Online Legal Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its legal courses to be successful legal professionals, judges, lawyers, paralegals, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 999,020 people employed as legal employees alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $95,820. Court reporters make on average $52,460 per year and there are about 18,780 of them employed today.

Legal Organizations Legal Common Job Tasks
  • preparing the legal arguments
  • coordinating the activities of other law office employees and maintain financial office records
  • ensuring that all relevant information is considered
Popular Journals & Magazines
courses
 

Ranked by Excellence

Legal Courses at Walden University

Program Name: B.S. in Forensic Psychology
Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology
Course Number PSYC 6001
Credits 1.0

This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals; development of the program of study and Professional Development Plan; strategies for online success; introduction to the online library; and introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence.


Introduction to Forensic Psychology
Course Number FPSY 6101
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with an overview of the areas covered by a broad definition of forensic psychology. In doing so, this course introduces the basic tenets of forensic psychology and the criminal justice system. Topics of study include criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, correctional psychology, and others. Assignments focus on providing the student with a broad basic knowledge of the forensic psychology field.


Abnormal Behavior
Course Number FPSY 6720
Credits 5.0

This course is an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, what constitutes normalcy is considered from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders are considered using the scholar-practitioner model. Techniques are reviewed for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis are reviewed.


Understanding Forensic Psychology Research
Course Number FPSY 6115
Credits 5.0

This course aims to help the student better understand how to be an astute consumer of forensic psychology research. Basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity, are covered. However, this course places emphasis on teaching the student how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic clinical settings.


Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings
Course Number FPSY 6125
Credits 5.0

This course covers the varied assessment techniques and instruments used in the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, lie detection, custody evaluations, and many of the psychological tests and instruments that are used in these assessments. The course will provide a solid foundation of the knowledge of forensic psychology techniques and assessment rather than specific skills in administering and interpreting psychological tests.


Criminal Behavior
Course Number FPSY 6135
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that which comes from the sociological and anthropological perspectives, is discussed. Theories and application of criminal profiling will be discussed. Additionally, more specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators will be addressed.


Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology
Course Number FPSY 6145
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as a forensic psychologist. The American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered.


Treatment of Forensic Populations
Course Number FPSY 6511
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.


Psychology in the Courts
Course Number PSYC 6520
Credits 5.0

This course covers the major roles that a forensic psychologist could have within the court system. Issues such as expert testimony, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, and consultation with attorneys will be covered. Additionally, practical skills such as documentation and report writing will be addressed.


Police Psychology
Course Number COUN 6521
Credits 5.0

The focus of this course is directed at the various roles a psychologist might have when working within a police department. Issues such as officer selection and training, stress management, critical incident stress debriefing, and upper-management consultation are mainstays of the police psychologist and will be covered. Additionally, less-well-known roles such as training in hostage negotiations and the selection of special operations officers (S.W.A.T., snipers, tactical commanders) will be reviewed.


Elective
Course Number PSYC 6245
Credits 5.0

In this course, you will use the lens of social psychology to examine both social cognitions and social behavior—nearly all phenomena that pertain to the individual in society. You will explore the topics of perceptions, attitudes, relationships and attraction, the motivation to help others, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture, and consider how knowledge of these topics can be used to effect positive social change. Your application of what you learn in this course culminates in a final project in which you develop a plan for using social psychology research to address a significant social problem. Moreover, your learning in this course will extend to your personal and professional life and truly enable you to effect positive social change as a scholar-practitioner committed to doing so.


Capstone Course or Field Experience
Course Number none
Credits 5.0

Capstone Course or Field Experience


Program description: Prepare to make a difference with a B.S. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University. Through this program, you will learn how to identify the social and psychological factors that influence the evolution of the criminal mind. Gain the skills you need to become a strong advocate for victims’ rights and explore ways to make a positive change within the legal system. Choose from a variety of concentrations designed to help you meet your personal and professional goals in the field of forensic psychology.

Concentrations

  • Forensics and the Law
  • Leadership and Management
  • Self-Designed
  • Victims and Justice


Note on Licensure

The B.S. in Forensic Psychology is not designed to prepare students to become a licensed psychology professional.

Legal Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: Master of Science in Legal Studies

Ethics and the Professional
Course Number LS 501
Credits 5.0

This course will explore the concept of ethics and its relationship to the professional. The course will examine concepts of normative ethics, professional behavior and moralistic ethics, and the relationship of ethical decision making to institutions and organizations in society. Th e focus will be on general ethical principles and the determination of fundamental and common values in society that govern societal institutions.





Applied Research Project
Course Number GM 599
Credits 4.0

This serves as the capstone course to the Master of Science in Management program, which allows the student to integrate theories with practical application. This course utilizes the conceptual foundations and skills acquired in earlier courses as a basis for an in-depth examination of an organizational issue or problem of significance that is of special interest to the student. The student will collaborate with organizational stakeholders to identify a problem and design a research project.



Program description: Practical skills in dispute resolution, ethical decision making, legal
terminology and writing, and use of the law library

• The opportunity to utilize a problem-based inquiry model of learning
within the intensive study courses

• The ability to apply legal principles and concepts to solve real-world social,
economic, political, and institutional problems within a professional context

• An in-depth understanding of the ethical and moral implications of the
law and legal processes

• The opportunity to complete a practicum and an action research project.
Students demonstrate their ability to apply the knowledge and skills
acquired in their online coursework to a real-world legal scenario.

Program Name: MS in Legal Studies

Ethics and the Professional
Course Number LS 501
Credits 5.0

This course will explore the concept of ethics and its relationship to the professional. The course will examine concepts of normative ethics, professional behavior and moralistic ethics, and the relationship of ethical decision making to institutions and organizations in society. Th e focus will be on general ethical principles and the determination of fundamental and common values in society that govern societal institutions.





Applied Research Project
Course Number GM 599
Credits 4.0

This serves as the capstone course to the Master of Science in Management program, which allows the student to integrate theories with practical application. This course utilizes the conceptual foundations and skills acquired in earlier courses as a basis for an in-depth examination of an organizational issue or problem of significance that is of special interest to the student. The student will collaborate with organizational stakeholders to identify a problem and design a research project.



Program description: This program was developed by professionals in law, social science, and teaching, and is guided by a national advisory board of subject matter experts in a variety of law-related areas. The curriculum is outcomes-oriented, which means we challenge you with real-world experiences to help you develop skills relevant to a variety of career fields.

These specialized online courses are designed to help you:

* Develop practical skills in dispute resolution, ethical decision making, legal terminology and writing, and use of the law library
* Focus on how to apply legal principles and concepts to solve real-world social, economic, political, and institutional problems within a professional context
* Reflect on the ethical and moral implications of the law and legal processes
* Complete a practicum and a research report to demonstrate your ability to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in your online coursework to real-world legal scenarios

Program Name: MSLS - Education and the Legal System

Rules and Regulations Governing Higher Education
Course Number LS 516
Credits 5.0

This course examines faculty issues in higher education. Specific topics include tenure and promotion issues covering liberty, property, contracts, expectations of continued employment, and race issues. In this course, students will examine considerations when fi ring faculty including termination for cause, seniority and age discrimination, financial exigency, program discontinuance, faculty density, collective bargaining, remedies, and relief. Students will also explore issues related to faculty research and regulation including informed consent and ethics, biotechnology, national security controls, and secrecy. Finally, students will thoroughly examine faculty misconduct and conflicts of interest, intellectual


Management of Institutions of Higher Education
Course Number LS 517
Credits 5.0

This course will explore college and university student issues. Th e course will start with the legal relationship between the institutions and students, then it will discuss in loco parent is and due process as it applies to students. Tort theories, contract theories, student admissions, and grades will be examined as well as all kinds of student dismissals, whether they are for academic, disciplinary, or misconduct infractions


Critical Concepts and Competencies for the IT Professional
Course Number IT 500
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a foundation in the concepts and paradigms that shape information technology today. Students will distinguish between current competing ideologies to expand their technological knowledge and make informed business decisions. A focus will be placed on Internet technologies, hardware and software components, and networked environmen ts, as well as ethical and social issues in information technology. Students will also be introduced to the Master of Science in Information Technology learning team model, which will be built upon throughout the program.


System Analysis and Design
Course Number IT 460
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Information Systems Project Management
Course Number IT 511
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the key factors in effectively managing information systems projects. Students study project management techniques for information systems projects through detailed case studies and exercises. Students learn how to manage information systems projects through the use of the five project management process groups integrated with the nine project management knowledge areas. Approaches for information systems project management and examples relevant to information systems projects are used throughout the course.


Database Management Systems
Course Number IT 520
Credits 4.0

This Course Discusses The Design, Implementation, And Operation Of Databases Using A Principal Relational Database Management System (dbms). The Course Covers Many Fundamental Topics Including: Data Modeling Using Entity-relationship Diagrams; Data Storage, Manipulation, And Queries Using Structured Query Language (sql); Functional Dependencies, Normalization Concepts, And Algorithms; Primary And Index File Organizations; And Transaction Processing. The Course Will Also Introduce Students To Advanced Topics In Database Management.


Computer Networks
Course Number IT 530
Credits 4.0

This course introduces data communications and networking technologies from the business perspective by heavily utilizing case studies and the decision-making process. Topics consist of network operating systems, local and wide area networks, and voice and wireless networks, as well as security and the Internet. The focus will be on practical applications of these concepts including support issues, administration, and management.


Management of Information Security
Course Number IT 540
Credits 4.0

IT professionals must focus on a wide range of security-related issues and develop security systems that address constantly changing threats. This course takes the approach that security components and business functions work in tandem. Topics like asset identification, human factors, compliance with regulations, personnel security, risk assessment, and ethical considerations are covered, as well as computer and network security tools and methods.



