Online Liberal Arts Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its liberal arts courses to be successful liberal arts and humanities graduate professionals, journalists, writers, philosophers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 56,880 people employed as education teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $62,160. Mathematicians make on average $93,920 per year and there are about 2,770 of them employed today.

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  • reading literature
  • writing a research paper
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Ranked by Excellence

Liberal Arts Courses at Walden University

Program Name: B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies
Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies
Course Number IDST 1001
Credits 5.0

This course will introduce students to the field of Interdisciplinary Studies and its comprehensive way of understanding complex issues. Topics include definition of interdisciplinary integration, the steps in the interdisciplinary process, and the utility of Interdisciplinary Studies. Upon completion, students will gain an understanding of the role interdisciplinary thinking plays in complex problem-solving and decision-making. (Prerequisite: ENGL 1001 English Composition.)


Interdisciplinary Experience: Identity in a Global Society
Course Number IDST 1050
Credits 5.0

This Course Aims To Sensitize Students To The Role Of A Global Society In The Development Of Identity. Students Collaborate To Explore Multiple Perspectives Derived From The Social And Natural Sciences And The Humanities. Subject Matter Is Treated As Unresolved Issues To Be Explored Rather Than Defined Knowledge To Be Learned. Upon Completion, Students Will Be Able To Articulate How Sense Of Self Cannot Rely On Authority Or Status Alone. (prerequisites: Comm 1001 Contemporary Communications, Engl 1001 English Composition, And Idst 1001 Introduction To Interdisciplinary Studies.)


Interdisciplinary Experience: Sustaining Quality of Life in the City
Course Number IDST 2050
Credits 5.0

In Light Of Global Urbanization, This Course Will Discuss The Components That Contribute To A Meaningful Life In The City And The Ways In Which Urban Communities Strive To Achieve It. Students Collaborate To Explore Multiple Perspectives Derived From The Social And Natural Sciences And The Humanities. Upon Completion, Students Will Understand The Factors That Contribute To Improving Quality Of Life In An Urban Environment. (prerequisites: Comm 1001 Contemporary Communications, Engl 1001 English Composition, And Idst 1001 Introduction To Interdisciplinary Studies.)


Change and Population Movements Across Borders (
Course Number IDST 3050
Credits 5.0

This Course Explores The Changes—both Real And Perceived—experienced By Immigrants And The Members Of An Existing Community. Students Collaborate To Explore Multiple Perspectives Derived From The Social And Natural Sciences And The Humanities. Subject Matter Is Treated As Unresolved Issues To Be Explored Rather Than Defined Knowledge To Be Learned. Upon Completion, Students Will Be Able To Identify How Population Movements Affect Individuals And Communities. (prerequisites: Comm 1001 Contemporary Communications, Engl 1001 English Composition, And Idst 1001 Introduction To Interdisciplinary Studies.)


Seminar in Interdisciplinary Research
Course Number IDST 4001
Credits 5.0

This Course Permits Students To Deepen Interdisciplinary Investigation By Participating In A Unique Experience Within A Community Of Learners Students Identify An Issue To Investigate, Utilize Interdisciplinary Research Skills, And Interact With Peers To Reflect On The Process. Upon Completion, Students Will Improve Their Skills In Interdisciplinary Integration And Develop A Broader Perspective Of The Issue Through A Collaborative On-line Experience (prerequisites: Comm 1001 Contemporary Communications, Engl 1001 English Composition, And Idst 1001 Introduction To Interdisciplinary Studies.)


Seminar in Public Service
Course Number IDST 4002
Credits 5.0

As A Supplement To Your Approved Service Learning Placement, This Seminar Course Provides Students With Interdisciplinary Research Skills With Applications To The Service Of Others. Activities Include Creating Action Plans For Service, Interviews With An Audience, Examination Of Multiple Viewpoints, And Reflection. Upon Completion, Students Will Integrate Their Experience Gained From The Service Learning Opportunity With Theory To Articulate Multiple Perspectives. (prerequisites: Comm 1001 Contemporary Communications, Engl 1001 English Composition, And Idst 1001 Introduction To Interdisciplinary Studies.)


Seminar with Internship
Course Number IDST 4003
Credits 5.0

As Part Of Your Approved Internship Placement, This Seminar Course Allows Students To Apply Their Disciplinary Focus And Interdisciplinary Process In Real-life Settings. Activities Include Creating An Action Plan For Internship, Interviews With An Audience, Examination Of Multiple Viewpoints, And Reflection. Upon Completion, Students Will Integrate Their Experience Gained From The Internship Opportunity With Theory To Articulate Multiple Perspectives. (prerequisites: Comm 1001 Contemporary Communications, Engl 1001 English Composition, And Idst 1001 Introduction To Interdisciplinary Studies.)


Seminar with Study Abroad
Course Number IDST 4004
Credits 5.0

In Conjunction With Your Study Abroad Experience, This Course Offers Students The Opportunity To Engage With Other Cultures And Integrate Their Experiences Abroad With Their Disciplinary Focus Utilizing Interdisciplinary Process. Activities Include Creating An Action Plan For Study Abroad, Examination Of Multiple Viewpoints, And Reflection. Upon Completion, Students Will Integrate Their Experience Gained From The Study Abroad Opportunity With Theory To Articulate Multiple Perspectives. (prerequisites: Comm 1001 Contemporary Communications, Engl 1001 English Composition, And Idst 1001 Introduction To Interdisciplinary Studies.)


Capstone—Interdisciplinary Methodology I
Course Number IDST 4080
Credits 5.0

This course requires students to demonstrate breadth and depth of their disciplines’ content and methods to address a complex problem. Students will engage in collaboration, critiquing, individual research, and integration. Upon completion, students will use creative thinking and decision-making to draw on interdisciplinary insights. (Prerequisites: Completion of all other coursework with the exception of IDST 4081.)


Capstone—Interdisciplinary Methodology II
Course Number IDST 4081
Credits 5.0

This course requires students to demonstrate breadth and depth of their disciplines’ content and methods to address a complex problem. Students will engage in collaboration, critiquing, individual research, and integration. Upon completion students will use creative thinking and decision-making to integrate insights and produce an interdisciplinary understanding. (Prerequisites: Completion of all other required coursework.)


Program description: Walden’s B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies program gives you a unique opportunity to define your own course of study and gain exposure to a wide range of topics. This online degree program provides a solid academic foundation as it prepares you for a successful and satisfying career across many professions. Through the B.S. in Interdisciplinary
Studies program, you have the flexibility to select two areas of disciplinary focus from Walden’s undergraduate majors. Additional experiences in a seminar, an internship, study abroad, or service learning and two research-driven capstone courses help you broaden your capacity to answer questions, solve problems, and address topics that are too broad to be covered by a single discipline or profession in today’s complex global society.

Walden also offers the following undergraduate programs:

  • B.S. in Accounting
  • B.S. in Business Administration
  • B.S. in Child Development
  • B.S. in Communication
  • B.S. in Computer Information Systems
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice
  • B.S. in Educational Studies
  • B.S. in Forensic Psychology
  • B.S. in Health Studies
  • B.S. in Healthcare Management
  • B.S. in Human Services
  • B.S. in Information Technology
  • B.S. in Instructional Design and Technology
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Completion Program
  • B.S. in Political Science and Public Administration
  • B.S. in Psychology
  • B.S. in Public Health

Liberal Arts Courses at Western Governors University

Program Name: B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies (K-8)
Schools and Society
Course Number FST4
Credits 3.0

Focuses on fundamental knowledge about the field of education, including education; teaching standards; legal rights and responsibilities; and the history and organization of education.


Human Development and Learning
Course Number FHT4
Credits 3.0

Content relates to various dimensions of child development (e.g., cognitive, social, emotional, physical, cultural); learning theory and conditions of learning; influences on learning; and the impact of various developmental influences on instruction.


Diversity and Inclusion
Course Number FDT4
Credits 3.0

Content deals with exceptionalities, legal rights of students with disabilities, inclusion tactics, multiculturalism, bilingual education, and at-risk factors.


Classroom Management
Course Number FCT4
Credits 3.0

Content includes competencies related to establishing and managing a classroom environment (e.g., organization of physical space, organization of time, behavior/academic expectations, social environment, culture for learning) and managing behavior (e.g., principles for changing behavior, establishment/management systems for classroom behavior management, systems for individual behavior change).


Testing
Course Number FTT4
Credits 3.0

Content addresses evaluating, selecting, developing, and administering assessments; analyzing, diagnosing, and reporting assessment results; and using results to plan and improve instruction.


Foundations of Teaching Practice Integration
Course Number FTC4
Credits 6.0

The FTC4 is a comprehensive exam assessing the student’s knowledge of the subdomains listed above. The student may participate in a comprehensive review session with a mentor and peers to prepare for the assessment.


Literacy and Elementary Reading
Course Number EAT1
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment


Literacy and Elementary Language Arts and Handwriting
Course Number ELT1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment


Specific Teaching Practices: Math and Science
Course Number EFT4
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment


Specific Teaching Practices: Health, VPA, and Social Studies
Course Number EHT4
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment


Specific Teaching Practices: Elem Ed Integration
Course Number ELO4
Credits 3.0

Proctored, computer-based, comprehensive objective exam


Cohort Seminar
Course Number DCS4
Credits 3.0

Addresses information about schools (e.g., finance, law), professional behavior, and other common job-related expectations (committee work, reporting, etc.)


