Online Law Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its law courses to be successful law professionals, tax lawyers, judges, paralegals, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 13,140 people employed as administrative law judges, adjudicators, and hearing officers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $87,620. Arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators make on average $63,250 per year and there are about 8,110 of them employed today.

Law Organizations Law Common Job Tasks
  • preparing briefs
  • planning defense
  • giving tasks to paralegals
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Ranked by Excellence

Law Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: MSCJ - Law
Human Resource Development for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Number CJ422
Credits 6.0

Application of Management Theory to Criminal Justice Organization
Course Number CJ424
Credits 6.0

Introduction to Criminal justice system
Course Number CJ101
Credits 5.0

here describes the basic of criminal system and how can we identifies the things in this system.


Criminology I
Course Number CJ 102
Credits 5.0

This course presents a framework for studying the nature and causes of crime and antisocial behavior. It focuses on explanations provided through criminal topologies and criminological theories, using a variety of multidisciplinary perspectives. Topics range from crime causation to the extent of crime, victimization, social and psychological theories, and various types of criminality including violent, property, and public order offenses.


College Composition II
Course Number CJ 220

Course description unavailable.


Applied Criminal Justice Ethics
Course Number CJ 340
Credits 6.0

This course teaches students the fundamentals of morality and ethics in the context of applied criminal justice. Topics covered include the role of ethics as it pertains to the recruitment, hiring, and promotion of personnel; the mission of the criminal justice system; the importance of maintaining public trust; the responsible use of discretionary authority; the devastating consequences of official misconduct and recommendations for its control; the importance of organizational leadership; the role of training; and the future of the criminal justice system.


Supervisory Practices in Criminal Justice
Course Number CJ345
Credits 5.0

The Kaplan University Correction Certificate Program is intended to prepare students to pursue entry-level and supervisory position in today's complex correction environment


Organizational Behavior in Criminal Justice Organizations
Course Number CJ 421
Credits 6.0

This course explores human behavior in criminal justice organizations. Students examine individual behaviors, attitudes, personalities, values, perceptions, and emotions and how these affect organization outcomes. The course also looks at the theories, concepts, and application of motivation as well as the importance of stress management and professional ethics in criminal justice organizations.


Employment and Policy Law for Supervisors and Managers
Course Number CJ 423
Credits 6.0

Employment and policy law helps to regulate the workplace environment by protecting employees from discrimination and harassment and providing a safe and fair workplace. In this course, students will analyze and evaluate legal concepts and learn to identify potentially troublesome employment-related legal and ethical issues to avoid liability, as well as to develop an understanding of how to manage employees to maximize productivity.


Managing Criminal Justice Organizations
Course Number CJ 444
Credits 6.0

This course deals with concepts and theory in the field of organizational behavior. The course focuses on the historical perspectives of organizational theorists, theories of motivations and leadership, and future trends and developments in modern organizations.


Program description: The Master of Science in Criminal Justice - Law degree program is designed to help advance the careers of persons who currently have a bachelor's degree. This program provides students with the advanced skills and knowledge needed to be successful in the field of criminal justice. There are two courses of study within this program, the non-thesis track, which contains practical law enforcement applications, and the research-based thesis path, which centers on criminal justice theory and prepares students to be instructors in criminal justice. Graduates will be able to hold a variety of occupations including law enforcement, security, court systems, education, and training. Additionally, the Law specialization provides more of a focus on laws and how they apply to the criminal justice spectrum.

Law Courses at Post University

Program Name: A.S. In Legal Studies

Program description:

Law Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Bachelor's (BSCJ) - Law Enforcement
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Comparative Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJS 305
Credits 4.5

This course gives students a rationale for understanding and appreciating the different ways justice is conceived and administered internationally. This course serves as a basis for comparing various justice systems as they relate to the American justice system. Students will explore how various countries organize their law enforcement, judicial systems and corrections agencies, and compare them with the American criminal justice system.


Crime Victim Studies
Course Number CRJS 310
Credits 4.5

This course presents the scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to victims and their situations. It also looks at the different types of victimizations, how victimization rates are measured, and what attempts the government has made to increase the involvement of victims’ role in the criminal justice system.


Constitutional Law
Course Number CRJS 400
Credits 4.5

This course examines the United States Constitution, its history, evolution and influence on the criminal justice system, including the structure of government and our system of checks and balances. Additionally, students will analyze doctrinal shifts in the court’s decisions, and critique the role of individual jurisprudential viewpoints in judicial decision making.


Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 410
Credits 4.5

This course offers a social historical overview of issues of race, class, gender, crime, and justice. The impact of the criminal justice system on culturally diverse groups is the primary theme of all class activities.


Ethics and Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 420
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of ethical conduct in the administration of justice. This course explores moral choices associated with individuals in the criminal justice field, and examines consequences associated with various choice options.


Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Number CRJS 430
Credits 4.5

This course teaches students the theoretical aspects of conducting and investigating research problems in criminology and criminal justice. It explores the entire research process from beginning to end including the following techniques: problem identification, data collection, measurement, reliability, and validity issues. Students will also examine the ethical issues in the research process and how to analyze and document the research findings in a written assignment.


Applied Statistics
Course Number CRJS 440
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to teach students basic inferential statistical computations and analyses. The course focuses on practical applications rather than advanced statistical analysis. Students will develop skills in statistical application related to criminal justice policies and this course prepares students for the work place or those who are interested in pursuing graduate studies involving research.


Advanced Topics in Corrections
Course Number CRJS 450
Credits 4.5

This course examines the theories and practices involved in probation and parole processes and decision-making. Topics include pre-sentence and pre-parole investigations, probation and parole supervision, the administration of corrections services including treatment and release decision making processes. Finally this course examines juvenile corrections and the use of intermediate methods of treatment including electronic monitoring, community service, and the use of restitution.


Senior Capstone in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 499
Credits 4.5

This course offers a comprehensive and systematic analysis of key contemporary criminal justice issues through a close review of the theories and policies guiding many crime fighting strategies. By applying critical thinking and analytical skills, oral and written communication skills, and information systems skills, students will learn of the complex nature of crime and society’s response to criminality. This course serves as the CJ capstone class and involves the student preparing a project agreed upon between the student and the instructor. Each project will require research, report writing, oral presentation, and interactive teamwork.


Administration of Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 345
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on the challenges administrators face in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will examine the various organizational frameworks in the criminal justice system and the concepts, organizational principles, and models associated with these criminal justice agencies.


Community Oriented Policing
Course Number CRJS 320
Credits 4.5

This course examines the relationship between police agencies and the communities they serve. Topics will include traditional relations and public policy as well as new programs designed to involve the community in resolving crimes in the community. Students will also examine issues involving police ethics and the public image of police agencies in the media.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJS 455
Credits 4.5

This course explores the elements of investigation including crime scenes, witnesses and evidence, and includes such topics as investigative techniques, evidence documentation, interrogation and arrest. The course addresses the particulars of investigating major crimes.


Crime Mapping and Analysis
Course Number CRJS 465
Credits 4.5

This course introduces basic concepts in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications in criminal justice. The class provides an overview of the use of maps in policing. Emphasis is on learning how to properly design, construct, manipulate, and interpret maps.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice
provides students with a broad based education in criminal
justice studies. The curriculum is designed to give students
a professional education in the criminal justice field, with
particular emphases in policing, courts, criminology,
corrections, juvenile justice, and the field of forensic
science. The focus is to provide students with an
education that will help them master the skills and
expertise needed to work in the field of criminal justice.

Law Courses at South University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Specialization
Biology II
Course Number BIO1021
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Bio1020 With A Grade Of C Or Better Co Or Pre Requisite: Eng1001 Biology Ii Is The Second Course In A Twocourse Sequence In Biology. This Course Continues The Study Of Human Biology With The Role Of Endocrine And Nervous Systems In Homeostatic Regulation. Other Topics Covered Are Human Reproduction, Development, Evolution, And Advanced Genetics. Ecological Concepts Are Also Discussed. The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Increase Knowledge Of The Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hour.


