Emphasis is placed on professional integrity and leadership skills that support laws, policies, and procedures in criminal justice. Prerequisites: CRJ 100Introduction to Criminal Justice


Comparative Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ330
Credits 4.0

This Course Offers A Comparative Perspective On Crime And On The Practice Of Criminal Justice. The Role Of Increased Globalization In Transnational Crime And Justice Are Explored, To Include: Trafficking In Persons, Transnational Crime, Narcoterrorism, International Cybercrime And Cyberscams, The Relationships Between International Terrorist Organizations, And The Functioning And Organization Of International Crime Fighting Agencies. Prerequisites: Crj 100introduction To Criminal Justice Crj 105crime And Criminal Behavior


Criminal Law
Course Number LEG220
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with the origins of criminal law and explores its historical development into modern American crimes codes. Each lesson introduces the student to substantive criminal law and associated legal principles and terminology. This course contrasts elements of crimes against persons, crimes against property, cyber-crime, white collar crime, and other types of crime. Early and modern approaches to identifying, deterring, preventing, detecting, prosecuting, and punishing criminal behavior are also examined.


Social Psychology
Course Number PSY110
Credits 4.0

Focuses on major theories in social psychology and the most recent research in the field. Topics include gender, interpersonal attraction, aggression, and prosocial behavior.


Society, Law and Government
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course examines the function of the American court system in its operational role within the government, the rule of law, and society. The criminal court process and the role of the judiciary are explained from a policy making perspective that reveals the impact of the courts on society and the rule of law in the evolution of social


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Introduction to Information Systems
Course Number CIS 105
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microcomputer applications including a brief introduction to computer concepts, computer operating systems, software and hardware. It introduces the student to word processing, spreadsheets, the Internet, graphics, and database software. Included is the creation of web pages, integration of the applications, and hands-on introduction to Microsoft Windows commands, files, features and functions.


English Composition
Course Number ENG 115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics
Course Number MAT105
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Research and Writing
Course Number ENG215
Credits 4.0

This course examines and implements the principles of argumentation. An argumentative paper is researched and developed based on the concept of writing as a process. The course focuses on the logical organization of ideas patterned on established structures of argument. The course reinforces the importance of the research process and critical evaluation of sources. Acknowledging the intellectual property of others through the proper documentation of sources is stressed.


The Origins of Western Culture
Course Number HUM101
Credits 4.0

Studies civilizations and cultures such as ancient Egypt, Crete, Greece, and Rome which have given root to Western culture. Analyzes the artistic, intellectual, religious, political, and socioeconomic aspects of each culture and traces their development in Western civilization.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI110
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Physical Sciences introduces the student to basic concepts from the physical sciences such as motion, force, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism and the atomic theory of matter. Discusses the scientific principles that underlie everyday phenomena, modern technologies and planetary processes. Examines how the various branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, astronomy, relate to each other. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Introduction to Biology
Course Number SCI115
Credits 4.0

Provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biology, as well as the process of biological inquiry using the scientific method. Covers the properties and characteristics of living cells, organisms, and ecosystems, and the relevance of this knowledge for contemporary issues in medicine, agriculture and the environment. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


The Individual and Society
Course Number PSY100
Credits 4.0

Presents the various ways in which the individual constructs his self-awareness. Studies how social institutions, such as the family and religion, influence the psychological makeup of the individual.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

Introduces psychology as a human and scientific endeavor. Includes examination of concepts and methods in learning, motivation, development, personality, and social behavior.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC100
Credits 4.0

Provides a critical survey of contemporary social, political, and economic problems facing American society. Emphasizes the urban crisis, military-industrial complex, racism, and distribution of income.


Program description: The Associate in Arts in Criminal Justice is designed to provide students current and relevant knowledge regarding the prevention, adjudication, and correction of juvenile and adult crime. It prepares students for public or private sector careers within the criminal justice field.

Law Enforcement Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Associate's - Criminal Justice
Foundations of the Criminal Justice System
Course Number CJS200

This course is an introduction to the foundational elements of the criminal justice system. Students examine this system from its influential past, to its multi-faceted present, to its theorized future. This course gives the student an interactive pathway through the laws that protect the system, through the people that enforce the system, and through the courts that govern this system. It also provides an overview of the correctional systems and their impact and roles in American society. Other topics include crime causation, terrorism, and cybercrime-related issues.


Fundamentals of Policing
Course Number CJS210

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain a basic understanding of policing in the United States. It examines the history of the police, the emerging role of private security, and the organizational concepts of police departments. This course also discusses the relationships between the police department and their respective communities. Other topics include recruitment processes, diversity, culture, and laws that govern policing. Students will have the opportunity to research their local police department for a closer look at policing in their community.


The Court System
Course Number CJS220

This course is an introduction to the fundamental elements of the courts in our criminal justice system. Students will examine the many complexities affecting the court system, from the theory behind the creation of laws to the implementation of such laws. This course provides an in-depth look into the roles and functions of the professionals interacting within the court while outlining the courtroom process. Other topics include punishments, appeals, and plea bargains.


Corrections: A World Apart
Course Number CJS230

This course introduces students to the fundamental elements of the corrections system within the criminal justice field. Students will examine the early implementations of punishment as well as evolving philosophies of sentencing. Students will gain insight into the purpose and functions of jails and prisons, while establishing a connection between prison life and prisoner’s rights. Students will also take an in-depth look into how parole and probation affect our communities. Other topics include correctional management, rehabilitation, and correctional systems in other countries.


Introduction to Juvenile Justice
Course Number CJS240

This course is a general orientation to the concept of delinquency and the field of juvenile justice. Students will examine the nature of delinquency, as well as a variety of theories and suspected causes of delinquent behavior. Students will study factors related to delinquency and/or prevention including gender, youthful behavior, family, peers, drug use, school, and community.. This course will also familiarize students with the evolution of juvenile justice and key players in the juvenile justice process. Additionally, students will develop an understanding of the juvenile court process, as well as juvenile detention, restitution, prevention and treatment.