Applied IT Master Project
Course Number IT 599
Credits 4.0

The Applied IT Master Project demonstrates a synthesis of knowledge gained in the degree plan. In this course, the student will implement an approved IT project. The project should emphasize the student™s ability to make use of the knowledge gained in the Master of Science in Information Technology program. The student will investigate a topic, evaluate alternative approaches, and present a proposed solution in a professional manner. The student will reflect upon his or her learning experiences in the Master of Science in Information Technology program and what he or she offers to the industry.


Program description: By earning a Master of Science in Legal Studies online, you could prepare yourself to pursue a career that requires a strong understanding of the law and its interaction with societal institutions.* That covers a lot of ground because most businesses and organizations in America deal with these sorts of legal issues. The program is designed to teach you the knowledge and skills it takes to access the law and legal system, understand legal terminology, and apply the law in a wide variety of settings; all without the pressure of law school and the bar exam.

Program Name: MSLS - Legal System and the Media
Intellectual Property and Digital Entertainment
Course Number LS 510
Credits 5.0

This course will explore the progression of content distribution and entertainment intellectual property laws, how these two have impacted each other, and the challenges caused. Students will examine questions that arise on a daily basis regarding content distribution, licensing, and syndication, explore the philosophy of “ownership” around content, discuss the legal diff erences between content for promotion versus content for revenue generation, and examine the challenges faced in determining those differences. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: Successful completion of all core courses in the Master of Science in Legal Studies


Music Content IP—Building Blocks of the Music Business
Course Number LS 511
Credits 5.0

This course will explore all aspects of the music industry as it relates to revenue-generating and exposure-generating sources for the content creator.


Current and Future Issues in Music Law
Course Number LS 512
Credits 5.0

This course will explore critical issues/changes as they relate to current or potential future shift s in music content generation, ownership, exposure, revenue, and/or distribution



Ethics and the Professional
Course Number LS 501
Credits 5.0

This course will explore the concept of ethics and its relationship to the professional. The course will examine concepts of normative ethics, professional behavior and moralistic ethics, and the relationship of ethical decision making to institutions and organizations in society. Th e focus will be on general ethical principles and the determination of fundamental and common values in society that govern societal institutions.





Applied Research Project
Course Number GM 599
Credits 4.0

This serves as the capstone course to the Master of Science in Management program, which allows the student to integrate theories with practical application. This course utilizes the conceptual foundations and skills acquired in earlier courses as a basis for an in-depth examination of an organizational issue or problem of significance that is of special interest to the student. The student will collaborate with organizational stakeholders to identify a problem and design a research project.



Program description: A Master of Science in Legal Studies online, you could prepare yourself to pursue a career that requires a strong understanding of the law and its interaction with societal institutions.* That covers a lot of ground because most businesses and organizations in America deal with these sorts of legal issues. The program is designed to teach you the knowledge and skills it takes to access the law and legal system, understand legal terminology, and apply the law in a wide variety of settings; all without the pressure of law school and the bar exam.

Legal Courses at Post University

Program Name: A.S. in Legal Studies
Managerial Communication
Course Number BUS311
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to provide instruction in organization and construction of the written, technological, and oral communication used in modern business. Prerequisite: ENG207.


Introduction to Law
Course Number LAW101
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to the system of legal thought and practice. The course examines legal methods and terminology while providing an orientation to state and federal laws and court systems. Internet resources and instructional technology are part of all topics, including a survey of subject specific areas in the law.


Estate Admin. & Probate Practic
Course Number LAW105
Credits 3.0

Students Learn The Role That Wills, Trusts And Powers Of Attorney Play In The Management Of Personal Assets. Further, Students Become Thoroughly Familiar With The Procedures Employed To Open, Manage, And Close Decedents’ Estates, Conservatorship, Guardianships, Small Estates, And Refusal Of Letters. Prerequisite: Law101; Acc111 Strongly Recommended.


Real Estate Law & Practice
Course Number LAW201
Credits 3.0

Students learn how to handle a real estate transaction from the drafting of the sales contract to the closing. Subjects covered include Notes, Mortgages and Deeds of Trust, Titles and Title Insurance, Recording Liens, Encumbrances, Foreclosures, and Easements. Prerequisite: LAW101.


Civil Litigation & Practice
Course Number LAW203
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to all aspects of a civil lawsuit, including Jurisdiction, Rules of Procedure, Pleadings, Motions, Discovery, Trial Procedures, and the Appellate Process. Prerequisite: LAW101.




College Reading & Writing
Course Number ENG110
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to develop and refine the analytical/critical reading skills and the substantive writing skills of freshmen. This intensive writing class will focus on writing essays of varying length and expose students to the various rhetorical modes of writing that will contribute to their success in university courses and their chosen careers.


College Writing Workshop
Course Number ENG120
Credits 3.0

This course looks to expand upon the rhetorical skills attained in ENG110. As a student-centered course, students explore their own writing in peer, group, and self-review skill sessions. Students enhance self-editing skills and increase awareness of the revision skills needed in both college coursework and in careers. The course will further develop students’ understanding of the writing process from pre-writing to final draft. This course encourages students to have their writing evaluated across the curriculum. The addition of thematic readings further enhances students’ knowledge base. The course culminates in a portfolio of original work.


Intro to Communications
Course Number COM107
Credits 3.0

This introductory course will focus on the knowledge and skills that students need to become competent communicators. This information and these skills will include speaking, listening, media literacy, computer-mediated communication, cultural sensitivity, workplace communication, group dynamics, and critical thinking. Students will prepare and present speeches and group projects that utilize media and technology. Emphasis will be place on personal, social and workplace interaction both individually and in group settings.


World Civilization I
Course Number HIS101
Credits 3.0

This course provides a survey of significant developments relating to the rise of early Mediterranean, European, and Asiatic societies. Economic, political, and religious themes are stressed from the foundations of civilization to the eve of the Western Enlightenment.


College Algebra
Course Number MAT120
Credits 3.0

This course provides a review of the fundamentals of algebra: a study of function theory, specifically linear and quadratic functions; matrix operations; and linear programming. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving techniques with special attention given to business and other applications. Prerequisite: MAT101 or placement examination.


American National Government
Course Number PSC101
Credits 3.0

This course provides a survey introduction to the United States governmental system at the national level. Students are introduced to the major components of the federal government as well as the system’s human and legal context: the American political culture and constitutionalism.


Comparative Government
Course Number PSC201
Credits 3.0

This survey focuses on a selection of major nation-states in the international arena, comparing their governmental institutions, policy decision-making processes, and political cultures. Each state is also examined for its historical background and prevailing contemporary issues of concern.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC111
Credits 3.0

This course is for the student to learn about accounting as an information development and communications function that supports economic decision-making. The course will help students perform financial analysis; derive information for personal or organizational decisions; and understand business, governmental, and other organizational entities.


Business Law I
Course Number BUS204
Credits 3.0

This course covers Constitutional Law and the rights and duties that apply to business entities as well as to individuals. Also covered are Tort Law, body and property injury, as well as harm to reputation in the business context; Criminal Law, specifically those areas pertinent to business, such as bribery and embezzlement; Intellectual Property Law, including copyright, patent and trademark laws; Contract Law, which encompasses sales contracts and the application of the Uniform Commercial Code as well as common law contracts, such as employment contracts.


Business Law II
Course Number BUS205
Credits 3.0

This course continues the study of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code and proceeds to Agency Law, which governs employer-employee fiduciary and contractual relationships. The Workers Compensation Act, including advantages and disadvantages to both employer and employee, is examined. Also covered are Sole Proprietorship, Partnership Law, both common and statutory provisions, Corporate Law and Bankruptcy Law.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGT105
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the principles of management and their application in public and private, profit and non-profit organizations. The areas of employee motivation, group behavior, leadership, strategic planning, organizational design, and career opportunities represent a variety of subjects presented and discussed in the course. Emphasis is on the research and techniques available to assist in the development of requisite management skills.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number CIS112
Credits 3.0

This course strives to meet the high level of computer literacy required of all students earning a degree from the university. Special emphasis is placed on the ethical use of computer technology for information analysis and communications. Computer units introduce the Internet, Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. Students who feel they have attained computer literacy and earn 70 percent on an exemption exam may substitute any other 3-credit course for this core requirement. Students may prove competency by passing a waiver examination. No credit is granted if the requirement is waived.


Program description: The paralegal studies program offered online at Post University prepares students to work as a member of a professional team delivering legal services. Students become familiar with the American legal system, including federal and state courts, statutes, codes and treaties as well as with legal theory and its practical applications in various disciplines, including legal research, civil litigation, real estate and estates. Paralegal programs include general courses on the law and legal research techniques; courses covering specialized areas of the law such as real estate, estate planning and probate, litigation, family law, contracts and criminal law, as well as courses introducing students to the legal applications of computers. Many employers prefer applicants with specialized training. Students can also do internships in which they gain practical experience by working for several months in a law office, corporate legal department or government agency. This experience is an asset when seeking a job after graduation.

Program Name: B.S. in Legal Studies
Business Organizations & Practice
Course Number LAW307
Credits 3.0

Students Are Introduced To The Substantive Law Of Business Entities Including Sole Proprietorships, General And Limited Partnerships, And Corporations. Subjects Covered Include The Application Of Substantive Law To Incorporation Procedure,partnership Agreements, General Corporation Maintenance, Corporate Capitalization, Financing And Corporate Changes Such As Mergers, Amendments, Dissolutions. Prerequisite: Law101. Bus204 Is Strongly Recommended.