Statistics
Course Number MAT2058
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat1001 Or Mat1002 Statistics Introduces The Student To The Terminology And Techniques Of Statistics Including Levels Of Measurement, Measures Of Central Tendency And Variance, Random Variables, Linear Correlation And Regression, Normal Probability Distributions, Sampling Distributions, The Central Limit Theorem, And Hypothesis Testing.4 Quarter Hours.


History of Art
Course Number HUM1001
Credits 4.0

Co or Pre requisite: ENG1001 This course surveys the history of art beginning with the Prehistoric/Tribal period and continuing through the Middle Ages. The concepts,artists, motifs, works, and styles of the periods will be studied. The course introduces students to elements of art and design, and fosters an appreciation for the world of art. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement
Course Number CRJ1101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the criminal justice system and contemporary policing in the United States. 4 quarter hours


Introduction to Criminal Courts and Corrections
Course Number CRJ1102
Credits 4.0

This course provides a comprehensive look at the criminal court system in the United States and the American correctional system.The course looks at the roles of prosecutors,judges, defense attorneys and the dynamics of their interactions as well as an overview on all aspects of corrections, including probation and parole. 4 quarter hours


Ethics in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ2004
Credits 4.0

This course examines ethical issues faced by actors in the criminal justice system. The focus will be placed on the philosophical and practical approaches to solve ethical dilemmas within the complicated criminal justice system.4 quarter hours


Criminal Procedures
Course Number CRJ2006
Credits 4.0

This course will cover the legal aspects of police investigatory practices, criminal procedure law, and constitutional cases as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Focus will be on U.S. Supreme court cases and lower court cases setting out the requirements for arrest,search and seizure, confessions, and pretrial identifications. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the legal rights,duties, and liabilities of criminal justice professionals.4 quarter hours


Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJ3004
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on theoretical foundations and current research on theories of racial,ethnic, class and gender discrimination within America’s criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on the most recent research on patterns of criminal behavior and victimization,police practices, court processing and sentencing,the death penalty, and correctional programs as they relate to minority groups. 4 quarter hours


Criminal Justice Management and Administration
Course Number CRJ3005
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Covers Modern Management Theory And The Application Of Management Techniques Appropriate To Each Area Of The Criminal Justice System. 4 Quarter Hours


Theories of Crime/Justice
Course Number CRJ3009
Credits 4.0

An overview of a variety of criminological theories. Attention will be directed toward the study of the major theoretical schools of thought which have influenced the American system of crime and justice. The basic goal of this course is to help the student develop an understanding of and appreciation for the insights gained by examining crime and criminals through different theoretical frameworks.4 quarter hours


Victimology
Course Number CRJ4001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3011 The course is a comprehensive look at the theories of victimology and the interaction of crime victims with others in the criminal justice system. 4 quarter hours


Alcohol, Drugs and Criminal Justice Policy
Course Number CRJ4007
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Examines The Pharmacological Effects And Medical Uses Of Drugs And Alcohol And The Role They Play In The U.s. Criminal Justice System. Topics Covered Include The History Of Alcohol And Drug Prohibition In The U.s.; The Types Of Illegal Drugs Currently Available In The United States; Patterns, Trends, And Scope Of Illicit Drug Use; Consideration Of The Relationship Between Drugs And Crime; And Manifestations And Consequences Of The Criminal Justice System Response. 4 Quarter Hours


Senior Seminar (Capstone)
Course Number CRJ4999
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: All core required CRJ courses The senior capstone course is designed to ensure that graduates of the criminal justice program are equipped with the skills necessary to pursue further study in their discipline or obtain responsible positions within criminal justice agencies or related professional organization.4 quarter hours


Intermediate Algebra
Course Number MAT1001
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Algebra is a continuation of MAT0099 exploring the arithmetic of polynomials, factoring, systems of linear equations, solving quadratic equations, and applying algebra techniques to problem solving and applications.


Biology I
Course Number BIO1020
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites: Mat0099 Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 This Is The First Of A Two-course Sequence In Biology. This Course Introduces Biology, Scientific Methods, Biological Chemistry, And Energy For Life. This Course Also Exposes Students To The Organization Of Humans And Plants, Basic Genetics, And Evolutionary Concepts. In Addition, The Student Will Complete Writing Assignments That Serve To Introduce Scientific Literature. 4 Quarter Hours


College Math
Course Number MAT1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Mat0099 Or Exemption Thereof. Co Or Prerequisite: Eng1001 College Math Is A Survey Course Emphasizing Inductive And Deductive Reasoning, Concepts From Set Theory, Applications Of Venn Diagrams, Elements Of Formal Logic, Common Formulas And Relationships From Geometry, And An Introduction To Probability And Statistics. 4 Quarter Hours


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
Course Number PSY2007
Credits 4.0

An investigation of the methodological principles regarding behavioral science research, descriptive and inferential techniques, and the process of using these techniques for psychological experimentation and data analysis


Statistics for Behavioral Sciences Lab
Course Number PSY2008
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the statistical principles associated with the study of behavioral science research through application and computerized data analysis (i.e., SPSS).


Composition I
Course Number ENG1001
Credits 4.0

Prerequisites:ENG0099 or exemption thereof. In this course students develop their writing skills through the reading and construction of expository essays. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition II/Literature
Course Number ENG1002
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: ENG1001 In this course students write analytical and critical essays about plays, short stories, and poetry. Emphasis is placed on literal and figurative interpretations, structural analysis, and variations in thematic approach. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course. 4 quarter hours


Composition III
Course Number ENG2001
Credits 4.0

Focusing on the construction of effective written argument, this course refines composition techniques, develops abstract thought processes, and promotes critical thinking. A library paper is included. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.


Public Speaking
Course Number SPC1026
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to prepare the student to develop and improve the ability to communicate. Self-expression, preparation of effective speeches, and development of speaking and listening skills will be emphasized. 4 quarter hours


Strategies for Success
Course Number UVC1000
Credits 4.0

Designed to help entering students develop a more effective approach to college success, this course emphasizes positive self-evaluation, goal setting and motivation; practical skills of successful students; effective use of the library and the many sources of information available; and the concepts and tools of critical thinking, and their applications. 4 quarter hours


General Psychology
Course Number PSY1001
Credits 4.0

In this course a study is made of human behavior with special reference to perception, learning, memory, thinking, emotional life, and individual differences in intelligence, aptitude, and personality. Emphasis is placed on the scientific nature of psychological investigations. Research methods are analyzed, and results are related to daily life and everyday problems.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC1001
Credits 4.0

This course serves as an introduction to the study of human social development, its organizations, and its institutions. It teaches the student to look at our society and others from a sociological perspective. Specific areas covered are group dynamics, social deviance, gender equality, racial and ethnic relations, the family, religion, and education


American Government
Course Number POL2076
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to general principles and problems of modern government. It shows the forms of government, the place of government in the social process, and theories of the state. The American system is analyzed. Studying political science provides accurate understanding of how and why political systems work as they do


Criminal Law
Course Number LGS2004
Credits 4.0

This course familiarizes the student with substantive criminal law and criminal procedures. It enables the student, under the supervision of a lawyer, to prepare pretrial pleadings, interview witnesses, and conduct trial and post trial proceedings


Research Methods
Course Number PSY2060
Credits 2.0

Research design and methodology. An analysis of the approaches to developing, understanding, and interpreting psychological phenomena. Topics include experimental vs. non-experimental research such as survey, observation, case study, and archival data. An understanding of reliability, validity, and experimental control issues.


