Online Liberal Arts and Humanities Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its liberal arts and humanities courses to be successful liberal arts and humanities graduate professionals, designers, artists, reporters, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 56,880 people employed as education teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $62,160. Mathematicians make on average $93,920 per year and there are about 2,770 of them employed today.

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Liberal Arts and Humanities Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Associate's (AABA) - Visual Communication
English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: None In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN 105
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed, and controlled.



Principles of Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 205
Credits 4.5

"This course introduces students to financial accounting. Students can learn the fundamentals of the accounting cycle."


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON 220
Credits 4.5

"This course focuses on Economic theory of the firm, resource allocation and price determination, the free market supply/demand mechanism, and pure and imperfect competition models are analyzed."


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON 224
Credits 4.5

"Presents basic economic concepts emphasizing the part the United States plays in a global economy. Foundations of economic theory are presented, using topics from television news and mass media. Topics introduced are GDP, National Income Accounting, United States fiscal policy and economic growth."


Business Management and Leadership
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

"Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix."


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix.


Lower Division Capstone
Course Number BUSN 300
Credits 4.5

This course requires students completing their AABA degree to demonstrate knowledge learned throughout the program and apply the theories to real world issues. Students are expected to synthesize and integrate learning experiences acquired throughout their program and to evaluate research and current topics relative to their area of concentration.


Design Principles
Course Number VCDD 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a foundation class in principles relating to all areas of visual design. In this course, students can develop an awareness of the basic elements of visual language, aesthetics sensitivity, and the ability to think and act as a designer. Students explore methods for evoking intuitive responses through color, shape, texture, rhythm, line, and other compositional elements. The class consists of both practical studio-based assignments and contextual studies areas.


Fundamentals of Color
Course Number VCDD102
Credits 4.5

This is a theoretical and practical course examining the visual forces of color and color relationships in traditional and electronic media. This foundation-level class is essential to all design students. Students can develop knowledge of color principles and the ability to manipulate hue, value and chroma as well as sensitivity to aesthetic and psychological qualities.


Computer Design I
Course Number VCDD 201
Credits 4.5

Utilizing digital media and traditional visualization techniques in the production of graphic art for print and screen, this course will develop skills accrued during Intro to Mac; examining closely the potential of the Macintosh or PC as a creative and communication tool. All assignments are related to professional practice. Adobe CS (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Flash, Acrobat) is the default software set for this class.


Drawing Concepts
Course Number VCDD 202
Credits 4.5

The techniques of drawing basic forms and shapes are developed through exercises that are designed to develop perceptual skills. The student studies volume, tone, texture, perspective, and composition. The exercises are presented in sequence and are designed to develop the individual student's basic drawing methods and techniques. Subject matter can vary from still life to figure drawing.


Program description: The AIU Online AABA degree with a concentration in Visual Communication combines the business skills from our University's AABA degree program with specific skills needed to pursue career opportunities in the creative, diverse field of visual communication. This career-focused curriculum is for students wishing to parlay their creative skills into fulfilling, interesting professions.

For students wishing to pursue their creative interests in Visual Communication, AIU Online's rich multimedia courses can be an excellent way to quickly acquire industry-current skills and real-world knowledge.

Liberal Arts and Humanities Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Business Administration - Technical Communication
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190



Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Marketing
Course Number BUSN-319
Credits 3.0

In This Course Students Apply Principles And Strategies For Marketing Products And Services To Industrial, Commercial And Governmental Entities. Topics Include Ways In Which Market Information And Product Life Cycle Affect Product And Production Design; Forecasting Techniques; Interdependencies Between Marketing And Operations Functions; And Selling Skills. Prerequisites: Busn-115 And Math-114


Finance
Course Number BUSN-379
Credits 3.0

This course introduces corporate financial structure and covers basic capital budgeting techniques, including discounted cash flow analysis. Funds sources and financial resource allocation are analyzed. Spreadsheet software packages are used to analyze data and solve case-based problems. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGMT-303
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental management theories and traditional managerial responsibilities in formal and informal organizational structures. Planning, organizing, directing, controlling and staffing are explored. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Fundamentals of E-Commerce
Course Number ECOM-210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth overview of the issues, technology and environment of electronic commerce. Knowledge gained facilitates more comprehensive and contemporary exploration of future coursework in marketing, operations, finance, business law, and database and website management. Challenges and opportunities of electronic business are discussed. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Federal Tax Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-424
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the special tax issues of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, gift taxes, estates and trusts. Tax forms, tax software, the Internet, spreadsheets and word processing programs are used to research, solve and analyze tax problems relating to corporate and partnership income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT-324


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Data Analysis with Spreadsheets with Lab
Course Number BIS-155
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing business situations using current spreadsheet software. Using data derived from real-world business situations, students learn to use appropriate spreadsheet software features to organize, analyze and present data, as well as to make business decisions. Through personal database technology such as Access, the course also introduces basic database concepts. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 4-3


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Database Essentials for Business with Lab
Course Number BIS-245
Credits 5.0

Students in this course learn to design relational databases and to build database applications, including tables, queries, forms, reports and macros. Also addressed is implementation of basic database security, backup and recovery procedures. Generating reports and meeting business requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIS-155 / 5-4


Perspectives on Technology
Course Number TC-160
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of characteristics that help define, analyze and communicate about technology. Tools and techniques are introduced to facilitate recognition of technology’s processes and methods, as well as its organization, management and development. The relationship between science and technology is fundamental to explorations of the course. Prerequisite: MATH-114 / 4-4


Rhetorical Strategies for Technical Communication
Course Number TC-220
Credits 4.0

Students in this course use audience and context analysis, determination of purpose and other rhetorical strategies to create technical documents for persuasive and informative purposes. Major emphasis is placed on logic, argument, evidence and various appeals in producing documents containing sound reasoning and effective language.Studies include logical fallacies; social, ethical, political and practical influences; and ways of incorporating quantitative and qualitative information into documents. Prerequisite: ENGL-135 / 4-4