Introduction to Security
Course Number CJS250

This course is an introduction to contemporary security practices and programs. Students will study the origins of private security, its impact on our criminal justice system, and the roles of security personnel. Students will also examine the growth and privatization of the security industry, and study the elements of physical security including surveillance and alarm systems. The course will cover legal and liability issues, which determine the extent of private security authority as well as its limitations. This course will also focus on the current and future integration of private security services in law enforcement agencies.


Program description: The Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice degree program focuses on policing practices, corrections, the criminal court system and juvenile justice. Students take a comprehensive look at these topics through interactive assignments that not only develop their critical thinking skills, but also enable them to recognize the functions of the criminal justice professions within their communities.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Law Enforcement Courses at South University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Specialization
Biology II
Course Number BIO1021
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Bio1020 With A Grade Of C Or Better Co Or Pre Requisite: Eng1001 Biology Ii Is The Second Course In A Twocourse Sequence In Biology. This Course Continues The Study Of Human Biology With The Role Of Endocrine And Nervous Systems In Homeostatic Regulation. Other Topics Covered Are Human Reproduction, Development, Evolution, And Advanced Genetics. Ecological Concepts Are Also Discussed. The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Increase Knowledge Of The Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hour.


Statistics
Course Number MAT2058
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat1001 Or Mat1002 Statistics Introduces The Student To The Terminology And Techniques Of Statistics Including Levels Of Measurement, Measures Of Central Tendency And Variance, Random Variables, Linear Correlation And Regression, Normal Probability Distributions, Sampling Distributions, The Central Limit Theorem, And Hypothesis Testing.4 Quarter Hours.


History of Art
Course Number HUM1001
Credits 4.0

Co or Pre requisite: ENG1001 This course surveys the history of art beginning with the Prehistoric/Tribal period and continuing through the Middle Ages. The concepts,artists, motifs, works, and styles of the periods will be studied. The course introduces students to elements of art and design, and fosters an appreciation for the world of art. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement
Course Number CRJ1101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the criminal justice system and contemporary policing in the United States. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Courts and Corrections
Course Number CRJ1102
Credits 4.0

This course provides a comprehensive look at the criminal court system in the United States and the American correctional system.The course looks at the roles of prosecutors,judges, defense attorneys and the dynamics of their interactions as well as an overview on all aspects of corrections, including probation and parole. 4 quarter hours


Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ2004
Credits 4.0

This course examines ethical issues faced by actors in the criminal justice system. The focus will be placed on the philosophical and practical approaches to solve ethical dilemmas within the complicated criminal justice system.4 quarter hours


Criminal Procedures
Course Number CRJ2006
Credits 4.0

This course will cover the legal aspects of police investigatory practices, criminal procedure law, and constitutional cases as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Focus will be on U.S. Supreme court cases and lower court cases setting out the requirements for arrest,search and seizure, confessions, and pretrial identifications. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the legal rights,duties, and liabilities of criminal justice professionals.4 quarter hours


Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ3004
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on theoretical foundations and current research on theories of racial,ethnic, class and gender discrimination within America’s criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on the most recent research on patterns of criminal behavior and victimization,police practices, court processing and sentencing,the death penalty, and correctional programs as they relate to minority groups. 4 quarter hours


Criminal Justice Management and Administration
Course Number CRJ3005
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Covers Modern Management Theory And The Application Of Management Techniques Appropriate To Each Area Of The Criminal Justice System. 4 Quarter Hours


Theories of Crime/Justice
Course Number CRJ3009
Credits 4.0

An overview of a variety of criminological theories. Attention will be directed toward the study of the major theoretical schools of thought which have influenced the American system of crime and justice. The basic goal of this course is to help the student develop an understanding of and appreciation for the insights gained by examining crime and criminals through different theoretical frameworks.4 quarter hours


Victimology
Course Number CRJ4001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3011 The course is a comprehensive look at the theories of victimology and the interaction of crime victims with others in the criminal justice system. 4 quarter hours


Alcohol, Drugs and Criminal Justice Policy
Course Number CRJ4007
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Examines The Pharmacological Effects And Medical Uses Of Drugs And Alcohol And The Role They Play In The U.s. Criminal Justice System. Topics Covered Include The History Of Alcohol And Drug Prohibition In The U.s.; The Types Of Illegal Drugs Currently Available In The United States; Patterns, Trends, And Scope Of Illicit Drug Use; Consideration Of The Relationship Between Drugs And Crime; And Manifestations And Consequences Of The Criminal Justice System Response. 4 Quarter Hours


Senior Seminar (Capstone)
Course Number CRJ4999
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: All core required CRJ courses The senior capstone course is designed to ensure that graduates of the criminal justice program are equipped with the skills necessary to pursue further study in their discipline or obtain responsible positions within criminal justice agencies or related professional organization.4 quarter hours


Intermediate Algebra
Course Number MAT1001
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Algebra is a continuation of MAT0099 exploring the arithmetic of polynomials, factoring, systems of linear equations, solving quadratic equations, and applying algebra techniques to problem solving and applications.


Biology I
Course Number BIO1020
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: Mat0099 Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 This Is The First Of A Two-course Sequence In Biology. This Course Introduces Biology, Scientific Methods, Biological Chemistry, And Energy For Life. This Course Also Exposes Students To The Organization Of Humans And Plants, Basic Genetics, And Evolutionary Concepts. In Addition, The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Introduce Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hours


College Math
Course Number MAT1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat0099 Or Exemption Thereof. Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 College Math Is A Survey Course Emphasizing Inductive And Deductive Reasoning, Concepts From Set Theory, Applications Of Venn Diagrams, Elements Of Formal Logic, Common Formulas And Relationships From Geometry, And An Introduction To Probability And Statistics. 4 Quarter Hours


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
Course Number PSY2007
Credits 4.0

An investigation of the methodological principles regarding behavioral science research, descriptive and inferential techniques, and the process of using these techniques for psychological experimentation and data analysis


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences Lab
Course Number PSY2008
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the statistical principles associated with the study of behavioral science research through application and computerized data analysis (i.e., SPSS).