Research Methods Lab
Course Number PSY2061
Credits 2.0

An understanding of the methodological principles associated with behavioral science research through an application of the theoretical, conceptual, and practical principles


Community Policing
Course Number CRJ4006
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3007 This course focuses on the dual themes of problem solving and community/police collaboration and partnerships. A historical perspective is presented that details the community policing philosophy and the course provides practical strategies to implement community policing. 4 quarter hours


Law Enforcement Supervision and Management
Course Number CRJ4010
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3007 This course focuses on law enforcement managers and supervisors, their jobs, and the complicated interrelationships between members of the law enforcement team and the communities they share. Topics covered include: leadership, organizational behavior, and new developments in the field. 4 quarter hours


Terrorism and Homeland Security
Course Number CRJ4011
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 This Course Focuses On The Theories Of Domestic And International Terrorism And The Criminal Justice Response To Homeland Security. 4 Quarter Hours


Law Enforcement Structure And Process
Course Number CRJ3007
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ1101 This course provides an introduction to the philosophical, cultural, and historical background of police. The course deals with concepts such as the role of the police in contemporary society, the quasi-military organization of the police, and community issues. 4 quarter hours


Illegal Immigration and the Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJ4009
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: Crj1101 And Crj1102 An Overview Of The Political And Legal Aspects Of Illegal Immigration In A Nation Of Immigrants. Emphasis On The Operational And Bureaucratic Impediments Of The Enforcement Of Immigrant Laws. 4 Quarter Hours


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJ4012
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3007 This course is designed to combine the practical and theoretical aspects of criminal investigations and to develop an analytical and practical understanding of the investigative. 4 quarter hours


Criminalistics I
Course Number CRJ3008
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ1101 This course is an introduction to the field of forensic science. Students will learn the scientific techniques used by crime laboratories to process crime scenes, collect evidence, and examine physical evidence. The course will focus on how evidence from a crime scene can aid a criminal investigation. 4 quarter hours


Deviant Behavior
Course Number CRJ3010
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: CRJ3011 This course focuses on the concepts and theories of deviance and how they can be applied in the criminal justice field. 4 quarter hour


Criminal Justice and the Media
Course Number CRJ3014
Credits 4.0

Criminal Justice and the Media explores the relationship between the mass media, crime and the criminal justice system in the United States. Students will examine the role media plays in the social construction of crime and justice, and the impact of the media on attitudes and perceptions of crime and criminality. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship of the media and crime prevention, and the impact of the media on the operations of the agencies in the criminal justice system from law enforcement to corrections. 4 quarter hours


White Collar Crime
Course Number CRJ3015
Credits 4.0

This course examines the various types of “white-collar” and economic crimes in America. These include corporate crimes such as consumer fraud and stock fraud, environmental crimes, corruption, medical crime, and computer- based crime. Students will learn about pyramid schemes, e-mail and web-based crimes, boiler-room operations, and criminal organizations posing as religions or charities. 4 quarter hours


Program description: The South University Criminal Justice program offers a course of study
leading to a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. This course of study
is designed to give students broad perspectives on the causes of crime
and critical insights to the functions of the components of the criminal
justice system. Courses in the program deal with crime, violence, and
other forms of deviance and the responses to these problems by police,
courts, and corrections; contemporary criminal justice issues; and ethical concerns and research. Students majoring in criminal justice receive
excellent preparation for further study in graduate or professional schools
as well as for careers in the criminal justice system.

Law Courses at Ivy Bridge College of Tiffin University

Program Name: Associate of Criminal Justice in Law Enforcement
Introduction to the American Political Process
Course Number POL101
Credits 3.0

Examines the American democratic process and the distribution of authority and responsibility between the federal, state, and local levels.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY101
Credits 3.0

Introduces psychology as a behavioral science, including historical background, human development (genetic and physical) from birth through death, the senses and perception, intelligence and creativity, and the principles of conditioning, learning, memory, and forgetting.


Juvenile Justice Systems
Course Number COR 131
Credits 3.0

Examines the history, concepts, and scope of the juvenile justice system and its contrast with the adult system of justice. Includes an analysis of the juvenile justice process from initial intervention of delinquency and status offenses by law enforcement personnel and others through release from intervention. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Spring.


Police and Society
Course Number ENF 150
Credits 3.0

Explores the various response methodologies available to the patrol officer in assisting the citizen’s request for police service. Discusses traffic enforcement from the stop of the violator through traffic accident investigation. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Spring.


Computers in Law Enforcement
Course Number ENF 234
Credits 3.0

Surveys The Use And Potential Of Computers In Law Enforcement Agencies, The Ethical And Legal Problems Confronting Society And Police Agencies Occasioned By The Use Of Computers As Information Gathering And Storage Instruments, And The Advantage Of Using Computers In Research And Agency Operations. Students Will Learn To Use Computers For Link Network Analysis, Crime Mapping, Traffic Analysis And Accident Plotting, Crime Analysis And Other Functions Relating To The Administration/operation Of A Law Enforcement Agency. Prerequisites: Cit105, 111 Or 205, Enf150, Or Permission Of Instructor. Offered Fall.


Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation
Course Number ENF 237
Credits 3.0

Explores the fundamentals of criminal investigative techniques including initial response to the crime scene, location and recognition of evi­dence, interviewing, sketching, collection and transpiration of evidence, report writing and court testimony. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Fall.


Applied Criminal Investigation and Criminalistics
Course Number ENF 239
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes the investigation of specific crimes including Homicide, Sexual Assault, Aggravated Assault, Robbery, Burglary, Theft, Auto Theft and Arson. Students will investigate a "mock" crime scene, collect and analyze evidence obtained and present their investigation in a "moot" court. Prerequisite: ENF237. Offered Spring.


Agency Management
Course Number COR 230
Credits 3.0

Analyzes Some Of The Distinct Differences Between Public And Private Management. Covers The Theory Of Controlling, Organiz­ing, Planning, Directing And Assembling Resources. Students Will Develop A Course Project Designed To Cover These Concepts. Prerequisites: Jus110, Mgt201. Offered Spring.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 110
Credits 3.0

Analyzes the Criminal Justice System and its major subsystems: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Emphasizes structure and functions of the various components and their interactions. Introduces the basics of criminal justice research through the use of the collection of the National Criminal Justice Reference Service and other professional sources of information. Offered Fall and Spring.


Criminal Law
Course Number JUS 201
Credits 3.0

Analyzes criminal laws from their development under common law to their present day applicability under constitutional and statutory standards, with special emphasis on practice with the Ohio Revised Code. Prerequisite: JUS110. Offered Fall.


Criminal Procedures
Course Number JUS 202
Credits 3.0

Explores the constitutional and legal ramifications affecting the procedure of criminal arrest, search, seizure, and evidence. Prerequisite: JUS201. Offered Spring.


Communication (any oral or speech)
Course Number COM204
Credits 3.0

Explores visual design, graphics and presentational strategies by introducing students to digital photography and layout and design skills. Students learn digital and graphic design techniques using the leading industry software applications for desktop publishing and graphics illustration.


Introduction to Mass Communication
Course Number COM241
Credits 3.0

Examines the various media (i.e., newspaper, radio, television, film, etc.) comprising the mass media in contemporary American society. Emphasis in this survey course is given to the history, structure, and potential effects of each medium.


Expository and Research Writing
Course Number ENG141
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes the development, structure, and writing of abstracts, summaries, and critiques. This course in written communication teaches literary devices such as pro/con, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, persuasion/argumentation essays—plus research/synthesis skills—through the development of a research paper. Students must receive a grade of "C" or better to enroll in ENG142.


Literature and Criticism
Course Number ENG142
Credits 3.0

Presents literature—drama, short stories, novel, poetry and critical essays—from several literary critical perspectives. Through reading, discussion, and critical writing, students become familiar with representative genres in literature as well as authentic critical approaches.