Supervised Teaching Practicum, Obs 1 and 2
Course Number STT1
Credits 3.0

Includes a series of classroom performance observations gathered across time that serve as comprehensive performance data about the teacher candidate’s skills


Supervised Teaching Practicum, Obs 3 and Midterm
Course Number SUT1
Credits 3.0

Includes a series of classroom performance observations gathered across time that serve as comprehensive performance data about the teacher candidate’s skills


Supervised Teaching Practicum, Obs 4 and 5
Course Number SVT1
Credits 3.0

Includes a series of classroom performance observations gathered across time that serve as comprehensive performance data about the teacher candidate’s skills


Supervised Teaching Practicum, Obs 6 and Final
Course Number SWT1
Credits 3.0

Includes a series of classroom performance observations gathered across time that serve as comprehensive performance data about the teacher candidate’s skills


Professional Portfolio
Course Number POP4
Credits 6.0

The professional portfolio is a written document containing a comprehensive Teacher Work Sample. It provides direct evidence of the teacher candidate’s ability to design and implement a multi-week, standards-based unit of instruction; assess student learning; and then reflect on the learning process. The WGU Teacher Work Sample requires teacher candidates to plan and teach a multi-week, standards-based instructional unit consisting of seven components: (1) contextual factors, (2) learning goals, (3) assessment, (4) design for instruction, (5) instructional decision making, (6) analysis of student learning, and (7) self-evaluation and reflection.


Education Without Boundaries
Course Number EWB2
Credits 2.0

Foundations of College Mathematics
Course Number BAC1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer‐based objective exam.


Communications Fundamental
Course Number BBC1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer‐based objective exam.


Language and Communication: Essay
Course Number LAE1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer-based essay exam.


Language and Communication: Research
Course Number LAT1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment that includes writing a research paper.


Language and Communication: Presentation
Course Number LUT1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment that includes an oral presentation.


Health, Fitness and Wellness
Course Number BCC1
Credits 4.0

Proctored, computer based objective exam.


General Education Social Sciences
Course Number SSC1
Credits 1.0

General Education Social Science.


General Education Social Science: Analysis and Applications
Course Number SST1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment that includes analysis and application of social science theories and method.


Integrated Natural Sciences
Course Number INC1
Credits 4.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


Integrated Natural Sciences Applications
Course Number INT1
Credits 4.0

Performance assessment that utilizes scientific inquiry and analysis of evidence.


Literature, Arts, and the Humanities
Course Number IWC1
Credits 2.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


Literature, Arts, and the Humanities: Analysis and Interpretation
Course Number IWT1
Credits 2.0

Performance assessment that includes subjective and objective analysis and interpretation in the humanities.


United States Constitution
Course Number AZC1
Credits 1.0

Proctored, computer based objective exam.


Themes in U.S. and World History
Course Number GKE1
Credits 1.0

Proctored, essay.


Applications in U.S. and World History
Course Number GKT1
Credits 1.0

Performance assessment.


Quantitative Literacy: College Algebra, Measurement, and Geometry
Course Number QLC1
Credits 3.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


Quantitative Literacy: Statistics, Probability, and Problem Solving
Course Number QMC1
Credits 3.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


Quantitative Literacy: Quantitative Problem Solving and Applications
Course Number QLT1
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment that utilizes quantitative problem solving strategies.


Survey of Literature
Course Number LCC1
Credits 3.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


Survey of Literature: Analysis and Interpretation
Course Number LCT1
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment that includes literary analysis and interpretation.


Reasoning and Problem Solving
Course Number CLC1
Credits 3.0

Proctored, computer-based objective exam.


Instructional Planning and Strategies
Course Number EIT4
Credits 3.0

Performance assessment.


Instructional Presentation and Follow-Up
Course Number ETT4
Credits 6.0

Performance assessment.


Instructional Planning, Strategies and Presentation Integration
Course Number EIO4
Credits 3.0

Proctored, computer-based comprehensive objective exam.


Program description: Our online elementary education degree will put you in the classroom of your dreams. The B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies (K-8) will teach you the content knowledge and teaching skills necessary to become a certified elementary school teacher. You will become a highly qualified teacher ready to make a difference in a child’s life.

Liberal Arts Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Associate in Arts in General Studies
Major Component
Credits 36.0

Courses will be selected in consultation with the Academic Advisor from the General Studies disciplines listed in the catalog: Economics, English, Foreign Language, History, Humanities, Mathematics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. (8 Courses)


Research and Writing
Course Number ENG215
Credits 4.0

This course examines and implements the principles of argumentation. An argumentative paper is researched and developed based on the concept of writing as a process. The course focuses on the logical organization of ideas patterned on established structures of argument. The course reinforces the importance of the research process and critical evaluation of sources. Acknowledging the intellectual property of others through the proper documentation of sources is stressed.


The Origins of Western Culture
Course Number HUM101
Credits 4.0

Studies civilizations and cultures such as ancient Egypt, Crete, Greece, and Rome which have given root to Western culture. Analyzes the artistic, intellectual, religious, political, and socioeconomic aspects of each culture and traces their development in Western civilization.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI110
Credits 4.0

Introduction to Physical Sciences introduces the student to basic concepts from the physical sciences such as motion, force, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism and the atomic theory of matter. Discusses the scientific principles that underlie everyday phenomena, modern technologies and planetary processes. Examines how the various branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, astronomy, relate to each other. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


Introduction to Biology
Course Number SCI115
Credits 4.0

Provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biology, as well as the process of biological inquiry using the scientific method. Covers the properties and characteristics of living cells, organisms, and ecosystems, and the relevance of this knowledge for contemporary issues in medicine, agriculture and the environment. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.


The Individual and Society
Course Number PSY100
Credits 4.0

Presents the various ways in which the individual constructs his self-awareness. Studies how social institutions, such as the family and religion, influence the psychological makeup of the individual.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

Introduces psychology as a human and scientific endeavor. Includes examination of concepts and methods in learning, motivation, development, personality, and social behavior.


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC100
Credits 4.0

Provides a critical survey of contemporary social, political, and economic problems facing American society. Emphasizes the urban crisis, military-industrial complex, racism, and distribution of income.


Accounting I
Course Number ACC 100
Credits 4.0

Provides an understanding of accounting concepts, assumptions, and principles. Covers analysis and recording of business transactions; the adjusting process; and the procedures to complete the accounting cycle.� Progresses to illustrating merchandising operations and merchandise inventory accounting; covers internal control and cash; and explains accounting procedures for receivables.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Introduction to Information Systems
Course Number CIS 105
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microcomputer applications including a brief introduction to computer concepts, computer operating systems, software and hardware. It introduces the student to word processing, spreadsheets, the Internet, graphics, and database software. Included is the creation of web pages, integration of the applications, and hands-on introduction to Microsoft Windows commands, files, features and functions.


English Composition
Course Number ENG 115
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the principles of writing coherent expository essays in various modes. The course reinforces and emphasizes the concept of writing as a process that includes developing and narrowing a topic, logically organizing ideas, drafting, and revising. The course introduces the process of using sources to support ideas and documentation of sources in accordance with citation styles.


Introduction to College Mathematics
Course Number MAT105
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes representations and operations of polynomials and rational expressions, functions, and the graphing of linear functions. Methods of solving linear and quadratic equations are discussed. Introduces complex numbers, exponents, and radical expressions.


Program description: The Associate in Arts in General Studies allows students to pursue interests in the liberal arts and sciences. The student may tailor his/her studies to meet individual interests, selecting courses from the following disciplines: Economics, English, Foreign Language, History, Humanities, Mathematics, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology. Through careful planning and consultation with an academic advisor the student may take courses which will apply towards more advanced work.

Liberal Arts Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Associate's - General Studies
Effective Essay Writing
Course Number COM 150
Credits 3.0

In this course, students develop academic writing skills. Students use the writing process to construct an expository essay with an emphasis on coherence and correctness in written communication. Students also conduct basic research for the expository essay. Selected readings provide the basis for discussion regarding the difference between fact and opinion. Grammar exercises focus on verb tense and form, subject-verb and pronounantecedent agreement, and pronoun case. Students also complete exercises covering topic sentences, paragraph development, citations, and formatting guidelines. (3 credits)


University Composition and Communication I
Course Number COM 155
Credits 3.0

This course addresses the key elements necessary for effective academic writing in college. The course begins with focus on pre-writing strategies and builds to drafting and revising essays. In addition, the course includes skill development at the sentence and paragraph level. (3 credits)


University Composition and Communication II
Course Number COM 156
Credits 3.0

This course builds upon the foundations established in COM/155. It addresses the various rhetorical modes necessary for effective college essays: narration, illustration, description, process analysis, classification, definition, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, and argumentation. In addition, requirements for research essays, including the use of outside sources and appropriate formatting, are considered. (3 credits)


Research Writing
Course Number COM 220
Credits 3.0

Students focus on gathering research, evaluating and documenting sources, and developing a major research paper. Selected readings prompt discussion regarding bias, rhetorical devices, arguments, and counter arguments. Grammar exercises address commonly confused sets of words, modifiers, parallel structure, sentence variety, and sentence clarity. (3 credits)


Critical Thinking
Course Number CRT 205
Credits 3.0

In this course, students develop the ability to think clearly and critically. Practice includes developing writing skills that enable students to clearly present claims to support their conclusions and avoid reinforcing biases. Students are given the opportunity to analyze and discuss various types of media—including television, Internet, and print—to determine which sources provide the most reliable information. Topics addressed include the relationship between critical thinking and clear writing, credibility of sources, rhetorical devices, fallacies, unclear or misleading language, and the characteristics of various types of arguments. (3 credits)


Critical and Creative Thinking
Course Number HUM 111
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on developing the critical and creative thinking skills necessary to analyze and solve problems, make decisions, implement strategies, and formulate well supported points of view on key academic, social, and professional issues. The principles of creative thinking are essential to critical thinking skills. Students will learn how to evaluate their ideas and how to communicate their points of view persuasively. (3 credits)


Religions of the World
Course Number HUM 130
Credits 3.0

This course studies the major religions of the world. Topical areas include Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Indigenous Cultures, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Students will be objectively studying the origins and major figures and comparing and contrasting each of the major religions. During this course each student will visit a religious site and interview a person of an unfamiliar faith. (3 credits)