Composition I
Course Number ENG1001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites:ENG0099 or exemption thereof. In this course students develop their writing skills through the reading and construction of expository essays. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition II/Literature
Course Number ENG1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: ENG1001 In this course students write analytical and critical essays about plays, short stories, and poetry. Emphasis is placed on literal and figurative interpretations, structural analysis, and variations in thematic approach. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition III
Course Number ENG2001
Credits 4.0

Focusing on the construction of effective written argument, this course refines composition techniques, develops abstract thought processes, and promotes critical thinking. A library paper is included. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.


Public Speaking
Course Number SPC1026
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare the student to develop and improve the ability to communicate. Self-expression, preparation of effective speeches, and development of speaking and listening skills will be emphasized. 4 quarter hours


Strategies for Success
Course Number UVC1000
Credits 4.0

Designed to help entering students develop a more effective approach to college success, this course emphasizes positive self-evaluation, goal setting and motivation; practical skills of successful students; effective use of the library and the many sources of information available; and the concepts and tools of critical thinking, and their applications. 4 quarter hours


General Psychology
Course Number PSY1001
Credits 4.0

In this course a study is made of human behavior with special reference to perception, learning, memory, thinking, emotional life, and individual differences in intelligence, aptitude, and personality. Emphasis is placed on the scientific nature of psychological investigations. Research methods are analyzed, and results are related to daily life and everyday problems.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC1001
Credits 4.0

This course serves as an introduction to the study of human social development, its organizations, and its institutions. It teaches the student to look at our society and others from a sociological perspective. Specific areas covered are group dynamics, social deviance, gender equality, racial and ethnic relations, the family, religion, and education


American Government
Course Number POL2076
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to general principles and problems of modern government. It shows the forms of government, the place of government in the social process, and theories of the state. The American system is analyzed. Studying political science provides accurate understanding of how and why political systems work as they do


Criminal Law
Course Number LGS2004
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with substantive criminal law and criminal procedures. It enables the student, under the supervision of a lawyer, to prepare pretrial pleadings, interview witnesses, and conduct trial and post trial proceedings


Research Methods
Course Number PSY2060
Credits 2.0

Research design and methodology. An analysis of the approaches to developing, understanding, and interpreting psychological phenomena. Topics include experimental vs. non-experimental research such as survey, observation, case study, and archival data. An understanding of reliability, validity, and experimental control issues.


Research Methods Lab
Course Number PSY2061
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the methodological principles associated with behavioral science research through an application of the theoretical, conceptual, and practical principles


Community Policing
Course Number CRJ4006
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3007 This course focuses on the dual themes of problem solving and community/police collaboration and partnerships. A historical perspective is presented that details the community policing philosophy and the course provides practical strategies to implement community policing. 4 quarter hours


Law Enforcement Supervision and Management
Course Number CRJ4010
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3007 This course focuses on law enforcement managers and supervisors, their jobs, and the complicated interrelationships between members of the law enforcement team and the communities they share. Topics covered include: leadership, organizational behavior, and new developments in the field. 4 quarter hours


Terrorism and Homeland Security
Course Number CRJ4011
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Focuses On The Theories Of Domestic And International Terrorism And The Criminal Justice Response To Homeland Security. 4 Quarter Hours


Law Enforcement Structure And Process
Course Number CRJ3007
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ1101 This course provides an introduction to the philosophical, cultural, and historical background of police. The course deals with concepts such as the role of the police in contemporary society, the quasi-military organization of the police, and community issues. 4 quarter hours


Illegal Immigration and the Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJ4009
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 An Overview Of The Political And Legal Aspects Of Illegal Immigration In A Nation Of Immigrants. Emphasis On The Operational And Bureaucratic Impediments Of The Enforcement Of Immigrant Laws. 4 Quarter Hours


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJ4012
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3007 This course is designed to combine the practical and theoretical aspects of criminal investigations and to develop an analytical and practical understanding of the investigative. 4 quarter hours


Criminalistics I
Course Number CRJ3008
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ1101 This course is an introduction to the field of forensic science. Students will learn the scientific techniques used by crime laboratories to process crime scenes, collect evidence, and examine physical evidence. The course will focus on how evidence from a crime scene can aid a criminal investigation. 4 quarter hours


Deviant Behavior
Course Number CRJ3010
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3011 This course focuses on the concepts and theories of deviance and how they can be applied in the criminal justice field. 4 quarter hour


Criminal Justice and the Media
Course Number CRJ3014
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice and the Media explores the relationship between the mass media, crime and the criminal justice system in the United States. Students will examine the role media plays in the social construction of crime and justice, and the impact of the media on attitudes and perceptions of crime and criminality. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship of the media and crime prevention, and the impact of the media on the operations of the agencies in the criminal justice system from law enforcement to corrections. 4 quarter hours


White Collar Crime
Course Number CRJ3015
Credits 4.0

This course examines the various types of “white-collar” and economic crimes in America. These include corporate crimes such as consumer fraud and stock fraud, environmental crimes, corruption, medical crime, and computer- based crime. Students will learn about pyramid schemes, e-mail and web-based crimes, boiler-room operations, and criminal organizations posing as religions or charities. 4 quarter hours


Program description: The South University Criminal Justice program offers a course of study
leading to a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. This course of study
is designed to give students broad perspectives on the causes of crime
and critical insights to the functions of the components of the criminal
justice system. Courses in the program deal with crime, violence, and
other forms of deviance and the responses to these problems by police,
courts, and corrections; contemporary criminal justice issues; and ethical concerns and research. Students majoring in criminal justice receive
excellent preparation for further study in graduate or professional schools
as well as for careers in the criminal justice system.