Document Design
Course Number TC-310
Credits 4.0

This course presents fundamentals of information design using software products tailored to the design process. Students learn each software product and then apply their skills to design and present projects. Key topics are technical design theory including contrast, repetition, alignment and proximity; typology and linear components; and page layout. Rhetorical elements of information design focusing on purpose, audience and context are incorporated into each project. Prerequisite: ENGL-227 / 4-4


Advanced Technical Writing and Editing
Course Number TC-320
Credits 4.0

This course prepares students to write and edit technical and business documents for both the manufacturing and software development sectors. Students are introduced to the range of communication tasks performed by professional technical writers and editors, including engineering and software documentation, training and marketing materials, and corporate communication documents. Topics include document structure and formats, information gathering techniques, usability testing principles and practical guidelines for editing technical documents. Prerequisite: ENGL-227 / 4-4


Visual Design
Course Number TC-360
Credits 4.0

This course presents elements of visual design in technical communication using appropriate software. Students learn various software products, and then apply their skills to designing and presenting visual design projects. Coursework addresses visual design theory, minimalism, visual rhetoric and visual ethics. In addition, students incorporate visual design theory into document designs. Prerequisite: TC-310 / 4-4


Marketing and Corporate Communications
Course Number TC-420
Credits 4.0

Students in this course apply rhetorical strategies and composition principles to create marketing literature,investor communications, media releases and executive presentations. The course includes current communication issues in business, such as globalization, cross-cultural influences, technological advances, ethics and regulatory requirements. Students develop and present oral and written reports in a variety of media and channels. Client practitioner involvement is used as available. Prerequisites: BUSN-319 and TC-220 / 4-4


Proposal and Grant Writing
Course Number TC-430
Credits 4.0

In this course students explore procurement processes in industry and government, as well as grant funding in the nonprofit and government sectors, with particular emphasis on the technical writer’s role in these processes. Students also learn how businesses and government agencies purchase products and services, including types of contracts used; how companies and other organizations prepare bids and proposals; and how proposals and grant requests are reviewed. Issues of ethics and fairness are addressed. Proposals and grant-request documents for both the private and public sectors are developed. Prerequisite: TC-320 / 4-4


Scientific and Medical Writing
Course Number TC-450
Credits 4.0

This course addresses communication and information design in health care, science, public policy, patient education, scientific journalism and related fields. Students prepare a range of documents presenting their analysis of data and other information on medical and scientific issues for a general audience. In addition, student groups work on team projects for actual or simulated clients. Prerequisite: TC-320 / 4-4


Web Design
Course Number WGD-232
Credits 4.0

This Course Introduces Fundamentals Of Web Design Principles And Web Content Management. Topics Include The User Interface, Web Page Conceptualization, Page Structure, Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (xhtml), Cascading Style Sheets (css), Wysiwyg Editors, Scripting And Web Accessibility Standards. Prerequisite: Wgd-229 / 4-4


Program description: With a growing demand for technical writers and editors in fields like law, medicine, science, and technology, technical communication careers are expected to increase faster than the average for all professions through 2010*. Earn your business degree with a specialization in Technical Communication, and you can qualify to write for software companies, prepare content for the Internet, interpret technical material for a general readership, and produce user guides, instruction manuals, and training materials.
When you specialize your business degree in Technical Communication, your coursework may include these career-enhancing courses:

Marketing and Corporate Communications – Addressing current communication issues in business, such as globalization, cross-cultural influences, technological advances, ethics, and regulatory requirements, this course guides students as they apply rhetorical strategies and composition principles to create marketing literature, investor communications, media releases, and executive presentations.
Visual Design – Through visual design theory, minimalism, visual rhetoric, and visual ethics, this course presents elements of visual design in technical communication using appropriate software. Students learn various software products and then apply their skills to designing and presenting visual design projects and documents.
Web Design – In this course that focuses on user-centered design, appropriate use of design elements, and applying information design theories, students learn to use a variety of software products and apply their skills to designing and presenting a web page.
Proposal and Grant Writing – In this course students explore procurement processes in industry and government, as well as grant funding in the nonprofit and government sectors, with particular emphasis on the technical writer's role in these processes. In addition to issues of ethics and fairness, topics include types of contracts used; how companies and other organizations prepare bids and proposals; and how proposals and grant requests are reviewed.
Scientific and Medical Writing – Addressing communication and information design in healthcare, science, public policy, patient education, scientific journalism, and related fields, this course prepares students to create a range of documents presenting their analysis of data and other information on medical and scientific issues for actual or simulated clients.

Program Name: Bachelor's in Network and Communications Management
Principles of Ethics
Course Number HUMN-445
Credits 3.0

This course provides knowledge of ethics students need to make moral decisions in both their professional and personal lives. Combining moral theories and applied ethics topics, coursework helps students explore traditional and contemporary ethics dilemmas, as well as reflect on and evaluate their moral beliefs. Balancing respect for diversity and claims of universality, the course puts ethics principles in the social and cultural context of the world today


Essentials of Accounting
Course Number ACCT-301
Credits 4.0

This course is intended for students in technology-intensive programs, where understanding basic principles of finance and managerial accounting is essential to successful contribution to organizational achievement. Students are introduced to the accounting system, financial statements, and essential elements of cost and managerial accounting within the context of management decision-making. Capital investment analysis and other budgeting methods are studied in relation to goal attainment and organizational success. The effect of activities in the functional areas of business on organizations’ financial viability is emphasized


Management of Technology Resources
Course Number MGMT-408
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on developing and applying management and business skills in typical technical environments, as well as on technical support operations. Management approaches in resource planning, resource utilization, staffing, training, customer service, cost/benefit analysis and ongoing support are presented. Students apply business skills in developing and evaluating requests for proposal (RFPs) and related acquisition methods, and consider issues related to in-house and outsource solutions.


Introduction to Networking with Lab
Course Number NETW-202
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Underlying Technology Of Local Area Networks (lans), Wide Area Networks (wans) And The Internet. Topics Include Networking Media, The Open System Interconnection (osi) Model, Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip), An Overview Of Routing And Switching, And Small Network Configuration And Troubleshooting. Students Prepare And Test Cabling And Become Familiar With Protocol Analyzers.