Information Technology
Course Number CIT105
Credits 3.0

Covers the basics of information technology, including common Microsoft Office applications, responsible use of software and technology, file management techniques, and sound information consumption practices. CIT105 is designed for beginners with little or no experience using Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint.Participants are required to demonstrate software proficiency in the lab and through objective written tests.


Finite Mathematics
Course Number MAT 174
Credits 3.0

Emphasizes business applications that involve the study of linear functions, applications using linear equations in two variables, counting methods, probability, finance applications, interpretation of date presented graphically, and computation of mean, median, standard deviation, normal distribution curve, and z scores.


College Algebra
Course Number MAT 181
Credits 3.0

Focuses on developing a conceptual understanding of college algebra and problem solving skills. Topics include functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, and combinatorics and probability.


Principles of Sociology
Course Number SOC 101
Credits 3.0

Introduces the basic concepts of sociological study, elements of social life, social patterns and institutions, and the process of maintenance and change in society.


Program description: Using rigorous class preparations and unique learning experiences, this concentration offers 21 courses with special emphasis on law enforcement, supervision, criminal investigation, and corrections.
Ivy Bridge graduates with an ACJ in Law Enforcement can continue their studies at a four-year institution, or jump right into a high-demand position armed with the inquiry, practice, and interpersonal skills required at all levels of law enforcement.

Law Courses at Champlain College

Program Name: Master of Science in Law

ADR and Conflict Management
Course Number LAW 5200
Credits 3.0

This course offers an overview of an array of dispute resolution processes useful within business organizations and in relations between organizations and individuals. Essential terms and theories are covered and questions of when each process – mediation, negotiation, arbitration, and others – is and is not applicable. Students learn how to analyze conflict and adopt strategies that avoid litigation and improve outcomes. Students gain experience and practice with issues involving conflict, power, working in groups, and the decision-making process. An additional focus will be the creation of pro-active conflict management systems within and between organizations


Constitutional Law
Course Number LAW 5210
Credits 3.0

Students learn about our federal government, laws, and the legal system as well as the Constitution as the basis of individual rights. Students examine the doctrines of judicial review, federalism, and the separation of powers, and learn the practical and theoretical fundamentals of constitutional thought and law. Topics include due process, equal protection, the commerce clause, and individual rights. Through actual cases and problems, students gain the skills to analyze constitutional issues in their field of practice and see the constitutional dimensions of their professional decisions


Contracts and Commercial Law
Course Number LAW 5220
Credits 3.0

This course provides students with an overview of the legal environment and principles that affect contracts and commercial transactions with an emphasis on Articles 2 and 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Students focus on contract law including the elements of a valid contract; an analysis of the formation, transfer, and termination of contract rights and duties; what is required in performance; and the legal and equitable remedies available upon breach of contract


Information Privacy and Security
Course Number LAW 5230
Credits 3.0

Rapid developments in information technologies have resulted in heightened concern with information security in every area of business and government practice. This course will explore the laws and practices affecting personal privacy in a digital age and the information security needs of all those maintaining substantial and potentially sensitive records. Topics include internet privacy; issues related to anonymity, commercial profiling, spam, hacking, and viruses; database privacy in areas such as medical and financial records; identity theft; and the relationship of law enforcement to privacy as well as issues related to wiretapping, surveillance, and counter-terrorism


Litigation Law
Course Number LAW 5240
Credits 3.0

Students learn the laws and rules of civil procedure to understand what to expect if they must work with counsel in litigated conflicts. Successful students will understand how a lawsuit is prepared including the drafting of pleadings, motions, discovery, and other legal actions and documents used in litigation. Students will also consider case law and the rules of criminal procedure to grasp how criminal law is administered including police investigative techniques, laws of arrest, search and seizure, self-incrimination, right to counsel, interrogation and confessions, pre-trial motions, standards of evidence and proof, and trial procedures


Tort & Personal Injury Law
Course Number LAW 5250
Credits 3.0

This course offers an introduction to tort law with emphasis on the potential liability of business organizations and the individuals within them for injuries to property and person. Considered are intentional wrongs, negligence, malpractice, products liability, and strict liability; invasions of personal integrity and emotional well-being; injury to tangible and intangible rights in property; liability insurance and alternatives; and damages. While learning the different types of tort actions, students identify the causes of action, determine whether legal elements of these torts can be demonstrated, and analyze case studies to establish principles and guidelines for managerial applications


Business Organizations
Course Number LAW 5310
Credits 3.0

This course examines the basic forms of business organizations including the law of sole proprietorship, partnerships, and corporations. Topics include the authority and responsibility of partners and the responsibility between corporate directors, officers, shareholders, and creditors. The course also covers the principles of agency law


Administrative Law
Course Number LAW 5311
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of administrative law in areas of business and managerial practice affected by government regulation. Students will review the sources of law and chart the overlapping and sometimes conflicting roles of federal and state legal regulation. They will study the implications and effects of the various types of laws that may affect their activities, for example administrative agency regulations, constitutional provisions, statutes, and court decisions. Topics include agency powers and operation, determination and promulgation of administrative regulations, right to notice and hearing, enforcement, judicial review, standing, and the Administrative Procedure Act


Employment Law
Course Number LAW 5312
Credits 3.0

This course offers an overview of fundamental areas of employment law. Topics include job discrimination and related laws, labor law and labor relations, plant and job safety, public officers and employees, employee contracts, self-employment, Americans with Disabilities Act, Equal Employment Opportunity Act, non-competition agreements, workers' compensation, unemployment obligations, and personnel issues such as drug testing, lie detectors, whistle-blowing, and wrongful discharge


Intellectual Property Law
Course Number TBD
Credits 3.0

This course will examine intellectual capital and its relation to corporate strategy. Specifically, students will study the protection of technology through the federal patent system and the state law for trade secrets, copyright protection, trademarks, and related contracts. Related topics such as domain names, cyber-squatting, right of publicity, and false advertising will also be examined


Employment Practices
Course Number LAW 5321
Credits 3.0

This course details the laws that regulate how employees should be hired, fired, promoted, disciplined, or evaluated. It explores the steps an employer should take to avoid allegations of discrimination during the hiring, firing, or disciplinary process. The course also examines the legal limits on monitoring an employee's email, computer usage, and outside activities and examines the legal limits on drug testing employees and checking an employee's criminal, credit, and medical background


Health Law Issues
Course Number LAW 5341
Credits 3.0

This course creates a forum for the exploration and discussion of important contemporary problems, advances, and opportunities in the healthcare field. Topics range from the social and political forces affecting healthcare and health insurance policy to the ethical and legal dimensions of drug testing and advertising, food and nutrition, the medical significance of an aging population, environmental health, genetic and biomedical technology, assisted suicide, palliative care, and end of life issues


Program description: In the MSL program at Champlain College, we see the law not as a set of rules but as
a set of tools – tools to heighten the career development of managers, strategists, and
policy creators in a wide range of fields including business and manufacturing, human
resources, health and elder services, and advanced paralegal practice.

Law Courses at Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Program Name: Master of Science of the Law (JSM) in International Taxation and Financial Services
Anti-Avoidance Legislation & Tax Risk Management
Course Number ITX 648

This course in Anti-Avoidance Legislation and Tax Risk Management comparatively examines the general legal principles, tax regulations, case law, and audit procedures concerning anti tax-avoidance and tax risk mitigation in many OECD countries, and the ethical issues often confronted by practitioners. Issues concern economic substance; business purpose; economic benefit; abuse of law; assignment of income; thin capitalization and earnings stripping; anti-deferral regimes like control foreign company legislation, taxation of passive investment income held in foreign entities, and foreign trust regimes; anti-tax haven regimes; and other anti-avoidance legislation. Tax risk management also considers intra-group communication, establishing tax department operations, compliance programs, among other practices required for tax counsel.