Media and American Culture
Course Number HUM 176
Credits 3.0

The course provides an introduction to the most prominent forms of media that influence and impact social, business, political, and popular culture in contemporary America. It explores the unique aspects of each medium as well as interactions across various media that combine to create rich environments for information sharing, entertainment, business, and social interaction in the U.S. and around the world. (3 credits)


World Culture and the Arts
Course Number HUM 205
Credits 3.0

Culture and the arts play a complex role in enriching the human experience. This course will analyze the social role of the arts in the early civilizations through the present day. Learners will explore the key contributions in visual art, architecture, literature, and music of the civilizations presented in this course. (3 credits)


World Literature
Course Number LIT 210
Credits 3.0

This course covers fiction, drama, poetry, and essay by major world authors throughout history. Students will focus on literary devices and conventions of each literary genre through the following activities: matching exercises and literary matrices, short essays and literature evaluations on specified literature selections, and a final comparative essay of any two pieces of literature covered in the course. (3 credits)


Introduction to Philosophy
Course Number PHI 105
Credits 3.0

In this course, philosophical thinking and reasoning are introduced through the evaluation of the historical development, key contributors, and principle issues of philosophy. Topical areas include both Western and Eastern philosophy, moral and political philosophy, religious philosophy, and feminism. (3 credits)


Algebra 1A
Course Number MAT 116
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic algebra concepts and assists in building skills for performing specific mathematical operations and problem solving. Students solve equations, evaluate algebraic expressions, solve and graph linear equations and linear inequalities, graph lines, and solve systems of linear equations and linear inequalities. These concepts and skills serve as a foundation for subsequent coursework. Applications to real-world problems are integrated throughout the course. This course is the first half of the college algebra sequence, which is completed in Algebra 1B. (3 credits)


Algebra 1B
Course Number MAT 117
Credits 3.0

This course explores advanced algebra concepts and assists in building the algebraic and problem-solving skills developed in Algebra 1A. Students solve polynomials, quadratic equations, rational equations, and radical equations. These concepts and skills serve as a foundation for subsequent business coursework. Applications to real-world problems are also explored throughout the course. This course is the second half of the college algebra sequence, which began with MAT/116, Algebra 1A. (3 credits)


Finite Mathematics
Course Number MAT 205
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the concepts of finite mathematics, with a focus on real-world application. Students will explore linear functions and equations, linear programming, and the use and application of matrices. Mathematical applications of finance, statistics, and probability are also reviewed. (3 credits)


Management of Information Systems
Course Number IT 205
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to the world of information technology. Students will examine the technology concepts included in business systems, networking and project management and explore the systems development life cycle. Specific topics for the course include: hardware components, software applications, operating systems, databases, programming, as well as the security, privacy, and safety issues associated with information technology. (3 credits)


Principles of Health and Wellness
Course Number SCI 162
Credits 3.0

This course reinforces the concept that learning effectively and living well involves both the mind and body. It presents the fundamentals of wellness and preventive health including strategic planning to attain and maintain personal optimal health. In addition, physical and mental diseases are discussed along with the dangers of environmental pollution, stress, addiction, and other negative factors that can affect personal health. (3 credits)


Introduction to Life Science
Course Number SCI 230
Credits 3.0

This course applies a broad, conceptual understanding of biology. Students are introduced to scientific ideologies and concepts that not only shape our biological world, but also shape us as humans. Students examine the scientific method, evolution and biodiversity, the biology of cells, energy systems, the dynamics of inheritance, and the effect humans have on the environment. The text emphasizes methods and the theoretical foundations of ideas, while minimizing isolated facts. It stresses the integration of ideas, making connections that form our understanding of the living world. (3 credits)


The Science of Nutrition
Course Number SCI 241
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to the world of human nutrition. Students examine the components included in a healthy, balanced diet, and develop strategies to meet their changing nutritional needs throughout the various stages of life. Specific topics for the course include: the digestion process, functions and health benefits of specific nutrients, weight management and fitness, and the effects of nutritional deficiencies. (3 credits)


Physical Geology
Course Number SCI 245
Credits 3.0

This course gives an overview of physical geology by introducing concepts such as plate tectonics and geologic time. Students gain familiarity with the processes that shape the Earth’s surface and recognize the relevance of studying geology. Topics include the rock cycle, weathering, formation of geological features, and preservation of geological resources. (3 credits)


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI 275
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on the causes of, impacts of, and solutions to environmental issues. Students identify global environmental issues as well as develop and critique environmental action plans. Topics include ecosystems, energy, populations, resources, pollution, and sustainability. (3 credits)


Cultural Diversity
Course Number ETH 125
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to educate students about issues of race and ethnicity by presenting historical and modern perspectives on diversity in the United States, and by providing tools necessary to promote a respectful and inclusive society. Students will complete several activities that allow them to examine their own values in relation to the values of various other racial and ethnic communities. (3 credits)


The American Experience Since 1945
Course Number HIS 135
Credits 3.0

This course is an overview of the principal social, political, economic, and global events which have shaped the American experience since World War II. Understanding modern American history is a necessity in today’s ever-changing world. This course aims to supply the tools for understanding current political, social, cultural, and economic problems in the U.S. by applying historical perspective to analyze contemporary issues. (3 credits)


Introduction to Behavioral Science
Course Number BEH 225
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on human personality, motivation, learning, and cognition. The theories and insights of major figures in psychology are discussed. Neuroscience, psychological disorders, and therapies are also considered in relation to human behavior. (3 credits)


Foundations of Psychology
Course Number PSY 201
Credits 3.0

This course overviews the foundations of psychology as the field applies to everyday life. The physical and mental aspects of psychology are traced through lifespan development with emphasis on psychological health and wellness. Further study focuses on personality; thinking, learning and memory; motivation and emotions; and gender and sexuality. Based in various historical traditions, the course is set in the context of contemporary psychological principles. (3 credits)


Introduction to Sociology
Course Number SOC 120
Credits 3.0

This course is a foundation for studies of sociology. In this course, students gain an understanding of the sociological perspective, theories, and research methods. Students also explore culture, race, ethnicity, socialization, social interaction, deviance, social control, groups, organizations, social and gender stratification, population, and social change. (3 credits)


Skills for Learning in an Information Age
Course Number GEN 105
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to learning in an information-rich society. Students develop strategies for successful distance learning, time management, and for managing the abundance of information available in today’s society. Students also explore the appropriate use of information in an academic environment. Specific topics for the course include computing skills for distance learning, online library use, academic honesty, and the development of effective study skills. (3 credits)


Introduction to University Studies
Course Number US 101
Credits 3.0

The essential information, skills, tools, and techniques necessary for academic success and personal effectiveness at the University of Phoenix are introduced in this course. The course develops and applies practical knowledge and skills immediately relevant to first-year university students. Course topics include goal setting and working with personal motivation, understanding and using University resources, developing efficient study habits, making the most of personal learning styles, and how best to manage time and reduce personal stress levels. (3 credits)


Foundations of Personal Finance
Course Number FP 101
Credits 3.0

This course provides an overview of the elements necessary for effective personal financial planning and the opportunity to apply the techniques and strategies essential to this understanding. Primary areas of study include creating and managing a personal budget, understanding and paying taxes, working with financial institutions, wise use of credit cards and consumer loans, financing automobiles and homes, and the use of insurance for protecting one’s family and property. (3 credits)


Program description: The Associate of Arts degree in General Studies is designed to provide a foundation in liberal arts and sciences based on a survey of mathematics, physical and life sciences, humanities, social science and technology. As students become conversant with the values and terminology of these various academic disciplines, they will learn how best to access information resources and develop effective communication skills for informal, formal and quantitative tasks.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Liberal Arts Courses at Baker College

Program Name: Bachelor of General Studies
Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective
Course Number ELECT131B
Credits 4.0

Scientific InquiryElective
Course Number ELECT111A
Credits 4.0

Communication Elective
Course Number ELECT 121A
Credits 4.0

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective
Course Number ELECT131A
Credits 4.0

Description: NA


Personal and Social Environments Elective
Course Number ELECT141A
Credits 4.0

Personal and Social Environments Elective
Course Number ELECT141B
Credits 4.0

Description: NA


Computer Literacy Elective
Course Number ELECT161D
Credits 2.0

Computer Literacy Elective
Course Number ELECT161B
Credits 2.0

Composition I
Course Number ENG 101
Credits 4.0

Composition II
Course Number ENG 102
Credits 4.0

Philosophy of Ethics
Course Number HUM 401A
Credits 4.0

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.


Introductory Algebra
Course Number MTH 111
Credits 4.0

Intermediate Algebra
Course Number MTH 112
Credits 4.0

Continues the coverage of the basic elements of algebra. Included are rational functions, quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite(s): C or better in MTH 111.


Cultural Diversity
Course Number SOC 321R
Credits 6.0

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor degree program.


Oral Communication
Course Number SPK 201
Credits 4.0

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presenta


Human Relations
Course Number PSY 101
Credits 4.0

General Psychology
Course Number PSY 111
Credits 4.0

Group Dynamics
Course Number SPK 211
Credits 4.0

Integrates And Applies Knowledge Gained From The Oral Communication And Human Relations Classes. Specifically, Small Group Communication In Work And Social Organizations, Both Verbal And Nonverbal, Is The Primary Focus. Prerequisite(s): Psy 101 Or Psy 111, Spk 201.


Presentational Speaking
Course Number SPK 401
Credits 4.0

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations


Program description: The General Studies program gives you a broad range of knowledge that can open the door to a variety of career opportunities or lay the foundation for further study and specialization.

In this program, you will work with an academic advisor to create an individualized plan of study based on past education, career goals, intellectual interests, or preparation for graduate education.