Small Business Mgt.
Course Number MGT306
Credits 3.0

This course presents the concepts and the skills needed to set up, operate, and control a small business. The development of a business plan is integral to the course. Prerequisite: MGT 221 or permission of the instructor.





Family Law & Practice
Course Number LAW209
Credits 3.0

Students become familiar with such family law matters as annulment, legal separation, marriage and dissolution of marriage. Further, students are introduced to the general litigation process that resolves disputes, including post-judgment matters. Other family matters such as adoption, guardianship, domestic violence, actions for custody, and rights to property and support are covered. Prerequisite: LAW101


Bankruptcy Law & Practice
Course Number LAW301
Credits 6.0

Students Become Familiar With The Bankruptcy Code, As Amended; The General Functions Of The Bankruptcy Court; And The Power Of The United States Bankruptcy Court For The District Of Connecticut. Students Are Introduced To Chapter 7, Chapter 11, And Chapter 13 Proceedings And Rules. Prerequisite: Law101; Law203 Is Recommended.


Environmental Law & Practice
Course Number LAW405
Credits 3.0

Students Learn The Relevant Federal And State Environmental Laws Together With Their Practical Application To Corporate And Real Estate Transactions. Specific Areas Of Study Include Environmental Due Diligence. This Course Covers The Specific Area In Which Individuals And Business Entities Encounter Environmental Law. Cross Listed With Env405. Prerequisite: Bus204 Or Env121 Or Law101


Criminal Law
Course Number CRJ301
Credits 3.0

The Course Examines Substantive And Procedural Criminal Law Including The Common Law And Statutory Offenses. Law Of Evidence, Burden Of Proof, The Jury System, And Pre-trial Dispositions Are Also Studied. Prerequisite: Crj101 Or Law 101.


Criminal Procedure
Course Number CRJ302
Credits 3.0

This course is a survey and analysis of the due process rights of individuals in the criminal process. Emphasis is on the impact of the Bill of Rights on the practices of police, prosecutors and judges and the remedies available for the violation of those rights. Prerequisite: CRJ301.


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACC211
Credits 3.0

This course provides a practical understanding of the use of accounting by management in planning and controlling operations in all functions of the enterprise and in choosing among alternative courses of action. Prerequisite: ACC111


Introduction to Law
Course Number LAW101
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to the system of legal thought and practice. The course examines legal methods and terminology while providing an orientation to state and federal laws and court systems. Internet resources and instructional technology are part of all topics, including a survey of subject specific areas in the law.


Estate Admin. & Probate Practic
Course Number LAW105
Credits 3.0

Students Learn The Role That Wills, Trusts And Powers Of Attorney Play In The Management Of Personal Assets. Further, Students Become Thoroughly Familiar With The Procedures Employed To Open, Manage, And Close Decedents’ Estates, Conservatorship, Guardianships, Small Estates, And Refusal Of Letters. Prerequisite: Law101; Acc111 Strongly Recommended.


Real Estate Law & Practice
Course Number LAW201
Credits 3.0

Students learn how to handle a real estate transaction from the drafting of the sales contract to the closing. Subjects covered include Notes, Mortgages and Deeds of Trust, Titles and Title Insurance, Recording Liens, Encumbrances, Foreclosures, and Easements. Prerequisite: LAW101.


Civil Litigation & Practice
Course Number LAW203
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to all aspects of a civil lawsuit, including Jurisdiction, Rules of Procedure, Pleadings, Motions, Discovery, Trial Procedures, and the Appellate Process. Prerequisite: LAW101.



College Success Seminar
Course Number CSA100
Credits 3.0

The College Success Seminar is designed to provide first year students with the academic and social skills necessary for success in the university environment. Its mission is to provide students with an introduction to the many dimensions of university life and Post University.


Program description: Post University’s Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies program includes a comprehensive and rigorous curriculum that
provides students with the skills and experiences they’ll need to succeed in this field.

Our program provides a thorough grounding in ethical decision-making as students explore the relationship of the legal system to business, government, and society. The student-oriented curriculum explores cutting-edge topics and traditional skill-based subject areas.

Post University’s legal studies students take courses not only in their major, they also take courses in liberal arts,
organizational leadership, and personal development – all of which provide the breadth and depth of knowledge needed
to become leaders in this field. Students also participate in a cooperative education or internship program that provides hands-on, real-work work experience before they graduate.

Legal Studies majors may choose a concentration in the following areas: Corporate Law, Law and Technology, Civil and Criminal Trial Law, Environmental Law, and Law Office Administration.

Graduates pursue careers as a paralegal in corporate, private, or government organizations or continue their studies in law school or graduate school.

Program Name: Certificate: Legal Nurse Consulting
Personal Injury Law
Course Number LAW415
Credits 3.0

Students become familiar with Personal Injury Law, which is based on tort law concepts. Among the topics to be discussed are tort law, legal analysis, negligence, intentional torts, strict liability, and product liability.


Medical Malpractice
Course Number Law430
Credits 3.0

Students become familiar with Medical Malpractice Law, which is based on tort law concepts. The topics to be discussed include tort law, risk management, investigation of claims, litigation and the medical malpractice trial.


Elective course
Course Number LAWxxx
Credits 3.0

Internship
Course Number LAW398
Credits 3.0

This Elective Course Is A Continuation Of Law298. Students Continue To Learn How To Apply Knowledge Gained From Course Work To The Work Of A Law Office. Students Are Required To Meet 15 Hours Per Semester In Seminar Meetings And To Work In A Law Office Setting, Which Could Include Law Firms, Corporate Law Departments, Or Government Agencies, For At Least 90 Hours. Prerequisites: Law105, Law201, Law203, Law205.


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC111
Credits 3.0

This course is for the student to learn about accounting as an information development and communications function that supports economic decision-making. The course will help students perform financial analysis; derive information for personal or organizational decisions; and understand business, governmental, and other organizational entities.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number CIS112
Credits 3.0

This course strives to meet the high level of computer literacy required of all students earning a degree from the university. Special emphasis is placed on the ethical use of computer technology for information analysis and communications. Computer units introduce the Internet, Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. Students who feel they have attained computer literacy and earn 70 percent on an exemption exam may substitute any other 3-credit course for this core requirement. Students may prove competency by passing a waiver examination. No credit is granted if the requirement is waived.


Introduction to Law
Course Number LAW101
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to the system of legal thought and practice. The course examines legal methods and terminology while providing an orientation to state and federal laws and court systems. Internet resources and instructional technology are part of all topics, including a survey of subject specific areas in the law.


Civil Litigation & Practice
Course Number LAW203
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to all aspects of a civil lawsuit, including Jurisdiction, Rules of Procedure, Pleadings, Motions, Discovery, Trial Procedures, and the Appellate Process. Prerequisite: LAW101.




Program description: Legal Nurse consultants find employment with insurance companies, government agencies, private corporations, and hospitals. In fact, legal nurse consultants are in high demand at all of these locations as well as attorneys offices. HMOs and other agencies are constantly seeking medical experts with legal experience. According to Payscale.com, the median national salary of an RN is around $50,000 annually. When an RN becomes a legal nurse consultant this salary becomes considerably higher up to $80,000.

With Post University Online, you can earn your certificate in Legal Nurse Consulting entirely online, with no commuting or interruptions in your current career.

The online Legal Nurse Consulting Certificate program is designed for experienced registered nurses who are interested in combining their clinical experience with specialized legal knowledge enabling them to serve as liaisons between the legal and health care fields. The online legal nurse program will provide the legal knowledge required to evaluate, analyze, and offer informed opinions on the delivery of health care and resulting outcomes. The legal nurse certificate program of study combines business and legal theory and analysis with a practical field experience that meets the following objectives:

* Understand the civil litigation process
* Research legal problems using primary and secondary sources
* Analyze medical records and related materials for use in legal matters
* Prepare and write informed opinions using medical and legal knowledge
* Understand the health care industry, the insurance industry, and related government regulations
* Understand the role and ethical responsibilities of the field of legal nurse consulting

Accelerate your career with an online Legal Nurse Consulting Certificate from Post University Online
Apply today!

Program Name: Certificate: Paralegal (Legal Studies)
Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC111
Credits 3.0

This course is for the student to learn about accounting as an information development and communications function that supports economic decision-making. The course will help students perform financial analysis; derive information for personal or organizational decisions; and understand business, governmental, and other organizational entities.


Business Law I
Course Number BUS204
Credits 3.0

This course covers Constitutional Law and the rights and duties that apply to business entities as well as to individuals. Also covered are Tort Law, body and property injury, as well as harm to reputation in the business context; Criminal Law, specifically those areas pertinent to business, such as bribery and embezzlement; Intellectual Property Law, including copyright, patent and trademark laws; Contract Law, which encompasses sales contracts and the application of the Uniform Commercial Code as well as common law contracts, such as employment contracts.


Business Law II
Course Number BUS205
Credits 3.0

This course continues the study of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code and proceeds to Agency Law, which governs employer-employee fiduciary and contractual relationships. The Workers Compensation Act, including advantages and disadvantages to both employer and employee, is examined. Also covered are Sole Proprietorship, Partnership Law, both common and statutory provisions, Corporate Law and Bankruptcy Law.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number CIS112
Credits 3.0

This course strives to meet the high level of computer literacy required of all students earning a degree from the university. Special emphasis is placed on the ethical use of computer technology for information analysis and communications. Computer units introduce the Internet, Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. Students who feel they have attained computer literacy and earn 70 percent on an exemption exam may substitute any other 3-credit course for this core requirement. Students may prove competency by passing a waiver examination. No credit is granted if the requirement is waived.