International Tax & Tax Treaties
Course Number ITX 649

Designed For Tax Lawyers, Accountants, In-house Tax Planners, Government Officials, And Other Professionals Who Deal, Or Want To Deal, With Tax Matters, This Course Provides An Overview Of Global Tax Planning. It Will Examine Sources Of Law; Fiscal Jurisdiction; The Determination Of Taxable Income For Natural Persons, Corporate Entities, Business Operations, And Different Types Of Income; How Tax Treaties Affect The Exercise Of Fiscal Jurisdiction And Limit The Imposition Of Tax; And The Problem Of Double Taxation, Including How Jurisdictions May Mitigate Double Taxation (and Double-dipping Of Deductions And Losses) Under Local Law And Tax Treaties. The Course Also Covers Tax Diagnostics For The Multi-national Enterprise (mne) And The Impact Of Politics And Economics On Tax Policy. Tax Treaties Will Be Discussed Both As A Tool Of Tax Avoidance For Tax Planners And As A Tool For Tax Compliance, Enforcement, And Information Collection By Revenue Authorities. The Oecd, Un And Us Model Tax Treaties Are Used As Teaching Tools Due To Their Overwhelming Effect On International Treaty Policy, And Other Treaties Are Also Studied From Both A Case Law And Case Study Perspective. Topics Also Include: Interpretation And Definitions Of Articles And Terms; Effective Application; Taxation Of Investment Income; Taxation Of License Fees And Royalties; Treaty Shopping; Limitation Of Benefits; An In-depth Approach To The Permanent Establishment; Allocation Of Income Between Related Parties; Non-discrimination Toward Foreigners; The 1992 United States-netherlands Treaty As An Anti-avoidance Model; And New Treaty Developments, Such As Tieas.


International Tax & Financial Centers
Course Number ITX 657

This Global Financial Services Course Focuses On The Eleven To Fifteen Trillion Us Dollars - Approximately Half The World's Money Supply - That Flow Through And Are Managed By Firms In International (offshore) Financial Centers Such As The United Kingdom, Switzerland, Usa, The Netherlands, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cayman Islands, Bermuda And Mauritius. The Course Takes An In-depth Comparative Analysis Of Some Of The Best Known Offshore Jurisdictions From The Viewpoint Of The Planner, The Client, And The Tax Official. Students Will Examined Both Tax Incentives That Promote The Effective Use Of International Structures For Mitigation, And The Activities Of Non-compliant Persons. Topics Include Due Diligence; Offshore Planning Structures Such As Asset Protection Trusts And Mne Holding And Investment Companies; Planning Techniques [e.g., Back-to-back Finance, Licensing Agreements, Cross-border Double Dip Leasing; Corporate Inversions}; Comparative Regional And Jurisdictional Analysis; Multinational Offshore Operations [e.g., Treasury Management]; Offshore Vehicle Strategy Such An Re-insurance And Private Banking; Licensing For Offshore Service Providers And Trustees. Using Client-based Case Studies, Students Will Be Required To Research The Tax Systems And Rules In Various Countries In Finding Solutions, And Will Be Introduced To The Techniques Of International Tax Planning.


International Estate Planning
Course Number ITX 611

This course deals with the topics associated with the multinational estate. Its relevance is highlighted by an increasing need by international tax planners to effectively deal with sometimes perplexing and often conflicting rules posed by different jurisdictions upon a single estate. Although there is a heavy emphasis in this offering on the traditional estate and gift duties, numerous other tax and non-tax matters will be discussed in detail, including issues of burial; the family office of private banks; using complex insurance contracts in estate planning as well as companies; annuity structures; charitable structures and family foundations; trusts and other family holding entities; tax treaty issues such as estate and gift tax treaties and the OECD model; among other issues.


European Taxation
Course Number ITX 661

The European Union Embraces 27 Countries And 484 Million People, And It Deals With A Wide Range Of Tax And Vat Issues Of Direct Importance For Individuals And Corporations. Many International Tax Issues Are On The Agenda In The Eu, Such As Transfer Pricing, Home State Taxation, Tax Harmonization, Savings Directive, Vat And The Place Of Supply, Etc. Taxation Within The Eu Is More Important Than Ever. The European Court Of Justice Has Made Decisions On Hundreds Of Tax And Vat Cases, Which Affect Corporations And Individuals Cross Europe. European Taxation Addresses The Importance Of Eu Taxation And The European Court Of Justice And Their Impact On Each Member State, Corporations And Individuals, As Well As The Fundamental Principles Within The Union.


International Transfer Pricing
Course Number ITX 606

This Course Covers Practical International Transfer Pricing Issues Faced By Multinational Corporate Groups And Revenue Departments. The Course Examines Transfer Pricing Regulations From The Perspective Of The Oecd Guidelines And The Us Treasury Regulations Pursuant To Irc Section 482. The Main Concentration Of The Course Concerns Identifying Comparables For The Determination Of Arm's Length Pricing. Other Issues Covered Include Using Cost-plus And Resale Minus, Developing Cost Sharing And Profit Split Arrangements, Contract Manufacturing, Transfer Pricing Compliance And Record Keeping, Internal Policy Development, Revenue Audit Techniques, And Advance Pricing Agreements.


Chartered Portfolio Manager & Investment Management
Course Number ITX 646

The Role Of International Consulting, Tax Firms, And Financial Institutions Has Expanded Since The Repeal Of The Glass-steagall Act To Include A Mix Of Asset And Portfolio Management (securities Investments), Banking And Insurance Law. Cognizant Of The Extensive Regulation In This Area, Advisors, Tax Lawyers, Bankers, Managers, Compliance Officers, And Accountants Are Required To Observe And Utilize Strategic Investment-risk Management Skills While Complying With Regulatory Requirements. This Course Analyzes Investment Management And The Compliance Issues Involved While Incorporating Case Studies, Practical Knowledge, And Assessment Of Legal Knowledge In The Area Of Compliance And Investment Management. Topics Include Investment Policy And Law; Fiduciary Rules And Regulations For Investment Advisors And Managers; Prudent Investor Rules; And Investment Products: Mutual Funds, Etfs And 401ks; Insurance Products, Services And Regulation; Hedge Funds History And Law; Sec And Nasd Regulation Of Rias (registered Investment Advisors); Stocks: Fixed Income, Dividend, And Growth; Bonds (corporate And Tax Free); Asset Allocation And Portfolio Management; Risk Management; Fundamental And Technical Analysis; Measuring Returns; Client Review And Communication; Disclosure; Privacy; Annual Reporting; And Investment Management, Legal Compliance And Ethics.


Thesis
Course Number ITX 654

An advanced research course on an approved topic. In this final capstone course, required to graduate and offered in every term, each student must write a thesis of between 12,500 and 25,000 words with a minimum of 10 unique sources and 120 footnotes. The student is encouraged to publish the thesis after course completion. The thesis tests the student's ability to independently identify the issue, address a research methodology for the issue, create an outline, think laterally but hone in on the relevant, as well as to produce an article of professional quality. During the course, students will learn advanced research techniques and participate in feedback workshops.


Program description:

Law Courses at Concord Law School

Program Name: Executive Juris Doctor (EJD)

CONTRACTS
Course Number CL 6100
Credits 8.0

this course examines the legal theories and principles relating to parties and agreements and their resultant obligations or benefits. Covered topics include: formation, conditions, and remedies of contracts; bargained for consideration; third-party contracts (including assignments and delegations); statute of frauds; parole evidence; impossibility of performance; and frustration of purpose.


TORTS
Course Number CL 6200
Credits 8.0

this course explores the study of civil liability relating to intentional acts and violation of duties imposed by law. In addition, legal wrongs committed by a private person upon the person or property of another independent of a contractual relationship are covered in detail in this course. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, product liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, and misrepresentation.


Criminal Law
Course Number CL 6300
Credits 6.0

this course examines the state’s ability to punish individuals for wrongs committed. Homicide, thet (including robbery and burglary), assault, rape, kidnapping, and arson as well as attempts, conspiracies, and solicitation are covered in depth. h e state of mind required to commit a crime, including justii cations and excuses, is thoroughly covered.