Liberal Arts Courses at Saint Joseph's University

Program Name: BS in Professional and Liberal Studies
The Craft of Language
Course Number ENG 101
Credits 3.0

A study of the use and power of words—including poetic terms—and of how words are best put together in an essay. This is mainly a writing course, and literary form will be used as a means to teach writing. The emphasis will be on expository prose.


Career and Personal Development
Course Number ODL 200
Credits 3.0

Career and personal development is rooted in Organizational Psychology. This course provides students with an opportunity to learn and develop the knowledge and skills necessary to engage in a lifelong career development process. The course takes the student through various topics related to career development and how those topics apply to the students' self and their own career process. This course will be partially didactic, experiential and self-reflective.


Using Microsoft Office
Course Number CSC 101
Credits 3.0

Emphasis is on learning and using software applications for document creation, numeric data handling (spreadsheets), presentations and project planning. This course is a hands-on introduction and will introduce four Microsoft software packages, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Project.


Organizational Writing
Course Number COM 263
Credits 3.0

This course is a study of the principles of writing in the business world. The course will examine the style, structure, and tone of various types of business communications and consider the planning and development process for business reports.


Research Based Writing
Course Number ENG 112
Credits 3.0

Emphasizing process and product through three significant research assignments, Research Writing teaches students to: conduct academically-based and workplace-based research; use traditional and technological library resources; read, analyze, compare and evaluate existing research and ideas; integrate sources while maintaining voice and syntactic fluency; document appropriately; conduct original research (such as surveys and interviews); present results in clearly written, skillfully organized and well documented papers; and effectively deliver oral presentation. Students will be expected to provide feedback to other writers, incorporate critical feedback into their own writing, produce multiple drafts of papers, and further sharpen their writing skills.


Organizational Development
Course Number ODL 300
Credits 3.0

A behavioral science perspective on the causes and outcomes of individual and group behavior in organizations, and of the behavior of organizations. Topics will include motivation, attitudes, interpersonal processes, leadership, and macro-organizational behavior.


Issues in Organizational Development
Course Number ODL 330

Selected issues in the field such as emotional intelligence, assessment, group and interpersonal processes, job enrichment, selection, and placement will be discussed. small groups, role-playing, and other experiential exercises will clarify important concepts in the field. Prerequisite: ODL 300


Introduction to Christian Tradition
Course Number THE 154
Credits 3.0

A broad chronological survey of the history of the development of the Christian tradition from antiquity to the present. This course will examine the origins of Christianity in the unique life of Jesus of Nazareth and trace the subsequent evolution of Christianity from a small Jewish sect to a major world religion. As is fitting for a foundational course taught in a Jesuit institution, this course will place a primary emphasis on the Roman Catholic thread of this great tradition, understanding that this specific tradition is at times clarified and properly understood only in contrast to alternative Christian positions. Critical dialogue with primary sources will be emphasized throughout the course.


Introduction to Christian Tradition
Course Number THE 154
Credits 3.0

A broad chronological survey of the history of the development of the Christian tradition from antiquity to the present. This course will examine the origins of Christianity in the unique life of Jesus of Nazareth and trace the subsequent evolution of Christianity from a small Jewish sect to a major world religion. As is fitting for a foundational course taught in a Jesuit institution, this course will place a primary emphasis on the Roman Catholic thread of this great tradition, understanding that this specific tradition is at times clarified and properly understood only in contrast to alternative Christian positions. Critical dialogue with primary sources will be emphasized throughout the course.


Organizational Leadership
Course Number ODL 320
Credits 3.0

In this course, participants will review and discuss current applicable social science literature in an attempt to answer some of the following questions: Who is a leader What is leadership Does effective leadership originate in a person or in a set of actions or behavior What do we know about developing leaders How do the constraints of organizations inhibit or facilitate leadership development What is your current leadership style These and related questions will be examined by class members through lectures, case studies, self-assessments, and experiential activities.


Moral Foundations
Course Number PHL 154
Credits 3.0

A critical study of the various says in which agents, actions, and social practices are evaluated from the moral point of view, as this has been articulated in major Western ethical theories. Tools for this study include an introduction to philosophical reasoning concepts basic to the moral point of view, such as rights, duties, virtue and character. Theories studied include but are not limited to Consequentialism, Deontologism, and Natural Law.


Coaching and Consulting
Course Number ODL 340
Credits 3.0

Roles, functions, tools and settings that define coaching and consulting within a business context will be explored with an emphasis on the corporate world. Small groups, role-playing, videos and other experiential exercises will clarify and supplement readings, research and discussion.


Comparative Religions
Course Number REL 101
Credits 3.0

An introduction to the comparative study of religion which examines the historical evolution of religious, nature and diversity of religious experience, the concept of a religious world and the diverse types of religious worldviews, the role of myth and ritual in the maintenance of religious worlds, the problem of religious change and the concept of transcendence.


Ethics in Supply Chain
Course Number PUR 245
Credits 3.0

An analysis of the question, "Does business have a social responsibility" The examination of various internal and external stakeholders of the contemporary business organization. The course exposes students to some of the ethical dilemmas confronted by employers in the workplace, and serves to help students enhance their skills in resolving these types of dilemmas.


Knowledge and Existence
Course Number PHL 201
Credits 3.0

Three basic problems concerning reality and the quest to know reality: 1) the origin, validity, and limits of human knowledge; 2) Graeco-Christian, modern, and contemporary approaches to being and causality; and 3) the problem of God.


Negotiations
Course Number PUR 240
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to develop the knowledge, attitude and skill required for successful purchasing negotiations. The course covers factors such as pace and style of negotiations, personal relationships, building cooperative supplier relationships, partnership development, decision making, and legal and administrative issues. Other areas covered: strategy and tactics development, communication styles, listening, understanding conflict, and assertiveness. The course will integrate the student and the instructor in a total learning environment with an appropriate mix of lecture, discussions, readings, case studies and realistic practice negotiations sessions.


Capstone Project in Organizational Development
Course Number ODL 400
Credits 3.0

This course serves as a senior-level, research-based capstone in Organizational Development. Students complete a research project typically developed in the Issues in Organizational Development course. Students will present and orally defend their research project to the Organizational Development faculty. Prerequisite: ODL 300, 330, 320 and 340


Contemporary Topics in Math
Course Number MAT 107
Credits 3.0

Topics in discrete mathematics: graphs and routing problems, graph theory, minimum cost spanning trees, linear and exponential growth models, voting systems, voting power, introduction to counting and probability theory.


Chemistry for the Consumer
Course Number CHM 100
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to help one understand the chemistry that affects him/her through life. Topics covered: nuclear power, detergents, food additives, brewing, pollution, chemotherapy, and home products.


Program description: The Online Bachelor of Science in Professional and Liberal Studies is a degree completion program that can immediately improve your job performance and enhance your future career potential. The strength of the program lies in the combination of a solid foundation in the liberal arts -- from communication skills to philosophy -- and a focus on organizational development and leadership. This bundle of knowledge and skills is applicable to almost any organization or professional situation, and greatly broadens the range of your professional opportunities.

Designed with your busy work and personal life in mind, the online B.S. in Professional and Liberal Studies offers you a flexible and convenient way to complete your degree. This online degree provides an accelerated, practical education that emphasizes critical thinking and organizational knowledge applicable to a broad range of career paths. Courses cover:

* Effective oral and written communication
* Issues in organizational development
* Principles of financial management
* Leadership development
* Ethics

Liberal Arts Courses at Jones International University

Program Name: BBA Generalist
Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving
Course Number CRT100
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth.This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree. .


The Writing Process
Course Number ENG100
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Human and Cultural Geography
Course Number GEOG201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


History of World Literature
Course Number HIST201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Peace and Conflict Studies
Course Number HUM201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Intermediate Algebra
Course Number MATH201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Psychology of the Organization
Course Number PSY201

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Using the Internet in Business
Course Number BBA311

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Business Communication Contexts
Course Number BC355

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Intercultural Communication
Course Number BC372

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Team Communication
Course Number BC380

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Negotiation and Conflict Management
Course Number BC465
Credits 3.0

This course presents a comprehensive process for conflict management, from needs assessment to final program evaluation. Students will explore topics such as: Assessment of various dimensions of conflict, including structural, psychological, and interactional Conflict intervention strategies, including negotiation, conversation, problem solving, dialogue, mediation, and arbitration Evaluation of conflict management programs and strategies The course project, Conflict Assessment Report: Analyzing and Managing Organizational Conflict, engages students in identifying an organizational conflict, assessing its dimensions, analyzing it from three theoretical perspectives, determining what interventions strategies have been attempted, recommending strategies for managing the conflict, and proposing options for evaluating the success of their conflict management plan.


Collaboration Technology Systems
Course Number BC470
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on collaborative technology systems’ influence on the content, context, and processes of professionals and organizations. Current developments in collaborative technologies and research about applying them to create measurable value and affect society at large are highlighted. The course project, Collaborative Technology Analysis: Evaluating Key Factors Contributing to Collaboration in Organizations, is a report of benchmarked assessments of collaboration in an organization. Students evaluate the factors of technology, culture,economics, and politics to obtain scores reflecting the perceived level of collaboration. The final report includes the results of these assessments along with a project for improving the collaboration capability of an organization.


Organizational Training and Development
Course Number BC475
Credits 3.0

This course examines the role of training and development in organizations to support business strategy. Course content focuses on the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of training programs from a global perspective. The course project, Training Proposal: Developing Employee Orientation Training for a Global Audience, is a proposal prepared for senior management in a company that has employees in several international locations. The focus of the training is on helping new employees become aligned with a newly formulated mission, vision statement, and business goals. The proposal addresses the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the new employee orientation training course.