Introduction to Law
Course Number LAW101
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to the system of legal thought and practice. The course examines legal methods and terminology while providing an orientation to state and federal laws and court systems. Internet resources and instructional technology are part of all topics, including a survey of subject specific areas in the law.


Estate Admin. & Probate Practic
Course Number LAW105
Credits 3.0

Students Learn The Role That Wills, Trusts And Powers Of Attorney Play In The Management Of Personal Assets. Further, Students Become Thoroughly Familiar With The Procedures Employed To Open, Manage, And Close Decedents’ Estates, Conservatorship, Guardianships, Small Estates, And Refusal Of Letters. Prerequisite: Law101; Acc111 Strongly Recommended.


Real Estate Law & Practice
Course Number LAW201
Credits 3.0

Students learn how to handle a real estate transaction from the drafting of the sales contract to the closing. Subjects covered include Notes, Mortgages and Deeds of Trust, Titles and Title Insurance, Recording Liens, Encumbrances, Foreclosures, and Easements. Prerequisite: LAW101.


Civil Litigation & Practice
Course Number LAW203
Credits 3.0

Students are introduced to all aspects of a civil lawsuit, including Jurisdiction, Rules of Procedure, Pleadings, Motions, Discovery, Trial Procedures, and the Appellate Process. Prerequisite: LAW101.




Program description: The Paralegal certificate program at Post University prepares you to become a Paralegal. As the practice of law becomes
more sophisticated, specialized, and international, men and women with advanced education in this area will be in great
demand

Legal Courses at Penn Foster Career School

Program Name: Legal Secretary
Instruction Set 1: Learning Strategies

Identifying and implementing a successful study method; planning when, where and how you’ll study; creating effective and efficient study tools; using study tools to improve chances for success.



Instruction Set 2: Your Professional Image

Components of a professional image; the link between a professional image and job success; identifying personal strengths and detecting areas for improvement.


Instruction Set 2: Stress and Time Management

Importance of relaxation; developing coping strategies and a stress management program; value of time management; setting goals.


Instruction Set 3: Interpersonal Communication Skills

The importance of interpersonal skills; effective listening; traits for positive interpersonal relations; oral communication skills, articulation; enunciation and pronunciation; improving speech; interacting with others; non-verbal communication; respecting and working with others.


Instruction Set 3: Administrative Office Procedures

Responsibilities of the office professional; leadership tasks; project coordination; customer relations; business ethics; professionalism.


Instruction Set 3: Travel and Meeting Planning

Using a business traveler profile; various ways of making travel arrangements; differentiating between classes of airfare; business traveler’s itinerary; planning online meetings; planning a convention.


Instruction Set 4: Filing Techniques

Filing according to the Association of Records Managers and Administrators (ARMA International); color-coded filing systems; electronic filing systems; alphabetic filing rules.


Instruction Set 4:Records Management

Handling records; classification of records; records control; electronic records management; archiving technologies.


Instruction Set 4:Math for Office Professionals

Basic math; mean, median, mode, and range; figuring sales tax; markups and markdowns; loan amortization, metric system; foreign currency exchange.


Instruction Set 5:Technologies in the Workplace

Technologies used in today’s workplace; use of the Internet; the virtual office; security and ethical issues; electronic communications; electronic communication systems.


Instruction Set 5:Resources and References

Standard reference resources; using the Internet for research; mapping; manuals; using directories and libraries.


Instruction Set 5:Internet Basics

Features of the Web; navigating the Web; accessing and sending email; basic research tools and search engines.


Instruction Set 6:Business English

Writing difficulties; grammar review (sentences, parts of speech, punctuation marks, and paragraphs); defining unfamiliar terms; finding ideas through freewriting and brainstorming; organizing ideas; principles of revising and editing; figures of speech; writing for the senses; getting the readers’ attention; descriptive writing; first-person narratives; reflective and persuasive essays; thesis statements.


Instruction Set 7: First Steps in Using a Personal Computer

The boot process; launching Microsoft® Windows®; developing mouse skills; Windows accessories; Windows programs.


Instruction Set 7:Using Windows

Learning about Windows® XP, Vista®, and Windows® 7; setting up the Windows® desktop; working with Windows® tools.


Instruction Set 7:Keyboarding and Word Processing

Alphabetic and numeric keys; keying techniques; basic keyboarding skills; improving speed and accuracy. Textbook: Keyboarding and Word Processing Software: Keyboarding Pro


Instruction Set 8:Advanced Word Processing

Formatting common business documents; basic and advanced word processing functions. Textbook: Advanced Word Processing Membership: Student membership in the National Association of Legal Secretaries (NALS)


Instruction Set 9:Integrated Applications

Integrating Microsoft® Word®, PowerPoint®, and Excel® to create documents with text, charts and graphs, and clip art, lines, and borders. Textbook: Integrated Applications


Instruction Set 10:Legal Terminology, Part 1

Legal terms presented in context, including terminology used in criminal law, contracts, wills and estates, family law, and business organization.



Instruction Set 10: Ethics, Professional, and Risk Management

Ethical issues in the legal office, including the lawyer’s role and special responsibilities; risk management; types of errors; relationship of ethics, professionalism, and risk management.




Instruction Set 12: Office Finances

Operating income; operating expenses; travel expenses; using technology to handle office finances; banking procedures; maintaining inventory records; understanding financial reports; office finances and ethics.


Instruction Set 12: Office Management

Office planning and layout; selecting office staff; supervising employees; motivating employees; evaluating employee performance; Effective teams in the office; legal issues in office management.


Program description: Learn the skills you need to become a Legal Secretary - at home, at your own pace, with Penn Foster Career School.
There are certain skills you need to begin a career
as a Legal Secretary. The Penn Foster Career School Legal Secretary Program helps you learn them at home, quickly and conveniently! You'll learn:

* Technologies in the office
* Filing techniques and records management
* PC basics, keyboarding, and Internet basics
* Ethics, professionalism, and risk management

And you’ll learn it all at home – no classroom needed! You’ll get valuable information about written communication, time and stress management, and administrative office procedures.

Program Name: Legal Transcriptionist



Basic Keyboarding and Microsoft Office Applications
Course Number CSC106

This course is an introduction to the basics of a personal computer, the Windows® operating system, and the Internet. You will learn PC applications in word processing spreadsheets. The course also covers basic keyboarding topics, including alphabetic and numeric keys, keying techniques, basic keyboarding skills, and improving speed and accuracy. (Required textbook and software provided with the course.)


Business English
Course Number ENG010

This course provides instruction on the basic types of writing you’ll encounter in a business environment. You’ll learn about business letters, forms, client records, and memos; organization, grammar, punctuation, and sentence and paragraph construction; coherent paragraphs, well-organized documents, and purpose-focused materials; and accurate, attractive, and effective final copies.


Personal Development
Course Number PLS028

This course is intended to help you develop the personal skills needed for a career as a legal transcriptionist. Topics include handling problems, relating to your supervisor, improving your reading skills, setting up a time-management program, handling work overload, and effective stress-management strategies.




Program description: Upon completion of the Legal Transcriptionist program, the student will be able to:

* Discuss how history has shaped the organization and structure of contemporary courts
* Use and understand basic legal terminology in the drafting of legal documents
* Prepare legal documents utilized in various fields of law, including pleadings, discovery, and appellate procedures
* Use legal libraries, computers, and the Internet to complete legal research
* Use basic word processing programs to create, edit, format, save, and print correspondence, reports, tables, newsletters, and Web pages
* Transcribe and revise any legal document with correct formatting, punctuation, and spelling using word-processing software
* Obtain entry-level employment as a legal transcriber in law firms, independent transcription agencies, corporations, government agencies, insurance companies, banks, and even the military

You’ll also get valuable information intended to help you develop the personal skills needed for a career as a legal transcriptionist such as handling problems, setting up a time-management program, handling work overload, and effective stress-management strategies.

Program Name: Paralegal
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies The advantages of learning at home; types of study materials; types of examinations; accessing and using the features of our website; determining what kind of learner you are; establishing a study schedule; using study tips; preparing for and taking examinations. The Paralegal Professional An introduction to the paralegal career field; education, qualifications, and certifications; personal characteristics; places of employment; typical paralegal duties.


Instruction Set 2

Legal Terminology, Part 1 The basics of legal terminology; specific terms for litigation and torts. Legal Terminology, Part 2 Specific terms for criminal law, contract law, real property, family law, and other areas of law. Developing Critical Thinking Skills How to analyze the logic of arguments; cheap tactic strategies, including emotional manipulation and agenda promotion; how to determine valid reasoning.


Instruction Set 3

Ethics and Professional Responsibility Professional ethics; the unauthorized practice of law; working as an independent contractor; confidentiality issues, including attorney-client privilege; conflicts of interest; advertising and solicitation. Graded Project: Thinking Critically About Ethics Practical exercise designed to heighten your awareness of important ethical issues


Instruction Set 4

How the Law Works Function and sources of law; the legal community in America; ethical considerations for the paralegal; jurisdiction; “briefing” a case; due process. U.S. Court System, Part 1 The foundations of modern law and the justice system; the English common law system; case law and precedence; the codification of law; different areas of law; the structure of the court system; federal vs. state courts. U.S. Court System, Part 2 Civil vs. criminal litigation; litigation in federal vs. state courts; state laws, procedures, and rules of court, including local rules of court; federal laws, procedures, and rules of court; the paralegal’s role in litigation.


Instruction Set 5

Business Law Types of business organizations; sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; advantages and disadvantages of business types; law of agency; the paralegal’s role. Graded Project: Business Law Practical exercise designed to apply what you’ve learned about business law. Torts Definition of torts; tort law; categories of torts; negligence defined; typical defenses; intentional torts; liability; state-specific tort laws.