Constitutional Law
Course Number CL 7000
Credits 6.0

this course examines the organization and framework of the federal government, the distribution of political and governmental authorities and functions, and the fundamental principles that regulate the relationship between the government and its citizens. Specii c topics include the source of judicial review, the powers of legislative and executive branches, the authority reserved for the states, due process, equal protection, and First Amendment freedoms.


Real Property
Course Number CL 7100
Credits 8.0

the law governing all aspects of real property and the creation of rights is the focus of this course. Additional topics include ownership rights (including present estates), cotenancy, future interests, and the relations between landlord and tenant. Real property contracts, statute of fraud problems, real property mortgages, conveyancing, and adverse possession are also discussed.


Wills And Trusts
Course Number CL 7150
Credits 6.0

this course covers the law of estates and trusts as applied in California and gives a general overview of how it applies in the rest of the country. Issues dealing with the validity and revocation of wills are examined, in particular as they may af ect distribution of assets of an estate. In addition, the laws of express trusts (including creation and administration), charitable trusts, and consecutive trusts are covered


Civil Procedure
Course Number CL 7200
Credits 6.0

Access to the U.S. court system is the focus of this course. Proper jurisdiction and venue (including long arm statutes and minimum contacts) are covered in detail. Other topics include pleadings, joinder of parties and claims, class actions, discovery, summary judgment, directed verdict, res judicata, collateral estoppel, and the appeal process.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CL 7300
Credits 4.0

this course focuses on the law governing the rights of the accused. h e topics of arrest, search, seizure, confession, and self-incrimination, police lineups, and inef ective assistance of counsel are covered in detail.


Corporations And Business Organizations
Course Number CL 7500
Credits 4.0

this course covers the area of law relating to artii cial persons or legal entities, consisting of members acting with a common purpose. Particular emphasis is placed on the formation of the corporate unit, the sale of shares (including federal securities law), the operation and management of the corporation, and the law covering dividends, repurchases, and redemptions.


EVIDENCE
Course Number CL 7600
Credits 6.0

this course covers the substance of and means by which alleged matters of fact are proved or disproved in court. Central topics include the requirements for the introduction and impeachment of evidence, relevancy, character evidence, expert testimony, privileges, and hearsay. h e course also covers the requirements of the originals and roles of judges and juries in the evaluation of evidence.


Community Property
Course Number CL 7700
Credits 4.0

this course covers the Law of Community Property and Division of Marital Assets in California. Specii c topics include the characterization of property as separate or community, creditors rights, third-party transfers, and the resolving of disputes upon the termination of a relationship or the death of a party




Commercial Law
Course Number CL 8000
Credits 4.0

h is survey course covers essential business transactions involving the transfer of interests in personal property and the means by which the obligation to pay is secured and satisi ed. Commercial Law will expose students to a wide variety of concepts governed by the articles of the Uniform Commercial Code, including Sales (Article 2), Negotiable Instruments (Article 3), and Secured Transactions (Article 9). Students will gain experience working with statutory law in the commercial arena. Special attention will be paid to security interests, checks, and securities. h is is an important course for students seeking exposure to fundamental business law concepts, creditor/debtor issues, and banking transactions.


Contract Drafting
Course Number CL 8010
Credits 2.0

A lawyer once said, “Legal drafting is legal thinking made visible.” h e drat er’s work makes explicit the parties’ understanding of the deal, but also i lls the “gaps” sometimes let in contract negotiations and anticipates problems that might arise in the future. h is course uses contract drafting to (1) exemplify the principles of contract law; (2) illustrate those principles in a planning context rather than a litigation context; and (3) develop the legal skills of reading, writing, and analysis. h rough a series of readings and drat ing exercises, students will learn to analyze and drat contracts that accomplish the particular needs and objectives of their client.


Business Planning And Skills Training—practicum
Course Number CL 8020
Credits 4.0

this course focuses on the role of the lawyer as an advisor to closely held businesses and their owners. h e required course materials include an online cyberworkbook entitled Drake on Representing Closely Held Entities, which is written by Dwight Drake on business planning and integrates case study problems written by Andrea Johnson. During the course, students will study and plan the creation, operation, and dissolution of a closely held company called “Compu Devices.” This course workbook integrates a primary textbook, course materials, and assessment tools that focus on California law. h is is a practicum course and, as such, the focus in this course will be to provide hands-on skills training for business lawyers in devising strategies, negotiating agreements, and drat ing business documents. Students will work individually and in teams to negotiate and drat dif erent types of documents used during the life of a business. Students will be required to participate in one or more small group projects and must be able to accommodate conference calls and virtual meetings with their business partners outside of the regularly scheduled classes. Note: this course will utilize additional technologies that will require the student to have a working headset and microphone, in addition to a high-speed Internet connection. Students are also required to have Microsot PowerPoint.


Administrative Law
Course Number CL 8110
Credits 4.0

this course provides an overview of administrative law and procedure including the creation and authority of federal agencies and the ways that agencies exercise their authority to govern certain areas. It includes a review of agency rulemaking, investigation, and adjudicatory functions. It also includes judicial review of administrative agency actions. h e assessments in the course give students some hands-on opportunities to apply what they learn in a “real-world” way by doing projects on federal agencies that they are interested in and by addressing situations that are based on agency actions.


Products Liability
Course Number CL 8140
Credits 2.0

this course explores the legal aspects of injuries caused by products, including design and warning defects, strict liability, and other causes of action. Students will evaluate the current laws applicable to these areas and how they are applied through litigation and other remedies.


Federal Taxation
Course Number CL 8500
Credits 4.0

this course examines the fundamental concepts underlying the federal income tax system, with emphasis on its history and current operation. Major topics that will be explored include determination of gross income and deductions, timing issues, and disposition of property, with emphasis on taxation of the individual. Students will gain an understanding of the research tools used by lawyers in analyzing taxation issues.


Intellectual Property
Course Number CL 8600
Credits 4.0

this is a survey course in the i eld of intellectual property law. Topics include patent, copyright, and trademark law. It would be valuable for students to have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Real Property, Constitutional Law, and Civil Procedure.


Program description: The Executive Juris Doctor - Health Law online degree program at Concord Law School provides an exciting alternative to the JD degree for those who have a personal or professional interest in a challenging law education, but do not want to address the regulatory requirements associated with becoming a member of the bar.

Executive Juris Doctor - Health Law Track, one of online degree programs at Concord Law School, is designed for those who want to gain a sophisticated knowledge of the law and sharpen their analytical reasoning and communication skills. The EJD law online degree program is a 72-unit, part-time program; unlike the four-year JD degree program, it is usually completed in three years. During their first year, students take the same foundation courses as JD law degree students. After the first year, students are encouraged to construct a curriculum plan centered on their interests and career needs.

Program Name: Juris Doctor (JD)

Professional Responsibility
Course Number CL 7900
Credits 4.0

Th E Law Relating To The Ethical Standards That Govern Attorneys And Judges Is The Focus Of This Course. It Covers The Aba Rules Of Professional Conduct, The Aba Model Rules Of Professional Conduct, And The Aba Code Of Judicial Ethics. The Course Will Also Include Materials On Professional Conduct Of The Attorney, The Role Of A Lawyer, The Lawyer As An Offi Cer Of The Court, And The Relationship Of The Lawyer To Society.