Business Mathematics
Course Number MATH301

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Art Appreciation
Course Number ART101
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Composition
Course Number ENG101
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


English Literature
Course Number ENG102
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Computer Information Systems
Course Number IT102
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


College Mathematics
Course Number MATH101 C
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Science and Technology
Course Number SCI201
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Physics of Modern Technology I
Course Number SCI202
Credits 3.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Physics of Modern Technology II
Course Number SCI203

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Course Number SPCH101 F

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Business
Course Number BBA101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


History of Business
Course Number BBA110

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.



Financial Flow - Follow the Money
Course Number BBA210

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Introduction to Management
Course Number BBA211

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Technical Writing
Course Number BBA212

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


The Global Marketplace
Course Number BBA301
Credits 3.0

This course examines how to compete in the global electronic marketplace with an enduring product or service. Students learn how to scan the competitive environment and develop a viable marketing mix that is globally competitive.


Marketing Management
Course Number BBA304
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental concepts and issues in marketing. Students will learn to analyze an organization’s marketing environment and its potential customers. Based on these insights, students will discuss the key functions of marketing, which consist primarily of decisions related to product, price, place (distribution), and promotion.


Introductory Economic Theory
Course Number BBA305
Credits 3.0

This foundational course in economic theory provides students with a unified framework for understanding local and global economies. Beginning with a study of the macroeconomic environment, the course presents a coherent world view of how the world works, with the adaptation of the “circular flow of income” to accommodate the participants, institutions, products and services, and prices that form the full “circular flow of the economy.” In addition to the introduction of key concepts, this class enables students to critically evaluate theoretical models and to survey methods and data for an economic analysis that can serve, for example, as the basis of an organization’s economic strategy.


Financial Accounting
Course Number BBA306
Credits 3.0

This course explores the topic of using financial data to make business decisions and to evaluate performance in the fast-moving information age. Students will learn to use the balance sheet, the income statement, the statement of cash flows, and the statement of retained earnings as tools for evaluation and analysis.


Finance
Course Number BBA307
Credits 3.0

This course addresses financial management from the perspective of a financial manager at a medium to large company. Students will examine topics such as the financial environment, interest rates, financial statements, the time value of money, and risk and return. These concepts will be applied through the study of bond and stock valuation, the cost of capital, and capital budgeting.


Management
Course Number BBA310
Credits 3.0

This course examines the fundamental tasks that comprise the manager's job in organizations today. It explores strategies managers utilize in their role: decision-making, planning, organizing, controlling, and innovating.


Marketing Research
Course Number BBA431
Credits 3.0

This course examines commonly used marketing research methods and their application in real-world marketing contexts. Marketing research is the process of obtaining appropriate information about a company’s markets and analyzing and interpreting such information to make better marketing decisions.


Global Strategies
Course Number BBA484
Credits 3.0

This course grounds students in a field-tested framework for the design and implementation of successful global strategies for business. Globalism is a 21st century fact of business, and this course helps students to master its risks and to profit.


Organizational Communication
Course Number BC345

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Fundamentals of Business Writing
Course Number BC352

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Making Ethical Management Decisions
Course Number ETH401
Credits 4.0

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Program description: Get where you want to go. Sometimes the basics just aren’t enough – especially in the highly competitive business world. This
degree program will provide you with a working knowledge of areas identified by you as important to your career path. JIU’s
exceptional BBA in General Business is deliberately flexible to meet the diverse needs of our students.
This program builds on the foundational business knowledge and skills developed through the core courses and consists of four
additional courses chosen from any of the other specializations in the BBA program (with the approval of your faculty advisor).
This generalist program provides you with the flexibility to make the most of your education. Whether your interests lie in corporate
finance, accounting, sales and marketing, or, perhaps, more accurately, a combination of these areas, we can tailor your course of
study to meet all of your personal and professional goals.
Who should enroll:
Ideal for students committed to gaining a diverse foundation that draws from a variety of business disciplines, this
specialization offers graduates an array of career options.
This program also provides a strong basis for those looking to extend their academic careers with an MBA.

Liberal Arts Courses at Florida Tech University Online

Program Name: Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts
Select one 1000-level (or higher) math course
Course Number MTH 1000+
Credits 3.0

Restricted and Free Electives
Credits 21.0

Select courses based on common program prerequisites for the intended upper-division major


Mastering eLearning (Requirement for all Florida Tech University Online students.)
Course Number ASC 1006
Credits 1.0

Mastering eLearning (Requirement for all Florida Tech University Online students. Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


PC Applications (CL) or
Course Number CIS 1130
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Business Computer Skills (CL)
Course Number CIS 1140
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Composition and Rhetoric (Requirement: Passing grade on the placement test or COM 0110.)
Course Number COM 1101
Credits 3.0

Composition and Rhetoric (Requirement: Passing grade on the placement test or COM 0110.)


Writing About Literature (Prerequisite: COM 1101)
Course Number COM 1102
Credits 3.0

Writing About Literature (Prerequisite: COM 1101)


Scientific & Technical Communications
Course Number COM 2223
Credits 3.0

Practice in the technical and scientific writing style and format, including gathering and using data to prepare reports. Includes abstracts, reports, letters, technical descriptions, proposals and at least two oral presentations.


Business And Professional Writing (com) (prerequisite: Com 1102)
Course Number COM 2224
Credits 3.0

Business And Professional Writing (com) (prerequisite: Com 1102)


Civilization 1: Ancient Through Medieval (Prerequisite: COM 1102)
Course Number HUM 2051
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Civilization 2: Renaissance Through Modern (Prerequisite: COM 1102)
Course Number HUM 2052
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


College Algebra (Requirement: Passing score on placement exam or prerequisite course.)
Course Number MTH 1701
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Mythology (HU)
Course Number HUM 1015
Credits 3.0

Mythology (hu) Is A Humanities Program (choose One) Hum 1015 Mythology (hu) Hum 1020 Art Appreciation (hu) Hum 1021 Integrated Arts (hu) Hum 1023 Philosophy Of Human Nature (hu) Hum 1024 Religions Of The World 1: Western Religions (hu) Hum 1025 Religions Of The World 2: Eastern Religions (hu) Hum 2233 Modern Middle East (hu) (prerequisite: Hum 2051) Hum 3275 Contemporary Literature (hu) (prerequisites: Hum 2051, Hum 2052)


Art Appreciation (HU)
Course Number HUM 1020
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes HUM 1020


Integrated Arts
Course Number HUM 1021
Credits 6.0

Philosophy of Human Nature
Course Number HUM 1023
Credits 6.0

Religions of the World 1: Western Religions
Course Number HUM 1024
Credits 6.0

Religions of the World 2: Eastern Religions
Course Number HUM 1025
Credits 6.0

General Physical Science
Course Number EDS 1021
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


General Biological Science
Course Number EDS 1022

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number CRM 1000
Credits 3.0

n/a


Drugs, Crime and Society
Course Number CRM 2320
Credits 3.0

Introduction To Macroeconomics (ss) (prerequisite: Mth 1000 Or Mth 1001 Or Mth 1701 Or Mth 1702)
Course Number EEC 2303
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Introduction To Microeconomics (ss) (prerequisite: Mth 1000 Or Mth 1001 Or Mth 1701 Or Mth 1702)
Course Number EEC 2304
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Introduction to Psychology (SS)
Course Number PSY 1411
Credits 3.0

Associate of Arts in Accounting Major Code: 3550 Degree Awarded: Associate of Arts Delivery Mode(s): Online Location(s): University Alliance Admission Status: Undergraduate Age Restriction: Yes


Program description: As businesses continue to streamline, demand for professionals with a wide range of skills is expected to grow. If you want to earn an associate's degree but you're not decided on a specific discipline, liberal arts is a good choice as it provides a solid educational foundation in as little as 18 months. This AA Liberal Arts degree exposes you to a broad range of subjects within a flexible liberal arts curriculum - 100% online. Course selections include the natural sciences, humanities, social sciences, the arts, religion and philosophy.

Learn How To
* Exercise critical thinking methods to identify and solve problems
* Integrate skills from a number of disciplines including literature, philosophy, science, math and history
* Utilize practical, modern applications of computers

How You'll Benefit From an AA Liberal Arts Degree
* Learn fundamental skill areas such as research and analysis, problem-solving, decision-making and communication.
* Engage in dialogue meant to further personal and professional excellence, a sense of community, respect, personal development, responsible stewardship and integrity.
* Gain skills you can apply immediately in the workplace.
* Get an excellent start on earning your bachelor's degree.

Liberal Arts Courses at Tiffin University

Program Name: BA in Professional Studies
American Art
Course Number ART 310
Credits 3.0

This course addresses the material culture of what is now the continental United States. Material culture in this context emphasizes painting, sculpture, and architecture, but also explores the development of the visual arts and the historical references associated with the arts in the United States. Emphasis will be place on learning to identify and interpret artists, styles, and international influences.


Information Systems for Managers (w)
Course Number CIT 312
Credits 3.0

Introduces the foundations of information systems and their expanding role in the business environment. The technology of information systems will be discussed as it relates to supporting the day-to-day operations of an organization, with a strong emphasis on the use of it in managerial decision-making. This is a writing intensive course.


Organizational Communication
Course Number COM 441
Credits 3.0

An advanced course designed to examine interpersonal relationships and patterns of managerial communication within the organizational structure. Focus is on organizational channels of communication, an examination of problems encountered in various leadership styles, coping with complementary relationships in the organization, and effective use of intervention.


World Mythology (w)
Course Number CUL 443
Credits 3.0

A study of the great epics and myths of the world, possibly ancient and modern, and the common themes, archetypes, and folklore around the world and their roles in defining archetypes and influencing the contemporary world. The course might discuss creation myths, fertility myths, and hero/heroine myths/epics. This is a writing intensive course.


Issues in Literature (w)
Course Number ENG 365
Credits 3.0

This course is conducted as a forum wherein students read, analyze, and discuss different works of fiction and poetry. Special attention is given to those literary works that focus on the challenges of being responsible adults. Students will be asked to make personal connections with the material, using their own lives and work experiences as a means to focus on literary technique in the established literary canon. They will be challenged to make the transition from superficial reading of a text to a deeper interpretation and appreciation for literary theories and concepts. This is a writing intensive course.