Instruction Set 6

Civil Litigation Introduction To Civil Litigation; Courts And Jurisdiction; Investigation, Evidence, And Case Evaluation; Discovery; Settlements; Trials; Appeals. Discovery Definition, Purpose, And Overview; Compelling Discovery; Interrogatories; Depositions; Requests For Physical And Mental Examinations; Expert Witnesses. Alternative Dispute Resolution History Of Alternative Dispute Resolution (adr); Adr Vs.litigation; Types Of Adr: Negotiation, Mediation, Arbitration, And Hybrids. Criminal Litigation Introduction To Criminal Litigation; Courts And Jurisdiction; Investigation, Evidence, And Case Evaluation; Pleadings, Draftings, And Motions; Trials; Appeals.


Instruction Set 7

First Steps in Using a Personal Computer Setting up a computer system; navigating in the Windows® environment; accessing the Help feature; using programs in Windows® Accessories; using System Tools for Windows.® Using Windows® XP Customizing your computer display and input devices; changing the size, shape, and position of a window; creating notes, documents, and drawings using Windows® Accessories; saving and closing a data file; adding a screen saver to protect your monitor; locating a file; retrieving a file that has been recently deleted; using the Clipboard to copy information from one window to another; using the taskbar to control two windows; viewing and organizing files and folders on your local disk. Internet Basics How to use a browser; downloading; using email and search engines; setting preferences; plug-ins. Study Unit: Microsoft® Word Using Word; creating and saving documents. Graded Project: Microsoft® Word Practical exercise designed to apply what you’ve learned about Word. Study Unit: Microsoft® Excel® Creating spreadsheets with Excel.® Graded Project: Microsoft® Excel® Practical exercise designed to apply what you’ve learned about Excel.® Study Unit: Microsoft® PowerPoint® Using PowerPoint® to create, modify, enhance, and customize presentations; producing visual aids; working with charts and embedded and linked objects in presentations; creating hyperlinks in presentations; using advanced PowerPoint® features. Graded Project: Computer Applications Creating a memo with Microsoft® Word; creating a chart with Microsoft® Excel;® creating a presentation with Microsoft® PowerPoint.®


Instruction Set 8

Introduction to Writing The basics of business writing; how business writing differs from personal writing; why good writing is important; how to approach each type of writing based on the audience and the purpose of the task; a review of the parts of speech. Using the Parts of Speech A description of the parts of a sentence; how to use the parts of speech to write effectively; subject-verb agreement; use of the active voice; effective use of modifiers; producing correct, polished writing for business; common grammatical problems. Punctuation and Capitalization Descriptions of punctuation marks and the purpose of each; using punctuation to properly document research sources; rules of capitalization. Writing Sentences and Paragraphs Writing complete, correctly structured sentences and unified, coherent paragraphs; sentence length and variety; avoiding run-ons and fragments; constructing organized paragraphs. Improving Your Writing Using particular patterns of organization, content, and language to most effectively convey a specific idea to a specific audience; revising, editing, and proofreading. Types of Business Writing Composing clear, courteous, and complete messages; formatting and etiquette for letters, email, memos, and forms.


Instruction Set 9

Legal Writing Law-specific Style And Usage; The Legal Memorandum; Forms And How To Use Them; Hands-on Form Practice. Graded Project: Legal Writing Project 1 Practical Exercise Designed To Apply What You’ve Learned About Legal Document Production In The Creation Of A Legal Document. Legal Research Sources Of Law; The Hierarchy Of Law; Looking Up Cases And Statutes; Citing Cases And Statutes; Reading And Debriefing Cases. Graded Project: Legal Writing Project 2 Practical Exercise Designed To Apply What You’ve Learned About Legal Document Roduction And Legal Research In The Creation Of A Legal Document. Computer-assisted Legal Research, Part 1 Hands-on Legal Research Using Lexis.com.® Computer-assisted Legal Research, Part 2 Hands-on Legal Research Using Lexis.com.® Graded Project: Calr Project Practical Exercise Designed To Apply What You’ve Learned About Legal Research, Legal Writing, And Calr. Supplements (available Online): • Work Experience Option • Job Hunting For Paralegals Access To Lexis.com® Provided To Student In This Instruction Set.


Program description: Learn the skills you need to become a Paralegal - at home, at your own pace, with Penn Foster Career School.
There are certain skills you need to begin a career
as a Paralegal. The Penn Foster Career School Paralegal Program helps you learn them quickly and conveniently!
You'll learn:
Legal terminology and the U.S. Court System
How to conduct legal investigations and interviews
Legal writing and legal research
Paralegal ethics and professional responsibility
And you’ll learn it all at home – no classroom needed! You’ll get valuable information about the Paralegal’s role in civil vs. criminal litigation, the federal and state court system, case investigation, and evidence and evaluation.
Start a rewarding career in a growing field.
Why learn Paralegal skills? With the right credentials, you can:
Work for a private law firm, corporate legal department, or government agency.
Work in civil and criminal litigation, real estate, or estates and trusts.
Prepare legal documents, do research, and ready cases for trial.
Demand for the professional Paralegal will rise more than 28% through 2018.* Paralegals enjoy exciting, varied assignments, respect and prestige, and the confidence that comes with doing important work and doing it well.
State Licensing Requirements
In the States of California and South Dakota, a Paralegal Diploma will not qualify graduates for employment as paralegals.
Contact Penn Foster Career School Today.
We’ll send you FREE information – with absolutely no obligation! Find out more about Penn Foster Career School's Paralegal training that includes:
All the lessons, equipment, and learning aids you need
Access to student services by website, phone, and mail
Get Started Today!
Start today and in as little as one year from enrollment, you can be on your way to a career as a Paralegal!
*Growth figures represent a ten-year period ending 2018. Source: "National Industry-Occupation Employment Matrix,” a publication of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Legal Courses at Everest University

Program Name: Paralegal (Associate's)
Introduction to Paralegal
Course Number PLA 1003
Credits 4.0



Torts
Course Number PLA 2273
Credits 4.0

Contract Law
Course Number PLA 2423
Credits 4.0

Wills, Trusts and Probate
Course Number PLA 2600
Credits 4.0

Family Law
Course Number PLA 2800
Credits 4.0

Law Office Management
Course Number PLA 2763
Credits 4.0

Civil Procedure
Course Number PLA 2203
Credits 4.0

Bankruptcy
Course Number PLA 2460
Credits 4.0

Contemporary Issues and Law
Course Number PLA 2930
Credits 4.0

Business Organizations
Course Number PLA 2433
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Administrative Law
Course Number PLA 2483
Credits 4.0

Real Estate Law
Course Number PLA 2610
Credits 4.0

Environmental Law
Course Number PLA 2631
Credits 4.0

20 th Century American History
Course Number AMH 2030
Credits 4.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Introduction to Business Enterprise
Course Number MAN 1030
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure and the Constitution
Course Number CJL 2134
Credits 4.0

Composition I
Course Number ENC 1101
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Composition II
Course Number EN1300
Credits 4.0

Principles of Sociology
Course Number SYG 2000
Credits 4.0

College Algebra
Course Number MAT 1033
Credits 4.0

General Psychology
Course Number PSY 2012
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Basic Critical Thinking
Course Number SLS 1505
Credits 2.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Introduction to American Literature
Course Number AML 2000
Credits 4.0

Environmental Science
Course Number EVS 1001
Credits 4.0

The Homeland Security program focuses on the issues of security, intelligence operations, emergency services and crisis management. The Homeland Security program is designed to serve three types of students: x Students wishing to continue their education and pursue an upper level degree in an area of homeland security studies. x Students wishing to secure employment in the field of corporate or government security. x Professionals who need to increase their skills for their present duties. The Homeland Security program provides a broad understanding of the intelligence cycle, business continuity cycle and security


Program description: Graduates of the Paralegal Program are prepared, under the direction of an attorney, to interview, gather, review, and analyze
factual situations; research the law; prepare and interpret legal documents; and conduct day-to-day operations of a legal office.
Graduates of the program may find employment in legal offices, state and federal government agencies, corporate legal departments,
consumer groups, insurance companies, banks, title companies, and legal aid societies. The Legal Assistant/Paralegal Program is a
terminal degree in that it trains individuals for entry-level positions and is not a preparatory curriculum for law school.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Paralegal enhances the study of law and legal research to permit the graduate to further their
legal knowledge while enhancing their opportunity for career advancement

Program Name: Paralegal (Bachelor's)

Civil Litigation I
Course Number PLA 2201
Credits 4.0

Civil Litigation II
Course Number PLA 2224
Credits 4.0

Wills, Trusts and Probate
Course Number PLA 2600
Credits 4.0

Law Office Management
Course Number PLA 2763
Credits 4.0


International Law
Course Number PLA 3570
Credits 4.0

Worker’s Compensation and Employment Benefit Law
Course Number PLA 4473
Credits 4.0


Rules of Evidence
Course Number PLA 4263

Advanced Tort Law
Course Number PLA 4274
Credits 4.0


Introduction to Paralegal
Course Number PLA 1003
Credits 4.0

Computer Applications
Course Number CGS 2167C
Credits 4.0

Strategies for Success
Course Number SLS 1105
Credits 4.0

Career Skills
Course Number SLS 1321
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Internet Research
Course Number LIS 2004
Credits 2.0

Introduction to Business Enterprise
Course Number MAN 1030
Credits 4.0

Criminal Procedure and the Constitution
Course Number CJL 2134
Credits 4.0


Torts
Course Number PLA 2273
Credits 4.0

Contract Law
Course Number PLA 2423
Credits 4.0

Family Law
Course Number PLA 2800
Credits 4.0

Civil Procedure
Course Number PLA 2203
Credits 4.0

Communications and Technology Security
Course Number HSSP 4400

Program description: Graduates of the Paralegal Program are prepared, under the direction of an attorney, to interview, gather, review, and analyze
factual situations; research the law; prepare and interpret legal documents; and conduct day-to-day operations of a legal office.
Graduates of the program may find employment in legal offices, state and federal government agencies, corporate legal departments,
consumer groups, insurance companies, banks, title companies, and legal aid societies. The Legal Assistant/Paralegal Program is a
terminal degree in that it trains individuals for entry-level positions and is not a preparatory curriculum for law school.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Paralegal enhances the study of law and legal research to permit the graduate to further their
legal knowledge while enhancing their opportunity for career advancement.