Law Enforcement Courses at Virginia College

Program Name: Associate's - Criminal Justice
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ 1010
Credits 4.0

N/A


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CRJ 1050
Credits 4.0

N/A


Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CRJ 1400
Credits 4.0

N/A


Courts in America
Course Number CRJ 1500
Credits 4.0

N/A


Criminal Justice Ethics
Course Number CRJ 1600
Credits 4.0

N/A


Investigative Report Writing
Course Number CRJ 2000
Credits 4.0

N/A


Criminology
Course Number CRJ 2010
Credits 4.0

N/A


Juvenile Justice
Course Number CRJ 2030
Credits 4.0

N/A


Police in America
Course Number CRJ 2050
Credits 4.0

N/A


Business, Corporate, and Industrial Security
Course Number CRJ 2490
Credits 4.0

N/A


Introduction to Forensic Science
Course Number CRJ 2900
Credits 4.0

N/A


Criminal Law
Course Number LGA 1800
Credits 4.0

N/A


Keyboarding
Course Number AOM 1010

Word Processing
Course Number AOM 1100

Learning Framework
Course Number EDU 1010
Credits 4.0

Career Exploration/Planning
Course Number EDU 1020
Credits 4.0

Program description: Prepare for or enhance your career in law enforcement online in the Criminal Justice program at Virginia College, where technology meets law enforcement. Virginia College's associate degree in Criminal Justice is offered online to fit the busy schedules of today's students. For those with work hours that vary from day to day, for students with an active family life, or for people who just want to complete their course work on their own schedule, online learning is an excellent option.

This program is right for you if you are currently employed in the field, if you are interested in pursuing a career in criminal justice, or if you have a strong desire to make your community a better place in which to live. The program will help you succeed in a variety of criminal justice positions, including courtroom administrator, police officer, private security officer, probation or parole officer, juvenile delinquency case manager, corrections officer, police detective, industrial security, commercial security, or homeland security.

Law Enforcement Courses at Ivy Bridge College of Tiffin University

Program Name: Associate of Criminal Justice in Law Enforcement
Introduction to the American Political Process
Course Number POL101
Credits 3.0

Examines the American democratic process and the distribution of authority and responsibility between the federal, state, and local levels.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY101
Credits 3.0

Introduces psychology as a behavioral science, including historical background, human development (genetic and physical) from birth through death, the senses and perception, intelligence and creativity, and the principles of conditioning, learning, memory, and forgetting.


Juvenile Justice Systems
Course Number COR 131
Credits 3.0

Examines the history, concepts, and scope of the juvenile justice system and its contrast with the adult system of justice. Includes an analysis of the juvenile justice process from initial intervention of delinquency and status offenses by law enforcement personnel and others through release from intervention. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Spring.


Police and Society
Course Number ENF 150
Credits 3.0

Explores the various response methodologies available to the patrol officer in assisting the citizen’s request for police service. Discusses traffic enforcement from the stop of the violator through traffic accident investigation. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Spring.


Computers in Law Enforcement
Course Number ENF 234
Credits 3.0

Surveys The Use And Potential Of Computers In Law Enforcement Agencies, The Ethical And Legal Problems Confronting Society And Police Agencies Occasioned By The Use Of Computers As Information Gathering And Storage Instruments, And The Advantage Of Using Computers In Research And Agency Operations. Students Will Learn To Use Computers For Link Network Analysis, Crime Mapping, Traffic Analysis And Accident Plotting, Crime Analysis And Other Functions Relating To The Administration/operation Of A Law Enforcement Agency. Prerequisites: Cit105, 111 Or 205, Enf150, Or Permission Of Instructor. Offered Fall.


Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation
Course Number ENF 237
Credits 3.0

Explores the fundamentals of criminal investigative techniques including initial response to the crime scene, location and recognition of evi­dence, interviewing, sketching, collection and transpiration of evidence, report writing and court testimony. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Fall.


Applied Criminal Investigation and Criminalistics
Course Number ENF 239
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes the investigation of specific crimes including Homicide, Sexual Assault, Aggravated Assault, Robbery, Burglary, Theft, Auto Theft and Arson. Students will investigate a "mock" crime scene, collect and analyze evidence obtained and present their investigation in a "moot" court. Prerequisite: ENF237. Offered Spring.


Agency Management
Course Number COR 230
Credits 3.0

Analyzes Some Of The Distinct Differences Between Public And Private Management. Covers The Theory Of Controlling, Organiz­ing, Planning, Directing And Assembling Resources. Students Will Develop A Course Project Designed To Cover These Concepts. Prerequisites: Jus110, Mgt201. Offered Spring.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 110
Credits 3.0

Analyzes the Criminal Justice System and its major subsystems: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Emphasizes structure and functions of the various components and their interactions. Introduces the basics of criminal justice research through the use of the collection of the National Criminal Justice Reference Service and other professional sources of information. Offered Fall and Spring.


Criminal Law
Course Number JUS 201
Credits 3.0

Analyzes criminal laws from their development under common law to their present day applicability under constitutional and statutory standards, with special emphasis on practice with the Ohio Revised Code. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Fall.


Criminal Procedures
Course Number JUS 202
Credits 3.0

Explores the constitutional and legal ramifications affecting the procedure of criminal arrest, search, seizure, and evidence. Prerequisite: JUS201. Offered Spring.


Communication (any oral or speech)
Course Number COM204
Credits 3.0

Explores visual design, graphics and presentational strategies by introducing students to digital photography and layout and design skills. Students learn digital and graphic design techniques using the leading industry software applications for desktop publishing and graphics illustration.


Introduction to Mass Communication
Course Number COM241
Credits 3.0

Examines the various media (i.e., newspaper, radio, television, film, etc.) comprising the mass media in contemporary American society. Emphasis in this survey course is given to the history, structure, and potential effects of each medium.