Introduction to Routing with Lab
Course Number NETW-204
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Router Configuration, Maintenance And Troubleshooting; Routing Protocols; And Use Of Access Control Lists (acls) As A Traffic Management Tool. Students Gain Commandline- Interface (cli) Knowledge And Configure Local And Wide Area Networks With Routers. In Addition, Students Apply The Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip) Suite Of Commands And Acls To Real Networks Under Troubleshooting And Traffic Management Scenarios. Prerequisite: Netw-202


Introduction to Switching with Lab
Course Number NETW-206
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Advanced Internet Protocol (ip) Addressing Techniques, Intermediate Routing Protocols, Switch Configuration And Maintenance, Virtual Local Area Networks (vlans) And Related Protocols, And Network Design Strategies. Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks. Prerequisite: Netw-204 / 4-3


Introduction to WAN Technologies with Lab
Course Number NETW-208
Credits 3.0

The Course Addresses Wide Area Network (wan) Design Using Various Technologies; Wan Protocols Configuration And Troubleshooting; And Network Management. In The Lab, Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks, As Well As Design, Configure And Troubleshoot Various Wan Topologies. Use Of The Following Protocols And Technologies Is Expanded Or Introduced: Network Address Translation And Port Address Translation, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, Point-topoint Protocol Authentication, Integrated Services Digital Network, Dial-on-demand Routing And Frame Relay. Prerequisite: Netw-206 / 4-3


Network Operating Systems - Windows, with Lab
Course Number NETW-230
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using The Microsoft Network Operating System (nos). Topics Include Installation Of Server And Workstation Software, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Domain Controllers, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Network Operating Systems - UNIX, with Lab
Course Number NETW-240
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using Unix Or Similar Network Operating Systems (noss). Topics Include Server And Workstation Software Installation, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Voice/VoIP Administration with Lab
Course Number NETW-250
Credits 3.0

This course examines technologies and systems that serve voice traffic, including enterprise switches (e.g., private branch exchanges and Centrex), networked telephony solutions, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), call centers, voice processing and wireless systems. Administration of these systems is emphasized, and relevant troubleshooting and security issues are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-204 / 4-3


Wired, Optical and Wireless Communications with Lab
Course Number NETW-310
Credits 4.0

This course examines wired, optical and wireless signals and their transmission in the network. Topics include codes and numbering systems, data transmission methods, basic pointto- point networks, error detection and correction, and Internet access technologies. Prerequisite: NETW-204


Converged Networks with Lab
Course Number NETW-320
Credits 4.0

This course examines foundations for current and emerging networks that deliver voice, data and video/imaging through various technologies. Topics include core switching, broadband and edge access, Internet protocol telephony, adding packet capabilities to circuit-switched networks, 3G solutions, presence-enabled communications, security and troubleshooting. Telecommunications regulation and standards are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-208


Wireless Technologies and Services with Lab
Course Number NETW-360
Credits 4.0

This course examines wireless technology and how wireless networks operate. Wireless network components, design, security and troubleshooting are explored, as is wireless network regulation. Trends and related issues in wireless technology and services are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-310 /


Enterprise Network Design with Lab
Course Number NETW-410
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Apply Knowledge Of Wired And Wireless Network Technologies And Services – As Well As Network Security And Cost Consideration – To Develop Network Solutions That Meet Business Requirements. Critical Thinking, Problem-solving, Troubleshooting And Teamwork Are Emphasized. Prerequisite: Netw-230 Or Netw-240


Enterprise Network Management with Lab
Course Number NETW-420
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Develop Skills Related To Ongoing Network Management. Topics Include Issues Relating To Wireless; Traffic Analysis; Troubleshooting/problem-solving; And Improving Network Performance, Reliability And Security. Coursework Integrates Business Management Considerations With Network Management To Support Business Goals. Prerequisites: Math-221 And Netw-410


Composition
Course Number ENGL-112
Credits 4.0

This course develops writing skills through analysis of essays, articles and other written works that are used as models for writing practice and development. Writing assignments stress process approaches, development, organization, revision and audience awareness. Students use word processing and webbased tools to develop written work. Eligibility to enroll in the course is based on placement results or successful completion of ENGL-092. / 4-4


Advanced Topics in Networking
Course Number NETW-471
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on emerging and advanced topics in the networking field. Students explore advances in technology and their implications in designing, implementing, securing and managing networks. Prerequisite: NETW-420


Senior Project with Lab
Course Number NETW-490
Credits 5.0

Through An Applications-oriented Team Project, Students Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project Management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation, Troubleshooting And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisites: Mgmt-404 And Netw-420


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing. Prerequisite: ENGL-112


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 3-3


Introduction to the Humanities
Course Number HUMN-303
Credits 3.0

This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy. Students analyze and evaluate works of art, and develop connections among these works and their historical, cultural and philosophical contexts. Discussions, writings, oral presentations, group activities and visits to cultural venues prepare students for more advanced inquiry in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


United States History
Course Number HUMN-405
Credits 3.0

This course examines American history from the formation of the 13 original colonies to the present. Coursework addresses the struggle to define American citizenship and government, development of the nation and a national economy, and racial exclusion in American society. Also examined are the country’s transformation to a world power, Reconstruction, resurgence, recession and reform, principles of justice and the American experience. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Psychology
Course Number PSYC-110
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation for understanding, predicting and directing behavior. Organized within a framework encompassing foundations, general topics and applications, the course provides an understanding of how psychological principles and concepts relate to professional and personal life. Topics include learning, attitude formation, personality, social influence, dynamics of communication, conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and group roles and processes. / 3-3


Developmental Psychology
Course Number PSYC-285
Credits 3.0

In The Context Of A General Introduction To Psychology And The Social Sciences, This Course Explores Human Development Across The Life Span. Topics Include Physical, Cognitive, Psychological, Social And Moral Development Of Infants, Children, Adolescents And Adults. Coursework Also Addresses Developmental Theories, Motivation, Personality Development, Culture, And General Psychological Theories And Principles. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


PC Hardware and Software with Lab
Course Number COMP-129
Credits 3.0

This course explores the PC system from software, hardware and operating system points of view. Hardware topics include system boards, processors, memory, power supplies, input/output (I/O) ports, internal adapters, printers and basic networking devices. Software topics include client/server operating systems and installation, as well as licensing software applications.