Legal Courses at Capella University

Program Name: MS - Legal Studies
Human Resource Management in the 21st Century
Course Number HRM5004
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the evolution of human resource management, labor, law, and human capital management. In particular, learners analyze the trends and issues influencing the development and application of these elements within contemporary organizations. Learners also examine the effects of emerging legislative thought and action on today’s workplace. HRM5004 must be taken by master’s learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Marketing and Sales
Course Number HRM5010
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to theories, models, and strategies used to create internal and external organizational marketing systems. Learners explore ways to apply general marketing and sales knowledge to developing and sustaining the credibility of an organization’s human resource management function. Learners also study current marketing and sales models to develop an internal HRM marketing plan.


Business Fundamentals
Course Number HRM5020
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners gain an understanding of current accounting, economics, and finance principals and practices and the ways they can be applied to business management and human resource management. Learners use these principles and practices and their applications to develop an HRM business plan.


Ethics and Advocacy in Organizations
Course Number HRM5030
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is ethics and ethical behavior in organizations. Learners examine the role of human resource professionals as ethical change agents and assess their responsibilities in fostering ethical business and work environments


Managing Data and Information
Course Number HRM5040
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides Learners With Data And Information Management Technologies And Strategies Relative To Human Resource Management. Learners Examine The Transition From Hrm Systems To Emerging Enterprise Resource Planning (erp) Systems And Evaluate The Effectiveness Of Hrm Technology In Achieving An Organization’s Business Goals.


Strategy and Business Development
Course Number HRM5050
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Evaluate Organizational Theories, Models, And Strategies Used For Effective Human Resource Management Planning And Practice. Learners Examine The Current And Potential Applications Of Organizational Theories And Strategies To Contemporary Hrm Practices. Learners Also Create Strategic Hrm Models And Identify Best Practices.


Human Resource Management and the Law
Course Number HRM5250
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an understanding of the application of U.S. law and legislation to human resource management theory and practice in the modern workplace. Learners evaluate the legal perceptions and perspectives articulated in HRM policies, procedures, and practices and examine the laws and legislation that influence their development.



Building the Law
Course Number HRM5251
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of the U.S. legislative process. Learners analyze the foundational constitutional principles governing the legislative process and the legislative responsibilities of the branches of U.S. government. Learners also examine the role of law enforcement in the workplace and the applications of legal principles in the development of labor and employment law. Learners review case studies and engage in field work to gain understanding of and facility with labor and employment law.


Rights of Wrongs: Torts and Employment
Course Number HRM5253
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with a foundational understanding of torts. Learners examine the categories and elements of tort law in order to gain both theoretical and practical frames of reference for understanding its application in the workplace. Learners also explore the relationship between tort, labor, and discrimination law and analyze how U.S. courts have ruled in each type of case.


The Attorney Relationship
Course Number HRM5255
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to the dynamics and dimensions of the relationship between the human resource management professional and attorney. Learners examine the knowledge and skills needed to engage in informed and constructive dialogue with legal counsel and analyze the purpose, maintenance, and benefits of the HRM professional and attorney relationship. Learners also evaluate compensation models, multipurpose firms, and legal specializations.




Program description: Learners in the master’s Legal Studies specialization study the associations between business and law in the modern workplace. Specialization topics include practice and theory of constitutional, tort, and labor and employment law; employee discrimination; fact investigation; and workplace legal communications and actions. Learners examine and apply select business and legal practices and theories in establishing and maintaining legally compliant organizations that achieve business goals. Upon successful completion of this specialization, learners are prepared to pursue careers as human resource managers, employee relations managers, human resource management generalists, or conflict resolution specialists.

Legal Courses at Penn Foster College

Program Name: Associate's Degree in Paralegal Studies
Introduction to Paralegal Studies
Course Number PLS 101
Credits 1.0

Occupation of the paralegal; strategies for completing the paralegal studies program as an independent learner; value of the paralegal in the practice of law as it’s conducted in the traditional legal community as well as in government, education, and business. PREREQ: None



Ethics
Course Number PLS 110
Credits 2.0

Professional responsibilities that apply to paralegals as they assist their employers confidentiality and competence; handling fees and funds carefully; and avoiding unauthorized practice of law, conflicts of interest, and potential malpractice. PREREQ: None and their clients, including maintaining



Investigations and Interviews
Course Number PLS 114
Credits 2.0

Types of questions that can be used in an interview; identification of the objectives of an interview; ethical considerations about interviewing; summarizing the information obtained through an interview. PREREQ: Law and the Legal System


Torts
Course Number PLS 121
Credits 3.0

Principles of tort law that an attorney applies in a personal injury practice; the importance of the attorney-paralegal team in the practice of personal injury law; basics of the legal system, and the elements of the most common intentional and unintentional torts are discussed. PREREQ: Interpersonal Communication, Investigations, and Interviews



Civil Litigation
Course Number PLS 205
Credits 3.0

Use of the court system to resolve disputes; involvement of paralegals in litigation support, including discovery; alternative dispute resolution methods; how paralegals can develop their skills as arbitrators and/or mediators in these methods. PREREQ: None


Art Appreciation
Course Number HUM 102
Credits 3.0

Artistic media; historical periods and artistic movements; roles of the artist and the viewer; art criticism. PREREQ: None


Criminal Litigation
Course Number PLS 211
Credits 3.0

Introduction to the practice and theory of criminal law; substantive criminal law; criminal procedure; criminal responsibility; major felonies recognized in most, if not all, jurisdictions; constitutional dimensions of criminal procedure; practical aspects of the criminal justice process. PREREQ: None


Family Law
Course Number PLS 213
Credits 3.0

Description of the current state of family law and the role of the attorney-paralegal team within it; changes in the practice of family law. PREREQ: None


Real Estate Law
Course Number PLS 215
Credits 3.0

Introductory course in real property law; basics of real property law; areas of a modern real estate practice; preparation for assisting transactional real estate attorneys; legal forms used in real estate law. PREREQ: None


Wills and Estates
Course Number PLS 217
Credits 3.0

Basic, practical, everyday duties of paralegals working in the fields of wills, trusts, and estate administration; terminology and general principles of law that are the basis for drafting wills and trusts; planning and administering estates. PREREQ: None


Information Literacy
Course Number ENG 103
Credits 1.0

Teaches students to become effective in finding and utilizing information at libraries and other information centers, and through electronic resources available in libraries and on the World Wide Web. PREREQ: None


English Composition
Course Number ENG100
Credits 3.0

1)The Basics; The Writing Process; Descriptive Writing; 2)Narrative Writing; Reflective and Persuasive Writing. 3)Textbooks included


Computer Applications
Course Number CSC 104
Credits 3.0

Computer and Internet Basics; computer hardware and software; digital electronics and file management; introduction to Windows® ; PC applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. PREREQ: None


Interpersonal Communications
Course Number HUM 106
Credits 1.0

Developing more effective personal communication skills to increase chances for professional success; increasing skills levels involving the use and selection of words, gestures, tone of voice, facial expressions, listening skills, as well as overall physical appearance. PREREQ: None


Business Law 1
Course Number BUS 213
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the legal environment of business. Topics covered include American court practice and procedure; torts; employment law; international law; environmental law; contract law. PREREQ: None


Business Law 2
Course Number BUS 214
Credits 3.0

This course is a continuation of Business Law 1 and examines specific legal topics. Negotiable instruments; consumer law; commercial paper; property for both personal and real property; agency law; business organizations; and limited liability companies are examined and discussed. PREREQ: Principles of Business Law 1


Mathematics for Business and Finance
Course Number MAT 106
Credits 3.0

This course will provide the student with a foundation in basic mathematical operations. Topics covered include percentages; discounts; interest; present worth; sinking funds; installment buying; pricing; depreciation; investments; insurance; use of symbols and their applications, equations and formulas; importance of statistics. PREREQ: None


Economics 1
Course Number BUS 121
Credits 3.0

This course will provide an overview of macroeconomics and the modern market economy. Law of supply and demand, cost of living, monetary systems, international factors, and short run economic fluctuations will be examined and discussed. PREREQ: None


Essentials of Psychology
Course Number SSC 130
Credits 3.0

Biology and behavior; consciousness; memory; thought and language; intelligence; personality and gender; stress; community influences. PREREQ: None


Foundations of Political Science
Course Number SSC 150
Credits 3.0

The normative questions of politics; logical and empirical analysis of political questions. PREREQ: None


Music Appreciation
Course Number HUM 104
Credits 3.0

Appreciating music; roles of composer and listener; principles of music theory and instrumentation; historical periods; varying styles of music. PREREQ: None