Middle East History (w)
Course Number HIS 312
Credits 3.0

A survey of the history of the Middle East from the time of Muhammad (500 AD) through the beginning of the 21st Century. Specific emphasis is placed on the 20th Century and the decisions made that have resulted in the current world situation. The countries covered include Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan. This is a writing intensive course.


Business Law for Managers
Course Number LAW 302
Credits 3.0

This course studies the history, background, sources and influences of our modern day law as it pertains to the business activities of individuals, corporations and other legal entities, with particular emphasis upon business litigation, legal liabilities, and the laws governing contracts, creditors’ rights, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, partnerships, and corporations.


Statistics
Course Number MAT 376
Credits 3.0

A study in descriptive and inferential statistical methods that aid decision-making. Includes the following topics: variable, descriptive statistics, normal distribution, probability distribution, statistical inferences, sampling distribution, levels of confidence, and hypothesis testing. The focus is on the various statistical methods and formulas for analyzing and interpreting data.


Organizational Behavior
Course Number MGT 301
Credits 3.0

A study of the interface between the individual, the formal and the informal groups in organizational settings. Focus will be on individual growth, developing interpersonal skills, and understanding group dynamics.


Human Resource Management
Course Number MGT 317
Credits 3.0

A study of the human resource function in business. Major areas of study will include staffing, recruitment, training and development, wage and salary administration, job analysis and evaluation, and labor relations.


Small Business Management
Course Number MGT 359
Credits 3.0

A study and analysis of the problems of operating a small business. Additionally, a discussion of the how’s, what’s and why’s an individual would consider in developing their own business. All areas of managing an entrepreneurial operation will be covered such as marketing, finance and financial controls, government regulations and strategic planning.


Survey of Health
Course Number NAT 320
Credits 3.0

This course provides students with an understanding of personal wellness, to increase knowledge pertaining to common health problems, and to obtain an understanding of the promotion of personal health and prevention of illness. Students will learn strategies to maintain and/or improve well-being.


Applied Ethics
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 3.0

This course is a critical examination of various moral problems present in contemporary society and involved in various professions from the perspectives of different ethical theories. The emphasis is given to those moral problems that arise in daily life, especially those that involve rational decisions between conflicting values, each of which represent something good in itself in order to do what is right.


Public Administration
Course Number POL 320
Credits 3.0

This course examines the management of government at local, state, and federal levels. Emphasis is on the function and control of government agencies, the nature of bureaucracy, planning, budgeting, and decision making in the public sector.


Motivational Psychology
Course Number PSY 320
Credits 3.0

This course is an exploration from the perspective of scientific psychology of historical and current conceptions of motivation, the force that determines activity preference, selection and persistence. This course provides both a broad overview of motivational theories and practical applications of these theories to real-world problems.


Adult Development and Life Assessment
Course Number PSY 301
Credits 3.0

Course closely examines the nature of transitions in adult life and explores the skills needed to successfully navigate those transitions by “mastering the art of self-renewal”. Through a process of self-discover, adult learners come to a new understanding of themselves and others.


Social Behavior
Course Number SOC 350
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on how people think about, influence, and relate to others as well as how others influence our perception of ourselves. This course will also examine how people act in groups and how groups affect their members. Some of the topics in this course include social perception, attitudes and persuasion, prejudice and discrimination, different sources of social influence, helping behavior and aggression. Emphasis will be placed on how concepts and research in social psychology can be applied to various aspects of the criminal justice system.


Multicultural Issues (w)
Course Number SOC 360
Credits 3.0

An analysis of the problems and economic and social positions of minority groups in the United States will be presented. Interactions among historical and current social forces and institutions that influence group and individual behavior will be examined. New trends in inter-group relations, emergence of new minorities, and the contesting for program funding and services will be explored. This course also examines the struggles over income, property, and power on the interpersonal, community, national, and international levels. This is a writing intensive course.


Program description: Bachelor of Arts in Professional Studies
The Bachelor of Arts in Professional Studies is a flexible degree design for those students who have earned an associate degree in a technical/professional discipline. This is a career oriented degree program built upon the concept of the “inverted degree” which permits the students to complete the degree based on the approved technical occupational major that the student possesses. To complete the Bachelor of Arts in Professional Studies degree, the student must finish all 54 hours of the program for Tiffin University graduation requirements.

Liberal Arts Courses at Boston University

Program Name: Bachelor Completion Degree in Liberal Studies
Exploring Philosophy through Film: Knowledge, Ethics, & Personal Identity
Course Number MET IS 308
Credits 4.0

This introduction to philosophy revolves around selected films and related texts that provoke serious reflection on issues of knowledge, ethics, and personal identity. The main objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the nature of philosophical inquiry and analysis by exposing the student to specific philosophical problems and issues. By focusing on film as the visual and narrative medium in which these problems and issues emerge, the student will also consider the ways in which art (with the focus here being on cinematic art) can represent and embody philosophical questions, ideas, and positions. Related objectives include the development of critical thinking and writing skills as well as the cultivation of the students appreciation of film as an art form.


Food Stuff: A Taste of Biology
Course Number MET IS 312
Credits 4.0

This course, we will explore biological principles in the context of food. It will focus on biodiversity, evolution, biochemistry, symbioses, and humans in the biosphere. Students will be encouraged to make their own connections about the world of food by learning about biological interactions and relationships.


Explorations in the Essay: History, Theory, Practice
Course Number MET IS 325
Credits 4.0

The purpose of the course is threefold: first, to introduce students to a wide variety of essay forms, arranged historically and considered in historical context; second, to provide the opportunity to practice these forms and by imitating models to become more adept and polished writers of the essay, and finally, to explore the theory of the essay, by examining discussions among literary critics concerning the defining characteristics of the genre.


The Meaning of America: People, Identity, and Conflict that Built a Nation
Course Number MET IS 327
Credits 4.0

The course examines the philosophical underpinnings of what it means to be an American and the experiences of ordinary men and women in the making of modern America. It will look closely at the ideas of those who founded the nation and how this affected the idealism which became the American identity. The role of immigration, the change from agrarian to urban industrialized society, the growth and influence of labor unions, the shift of the U.S. from maker to buyer of goods and services, and how the ideological notion of what it means to be American evolved will be examined. How events shaped lives and national identity will be discussed. The course will look at ordinary workers and their communities and how they adjusted to changing events and forces around them.


Manipulating Life: The Ethics and Science of Biotechnology
Course Number MET IS 333
Credits 4.0

This course will explore the science behind new technologies in biology, but it will also address the ethical questions that define and direct the application of these approaches, especially in humans. Students initially will be expected to master the basic biology of DNA, gene expression, and genomics. The course will require students to learn the basic components of ethical theory and apply them to living organisms in general and to human life in particular.


Rethinking the Classics: Contemporary Takes on the Canon
Course Number MET IS 345
Credits 4.0

This interdisciplinary course pairs well-known "classic" texts with more contemporary, perhaps lesser-known works that, in one way or another, respond to the earlier examples. The course focuses on traditions (literary, cinematic, and so forth) to emphasize genre and cultural history, and, as one of its goals, moves toward discussions of aesthetics. The course will examine the timeless quality of any work we consider a "classic" and also challenge the idea of timelessness by thinking about dialogues that exist between centuries and cultures and art. Contemporary examples will allow students to think of how other voices and perspectives (gender, ethnic, racial) may question the stability of what we often deem enduring or artistic. The course pushes beyond a simple comparison/contrast approach and mere discussions of influence. Instead, we will think through the implications (theoretical, political and aesthetic) of revision, adaptation, and the intertextual. Finally, the class asks students to formulate their own aesthetic criteria through a close reading of both primary texts and secondary critical essays which will supplement the readings, film screenings, and artwork.


Nature and the Divine in Myth, Literature, and Art
Course Number MET IS 350
Credits 4.0

Over time and throughout cultures, human understanding of a divine presence, of a god or gods, has been intimately connected to our relationship with nature. In some myths, the divine is thought to be inherent in the forces of nature; in others, God stands outside, controlling nature and passing that control to human beings. Still another world view suggests that humans, nature, and the divine are all one thing, as represented in metaphors such as the circle or web of life. This course introduces students to some of the world's mythic traditions, applying them to the enduring cultural issues surrounding humanity's relationship to nature and our role as stewards of the environment. We will follow a roughly chronological syllabus, with readings from the Bible and classical mythology through the writings of Emerson and modern works such as Ceremony by Pueblo author Leslie Marmon Silko. Students will also be exposed to visual art (including Celtic Christian and Native American design) and some film.


Literature, Film, and the American Dream
Course Number MET IS 360
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the nature of the American Dream as seen through fiction, essays, poetry, autobiography, historical documents, and art. It will follow a chronological pattern with the Dream evolving from the Puritan fathers desire for religious freedom to the Revolution's emphasis on political liberty, the 19th century's focus on self reliance, and the quest for the good life characteristic of the 20th century. At the same time, such characteristic thematic elements as the desire for equality, individual expansion and achievement, and the maturation of the soul will be examined in terms of their impact on all the different permutations of the Dream.


Mathematics that Matter in the Twenty-first Century
Course Number MET IS 362
Credits 4.0

In this course students will expand their knowledge of the mathematics of probability, algebraic thinking, geometry, and statistics, with a focus on contemporary developments and applications. The course will examine the applications of mathematics in contemporary contexts via readings and explorations


Jobs, Wages, and the Global Economy
Course Number MET IS 367
Credits 4.0

This course introduces fundamental concepts of micro and macro economics within the context of the labor market. In micro economics, we focus on the supply and demand for labor, looking at trends in labor force participation, college attendance, and wage differentials. In macro economics, we focus on the ability of the economy to create enough jobs to maintain full employment. We will also cover current topics related to the functioning of the labor market, including a discussion of income distribution and poverty, and the employment impact of international trade and outsourcing.