Introduction to Scripting and Database with Lab
Course Number COMP-230
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic programming concepts, logic and scripting language tools used to automate basic system administrator processes. Critical thinking, logic and troubleshooting are emphasized. Database applications are also introduced, helping students develop basic skills in using a typical database. Security topics are discussed. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 5-4


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.

Program Name: Graduate Certificate in Network & Communications Management
Networking Concepts and Applications
Course Number IS589
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on design, development and operation of a data communications system and computer network, and emphasizes managing data distribution and access. The course includes essential elements of networks including hardware, software and interfaces. Students use a networking software tool to build and analyze network models. No prerequisite


Principles of Information Security and Privacy
Course Number SE571
Credits 3.0

This course provides a broad overview of security in information systems. Covered are various aspects of security in computing, including security threats and controls; basic cryptography and its applications; network intrusion detection and prevention; security administration and planning; anonymity and privacy; legal issues; protection; and ethics. Coursework also examines controls in information systems, and addresses security issues surrounding information systems and computer-generated data. No prerequisite


Network Security
Course Number SE572
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Telecommunications Law and Regulation
Course Number TM584
Credits 3.0

This course covers the legal and regulatory environment for telecommunications services. Coursework focuses on developing telecommunications law and policy as related to a variety of telecommunications technologies, including the broadcast spectrum of radio and television; cable and satellite; wireline and cellular telephone; and the Internet. Emphasized are the interconnected nature of media, as well as the policy rationale and techniques of government oversight.


Network Design and Management
Course Number TM585
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on technologies and processes used to design, optimize and manage networks. Topics include functions of network standards, protocols and architecture; network design and optimization processes; and network management. Topics also include network design requirements for support of high bandwidth multimedia applications, wireless local area connections and security strategies. Students use a networking software tool to build and simulate network models.


Wireless Communication Systems
Course Number TM589
Credits 3.0

This course provides an essential foundation in core wireless technologies. Topics provide managers with required knowledge of voice and data systems. The current wireless industry, its recent past and emerging systems are explored through real-world projects and practitioner-based case studies. P


IP Telephony/VoIP
Course Number TM590
Credits 3.0

This course examines technologies that carry voice communications over an IP network, including digitization and packetization of voice streams. Coursework addresses VoIP standards and protocols such as SIP and H.323 that support creation of telephony systems using advanced VoIP technology applications. Fundamentals of VoIP such as QoS, traffic aggregation issues, bandwidth management and network assessment are also investigated.


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking
solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding
of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.
Program Objectives
The NCM program is designed to produce graduates
who are able to:
• Develop network solutions matched to the needs
of the business.
• Manage technologies to support business objectives.
• Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
• Demonstrate project management skills.
• Apply research and problem-solving skills.
DeVry accomplishes these goals by:
• Providing coursework on networking principles
and technologies to develop networking solutions
for business using industry standards.
• Incorporating networking and communications
technologies into courses based on current and
emerging demands such as, but not limited to,
wireless and security.

Program Name: Graduate Certificate in Wireless Communications
Network Security
Course Number SE572
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Wireless Devices and Applications
Course Number TM562
Credits 3.0

Wireless Devices and Applications


Wireless Technologies
Course Number TM561
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Wireless Networks
Course Number TM563
Credits 3.0

Advance your career by increasing your knowledge and marketability with a Wireless Communications Certificate program from Keller. Earn the credential within your master's degree curriculum or pursue a stand-alone credential. Either way, our Wireless Communications Certificate program could help you develop a foundational background in networking, systems and wireless technologies that will help move your career forward in a growing field.


Management of Wireless Systems
Course Number TM564

By completing just six courses you can earn your Keller Wireless Communications Certificate. If you earn a stand-alone credential and decide to pursue a Keller master's degree at a later date, you may be eligible to transfer your wireless communications certificate course credits toward that degree. The following are the required courses for Keller's Wireless Communications Certificate:


Wireless Communication Systems
Course Number TM589

By completing just six courses you can earn your Keller Wireless Communications Certificate. If you earn a stand-alone credential and decide to pursue a Keller master's degree at a later date, you may be eligible to transfer your wireless communications certificate course credits toward that degree. The following are the required courses for Keller's Wireless Communications Certificate:


Networking Concepts and Applications
Course Number IS589
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on design, development and operation of a data communications system and computer network, and emphasizes managing data distribution and access. The course includes essential elements of networks including hardware, software and interfaces. Students use a networking software tool to build and analyze network models. No prerequisite


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.

Program Name: Master of Network and Communications Management
Wired, Optical and Wireless Communications with Lab
Course Number NETW-310
Credits 4.0

This course examines wired, optical and wireless signals and their transmission in the network. Topics include codes and numbering systems, data transmission methods, basic pointto- point networks, error detection and correction, and Internet access technologies. Prerequisite: NETW-204


Converged Networks with Lab
Course Number NETW-320
Credits 4.0

This course examines foundations for current and emerging networks that deliver voice, data and video/imaging through various technologies. Topics include core switching, broadband and edge access, Internet protocol telephony, adding packet capabilities to circuit-switched networks, 3G solutions, presence-enabled communications, security and troubleshooting. Telecommunications regulation and standards are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-208


Wireless Technologies and Services with Lab
Course Number NETW-360
Credits 4.0

This course examines wireless technology and how wireless networks operate. Wireless network components, design, security and troubleshooting are explored, as is wireless network regulation. Trends and related issues in wireless technology and services are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-310 /


Enterprise Network Design with Lab
Course Number NETW-410
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Apply Knowledge Of Wired And Wireless Network Technologies And Services – As Well As Network Security And Cost Consideration – To Develop Network Solutions That Meet Business Requirements. Critical Thinking, Problem-solving, Troubleshooting And Teamwork Are Emphasized. Prerequisite: Netw-230 Or Netw-240