Expository and Research Writing
Course Number ENG141
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes the development, structure, and writing of abstracts, summaries, and critiques. This course in written communication teaches literary devices such as pro/con, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, persuasion/argumentation essays—plus research/synthesis skills—through the development of a research paper. Students must receive a grade of "C" or better to enroll in ENG142.


Literature and Criticism
Course Number ENG142
Credits 3.0

Presents literature—drama, short stories, novel, poetry and critical essays—from several literary critical perspectives. Through reading, discussion, and critical writing, students become familiar with representative genres in literature as well as authentic critical approaches.


Information Technology
Course Number CIT105
Credits 3.0

Covers the basics of information technology, including common Microsoft Office applications, responsible use of software and technology, file management techniques, and sound information consumption practices. CIT105 is designed for beginners with little or no experience using Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint.Participants are required to demonstrate software proficiency in the lab and through objective written tests.


Finite Mathematics
Course Number MAT 174
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes business applications that involve the study of linear functions, applications using linear equations in two variables, counting methods, probability, finance applications, interpretation of date presented graphically, and computation of mean, median, standard deviation, normal distribution curve, and z scores.


College Algebra
Course Number MAT 181
Credits 3.0

Focuses on developing a conceptual understanding of college algebra and problem solving skills. Topics include functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, and combinatorics and probability.


Principles of Sociology
Course Number SOC 101
Credits 3.0

Introduces the basic concepts of sociological study, elements of social life, social patterns and institutions, and the process of maintenance and change in society.


Program description: Using rigorous class preparations and unique learning experiences, this concentration offers 21 courses with special emphasis on law enforcement, supervision, criminal investigation, and corrections.
Ivy Bridge graduates with an ACJ in Law Enforcement can continue their studies at a four-year institution, or jump right into a high-demand position armed with the inquiry, practice, and interpersonal skills required at all levels of law enforcement.

Law Enforcement Courses at Bryant and Stratton College

Program Name: Associates - Criminal Justice
Introduction to Information Literacy and Research
Course Number COMM150
Credits 3.0

Students study the evolution of information and the impact of technology on research, and learn how to access, evaluate, and synthesize acquired research. The research process and papers required, of each student include inquiry into the history of each student’s chosen career along with the assignments on how changes in technology have impacted the communication processes in the career field. Prerequisite or Corequisite: INSM180


Public Speaking and Rhetorical Persuasion
Course Number COMM201
Credits 3.0

This course is a multi-disciplinary course with the infusion of communication theory along with critical analyses of written and presented speech to include a composition/rhetoric/ textual element from the English discipline.


Research and Writing I
Course Number ENGL101
Credits 3.0

Students develop their expository and persuasive writing skills through varied writing experiences. Information literacy skills and research techniques are introduced and reinforced. Students apply their information literacy and writing skills to produce a paper which incorporates research in appropriate APA citation style.


Research and Writing II
Course Number ENGL250
Credits 3.0

This course builds on the research and writing skills developed in the previous English course. Students make critical decisions about the research necessary to produce diverse writings appropriate in content, format, and documentation. Using their research, students produce documents that will positively affect varied audiences.


History and Practice of Information Systems
Course Number INSM180
Credits 3.0

This introductory course exposes students to the theoretical basis of computing science. Students study the social, educational and career implications of computer hardware and system software, as well as emerging technologies. Learners will apply technology to develop proficiency in the productions, analysis and archiving of electronic communications common in today’s society.


Survey of Mathematics
Course Number MATH103
Credits 3.0

Students employ a wide range of problem solving strategies. This course introduces measurement, consumer math, quantitative reasoning, statistics, different numeration systems, and optional topics according to student needs.


Ecology
Course Number NSCI280
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to environmental science, and examines the human/environmental relationship, fundamental ecological principles, energy resources, human impact on ecosystems, and industry’s impact on ecosystems, natural disasters, and cutting-edge environmental issues.


Practices in Analytic Reasoning and Critical Thinking
Course Number PHIL250
Credits 3.0

Explore and analyze contemporary topics using analytic methods and metacognitive strategies. Emphasis is on the application of these strategies within the dynamic communities of college, career and life. Students complete a career based ethical controversy research paper which contributes to the student learning portfolio.


Principles of Psychology
Course Number PSYC101
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to the principles of psychological theory and research. This course surveys the sub categories of study including: cognitive, developmental, abnormal, social and biopsychology as it related to the scientific study and understanding of human thoughts, emotions and behaviors.


Principles of Sociology
Course Number SOSC102
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to sociological principles through exploring the relationship between the individual, attitudes, behavior and the community. This includes the contemplation of issues like race, gender, class, sex, and age, as well as organizational infrastructures and their tendencies towards power, authority, and status.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJU100
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminology
Course Number CRJU101
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Policing
Course Number CRJU102
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Community Corrections
Course Number CRJU120
Credits 3.0

This course will review probation, parole, and community corrections. Students will learn about their histories and organizational structures, the nature and effects of the process by which offenders are handled, and the dynamics and trends toward change in the fields of probation, parole, and communitybased corrections. Prerequisite: CRJU101


Criminal Courts
Course Number CRJU110
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Juvenile Justice
Course Number CRJU150
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminal Law
Course Number CRJU200
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJU 210
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CRJU 222
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Internship/Capstone Experience
Course Number CRJU260
Credits 3.0

The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.


Program description: The Associates Criminal Justice program at Bryant & Stratton College provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and introduces the student to law enforcement, courts and corrections, as well as private security management. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study.

Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in law enforcement, correctional facilities, juvenile agencies, private security and other human service agencies. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field.