Capstone Course
Course Number CL 7999
Credits 2.0

Th is course provides students with an eff ective means of integrating what they have learned over the course of their legal education, building on a strong substantive and skillsfoundation to make critical judgments about the law and policy as a practicing attorney. Special attention will be devoted to the skills necessary for success on the California Bar Examination. Th rough work with testing forms currently employed by the California Committee of Bar Examiners, students will refi ne their ability to analyze legal principles and express their thoughts in an appropriate legal fashion



Oral Argument Training And Practice
Course Number CL 8820
Credits 2.0

Th is course covers eff ective oral argument and how to implement presentational skills in the context of how to argue a case before an appellate court. Th e skills; however, apply equally to (1) students who will argue a motion before a trial court and (2) students who neverintend to practice law but, on occasion, need to speak before a group of people. Students will analyze and apply legal principles and policy to a complicated fact pattern and improve their skills in organization and logical thinking. While there are written assignments, success in the course turns on two oral arguments, one on each side of the case. Students will work with partners and on teams. Th e overarching goal of this course is “collaborative learning,” and students will research, analyze, and plan arguments in “law fi rm” teams. Th is is an opportunity to work in cooperative groups toward a fi nal collective goal.


CONTRACTS
Course Number CL 6100
Credits 8.0

this course examines the legal theories and principles relating to parties and agreements and their resultant obligations or benefits. Covered topics include: formation, conditions, and remedies of contracts; bargained for consideration; third-party contracts (including assignments and delegations); statute of frauds; parole evidence; impossibility of performance; and frustration of purpose.


Criminal Law
Course Number CL 6300
Credits 6.0

this course examines the state’s ability to punish individuals for wrongs committed. Homicide, thet (including robbery and burglary), assault, rape, kidnapping, and arson as well as attempts, conspiracies, and solicitation are covered in depth. h e state of mind required to commit a crime, including justii cations and excuses, is thoroughly covered.


TORTS
Course Number CL 6200
Credits 8.0

this course explores the study of civil liability relating to intentional acts and violation of duties imposed by law. In addition, legal wrongs committed by a private person upon the person or property of another independent of a contractual relationship are covered in detail in this course. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, product liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, and misrepresentation.



Community Property
Course Number CL 7700
Credits 4.0

this course covers the Law of Community Property and Division of Marital Assets in California. Specii c topics include the characterization of property as separate or community, creditors rights, third-party transfers, and the resolving of disputes upon the termination of a relationship or the death of a party


Wills And Trusts
Course Number CL 7150
Credits 6.0

this course covers the law of estates and trusts as applied in California and gives a general overview of how it applies in the rest of the country. Issues dealing with the validity and revocation of wills are examined, in particular as they may af ect distribution of assets of an estate. In addition, the laws of express trusts (including creation and administration), charitable trusts, and consecutive trusts are covered


REMEDIES
Course Number CL 7975
Credits 4.0

This course reviews both legal and equitable remedies, focusing on the underlying liability theories that give rise to the remedy and the remedy itself. Special attention is given to contract and tort remedies. Students will be exposed to the types of problems that they may encounter in law practice, with particular emphasis on ones that cross a variety of disciplines. Final papers are similar to the performance tests currently administered by the State Bar of California.


Program description: JD PROGRAM
Students seeking to practice law and develop a wide range of career
opportunities should enroll in the Juris Doctor program. Th e JD
program focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to be a
responsible and eff ective member of the legal profession. Law study
and the JD degree have also been widely recognized as providing
a foundation for individuals working in business, government,
education, and public interest positions.
Th e JD program at Concord strives to develop students’ abilities,
skills, and perspective in legal fundamentals, professional and
practical skills, and critical thinking skills.

Law Courses at Keiser University

Program Name: BA Legal Studies
Introduction to Psychology
Credits 3.0

Speech
Credits 3.0

Introduction to Computer
Credits 3.0

Microeconomic
Credits 3.0

Macroeconomics
Credits 3.0

English Composition I
Credits 3.0

English Composition II
Credits 3.0

American Literature
Credits 3.0

English Literature
Credits 3.0

College Algebra
Credits 3.0

College Mathematics
Credits 3.0

General Biology
Credits 3.0

General Biology Laboratory
Credits 1.0

Environmental Science
Credits 3.0


Criminal Law
Course Number CJL2100
Credits 3.0

Examines criminal law and defines legal principles and doctrines. Topics include need for and origins of criminal laws and reviews specific laws and their punishments, including violent crimes, economic crimes and defenses available.


Constitutional Criminal Procedures
Credits 3.0

Contracts
Credits 3.0



Civil Litigation
Credits 3.0

Bankruptcy
Credits 3.0

Wills, Trusts & Estates
Credits 3.0

Ethics
Credits 3.0

Family Law
Credits 3.0


Torts
Credits 3.0

Business Organizations
Credits 3.0

Real Property
Credits 3.0

Income Tax
Credits 3.0


Alternative Dispute Resolution
Credits 3.0

Evidence
Credits 3.0

Intellectual Property
Credits 3.0

Administrative Law
Credits 3.0

Law Office Managment & Technology
Credits 3.0

Immigration Law
Credits 3.0

Constitutional Law
Credits 3.0


Management Information Systems
Credits 3.0

Money & Banking
Credits 3.0

Writing for Managers
Credits 3.0

Critical Thinking
Credits 3.0

Program description: Keiser University's Bachelor of Arts degree in Legal Studies trains students for careers in law and law-related fields (business, government and criminal justice), as well as preparing students to pursue a law degree. Students learn the necessary information and skills for successful integration into a law office atmosphere. They also learn the ways in which the law impacts most professional fields.

Law Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Law Enforcement Foundations
Basic Standards Training 1
Course Number BT1E
Credits 50.0

This course is an introduction to the operations of a security guard, focusing on rights and regulations, duties, responsibilities, and the procedures performed on the job


Basic Standards Training 2
Course Number BT2E
Credits 25.0

This course focuses on communications and the use of force by a security guard


Criminology and the Criminal Justice System
Course Number CCJE
Credits 50.0

Students will gain insight and understanding of both the criminal and the crime including motivation, theories of crime and criminality, psychological/social impact of crime and violence, crime analysis, and Canada's criminal justice system


Criminal Code and Federal States
Course Number CFSE
Credits 50.0

This course provides an in-depth study of Canada’s criminal code and related federal statutes, including interpretation through the perspective of a law enforcement officer


Canadian Government and Politics
Course Number CGNE
Credits 50.0

Students will gain knowledge of both the organization and management of the public sector, as well as the structure, function, and powers of the federal, provincial, and municipal governments


Communications I
Course Number CO1E
Credits 50.0

This introduction to communications is designed to develop students’ English and communication skills so they can communicate accurately, persuasively, and credibly with individuals, groups, and multi-disciplinary teams


Communications II
Course Number CO2E
Credits 50.0

This advanced communication course is designed to enhance the foundational skills developed in introduction to communications. These skills will focus on interpretation of written communication, factual documentation of events for reports that form part of permanent public records, advanced editing skills and advanced verbal reports


Contemporary Social Problems
Course Number CPBE
Credits 50.0

This subject will help students understand what is happening in Canada today, what the trends indicate, and why these things are happening, how social policy is affecting areas such as poverty, child abuse, violence against women, and more


Conflict Resolution and Mediation
Course Number CRME
Credits 25.0

This subject will introduce the foundational concepts of conflict resolution and mediation. The course also introduces the foundations of incident debriefing. The demands of the law and regulatory enforcement constantly place professional in contact with hostile and interpersonal contact during stressful situations. These foundational skills will provide students with tools to improve their ability to do their job by being able to improve interpersonal communication at critical times. Incident debriefing identifies the purpose and process for this tool


Correctional Services
Course Number CSVE
Credits 50.0

This course covers topics related to post-law enforcement or regulatory enforcement including federal and provincial correctional services, probation, parole, halfway houses, rehabilitation processes, and restorative justice


Ethics
Course Number ETCE
Credits 25.0

A practical approach to ethics will help students maintain professional conduct and integrity that must be paramount in their decision-making. Topics include making ethical decisions, laws of police ethics, and moral decision-making