Enterprise Network Management with Lab
Course Number NETW-420
Credits 5.0

Students In This Course Develop Skills Related To Ongoing Network Management. Topics Include Issues Relating To Wireless; Traffic Analysis; Troubleshooting/problem-solving; And Improving Network Performance, Reliability And Security. Coursework Integrates Business Management Considerations With Network Management To Support Business Goals. Prerequisites: Math-221 And Netw-410


Information Storage and Management with Lab
Course Number NETW-430
Credits 3.0

This course covers core logical and physical components that make up a storage system infrastructure, as well as application of those components for maintaining business continuity, storage security, and storage infrastructure monitoring and management. Prerequisite: NETW-320


Advanced Topics in Networking
Course Number NETW-471
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on emerging and advanced topics in the networking field. Students explore advances in technology and their implications in designing, implementing, securing and managing networks. Prerequisite: NETW-420


Senior Project with Lab
Course Number NETW-490
Credits 5.0

Through An Applications-oriented Team Project, Students Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project Management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation, Troubleshooting And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisites: Mgmt-404 And Netw-420


Senior Project I with Lab
Course Number NETW-494
Credits 2.0

In This Course, The First In A Two-course Sequence, Students Begin An Applications-oriented Team Project To Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project-management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisites: Mgmt-404 And Netw-420


Senior Project II with Lab
Course Number NETW-497
Credits 3.0

In This Course, A Continuation Of Netw-494, Students Further Demonstrate Their Problem-solving And Project-management Skills. To Complete The Project, Students Integrate Aspects Of Network Analysis, Design, Planning, Implementation And Evaluation. This Course Must Be Taken At Devry. Prerequisite: Netw-494


Introduction to Networking with Lab
Course Number NETW-202
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Underlying Technology Of Local Area Networks (lans), Wide Area Networks (wans) And The Internet. Topics Include Networking Media, The Open System Interconnection (osi) Model, Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip), An Overview Of Routing And Switching, And Small Network Configuration And Troubleshooting. Students Prepare And Test Cabling And Become Familiar With Protocol Analyzers.


Introduction to Routing with Lab
Course Number NETW-204
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Router Configuration, Maintenance And Troubleshooting; Routing Protocols; And Use Of Access Control Lists (acls) As A Traffic Management Tool. Students Gain Commandline- Interface (cli) Knowledge And Configure Local And Wide Area Networks With Routers. In Addition, Students Apply The Transmission Control Protocol/internet Protocol (tcp/ip) Suite Of Commands And Acls To Real Networks Under Troubleshooting And Traffic Management Scenarios. Prerequisite: Netw-202


Introduction to Switching with Lab
Course Number NETW-206
Credits 3.0

This Course Presents Advanced Internet Protocol (ip) Addressing Techniques, Intermediate Routing Protocols, Switch Configuration And Maintenance, Virtual Local Area Networks (vlans) And Related Protocols, And Network Design Strategies. Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks. Prerequisite: Netw-204 / 4-3


Introduction to WAN Technologies with Lab
Course Number NETW-208
Credits 3.0

The Course Addresses Wide Area Network (wan) Design Using Various Technologies; Wan Protocols Configuration And Troubleshooting; And Network Management. In The Lab, Students Expand Their Skills In Router And Switch Configuration And Maintenance By Building And Troubleshooting Various Networks, As Well As Design, Configure And Troubleshoot Various Wan Topologies. Use Of The Following Protocols And Technologies Is Expanded Or Introduced: Network Address Translation And Port Address Translation, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, Point-topoint Protocol Authentication, Integrated Services Digital Network, Dial-on-demand Routing And Frame Relay. Prerequisite: Netw-206 / 4-3


Network Operating Systems - Windows, with Lab
Course Number NETW-230
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using The Microsoft Network Operating System (nos). Topics Include Installation Of Server And Workstation Software, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Domain Controllers, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Network Operating Systems - UNIX, with Lab
Course Number NETW-240
Credits 3.0

This Course Explores Basic Operation And Management Of Local And Wide Area Networks Using Unix Or Similar Network Operating Systems (noss). Topics Include Server And Workstation Software Installation, Physical Network Configuration, Network Security, Policy, Performance Monitoring And Troubleshooting Techniques. Nos Features, Ease Of Management, Utilities, Upgrades, And Interoperability With Other Noss And Client Types Are Analyzed. Prerequisites: Comp-230 And Netw-204 / 5-4


Voice/VoIP Administration with Lab
Course Number NETW-250
Credits 3.0

This course examines technologies and systems that serve voice traffic, including enterprise switches (e.g., private branch exchanges and Centrex), networked telephony solutions, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), call centers, voice processing and wireless systems. Administration of these systems is emphasized, and relevant troubleshooting and security issues are discussed. Prerequisite: NETW-204 / 4-3


Program description: To address the need for professionals who can harness
technology to advance business goals, DeVry’s Network &
Communications Management program integrates technology
and business management coursework, enabling graduates
to analyze communications needs, provide effective networking solutions and fill a critical niche in business organizations.
The program addresses designing, implementing, securing
and managing networks in order to gain a technical understanding of networking data, voice and images, as well as
their strategic application in business.

Liberal Arts and Humanities Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Associate of Science in General Studies
English Composition Preparation
Course Number ENGL080
Credits 4.0

This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual student’s needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization.


Introduction to Computing
Course Number IT080
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Computing identifies the use of computers to support professional activities and the role of computers in business and society. Students will develop skills in the use of computer applications to solve common problems. Topics covered include computer hardware and software, networks, the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation applications.


Pre-Algebra
Course Number MATH060
Credits 4.0

This is a self-paced course using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Techniques of estimation, order of operations and reasonableness of answers are emphasized. The course introduces the real number system and some introductory algebra. Calculators will not be used in this course or on any exam.


Elementary Algebra
Course Number MATH080
Credits 4.0

This course presents arithmetic operations on signed numbers, the concepts of symbols and algebraic notation, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, properties of exponents, and elementary graphing.


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL111
Credits 4.0

During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL112
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab


Professional Writing
Course Number ENGL200
Credits 4.0

This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.