Law Enforcement Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Law Enforcement Foundations
Basic Standards Training 1
Course Number BT1E
Credits 50.0

This course is an introduction to the operations of a security guard, focusing on rights and regulations, duties, responsibilities, and the procedures performed on the job


Basic Standards Training 2
Course Number BT2E
Credits 25.0

This course focuses on communications and the use of force by a security guard


Criminology and the Criminal Justice System
Course Number CCJE
Credits 50.0

Students will gain insight and understanding of both the criminal and the crime including motivation, theories of crime and criminality, psychological/social impact of crime and violence, crime analysis, and Canada's criminal justice system


Criminal Code and Federal States
Course Number CFSE
Credits 50.0

This course provides an in-depth study of Canada’s criminal code and related federal statutes, including interpretation through the perspective of a law enforcement officer


Canadian Government and Politics
Course Number CGNE
Credits 50.0

Students will gain knowledge of both the organization and management of the public sector, as well as the structure, function, and powers of the federal, provincial, and municipal governments


Communications I
Course Number CO1E
Credits 50.0

This introduction to communications is designed to develop students’ English and communication skills so they can communicate accurately, persuasively, and credibly with individuals, groups, and multi-disciplinary teams


Communications II
Course Number CO2E
Credits 50.0

This advanced communication course is designed to enhance the foundational skills developed in introduction to communications. These skills will focus on interpretation of written communication, factual documentation of events for reports that form part of permanent public records, advanced editing skills and advanced verbal reports


Contemporary Social Problems
Course Number CPBE
Credits 50.0

This subject will help students understand what is happening in Canada today, what the trends indicate, and why these things are happening, how social policy is affecting areas such as poverty, child abuse, violence against women, and more


Conflict Resolution and Mediation
Course Number CRME
Credits 25.0

This subject will introduce the foundational concepts of conflict resolution and mediation. The course also introduces the foundations of incident debriefing. The demands of the law and regulatory enforcement constantly place professional in contact with hostile and interpersonal contact during stressful situations. These foundational skills will provide students with tools to improve their ability to do their job by being able to improve interpersonal communication at critical times. Incident debriefing identifies the purpose and process for this tool


Correctional Services
Course Number CSVE
Credits 50.0

This course covers topics related to post-law enforcement or regulatory enforcement including federal and provincial correctional services, probation, parole, halfway houses, rehabilitation processes, and restorative justice


Ethics
Course Number ETCE
Credits 25.0

A practical approach to ethics will help students maintain professional conduct and integrity that must be paramount in their decision-making. Topics include making ethical decisions, laws of police ethics, and moral decision-making


Human Behaviour
Course Number HBVE
Credits 50.0

This course covers the foundations of human behaviour and the impact of deviant behaviour in the law and regulatory enforcement fields


Issues in Diversity and First Nations People
Course Number IDFE
Credits 25.0

By studying the ethnic composition and the history of race relations in Canada, concepts of culture and sensitivity training, students will understand critical situations which may arise from racially-motivated conflict. In order to better understand and deal with native issues, students will study a history of first nations people, laws, demographics, culture, and current issues


Investigation Techniques
Course Number IVTE
Credits 50.0

This course will build on the concepts and ideas taught in earlier foundation courses and will provide the student with the base skills required to be a successful investigator


Introduction to Law Enforcement
Course Number LEFE
Credits 50.0

Beginning with an introduction to the history of policing in Canada, studies will also include police jurisdictions in Canada, police administration, how police agencies use their resources, and more


Psychology
Course Number PSCE
Credits 50.0

This course provides an introduction to psychology including learning, motivation, behaviour, development, factors affecting interpersonal relationships, and group dynamics


Policing Authority / Search / Seizure / Arrest
Course Number PSSE
Credits 50.0

This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to carry out common law enforcement operations, including powers of arrest, rules of evidence, seizure, process of interviewing (both those under investigation and witnesses) and documentation. This topic also covers provincial and federal legislation that govern law enforcement practices in these areas


Regulatory Enforcment - Federal
Course Number REFE
Credits 50.0

In this course the student will be exposed to the purpose of Federal Regulations, enforcement, and compliance strategies as well as methods for obtaining compliance. Students will outline how Regulations are a form of law and how Acts that authorize the making of Regulations are called enabling Acts. The student will compare and contrast the enforcement of Regulations in its two forms ― compliance and sanctioning/deterrence


Regualtory Enforcement - Provincial
Course Number REPE
Credits 50.0

This course explores the history, purpose and range of provincial regulatory bodies including crown corporations that maintain an enforcement or investigation function. The course also reviews the jurisdiction and provincial acts that support the functions of regulatory provincial enforcement agencies. Enforcement agencies include fish and wildlife, transportation, motor vehicles, forestry, social services, air land and water, liquor and tobacco, gaming, taxation and municipalities. Provincial crown corporations include railway, insurance and public utilities


Sociology
Course Number SCLE
Credits 50.0

Knowledge of the workings and interaction of people in society will aid the student in understanding how people are influenced by their social environment. Time is also spent highlighting relevant social problems


Wellness Management
Course Number WMGE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to increase awareness of the lifestyle demands of the law and regulatory enforcement profession. The course also covers the extensive preparation requirements and screening processes used by agencies hiring in law and regulatory enforcement profession. The course covers topics in the physical requirements for the profession, demands of a 24-hour workplace, managing stress, identification of psychological impacts, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. This course includes fitness planning and training, lifestyle planning, and nutrition


Career and Employment Strategies
Course Number CESE
Credits 25.0

his course looks at the planning, preparation, execution, and follow-up stages of an interview.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number INTE
Credits 50.0

This course covers working with the Windows operating system to manage files and folders and customize the desktop, creating documents, and using the Internet for communication and research.


Practicum
Course Number PRAC
Credits 100.0

This program includes a practicum component consisting of a specified number of weeks of work at a job site. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the business organization does not pay for the services of the student during the practicum. The number of practicum hours varies between programs. To learn more about the specific practicum hours for a specific program, speak with an Admissions Representative.


Professional Skills
Course Number PSKE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to equip students with interpersonal skills identified by employers as essential for success in the professional world. Using a variety of instructional methods including case studies, group exercises, and discussion, students learn and practice key communication skills.


Student Success Strategies
Course Number SSSE
Credits 25.0

This course will introduce students to skills and concepts that will help them achieve personal, academic, and career success.