Business and Technical Writing
Course Number ENG 121
Credits 3.0

Writing Styles; Abc Method Of Organizing Material; Grammar (parts Of Speech, Active And Passive Voice, Complete Sentences Vs. Sentence Fragments; Parallel Construction); Using Action Verbs; Constructing Paragraphs; Writing Memos, Business Letters, And Emails; Organizing Material; Conducting Research; Documenting Sources; Outlining; Providing Illustrations; Writing Reports, Proposals, Descriptions, Instructions, Articles, And Manuals. Prereq: None


Nutrition
Course Number SCI 140
Credits 3.0

Personal decision making about nutrition; nutrition science; water; exercise; human growth and aging; safety of the food supply; the global view. PREREQ: None


Introduction to Biology
Course Number SCI 120
Credits 3.0

An introductory course that explains the origin of life and the relationships between all living things. It describes how a significant number of organisms are structured and how they work, in order to enable students to discuss intelligently the various forms of life and their processes. PREREQ: None


Program description: Get started toward a challenging career in the Legal field. Learn at home, in your spare time, at your own pace and earn your Associate of Science Degree in as little as two years, with our accredited program. Learn valuable skills with courses in these subjects and more: Legal Writing, Research, Civil and Criminal Litigation, Family Law, Real Estate Law, Wills and Estates. When you earn your Associate Degree in Parlegal Studies, you'll have plenty of career options. Wherever you find law firms, corporate legal departments, or government agencies that require legal services, you'll find a need for skilled Paralegals. Enjoy the independence and excitement of a rewarding new career. The Paralegal Studies program includes the textbooks, lessons, and learning aids you need to complete your program along with toll-free instructional support and access to student services by email, phone, and mail.

Legal Courses at Virginia College

Program Name: Associate's - Paralegal Studies


Technology Application in the Law Office
Course Number LGA 1600
Credits 4.0

Wills, Trusts, and Estate Administration
Course Number LGA 2120
Credits 4.0

Family Law
Course Number LGA 2140
Credits 4.0

Civil Litigation
Course Number LGA 2250
Credits 4.0

Bankruptcy Law
Course Number LGA 2260
Credits 4.0

Paralegal Certification Exam Review
Course Number LGA 2500
Credits 4.0

Real Estate Law
Course Number LGA 2520
Credits 4.0

Administrative Law
Course Number LGA 2800
Credits 4.0

Learning Framework
Course Number EDU 1010
Credits 4.0

Career Exploration/Planning
Course Number EDU 1020
Credits 4.0

Keyboarding
Course Number AOM 1010

Word Processing
Course Number AOM 1100

Spreadsheets
Course Number AOM 1200

Criminal Law
Course Number LGA 1800
Credits 4.0

N/A


Communications
Credits 12.0

Program description: Get legal! Looking for a career in which you can positively affect the lives of others? Looking for a challenging career that offers prestige and excitement and a brighter future? Then consider becoming a paralegal! The Paralegal Studies Program at Virginia College prepares you for this fast-paced and rapidly growing career field...offering you the skills and attributes employers are looking for. Paralegals can be found in courtrooms, corporations, insurance companies, governmental offices and bank trust departments, as well as in attorneys’ offices. Get the preparation you need from instructors with real-world experience.

Program Name: Bachelor's - Paralegal Studies

Constitutional Law
Course Number LGA 3000
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.



Civil and Criminal Procedure
Course Number LGA 3150
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Juvenile Law
Course Number LGA 3200
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Paralegal Ethics
Course Number LGA 3250
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Contract Law
Course Number LGA 3300
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Alternative Dispute Resolution
Course Number LGA 3350
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Elder Law
Course Number LGA 3400
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Medical Malpractice Law and Litigation
Course Number LGA 3450
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Advanced Civil Litigation
Course Number LGA 4000
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Law Office Management
Course Number LGA 4100
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Advanced Administrative Law
Course Number LGA 4200
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Environmental Law
Course Number LGA 4350
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Evidence Management for Paralegals
Course Number LGA 4400
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Labor and Employment Law
Course Number LGA 4600
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Capstone: Paralegal Studies
Course Number LGA 4900
Credits 4.0

Course description unavailable.


Learning Framework
Course Number EDU 1010
Credits 4.0

Career Exploration/Planning
Course Number EDU 1020
Credits 4.0

Keyboarding
Course Number AOM 1010

Word Processing
Course Number AOM 1100

Spreadsheets
Course Number AOM 1200



Technology Application in the Law Office
Course Number LGA 1600
Credits 4.0

Criminal Law
Course Number LGA 1800
Credits 4.0

N/A


Wills, Trusts, and Estate Administration
Course Number LGA 2120
Credits 4.0

Family Law
Course Number LGA 2140
Credits 4.0

Civil Litigation
Course Number LGA 2250
Credits 4.0

Bankruptcy Law
Course Number LGA 2260
Credits 4.0

Paralegal Certification Exam Review
Course Number LGA 2500
Credits 4.0

Real Estate Law
Course Number LGA 2520
Credits 4.0

Administrative Law
Course Number LGA 2800
Credits 4.0

Program description: The online bachelor’s degree in paralegal studies prepares graduates for employment in attorney’s offices, courtrooms, corporations, insurance companies, governmental offices and banks. This paralegal degree online provides knowledge of legal office procedures, delivery of legal services, legal research and writing and paralegal training in professional skills, general education, and technical competencies.

Legal Courses at Herzing University

Program Name: Associate of Science in Legal Assisting and Paralegal


Family and Tort Law
Course Number PL 130
Credits 3.0

This course provides the study of family law, torts, and personal injury law. Topics include: ethics and family law; cohabitation and marriage alternatives; property settlements and spousal support; child support, child custody, and child custody issues; torts and legal analysis; intentional torts and defenses to intentional torts; negligence, negligence actions, and defenses to negligence; and strict liability, products liability, and tort immunities.


Ethics and Paralegal Professionalism
Course Number PL 140
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents An In-depth Study Of The Codes Of Professional Responsibility From The Aba And Nala To The Code Of Judicial Conduct, Existing Guidelines, And Case Law Involving Paralegals.


Law Office Procedures
Course Number PL 180
Credits 3.0

This course presents a study of the operation of a private law firm from the perspective of a legal assistant/paralegal. Topics include: personnel and their responsibilities; managerial concepts; the various systems and procedures in the law office including timekeeping and billing systems; word processing; file organization and management; accounting/bookkeeping systems; trust accounts; docket control; tickler systems; conflicts checks; client development and case management; and current legal office software.


Civil Litigation
Course Number PL 215
Credits 3.0

This course provides an intensive examination of the role of the paralegal in civil litigation. Topics include: litigation and the paralegal’s role; the courts and their jurisdiction; ethical considerations; investigation and evidence procedures; the initial pleadings and response to the initial pleading; motion practice; discovery procedures and requests; settlements and alternative dispute resolution; and trial techniques and posttrial practices.



E-Business Concepts
Course Number Bu 195
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the concepts and principles of electronic commerce in business. Topics include: the foundations of electronic commerce; retailing in e-commerce; Internet consumers and market research; advertising in e-commerce; e-commerce for service industries; business-tobusiness e-commerce; intranet and extranet structures and applications; electronic payment systems; e-commerce strategy and implementation; public policy regarding legal, privacy, and consumer protection issues; infrastructure requirements for e-commerce; and economic and global issues in e-commerce.


Word Processing
Course Number IS 120
Credits 4.0

This course presents the practical application of the concepts and features of a leading word processor. Topics include formatting text and documents, creating and formatting tables, working with graphics, integrating information with other programs, managing styles and templates, working with columns, merging documents, file management techniques, creating forms, and creating web documents.


Introduction to the Internet
Course Number IS 121
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the structure and technologies of the Internet. Topics include: networking and Internet basics; the application of protocols and addressing; Internet servers and their applications; types of Internet clients and client configuration; security fundamentals and working with the different levels of security; Internet development through programming languages, databases, HTML, and multimedia; Internet site design and troubleshooting; and an overview of business on the Internet.


Spreadsheets
Course Number IS 160
Credits 4.0

This course presents the practical application of the concepts and features of a leading spreadsheet package. Topics include: using and managing worksheets and workbooks; applying formatting and style features; working with data, formulas, and functions; managing charts and graphics; working with outlines, views, and reports; automating tasks with the macro feature; using auditing tools, collaborative tools, and hyperlinks; and integrating with other programs.


Wills, Estates and Bankruptcy
Course Number PL 138
Credits 3.0

This course covers the estate of a deceased person and the process of placing the appropriate heirs into possession of the assets. Topics include the type, contents, terms, and language in the document known as the Last Will and Testament. Probate of the will and preparation of estate documents are presented. The estate of a debtor is covered in the second half of the course in bankruptcy. The reasons why persons are forced to file bankruptcy and the effect upon the debtor are explained. What debts are dischargeable and those that are not dischargeable are covered as well as property considered exempt


Criminal Law
Course Number PL 225
Credits 3.0

This course explores the basic concepts of both substantive and procedural criminal law. Topics include: the legal system and criminal law; the study of crimes against a person, property, habitation, and the public; the examination of factual, statutory, and constitutional defenses; and the constitutional aspects of criminal procedures including the pretrial, the trial, sentencing, and appeal processes.


Property Law and Intellectual Property Law
Course Number PL 235
Credits 3.0

This course provides the basics of property law, real and personal, as well as tangible and intangible. The topic of real estate is presented and includes sales, financing, zoning, and the legal acts that govern. Mortgages, liens, surveying, and servitudes are included in this study. The second half of the course covers intellectual property including trademarks, copyrights, patents, and trade secrets. Topics also include the application, possession, protection, violation, and transfer of rights in intellectual property.