Human Behaviour
Course Number HBVE
Credits 50.0

This course covers the foundations of human behaviour and the impact of deviant behaviour in the law and regulatory enforcement fields


Issues in Diversity and First Nations People
Course Number IDFE
Credits 25.0

By studying the ethnic composition and the history of race relations in Canada, concepts of culture and sensitivity training, students will understand critical situations which may arise from racially-motivated conflict. In order to better understand and deal with native issues, students will study a history of first nations people, laws, demographics, culture, and current issues


Investigation Techniques
Course Number IVTE
Credits 50.0

This course will build on the concepts and ideas taught in earlier foundation courses and will provide the student with the base skills required to be a successful investigator


Introduction to Law Enforcement
Course Number LEFE
Credits 50.0

Beginning with an introduction to the history of policing in Canada, studies will also include police jurisdictions in Canada, police administration, how police agencies use their resources, and more


Psychology
Course Number PSCE
Credits 50.0

This course provides an introduction to psychology including learning, motivation, behaviour, development, factors affecting interpersonal relationships, and group dynamics


Policing Authority / Search / Seizure / Arrest
Course Number PSSE
Credits 50.0

This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to carry out common law enforcement operations, including powers of arrest, rules of evidence, seizure, process of interviewing (both those under investigation and witnesses) and documentation. This topic also covers provincial and federal legislation that govern law enforcement practices in these areas


Regulatory Enforcment - Federal
Course Number REFE
Credits 50.0

In this course the student will be exposed to the purpose of Federal Regulations, enforcement, and compliance strategies as well as methods for obtaining compliance. Students will outline how Regulations are a form of law and how Acts that authorize the making of Regulations are called enabling Acts. The student will compare and contrast the enforcement of Regulations in its two forms ― compliance and sanctioning/deterrence


Regualtory Enforcement - Provincial
Course Number REPE
Credits 50.0

This course explores the history, purpose and range of provincial regulatory bodies including crown corporations that maintain an enforcement or investigation function. The course also reviews the jurisdiction and provincial acts that support the functions of regulatory provincial enforcement agencies. Enforcement agencies include fish and wildlife, transportation, motor vehicles, forestry, social services, air land and water, liquor and tobacco, gaming, taxation and municipalities. Provincial crown corporations include railway, insurance and public utilities


Sociology
Course Number SCLE
Credits 50.0

Knowledge of the workings and interaction of people in society will aid the student in understanding how people are influenced by their social environment. Time is also spent highlighting relevant social problems


Wellness Management
Course Number WMGE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to increase awareness of the lifestyle demands of the law and regulatory enforcement profession. The course also covers the extensive preparation requirements and screening processes used by agencies hiring in law and regulatory enforcement profession. The course covers topics in the physical requirements for the profession, demands of a 24-hour workplace, managing stress, identification of psychological impacts, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. This course includes fitness planning and training, lifestyle planning, and nutrition


Career and Employment Strategies
Course Number CESE
Credits 25.0

his course looks at the planning, preparation, execution, and follow-up stages of an interview.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number INTE
Credits 50.0

This course covers working with the Windows operating system to manage files and folders and customize the desktop, creating documents, and using the Internet for communication and research.


Practicum
Course Number PRAC
Credits 100.0

This program includes a practicum component consisting of a specified number of weeks of work at a job site. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the business organization does not pay for the services of the student during the practicum. The number of practicum hours varies between programs. To learn more about the specific practicum hours for a specific program, speak with an Admissions Representative.


Professional Skills
Course Number PSKE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to equip students with interpersonal skills identified by employers as essential for success in the professional world. Using a variety of instructional methods including case studies, group exercises, and discussion, students learn and practice key communication skills.


Student Success Strategies
Course Number SSSE
Credits 25.0

This course will introduce students to skills and concepts that will help them achieve personal, academic, and career success.


Program description: Law enforcement-related careers are one of the best rated social/community career paths in Canada. CDI's Law Enforcement Foundations program gives you a head start in this satisfying and rewarding field.
This program provides you with a broad education of the legal, ethical, and investigative skills you'll need to enter a career in public safety, security, policing or law enforcement. Courses cover topics such as Criminology and Human Behaviour, Conflict Resolution, Investigation Techniques, and more - which may be useful as police prep training or for other law enforcement careers.

Law Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: MS in Criminal Justice: Law Enforcement
Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 515
Credits 4.0

This course explores contemporary law enforcement management by examining personality, values, groups, power dimensions, decision making, conflict management, change, and organization development.


Restorative Justice
Course Number JUS 520
Credits 4.0

This course compares and contrasts traditional goals of punishment (rehabilitation, incapacitation, retribution, and deterrence) with the concepts of restorative justice. Topics include community service, victim assistance, victim-offender mediation, and restitution. Restorative justice seeks a balance between the need to rehabilitate offenders while executing a duty to protect the public.


Research Methods
Course Number JUS 510
Credits 4.0

This course provides a fundamental analysis of research and a methodological evaluation of criminal justice topics. This course familiarizes students with aspects of statistical analysis and research design relevant to today’s justice environment using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Additionally, coverage is provided for use of research design in community action


Forensic Psychology
Course Number JUS 610
Credits 4.0

This course provides an objective study of the many roles psychology plays in the legal system, including expert witnesses, criminal profilers, and trial consultants for jury selection and child custody hearings.


Criminal Investigations
Course Number JUS 521
Credits 4.0

This course enhances students’ understanding of criminal investigative procedure, collection and preservation of evidence, chain of custody concerns, computer forensics, investigative jurisdiction, administration, and use of information gathering techniques.


Exploration of Law and Public Policy
Course Number JUS 620
Credits 4.0

This course explores the interrelatedness of law and socioeconomic concerns and attempts to generate a holistic perspective of society and social control for those charged with the administration of justice


Terrorism and Homeland Security
Course Number JUS 524
Credits 4.0

This course provides insight into the historical causes, strategies, and tactics of terrorism, as well as counterterrorism planning and utilization of law enforcement assets to prevent, detect, and deter acts of terrorism. Also covered are constitutional issues regarding terrorism suspects, long-term detention, financial embargoes of private funds, and other issues pertinent to the modern political climate.


Ethics and Liability for Policing and Corrections
Course Number JUS 618
Credits 4.0

This course explores the subcultures created by police and correctional officers. Topics include the need for building a subculture of mutual support and survival in a dangerous profession, dilemmas of new officers entering corrupt departments, and ways administrators can help police and correctional officers rediscover their community.


Capstone
Course Number JUS 651
Credits 4.0

This course is taken in the final term of the graduate program. It focuses on professional portfolio development and a final written proposal by the graduate. The portfolio will contain the graduate’s curriculum vitae, exemplars of writing from graduate courses, a statement of criminal justice philosophy, a 5-year plan for professional goals, and a research topic paper/written proposal. A final written proposal must focus on how the graduate will use the totality of the learning experience to examine and improve the criminal justice system at the federal, state, county, or city level. The proposal must exhibit adequate research, coordination within the extant layers of justice policy, realistic consideration of available resources, and a reasonable timeline of benchmarks.


Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 250
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Examination Of Issues Relating To Justice Policies, Perspectives, Techniques, Roles, Institutional Arrangement, Management And Administration, Use Of Research, And Innovative Patterns. Prerequisite: Jus 104 And Jus 110.


Program description: The Master of Science in Criminal Justice with an Emphasis in Law Enforcement is designed for students
seeking to expand their understanding of the law, social order, and justice. This program is particularly suited to
law enforcement personnel who wish to advance in their field, as well as corrections, probation, and parole
officers; law clerks; and other decision makers who address questions of public policy, social research, and
administration of justice in the public sphere. This program also prepares students for work in legal foundations
where in-depth issues are contended.

Law Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Law Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of California-San Diego
Total Programs 121
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 22nd
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
Tufts University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 24th
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Boston College
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 94
Rank in USA 29th