Program description: Law enforcement-related careers are one of the best rated social/community career paths in Canada. CDI's Law Enforcement Foundations program gives you a head start in this satisfying and rewarding field.
This program provides you with a broad education of the legal, ethical, and investigative skills you'll need to enter a career in public safety, security, policing or law enforcement. Courses cover topics such as Criminology and Human Behaviour, Conflict Resolution, Investigation Techniques, and more - which may be useful as police prep training or for other law enforcement careers.

Law Enforcement Courses at Keiser University

Program Name: BA Criminal Justice
Accounting Principles I
Credits 3.0

Accounting Principles II
Course Number GB 520
Credits 3.0

Accounting Information for Business Decisions
Credits 3.0

Business Law
Credits 3.0

Financial Management
Credits 3.0

Principles of Management
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Marketing
Credits 3.0

Principle of Taxation
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Psychology
Credits 3.0

Speech
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Computer
Credits 3.0

Microeconomic
Credits 3.0

Macroeconomics
Credits 3.0

English Composition I
Credits 3.0

English Composition II
Credits 3.0

American Literature
Credits 3.0

English Literature
Credits 3.0

College Algebra
Credits 3.0

College Mathematics
Credits 3.0

General Biology
Credits 3.0

General Biology Laboratory
Credits 1.0

Environmental Science
Credits 3.0

Criminology
Course Number CCJ1010
Credits 3.0

Provides a survey of delinquent and criminal behavior. Topics include causes of these behaviors, specific problems and selected case studies.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CCJ1020
Credits 3.0

Evaluates courts, police and correctional organizations in the United States. The history of these criminal justice organizations is studied. Contemporary problems and their solutions are discussed


Introduction to Corrections
Course Number CJC2000
Credits 3.0

Discusses the development of corrections officers. Topics include a discussion of the complexity and scope of corrections historically, traditionally, operationally and legally.


Introduction to Law Enforcement
Course Number CJE1000
Credits 3.0

Explores the law enforcement profession. Topics include approaches to modern law enforcement, an historical overview and a consideration of law enforcement as a balance of social, historical, political, legal, individual and organizational forces


Communications and Writing for CJ Professionals
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Juvenile Procedures
Course Number CJJ2001
Credits 3.0

Examines the unique aspects of juvenile crime. Topics include a review of the laws, courts, police procedures and correctional alternatives that have been established to deal specifically with juvenile crime, examination of the influences of drugs and gangs on juvenile crime and consideration of strategies for intervention and prevention.


Criminal Law
Course Number CJL2100
Credits 3.0

Examines criminal law and defines legal principles and doctrines. Topics include need for and origins of criminal laws and reviews specific laws and their punishments, including violent crimes, economic crimes and defenses available.


Criminal Investigations
Course Number CJT2100
Credits 3.0

Presents fundamental principles, concepts, and theories of investigating crimes. Topics include interviewing, interrogations and surveillance. The course examines case preparation(s) and potential problems in criminal investigations. Investigative techniques for specific crimes are explored.


Deviant Behavior
Credits 3.0

Victimology
Credits 3.0

Criminal Justice Management
Credits 3.0

Organized Crime
Credits 3.0

White-Collar and Economic Crime
Credits 3.0

Drug Control
Credits 3.0

Terrorism
Credits 3.0

Ethics in Criminal Justice
Credits 3.0

Alternative Punishment
Credits 3.0

Private Security
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Forensic Science
Credits 3.0

Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Credits 3.0

Technology and Crime
Credits 3.0

Integrated Criminal Justice Capstone Project
Credits 3.0

Constitutional Criminal Procedures
Credits 3.0

Criminal Evidence and Procedures
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Management and Organizational Behavior
Credits 3.0

Research and Statistical Analysis
Credits 3.0

Critical Thinking
Credits 3.0

Sociology of the Urban Community
Credits 3.0

Program description: Keiser University’s Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice provides preparation in many areas of the criminal justice system. Topics include but are not limited to: deviant behavior, forensics, law enforcement and investigation, victimology, private security, corrections and juvenile justice and how components work together and are governed by our laws, the Supreme Court and the U.S. Constitution. This exploration of the American criminal justice system culminates with an emphasis on research, analysis and the future of the system.

Law Enforcement Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: MS in Criminal Justice: Law Enforcement
Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 515
Credits 4.0

This course explores contemporary law enforcement management by examining personality, values, groups, power dimensions, decision making, conflict management, change, and organization development.


Restorative Justice
Course Number JUS 520
Credits 4.0

This course compares and contrasts traditional goals of punishment (rehabilitation, incapacitation, retribution, and deterrence) with the concepts of restorative justice. Topics include community service, victim assistance, victim-offender mediation, and restitution. Restorative justice seeks a balance between the need to rehabilitate offenders while executing a duty to protect the public.


Research Methods
Course Number JUS 510
Credits 4.0

This course provides a fundamental analysis of research and a methodological evaluation of criminal justice topics. This course familiarizes students with aspects of statistical analysis and research design relevant to today’s justice environment using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Additionally, coverage is provided for use of research design in community action


Forensic Psychology
Course Number JUS 610
Credits 4.0

This course provides an objective study of the many roles psychology plays in the legal system, including expert witnesses, criminal profilers, and trial consultants for jury selection and child custody hearings.


Criminal Investigations
Course Number JUS 521
Credits 4.0

This course enhances students’ understanding of criminal investigative procedure, collection and preservation of evidence, chain of custody concerns, computer forensics, investigative jurisdiction, administration, and use of information gathering techniques.


Exploration of Law and Public Policy
Course Number JUS 620
Credits 4.0

This course explores the interrelatedness of law and socioeconomic concerns and attempts to generate a holistic perspective of society and social control for those charged with the administration of justice


Terrorism and Homeland Security
Course Number JUS 524
Credits 4.0

This course provides insight into the historical causes, strategies, and tactics of terrorism, as well as counterterrorism planning and utilization of law enforcement assets to prevent, detect, and deter acts of terrorism. Also covered are constitutional issues regarding terrorism suspects, long-term detention, financial embargoes of private funds, and other issues pertinent to the modern political climate.