Professional Speaking
Course Number ENGL210
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations


World History Since 1500 or World History and Culture I
Course Number HIST150 or HIST210
Credits 4.0

World History Since 1500 This course introduces the student to most significant events, personalities, trends and issues associated with the historical development of world civilization in the five centuries since the Middle-Ages, beginning with an overview of the Renaissance and Reformation and concluding with an assessment of the contemporary legacy of the Cold War. It explores the rise of capitalism and the modern nation state, the expansion of Western Europe, advances in science and technology, the impact of industrialization, and the global conflicts of the 20th Century. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls World History and Culture I HIST210 covers major cultures and civilizations of the world from ancient times to the birth of western imperialism in the 16th Century. Topics include cultures and historical experiences representative of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and pre-Columbian America. Of particular interest is the evolution of world religions or philosophies that prevail and are still critical in the modern world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference for the historical events which shaped the modern world outside Indo-European civilization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls


World Cultures and Values or World History and Culture II
Course Number HIST250 or HIST310
Credits 4.0

World Cultures And Values This Course Helps The Student To Develop The Global Viewpoint Appropriate For The Business And Technology Leaders Of The 21st Century. It Develops An Appreciation For The Variations In Culture Across The World’s Regions And People. Additionally, It Helps The Student To Develop A Framework For Understanding The Elements And Expressions Of Culture, And How Culture Shapes And Is Shaped By Historical Trends, Events, Situations, Climate, Geography, Beliefs And Values. Emphasis Is Placed On Driving Political, Intellectual And Technological Forces As Shapers Of Culture And Values, Especially Those That Have Influenced The Development Of The Global Marketplace. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Engl112, Hist150 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls World History And Culture Ii This Course Presents An Examination Of World History From The 16th Century To The Present. These Topics Include The Birth Of Western Imperialism, The Fall Of The Islamic Empires, The African Kingdoms And The Slave Trade, And The Collapse Of Traditional China. Other Topics Include The Rise Of Japan In The New Imperialism And Industrialization Of The 19th Century, The Decolonization Process, The Cold War, Latin American Revolutions, Conflicts In The Middle East And Other Contemporary Issues. Driving Political, Intellectual And Technological Forces Are Also Explored As Shapers Of Culture And Values, Especially Those That Have Influenced The Development Of The Global Marketplace. Western Civilization Is Used As A Timeline And A Reference To The Impact Of Non-western Cultures On Indo-european Civilization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls


Art and Music Appreciation
Course Number HUMN200
Credits 4.0

Creating Academic and Professional Success
Course Number INTD111
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for academic, professional, and life related success. The course helps students acquire, develop, and utilize basic learning tools. The course also teaches critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation methods and practices which will allow them to formulate reasonable alternatives, hypotheses, and/or premises for academic, social, and professional use. A clear, precise, fair, and unbiased approach to analysis, evaluation, problem-solving, and decision-making activities is emphasized and promoted.


Values in World Literature
Course Number LITR220
Credits 4.0

In this course the student will read and discuss masterpieces of world literature, concentrating on fiction, poetry, and drama. Examining character, plot, theme, form, and style across a variety of English and non-English works, the student will explore the role that human values play in our decisions and interactions. In such areas as leadership, love, trust, and life and death the lessons of “the best that has been thought and said” will be applied to our professional and personal lives throughout the course.


Business Algebra
Course Number MATH143
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better operate in the business community. Specifically, it focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope towards business applications. Topics include solving linear systems of equations; the mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization, basic probability; and an introduction to the binomial distribution.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL310
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an understanding of ethical expectations and prepares the student to make decisions that are ethically correct and legal. The study of ethics includes the development of ethical standards, prima facie obligations, responsibilities, societal aims and professional codes of conduct. The course will follow the aims of normative ethics. The students should expect to participate and become involved in case studies, hypothetical situations and discussions to develop an attitude that is ethically acceptable, as well as to practice the concepts learned to aid in decision making.


Introduction to Psychology or Introduction to Sociology
Course Number PSYC100 or SOCL101
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Psychology Taking this course will enable the student to have a better understanding of the basic principles of human behavior. The course also includes a foundation in the background of the field of Psychology, the workings of the human mind and senses, the disciplines and modes of treatment, and the way that Psychology affects our everyday lives. Additional emphasis will be in areas of perception, emotion, learning, motivation, and development. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls Introduction to Sociology During this course the student will study the organization of social behavior and the relationship of society and social conditions. Emphasis will be placed on culture, norm, stratification, systems, structure, social institutions and social change in different cultures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls


Introduction to Business
Course Number BADM100
Credits 4.0

This course provides a survey of the field of business management, marketing, finance, and accounting; the variety, nature, and interrelationship of problems of business operation are explored.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number BADM305
Credits 4.0

This course addresses some tools and insights necessary to understand and analyze the characteristics of human beings and organizational situations. It further explores both organization structure and human variables within that structure to contribute to the long-term survival of an enterprise and include team building.


Web Development I
Course Number EM208
Credits 4.0

The Fundamentals Of Web Servers, Web Sites, Html, Xhtml And Web Authoring Are Presented In The Context Of Using The Technology To Craft A Message For An Audience. Also Includes Fundamentals Of Linking, Graphics, And Other Media. The Creation Of A Web Site Project Is Required.


Introduction to IT
Course Number IT190
Credits 4.0

Introduction to IT Introduction to IT provides an overview of issues and opportunities presented by the fast-paced world of information technology. Students receive an overview of computer-based systems and learn about the development, operation, and management of these systems. The course includes basic hardware and software principles and current information systems. Topics include databases and networking and their critical organizational importance, IT systems development, the impact of the Internet on organizations, and emerging technologies and trends for the future. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT080 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Database Applications With Access
Course Number IT235
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basic database concepts. The course stresses the implementation of databases in the real world. Students learn about basic database design and terminology, and learn how to create a variety of databases using MS Access. During the quarter, students develop several databases and become familiar with tables, forms, queries and reports.