China, the Emerging Superpower: A Model for Development
Course Number MET IS 370
Credits 4.0

Online offering. The course will assess whether China will remain a friend or become a foe for the U.S., argue whether China's road to modernization is an apt model for other developing nations, analyze China's past to discover patterns and traditions that still exist, and study the interaction between China and the world community to determine its future role as a world leader. For further information, please call the Office of Distance Education at 617-358-1960.


Landscape, Climate, and Humans
Course Number MET IS 380
Credits 4.0

This course will provide students with an introduction to environmental science with a dual focus in physical geography and climatology. Students will learn to interpret major themes in Earth History and human affairs through interactive lessons that include online lectures, outside reading, and extensive online maps, diagrams, and animations. We will discuss the interactions of climate, physical geography, and human activities in the formation of a dynamic, living Earth. The action of weather, humans, and non-human organisms on the Earth's surface will tie the course together as we end with biogeochemistry and a look at the origin of life.


Interior and Exterior Landscapes: Understanding Native American Cultures
Course Number MET IS 385
Credits 4.0

The indigenous people of North America have a unique experience of negotiating cultural boundaries, alien ideologies, and inscrutable behaviors that appear in everything from personal interactions to national policy, and their own cultural and religious traditions have survived despite a dominant culture that has sought to both annihilate and romanticize them. This course is about that cultural interaction and offers an opportunity to understand Native American cultures in their own terms through the voices of their people expressing themselves in literature, film, and other cultural productions and to nderstand America from the perspective of the cultures of its original inhabitants.


The Holocaust and Music
Course Number MET IS 419
Credits 4.0

Introduction to musical compositions created during and after the Holocaust that commemorate the period's historical moments, social issues, and personal experiences. Listening, analysis, and background reading on music by Schoenberg, Shostakovich, and Reich.


The Moral Self: Psychological, Religious, and Spiritual Perspectives
Course Number MET IS 420
Credits 4.0

This course will examine morality through three related yet different lenses: psychology, religion and spirituality. With war, terrorism, global climate change, geological disruptions, and other threats, humans tend to feel more vulnerable, more insecure, and to seek deeper understandings of themselves and their world. Accordingly, issues such as abortion, capital punishment, and stem-cell research take on new meanings as morality evolves with culture. How do we develop a moral understanding of what is appropriate behavior for ourselves and others around us Is morality carved in stone or is it subject to change, depending upon life experience, religion, secular and social orientation, and other factors The goal of this course is not to definitively answer questions but to generate them; not to agree on moral issues, but to facilitate understanding of others views; not to criticize, but to comprehend the strengths and limitations of each paradigm.


The Art of Rhetoric in Life and Work
Course Number MET IS 421
Credits 4.0

The art of rhetoric is one of the original liberal arts and is a part of the trivium that includes grammar and logic. Rhetoric is as old as human communication and as diverse as the human imagination. In the twenty-first century, rhetoric has new forms and meanings but retains some of the dynamics of the classical age of Greece and Rome. This course is a study of the art of rhetoric in everyday life and work from both theoretical and practical perspectives with an emphasis on writing and interpretation.


Botany without Borders
Course Number MET IS 450
Credits 4.0

Online offering. Introduces students to practical problems in botany with a dual emphasis on plant evolution and plants in human affairs. The course crosses borders in time and geography as we examine the broad sweep of plants and their role on Earth over the past 300 million years. Plant form and function, evolution of seed plants, plant ecology, ethnobotany (human uses of plants), endangered plant communities, and prospects for conserving plant biodiversity are highlighted in this interdisciplinary course designed for undergraduates. While its focus is rigorously scientific, the course incorporates topics in the humanities (for example visual arts), and social sciences (anthropology) to illustrate the close relationship between humans and plants. Fur further information, call the Office of Distance Education at 617-358-1960.


Romanticism and Its Offshoots: Countering the Enlightenment in Philosophical Literature and the Visual Arts
Course Number MET IS 460
Credits 4.0

This course explores various currents, paradoxes, and extensions of Romanticism, especially as this movement took shape in Europe and America, with a special focus on philosophical literature and the visual arts. We will begin with some central ideas and themes of German Romantic thinkers, exploring how these ideas and themes are also evoked by British and American writers as well as by European and American painters. We will identify and analyze Romantic themes and styles in early German expressionist films, in British gothic fantasy movies, and in American motion pictures about western frontier heroes. In the concluding part of the course, we will study twentieth-century extension or offshoots of Romanticism, such as existentialism, depth-psychology, and the philosophy of nature.


Biblical Archaeology: Methods, Theories, Contexts
Course Number MET IS 470
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to examine important archaeological discoveries relating to the Bible. It will focus on two significant cultural settings: the rise of Judah and Israel 3000 years ago, and questions about the historical Jesus. The course will cover the geography and topography of Palestine and the ancient Near East, and archaeological field methods used in Israel and Palestine. The history of writing and significant manuscript discoveries, such as the Dead Sea Scrolls, will also be examined. Throughout the course, students will examine how archaeologists, looters, forgers, journalists, and theologians fight each other for the opportunity to discover, interpret, and sensationalize artifacts for the religious and irreligious alike. As we examine the archaeological artifacts, students will situate them in terms of their interpretation in documentary films, recent book publications, and other modern media


Physics of Motion
Course Number MET IS 480
Credits 4.0

Mechanics is the study of the motion of objects and the forces acting on objects. It is hoped that the student will share some of the excitement felt by great scientists such as Galileo and Newton when they discovered many of the principles on which the physics of motion are based. The course assumes that the student has a working knowledge of algebra, but the emphasis will be on a conceptual understanding of physics rather than on advanced mathematics. Many demonstrations and animations will be presented in the course, and the student will become familiar with the physics of many everyday situations.


Program description: The online Bachelor of Liberal Studies in Interdisciplinary Studies degree from Boston University is the only online Liberal Studies Completion program that is offered today.

This is an excellent online liberal studies program for those individuals who are looking to develop a well-rounded understanding of the variety of academic areas that are highly valued in today's business climate, including:

* The arts and humanities
* The social sciences
* Fundamentals of science

This liberal studies online degree enables its students with the abilities needed to succeed in a professional climate that requires interpersonal awareness and critical thinking as well as a variety of human factors.

This is an excellent online liberal studies degree program for those who have busy professional and personal lives, and who are looking for a program that will give them the flexibility that is needed to complete their degree online.

All applicants must have a minimum of 52 previous college credits.

Liberal Arts Courses at Arizona State University

Program Name: Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies - Organization Studies
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

Program description: Interdisciplinary studies is an approach to answering questions, solving problems and addressing contemporary social issues from multiple perspectives. Interdisciplinary students develop the intellectual tools needed to build bridges across academic disciplines and apply their skills, innovations and knowledge in various academic and practical settings. In core classes, students develop a portfolio that showcases each individual's skills, interests and talents. This portfolio and the applied learning experience provide each student with valuable resources for flexible, individualized career planning and development.

Program Name: Bachelor of Liberal Studies
Liberal Studies Seminar
Course Number BIS 470
Credits 3.0

Advanced analysis and application of theories and methods of human and social inquiry.


Program description: The BLS degree program offers students the opportunity to engage in courses across various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, and benefit from multiple perspectives and ideas. Students are exposed to a mix of peers and faculty from diverse backgrounds that share the common interest of experiencing the world and learning from different points of view. This is an ideal degree program for students with a wide range of intellectual interests, or for students seeking to complete their degree.

As part of the School of Letters and Sciences, the BLS program equips students with the knowledge and skills to succeed in the 21st century. They are guided by the principles of strategic partnerships, academic inquiry, entrepreneurship, and service. They enjoy personalized degree advisement with educational, technical and career support. They have university-wide online resources and benefits at their disposal.

Liberal Arts Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Bachelor of Commerce, General Studies
n/a
Course Number n/a
Credits 0.0

n/a


Program description: You need the most relevant, up-to-date skills in order to succeed in business management and administration. CDI's Business Administration program reflects best practices and up-to-the-minute skill requirements of the business world.

The program will teach you the accounting, computer, and project management skills you need to excel in any office environment. Courses include Professional Skills, Marketing, Business Essentials, and Effective Business Writing. This diploma program can be applied to a variety of career options such as office management, finance, administration, and more.

Liberal Arts Courses at Grand Canyon University

Program Name: BA in Interdisciplinary Studies
Origins of Western Consciousness and Community
Course Number UNV 150
Credits 4.0

This is a survey course focusing on the origins of Western thought from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students cover topics related to myth, logic, rhetoric, symbol, aesthetics, politics, citizenship, ethics, and the philosophy of the good life.


History of Ideas
Course Number UNV 200
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the history of Western ideas and aesthetics—from the age of Classicism, through Christianity, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism, and Globalism—designed to provide students with a better understanding of how modern Western worldviews are informed by historical human thought and events. These views are further examined in light of the aesthetics of their ages, especially through literature, visual art, architecture, and music that reflect the thoughts and feelings of the movements.


Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies
Course Number UNV 315
Credits 4.0

This course introduces concepts and methods of interdisciplinary study and critical analysis of contemporary vocational and cultural trends.


Social Psychology
Course Number SOC 369
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides A Study Of Social And Group Factors Affecting Individual Behavior. Attention Is Given To The Development Of Attitudes, Leadership Roles, Group Thinking, Sources Of Conflict, Effects Of Competition And Cooperation, Analysis And Evaluation Of Propaganda Techniques, And The Influence Of Mass Communication On Social Awareness And Control. Also Psy 369. Prerequisite: Psy 102 Or Soc 102.