Ethics and Liability for Policing and Corrections
Course Number JUS 618
Credits 4.0

This course explores the subcultures created by police and correctional officers. Topics include the need for building a subculture of mutual support and survival in a dangerous profession, dilemmas of new officers entering corrupt departments, and ways administrators can help police and correctional officers rediscover their community.


Capstone
Course Number JUS 651
Credits 4.0

This course is taken in the final term of the graduate program. It focuses on professional portfolio development and a final written proposal by the graduate. The portfolio will contain the graduate’s curriculum vitae, exemplars of writing from graduate courses, a statement of criminal justice philosophy, a 5-year plan for professional goals, and a research topic paper/written proposal. A final written proposal must focus on how the graduate will use the totality of the learning experience to examine and improve the criminal justice system at the federal, state, county, or city level. The proposal must exhibit adequate research, coordination within the extant layers of justice policy, realistic consideration of available resources, and a reasonable timeline of benchmarks.


Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 250
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Examination Of Issues Relating To Justice Policies, Perspectives, Techniques, Roles, Institutional Arrangement, Management And Administration, Use Of Research, And Innovative Patterns. Prerequisite: Jus 104 And Jus 110.


Program description: The Master of Science in Criminal Justice with an Emphasis in Law Enforcement is designed for students
seeking to expand their understanding of the law, social order, and justice. This program is particularly suited to
law enforcement personnel who wish to advance in their field, as well as corrections, probation, and parole
officers; law clerks; and other decision makers who address questions of public policy, social research, and
administration of justice in the public sphere. This program also prepares students for work in legal foundations
where in-depth issues are contended.

Program Name: MS in Leadership: Disaster Preparedness & Executive Fire Leadership
Emergency Planning and Management
Course Number EMM 600
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to teach students the planning and management processes and the issues involved in large-scale emergencies. The nature of natural and technological risk and emergency are explored via case studies. Public sector roles in contingency planning and response are also discussed and assessed.


Economic and Human Issues
Course Number EMM 605
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the strategic, political, economic, and human issues encountered in the management of disasters or major traumatic public events. This knowledge gives the emergency manager a realistic view of the issues to expect in a disaster, how to plan accordingly, and how to manage resources and people more effectively in emergency situations.



Understanding Terrorism’s Threats
Course Number EMM 641
Credits 4.0

This course explores modern terrorism and terrorist behavior, including cyberterrorism, the role of the media, the private sector, and implications in a global society.


Leadership Styles and Development
Course Number LDR 600
Credits 4.0

This course explores the nature of business leadership models and theories, examines these models through a broad variety of insights and viewpoints, and provides a description and analysis of these approaches to leadership, giving special attention to how the models can improve leadership in real-world organizations.


Power, Politics, and Influence
Course Number LDR 610
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on sources and types of power and specific tactics for becoming an empowering leader. Issues include organizational politics, influence tactics, and succession planning. Students learn how transactional leaders can become transformational leaders.


Organizational Development and Change
Course Number LDR 615
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the behavioral forces and relationships that influence organizational effectiveness and change. Topics include the study of intervention strategy and application skills.


Leading as a General Manager
Course Number LDR 620
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare leaders for the cross-functional complexities inherent in organizational life. Students develop an advanced skill set enabling effective leadership in each of the major organizational functions (marketing, finance, human resource management, information systems, and operations management). The course explores methods of evaluating alternatives to make effective decisions.


Organizational Culture and Team Leadership
Course Number LDR 625
Credits 4.0

This course equips students to fully understand the complexities of organizational systems and cultures, the ways in which these forces manifest themselves, and the means by which leaders intentionally impact the shape that these forces take in their organizations. Additionally, this course covers team dynamics, group processes, and strategies for designing and supporting teams in the workplace.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Master of Science in Leadership with an Emphasis in Disaster Preparedness and
Executive Fire Leadership provides students with the skills to develop professionally and gain self-confidence
in their own leadership styles. The program offers an opportunity for graduates of the National Fire Academy’s
Executive Fire Officer Program (NFA-EEOP) to complete a graduate degree. Students learn to integrate a
conceptual foundation for an executive leadership role that emphasizes the immediate application of ethical and
practical leadership skills as well as disaster preparation and crisis management. Environmental issues directly
related to leadership skills development and content required of leaders in the area of emergency public safety
and disaster preparedness will also be addressed.

Law Enforcement Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Law Enforcement Schools (campus and online)

Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Michigan State University
Total Programs 220
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 45th
George Washington University
Total Programs 194
Number of Subjects 171
Rank in USA 52nd
Rutgers University-New Brunswick
Total Programs 152
Number of Subjects 117
Rank in USA 55th
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
The College of New Jersey
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 80
Rank in USA 75th
Syracuse University
Total Programs 152
Number of Subjects 133
Rank in USA 89th
American University
Total Programs 118
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 97th
Drexel University
Total Programs 125
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 108th
Marquette University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 111th
Marist College
Total Programs 81
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 120th
Washington State University
Total Programs 2
Number of Subjects 93
Rank in USA 131st
Rochester Institute of Technology
Total Programs 1
Number of Subjects 108
Rank in USA 137th
University of South Florida
Total Programs 140
Number of Subjects 131
Rank in USA 138th
Grand Valley State University
Total Programs 103
Number of Subjects 101
Rank in USA 159th
Seattle University
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 118
Rank in USA 169th
Texas State University-San Marcos
Total Programs 164
Number of Subjects 152
Rank in USA 204th
Cedarville University
Total Programs 96
Number of Subjects 88
Rank in USA 206th
Virginia Commonwealth University
Total Programs 138
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 222nd
Northern Arizona University
Total Programs 206
Number of Subjects 156
Rank in USA 225th