Spreadsheet Applications
Course Number IT254
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the basics concepts of a spreadsheet, and stresses the application of advanced functions in solving real-world problems. Spreadsheet design, graphing, and report generation will be emphasized. Students will complete several spreadsheet projects.


Elective Credits
Course Number ELE
Credits 8.0

Program description: If you are unsure of which career or major to pursue but want to continue your education immediately, earning an Associate of Applied Science in General Studies degree is a great way to start.

Along with a foundation of communication, interpersonal and math skills, this General Studies Degree program exposes you to a wide range of topics that allow for career exploration. It is an excellent option if you plan to pursue a bachelor's degree in any field of study.

Liberal Arts and Humanities Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BA in Christian Studies
Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Art
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


Old Testament Historical Perspective
Course Number BIB 104
Credits 4.0

This course is an introductory historical survey of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the study of the Bible itself, its institutions, its literature, and the history of the national life of the Hebrew people from earliest times to the close of the Old Testament period. The course also explores the impact of the Old Testament on the development of Christianity and Christian values.


New Testament Historical Perspectives
Course Number BIB 105
Credits 4.0

This course is an introductory historical survey of the New Testament, beginning with the interbiblical period. The main emphasis of this course is the Gospels and Acts, and the development of Christian faith and perspectives throughout this historical period.


World Religion
Course Number INT 244
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the major contemporary religions of the world including Abrahamic religions, Eastern religions, and other religions. The course covers religious texts, historical background, and current beliefs and practices. Emphasis is given to the ideological foundations of a Christian world view, a comparison of world views, and the application of worldviews within a global society.


Spiritual Formation for Christian Leaders
Course Number MIN 350 ∆
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course is a study of the basic disciplines of Christian discipleship, focusing on the formation of character, values, disciplines, and habits, especially related to the inner development of spirituality. The study makes use of some of the Christian devotional classics. Beyond personal spiritual development, this course addresses students’ preparation for being spiritual leaders, encouragers, and/or disciplers of others.


Moses and the Prophet
Course Number BIB 351
Credits 4.0

This course examines the tradition of the pentateuch tradition and its elaboration in the prophetic tradition. The scriptural record of beginnings and of early Hebrew history, religion, and law is the foundation for the study, with corresponding attention given to Old Testament prophetic writings. Aspects of the prophetic study include the messianic element, the occasion of writing, authorship, content, and interpretation.


Jesus and His Interpreters
Course Number BIB 354
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the teachings and major events in the life of Jesus and the elaboration on those teachings in Paul’s writings. Special attention is given to the person, teachings, and work of Jesus. Some pertinent issues in Pauline studies, such as the Judaizer conflict, the effect of Paul’s conversion on his thinking and writing, and the sequence of his letters will be examined for their role in the development of the Gospel tradition.


Biblical Interpretation and Application
Course Number BIB 355 ∆
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course helps equip students to understand and use basic principles of biblical hermeneutics, including an introduction to the nature of Bible interpretation and the application to contemporary issues. The majority of the course focuses on developing practical procedures and step-by-step skills in exegesis of Scripture.


Systematic Theology
Course Number HTH 359
Credits 4.0

This course is a systematic study of the major doctrines of the Christian religion, including revelation and the Bible, the Trinity, the doctrine of man, the atonement, salvation and Christian growth, the church and it ordinances, and eschatology, examining the biblical foundation for these teachings and their development over time. The course also discusses the relationship between Christianity and other world religions and the relationship between Christian theology and philosophy.


History of Christianity
Course Number HTH 379
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the significant movements and turning points within the church from New Testament times through the Reformation and into modern day America and the world. Special emphasis is given to the ancient Christian church, the church fathers, heresies, monasticism, the Papacy, the practices and problems of the church, the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, and the mission movement—both Catholic and Protestant. Attention is also given to the relationship between Christianity and culture, as Christianity in its geographical expansion through the course of history has interfaced with various cultures ranging from the Jewish world, to the GrecoRoman world, to the barbarian cultures of northern Europe, to the varying cultures encountered as Christianity spread to the New World and then to African and Asian cultures.


Contemporary Theology
Course Number HTH 469
Credits 4.0

This course begins with a brief background of the development of Protestant liberal theology starting with Schleiermacher. Then attention is given to the 20th century schools of theological thought: neo-Orthodox, existential, process, theology of hope, Latin American liberation theology, African-American liberation theology, feminist liberation theology, new Catholic theology, theological expressions of Christianity in Africa and Asia, narrative/post modern approaches to theology, and variations and popular expressions in Protestant theology particularly in America. Even as Christianity must be clothed in various cultures, so the various contemporary theologies attempt to relate theological truth in ways that are relevant to particular cultures or sub-cultures. In the process of studying each contemporary theology, attention will also be given to how that theology is expressed in cultural clothing.


Christian Leadership in the 21st Century
Course Number CHL 465
Credits 4.0

This course is an examination of Christian leadership with an emphasis on ethics, community, the environment, and the intricacies of cross-cultural leadership. The course helps students identify administrative skills necessary for leading a successful organization, examine how their Christian values influence their actions and decisions as they live out their faith in their vocations and positions, develop a framework for practicing global citizenship, and initiate an informed dialogue concerning the nature of leadership in other cultures and in diverse situations.


Program description: Graduates of Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Christian Studies program will utilize biblical
studies as the foundation, and an understanding of theology, philosophy, and Christian history as the
framework, for communicating Christ to various audiences. In addition to spiritual formation and exegetical
skills essential to Christian studies, graduates will be able to employ communication, leadership, and
organizational skills necessary for effective ministry.

Program Name: BA in Christian Studies: Biblical/Theological Studies
Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


New Testament Historical Perspectives
Course Number BIB 105
Credits 4.0

This course is an introductory historical survey of the New Testament, beginning with the interbiblical period. The main emphasis of this course is the Gospels and Acts, and the development of Christian faith and perspectives throughout this historical period.


World Religions
Course Number INT 244
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the major contemporary religions of the world including Abrahamic religions, Eastern religions, and other religions. The course covers religious texts, historical background, and current beliefs and practices. Emphasis is given to the ideological foundations of a Christian worldview, a comparison of worldviews, and the application of worldviews within a global society.