Environmental Law and Administrative Agencies
Course Number PL 246
Credits 3.0

This course begins with exposure of the student to the topic of administrative law. The need for, function of, and importance of the administrative agency in the government are outlined and explained. As paralegals are today allowed limited practice before these agencies, this course is most important. Environmental law and the role of this vital administrative agency are then presented. Topics include: state and federal government regulation of the environment as well as superfund sites; and pollution and all matters that affect air, ground, and water resources.


Career Internship
Course Number PL 294
Credits 4.0

This is an elective course in the associate’s degree program that students take in their 4th or 5th semester. The career internship course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in legal studies. The outcome of the internship is an informed student fully apprised of the opportunities his/her degree program offers for professional growth. During the internship phase of training, the student will experience various aspects of working in the actual field in which they have been educated. The internship is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to experience and participate in duties typical of a contemporary workplace setting. Student learning will center on observing experienced personnel as well as participating in actual hands-on procedures under close supervision of trained professionals.


Business Law I
Course Number BU 206
Credits 3.0

This course provides a study of the American legal system and its effect on business and business organizations. Topics include an overview of the ethical issues that businesses encounter, the foundation of the American legal system, business ethics, torts, intellectual property, criminal law, cyber crimes, contracts, and sales and leases. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none


Computers and Application Software
Course Number IS 102
Credits 3.0

This course provides an introduction to operating systems and browsers as well as word processing, presentation, spreadsheets, and e-mail applications used in office productivity software. 4.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Accounting I
Course Number AC 107
Credits 3.0

This introductory course in accounting provides the practical application of the principles of financial accounting for the service and merchandising business structure. Topics include: an introduction to accounting; analyzing and recoding transactions using the double-entry framework; working through the accounting cycle from journalizing and preparation of the financial statements to post-closing trial balance; and introduction to subsidiary ledgers and special journals. The class also provides an overview of technology accounting software practices. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: IS 102 Computers and Application Software


Introduction to Management
Course Number BU 106
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the environment of American business with an overview of various topics that serve as a foundation for further study of business. Topics include the environments in which businesses operate, the organizational structures of businesses, management functions in an enterprise, and the challenges of managing marketing, operations, information technology, finance, and human resources. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none


Leadership and Team Dynamics
Course Number BU 209
Credits 3.0

This course provides students with a foundation of knowledge regarding leadership practices and theories. The student should develop an operational understanding of leadership concepts and theories to engage and reflect on leadership topics. Course topics include leadership models, collaboration, management styles, handling conflict, and ethical issues involved in leadership. 3.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: BU 106 Introduction to Management


Personal Financial Management
Course Number PD 120
Credits 1.0

This course deals with concepts of personal financial planning and financial control. Topics center on critical self examination of student planning techniques through analysis and research of personal financial legal documents, checking accounts and banking services, income tax procedures, savings methods, investment planning, risk management and insurance, and credit records, credit law, and the cost of credit. 1.0 credit hour. Prerequisite: none


Customer Services
Course Number PD 155
Credits 1.0

This course provides a critical examination of issues embedded in the practice of providing customer service. Topics include research about best practice in customer service and communication techniques, psychologically based methods for dealing with the management of customer complaints, and the roles of a customer service employee and supervisor within ethical boundaries and common business practice. 1.0 credit hour. Prerequisite: none


Career Development Seminar
Course Number PD 200
Credits 1.0

This seminar provides an opportunity for students to critically examine their skills and develop a plan to further their career. Students will be encouraged to develop a plan for maintaining life-long learning skills. Topics include research, job searching, developing career documents, creating personal budgets, and refining interview and communication skills. 1.0 credit hour. Prerequisite: none


AS/AAS/BS Internship Preparation
Course Number PD 214
Credits 0.0

This non-credit course will assist students in finding and securing the internship experience for credit in either an associate’s or bachelor’s program. Students must pass this course in order to be cleared to start working at their internship site. Students will discover ways to approach a facility about an internship, and they will learn how to access the tools they will need to successfully get their internship approved and successfully land an internship that correlates to their field of study. 0.0 credit hours. Prerequisite: none.


Program description: This program prepares students with the skills and academic knowledge necessary for a career as a legal assistant, paralegal working under the supervision of a licensed attorney. The American Bar Association defines a paralegal as “a person qualified by education, training or work experience who is employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, government agency or other entity and who performs specifically delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible.” The career opportunities may be in small or large firms working as a legal assistant, paralegal. The duties of a legal assistant paralegal include assisting the lawyer with research, brief preparation, and other legal office administration, but do not include practicing law, advising clients, or setting fees since paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public except as permitted by law. Upon completion of this program, students should be able to draft legal documents in areas of law studied including torts and family law, probate procedure, and contracts; demonstrate the ability to define and articulate law practices in a variety of legal settings where legal assistants, paralegals work, including small and large private firms, corporations, and governmental agencies, the emerging role of the legal assistant, paralegal, and the place of the legal assistant, paralegal in expanding the delivery of legal services; demonstrate the ability to define and articulate the affect of change in the delivery of legal services and corresponding needs for well-qualified legal assistants, paralegals; demonstrate mastery of word-processing, Internet and legal research technologies in a typical law office environment; demonstrate the ability to define and articulate alternatives to litigation including mediation, voluntary and mandatory arbitration; demonstrate the ability to articulate ethical decision-making in the legal environment; think critically both conceptually and by using mathematical analysis, write and speak effectively, use basic computer applications, and understand human behavior in the context of the greater society. The potential entry-level job position titles include legal assistant and paralegal.

Legal Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: MS in Criminal Justice: Legal Studies
Constitutional Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 531
Credits 4.0

This course conducts an in-depth analysis of both historic and contemporary questions of constitutional rights. Provided is an understanding of the powers of the federal courts, Congress, and the president; an examination of the doctrines of separation of power and federalism; and discussion regarding some of the limitations that the Constitution imposes on state powers. Topical coverage also includes the takings and contracts clauses, due process, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and equal protection.


International Law
Course Number JUS 630
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the issue of international law in an increasingly interconnected world. The course explores the procedural workings of various international and regional organizations regarding public international law.



Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 515
Credits 4.0

This course explores contemporary law enforcement management by examining personality, values, groups, power dimensions, decision making, conflict management, change, and organization development.


Restorative Justice
Course Number JUS 520
Credits 4.0

This course compares and contrasts traditional goals of punishment (rehabilitation, incapacitation, retribution, and deterrence) with the concepts of restorative justice. Topics include community service, victim assistance, victim-offender mediation, and restitution. Restorative justice seeks a balance between the need to rehabilitate offenders while executing a duty to protect the public.


Research Methods
Course Number JUS 510
Credits 4.0

This course provides a fundamental analysis of research and a methodological evaluation of criminal justice topics. This course familiarizes students with aspects of statistical analysis and research design relevant to today’s justice environment using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Additionally, coverage is provided for use of research design in community action


Forensic Psychology
Course Number JUS 610
Credits 4.0

This course provides an objective study of the many roles psychology plays in the legal system, including expert witnesses, criminal profilers, and trial consultants for jury selection and child custody hearings.


Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Number JUS 250
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Examination Of Issues Relating To Justice Policies, Perspectives, Techniques, Roles, Institutional Arrangement, Management And Administration, Use Of Research, And Innovative Patterns. Prerequisite: Jus 104 And Jus 110.


Exploration of Law and Public Policy
Course Number JUS 620
Credits 4.0

This course explores the interrelatedness of law and socioeconomic concerns and attempts to generate a holistic perspective of society and social control for those charged with the administration of justice


Capstone
Course Number JUS 651
Credits 4.0

This course is taken in the final term of the graduate program. It focuses on professional portfolio development and a final written proposal by the graduate. The portfolio will contain the graduate’s curriculum vitae, exemplars of writing from graduate courses, a statement of criminal justice philosophy, a 5-year plan for professional goals, and a research topic paper/written proposal. A final written proposal must focus on how the graduate will use the totality of the learning experience to examine and improve the criminal justice system at the federal, state, county, or city level. The proposal must exhibit adequate research, coordination within the extant layers of justice policy, realistic consideration of available resources, and a reasonable timeline of benchmarks.


Program description: Grand Canyon University's Master of Science in Criminal Justice program with an Emphasis in Legal Studies is designed for law enforcement, corrections, probation, and parole officers seeking additional career opportunities, as well as individuals who want to learn about the law, social order, and justice. Learn more about Grand Canyon University's Master of Science in Criminal Justice with an Emphasis in Legal Studies program here.
Official Program Name:
Master of Science in Criminal Justice with an Emphasis in Legal Studies

School Offering Program:
Grand Canyon University

Program Prerequisites:
The Master of Science in Criminal Justice with an Emphasis in Legal Studies program is intended for students interested in the criminal justice and legal systems. Though specific program requirements may vary, applicants to Grand Canyon University's graduate programs should have already earned a bachelor's degree and should be U.S. citizens.

Program Description:
Students enrolled in the Master of Science in Criminal Justice with an Emphasis in Legal Studies program at Grand Canyon University have the opportunity to study law enforcement management, leadership in the criminal justice system, restorative justice versus traditional punishment, procedures for criminal investigations, and the various aspects of psychology in the legal system, including the roles of expert witnesses, jury consultants, and criminal profilers. The program includes a capstone project and final written proposal requirement that addresses how to improve the criminal justice system at the federal, state, and local levels. Legal studies courses examine international law and methods of legal research.

Legal Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Legal Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of California-San Diego
Total Programs 121
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 22nd
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
Tufts University
Total Programs 120
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 24th
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Amherst College
Total Programs 50
Number of Subjects 46
Rank in USA 27th