Spiritual Formation for Christian Leaders
Course Number MIN 350
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course is a study of the basic disciplines of Christian discipleship, focusing on the formation of character, values, disciplines, and habits, especially related to the inner development of spirituality. The study makes use of some of the Christian devotional classics. Beyond personal spiritual development, this course addresses students’ preparation for being spiritual leaders, encouragers, and/or disciplers of others.


Biblical Interpretation and Application
Course Number BIB 355
Credits 4.0

This writing-intensive course helps equip students to understand and use basic principles of biblical hermeneutics, including an introduction to the nature of Bible interpretation and the application to contemporary issues. The majority of the course focuses on developing practical procedures and step-by-step skills in exegesis of Scripture.


Systematic Theology
Course Number HTH 359
Credits 4.0

This course is a systematic study of the major doctrines of the Christian religion, including revelation and the Bible, the Trinity, the doctrine of man, the atonement, salvation and Christian growth, the church and it ordinances, and eschatology, examining the biblical foundation for these teachings and their development over time. The course also discusses the relationship between Christianity and other world religions and the relationship between Christian theology and philosophy.


History of Christianity
Course Number HTH 379
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the significant movements and turning points within the church from New Testament times through the Reformation and into modern day America and the world. Special emphasis is given to the ancient Christian church, the church fathers, heresies, monasticism, the Papacy, the practices and problems of the church, the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, and the mission movement—both Catholic and Protestant. Attention is also given to the relationship between Christianity and culture, as Christianity in its geographical expansion through the course of history has interfaced with various cultures ranging from the Jewish world, to the Greco- Roman world, to the barbarian cultures of northern Europe, to the varying cultures encountered as Christianity spread to the New World and then to African and Asian cultures.


Contemporary Theology
Course Number HTH 469
Credits 4.0

This course begins with a brief background of the development of Protestant liberal theology starting with Schleiermacher. Then attention is given to the 20th century schools of theological thought: neo-Orthodox, existential, process, theology of hope, Latin American liberation theology, African-American liberation theology, feminist liberation theology, new Catholic theology, theological expressions of Christianity in Africa and Asia, narrative/post modern approaches to theology, and variations and popular expressions in Protestant theology particularly in America. Even as Christianity must be clothed in various cultures, so the various contemporary theologies attempt to relate theological truth in ways that are relevant to particular cultures or sub-cultures. In the process of studying each contemporary theology, attention will also be given to how that theology is expressed in cultural clothing.


Christian Leadership in the 21st Century
Course Number CHL 465
Credits 4.0

This course is an examination of Christian leadership with an emphasis on ethics, community, the environment, and the intricacies of cross-cultural leadership. The course helps students identify administrative skills necessary for leading a successful organization, examine how their Christian values influence their actions and decisions as they live out their faith in their vocations and positions, develop a framework for practicing global citizenship, and initiate an informed dialogue concerning the nature of leadership in other cultures and in diverse situations.


Old Testament Historical Perspective
Course Number BIB 104
Credits 4.0

This course is an introductory historical survey of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the study of the Bible itself, its institutions, its literature, and the history of the national life of the Hebrew people from earliest times to the close of the Old Testament period. The course also explores the impact of the Old Testament on the development of Christianity and Christian values.


Moses and the Prophet
Course Number BIB 351
Credits 4.0

This course examines the tradition of the pentateuch tradition and its elaboration in the prophetic tradition. The scriptural record of beginnings and of early Hebrew history, religion, and law is the foundation for the study, with corresponding attention given to Old Testament prophetic writings. Aspects of the prophetic study include the messianic element, the occasion of writing, authorship, content, and interpretation.


Jesus and His Interpreters
Course Number BIB 354
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the teachings and major events in the life of Jesus and the elaboration on those teachings in Paul’s writings. Special attention is given to the person, teachings, and work of Jesus. Some pertinent issues in Pauline studies, such as the Judaizer conflict, the effect of Paul’s conversion on his thinking and writing, and the sequence of his letters will be examined for their role in the development of the Gospel tradition.


Program description: BIB 355 Biblical
Interpretation and
Application
This writing-intensive course helps equip students to understand and use
basic principles of biblical hermeneutics, including an introduction to the
nature of Bible interpretation and the application to contemporary issues. The
majority of the course focuses on developing practical procedures and stepby-
step skills in exegesis of Scripture. Prerequisites: ENG 105, BIB 104, and
BIB 105.
4

Program Name: BA in Christian Studies: Christian Leadership
Old Testament Foundations
Course Number BIB 501
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of the historical and theological structures and themes of the Old Testament historical and literary documents


New Testament Foundations
Course Number BIB 502
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of the historical and theological structures and themes of the New Testament historical and literary documents


Systematic Theology I
Course Number HTH 505
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the study of theological method and the doctrines of revelation, God, humanity, and the world.


Systematic Theology II
Course Number HTH 550
Credits 4.0

This course is a continuation of the study of theology focusing on the doctrines of soteriology, Christology, ecclesiology, and eschatology.


Spiritual Formation and Mentoring
Course Number MIN 615
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of spiritual growth focusing on students’ own spiritual formation and application through mentoring of others


Theories of Leadership
Course Number CHL 520
Credits 4.0

A survey of current models, methods, and skills of leadership and their application in a variety of settings.



Biblical Hermeneutics
Course Number BIB 650
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the basic principles of evangelical biblical interpretation, exegesis, and application, especially in the context of ministry, including an introduction to the use of biblical language tools.


Leading Through Crisis, Conflict, and Change
Course Number CHL 650
Credits 4.0

This course is an investigation into the dynamics of crisis, conflict, and change, and how to address these realities in Christian ministry.


Program description: Graduates of Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Christian Studies program will utilize biblical
studies as the foundation, and an understanding of theology, philosophy, and Christian history as the
framework, for communicating Christ to various audiences. In addition to spiritual formation and exegetical
skills essential to Christian studies, graduates will be able to employ communication, leadership, and
organizational skills necessary for effective ministry

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