Cultural Anthropology
Course Number SOC 315
Credits 4.0

This course provides a study of the variety of cultures that have developed in human society. Attention is given to preliterate peoples in comparison with contemporary and other cultures. The origin and development of the cultures, their technologies, economies, social organizations, and beliefs are surveyed.


Social Inequality and Stratification
Course Number SOC 410
Credits 4.0

This course provides an inquiry into the dynamics of hierarchies of power, wealth, and prestige within and among human social systems, with particular attention given to the causes and effects of marked inequality, especially with regard to the foundations and consequences of concentration of political and economic power


Christianity and Culture
Course Number INT 454
Credits 4.0

This course leads students through a cross-cultural study to critically examine the essentials of Christianity as opposed to cultural values that might be considered Christian. Special emphasis is given to comparisons between Western and non- Western cultures, syncretism, and Christianity’s expression in cultures other than the United States. Some aspects of crosscultural communication are also included. Prerequisite: INT 244.


Applied Interdisciplinary Studies
Course Number UNV 350
Credits 4.0

This Is An Online Course Where Students Gain Practical Knowledge And Apply Interdisciplinary Coursework As It Applies To Real World Settings. This Capstone Project Is Required. Prerequisites: Unv 315, Soc 369, Int 454.


Ethical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
Course Number PHI 305
Credits 4.0

This course considers the role that ethical thinking plays in the liberal arts. Topics are set in historic, literary, artistic, political, philosophical, religious, social, and scientific perspectives. The impact and contributions of leaders in these fields are also considered.


World Religions
Course Number INT 244
Credits 4.0

This course is a study of the major contemporary religions of the world including Abrahamic religions, Eastern religions, and other religions. The course covers religious texts, historical background, and current beliefs and practices. Emphasis is given to the ideological foundations of a Christian worldview, a comparison of worldviews, and the application of worldviews within a global society.


Intercultural Communications
Course Number COM 315
Credits 4.0

This course creates an awareness of the skills necessary to promote positive communication and relationships across cultural differences. Students explore verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors. Other cultures are explored through an examination of demographics, family structure, religion, politics, education, social life, art, and literature.


University Foundations
Course Number UNV 103/303
Credits 4.0

Graduates Of Grand Canyon University Will Complete One Of The Following Unv Foundational Courses: Unv 103 For Students Entering With Under 36 Credit Hours Or Unv 303 For Students Transferring 36 Or More Credit Hours.


Effective Communication
Course Number ENG 105/106 and COM 126
Credits 9.0

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.


Christian Worldview
Course Number CWV 101
Credits 4.0

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV 101.


Global Awareness, Perspectives, and Ethics
Course Number HIS 221, PSY 102, SOC 102
Credits 6.0

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, cross- cultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.).


Critical Thinking
Course Number MAT 134, PHI 103, BIO 100
Credits 11.0

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of college-level mathematics.


Program description: Grand Canyon University’s Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies degree enables students to
individualize their program of study across disciplines. The program is built on a values-based liberal arts
foundation and seeks to use an interdisciplinary model applied to thought, ethics, and problem solving.

Liberal Arts Courses at Liberty University Online

Program Name: MA in Intercultural Studies
Missionary Relationships
Course Number ICST 373
Credits 3.0

An in-depth study of the special relationships of a missionary with his Lord, family, supporting churches, the mission agency, and nationals on the field. Special attention is given to deputation, mission policies and procedures as well as common areas of tension between missionaries and between missionaries and national church leaders.


Church and Missions
Course Number ICST 497
Credits 3.0

Assorted mission-related topics are addressed as requested. Outside experience personnel in missions share from their field of experience and expertise. Topics can range from world religions in general to finances, organization and administration.


Directed Research in Missions
Course Number ICST 495
Credits 3.0

Experience in leading, planning and coordinating LU campus mission functions (e.g., Campus Mission Fellowship - CMF). Credit is given only to those who faithfully and effectively serve on approved mission committees for two years. The student must register prior to the fall semester of his/her second year of the practicum to receive credit.


Introduction to Missions
Course Number ICST 200
Credits 3.0

A basic introductory course that presents the philosophy of world evangelization. Particular attention is given to the biblical mandates for discipleship evangelism as they apply to the individual believer and the local church. Discussions include the call,qualifications, message, methodologies of missions and current status of world evangelization. Consideration is given to prayer and theology as they relate to missions also.


Cultural Anthropology
Course Number ICST 300
Credits 3.0

Contemporary Mission Problems and Issues
Course Number ICST 338
Credits 3.0

Contemporary problems in world missions are examined. Issues and trends are identified and evaluated with possible solutions or alternatives considered. Topics that may affect missions in the future are ecclesiastical, economic, cultural concerns, socio-political, and theological in nature.


Program description: The Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies program prepares students to confidently and compassionately serve in a variety of cultural and missions-oriented settings. Through this program, students will participate in intensive study of personal evangelism, doctrinal learning, and techniques for effective ministry in both local and international mission fields. Specialized courses provide students with in-depth, biblical training to supply the values, knowledge and skills needed to effectively serve the church in an evangelism-specific capacity

Program Name: MAR-Intercultural Studies
Language Learning for Field Workers
Course Number ICST 280/LING 280
Credits 3.0

The course is a combination of lectures from the instructor and practice sessions with live speakers of some non-European language, with the aim to acquire the skills to learn any foreign language without a teacher.


Missionary Discipleship and Church Planning
Course Number ICST 341
Credits 3.0

An examination of how people are won and nurtured as disciples in a cross-cultural context. Biblical and cultural principles are considered on how these disciples start and develop local indigenous churches that reproduce themselves. Guidelines for church growth and revival are evaluated through student surveys and analyses.


Inter-Cultural Exposure Seminar
Course Number ICST 380
Credits 3.0

A seminar that exposes the student to missionary problems, needs, duties, conflicts and cultural barriers while working with a national church in a selected area of the world. The seminar requires on-the-field involvement accompanied with reading, lectures and interaction with mission-related personnel and nationals


Chronological Bible Storying
Course Number ICST 390
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to understand how people “hear” or understand the message, especially in light of the differences in the levels of literacy between the presenter and the hearer, which often impedes effective communication.


Missions Outreach Program (LIGHT)
Course Number ICST 400
Credits 1.0

A supervised training practicum for the purpose of preparing student volunteers for team involvement in mission outreach.


Theological Education by Extension (TEE)
Course Number ICST 415
Credits 3.0

Consideration is given to the historical development of TEE; biblical, theological and educational principles underlying extension education; organization patterns and problems of extension training; analysis of available programs; the methods, preparation and use of programmed instructional materials for theological education courses


Theology of Missions
Course Number ICST 420
Credits 3.0

(Offered spring semester) A study of the theological basis for missions in the Old and New Testaments, the Gospel, the adequacy of Christ, the nature and function of the Church, the eschatological picture and the ministry of the Holy Spirit.


Urban Ministries Worldwide
Course Number ICST 430
Credits 3.0

(Offered spring semester) A thorough study of third-world problems confronting the missionary endeavor. Special emphasis is placed on growing population and urban centers where multilingualism, prostitution, crime, poverty, racism, disease and housing become major concerns for the church planter. Students acquaint themselves with groups and personalities dealing with social ills.


Intro to Islam
Course Number ICST 431
Credits 3.0

A thorough examination of the history, sects and doctrines of the Islamic community, including major theological positions, ethics and issues of political protocol. A biblical evaluation of Islamic doctrines and practices is made with guidelines on how to present biblical truths to Muslims.


Career Missionary Preparation
Course Number ICST 441
Credits 3.0

A senior course designed to guide prospective missionaries step-by-step through the process of becoming a field missionary. Guest mission personnel will address matters such as the choice of a mission agency, the application procedures to follow, deputation guidelines, missionary internships, language acquisition, and prefield-orientation. The principles and practices of selected mission agencies are reviewed and evaluated


The Church in Mission
Course Number ICST 461
Credits 3.0

This course identifies the role, relationships, and responsibilities of the pastor and the missionary to the congregation regarding the Great Commission. It includes subjects such as support, ministry, accountability of the missionary and the mission agency, as well as the pastoral oversight and promotion of local and world evangelism through the local church.


Women’s Roles in Missions
Course Number ICST 483
Credits 3.0

A comprehensive course of the roles and ministries of women in missions. Consideration is given to the place of women in ministry, the opportunities, needs and the means for women ministries. This study presents the principles and practices that make for effective ministry in and outside the local church


Pioneer Ministry Orientation
Course Number ICST 485
Credits 3.0

A practical experience of learning cross cultural concepts, pioneer and survival ministry skills and cultural adjustments through simulated situations. Leadership skills, group dynamics, and other practical preparations for pioneer ministries.


Integrative Seminar
Course Number ICST 488
Credits 3.0

An integrative and interpretive seminar which may take place simultaneously with the Field Internship Experience. It is directed by a faculty member who endeavors to integrate the pre-field orientation concepts with the field internship training experience with emphasis on solving the personal, group and community needs and problems


Intercultural Studies Internship
Course Number ICST 499
Credits 9.0

Prerequisites: Junior or senior status and required GPA Field experience under the supervision of a qualified mission coordinator. A minimum of six hours (one hour per week) is earned after evaluations are submitted and all requirements for the internship have been completed with an approved rating. Application procedures processed through the Career Center. Must apply semester prior to completing internship


Introduction to Missions
Course Number ICST 200
Credits 3.0

A basic introductory course that presents the philosophy of world evangelization. Particular attention is given to the biblical mandates for discipleship evangelism as they apply to the individual believer and the local church. Discussions include the call,qualifications, message, methodologies of missions and current status of world evangelization. Consideration is given to prayer and theology as they relate to missions also.


Internship
Course Number ISYS 299
Credits 0.0

Prerequisites: Sophomore Status, 2.00 Gpa, Two Courses In Major, Declared Major, Not More Than One Cser Behind. Application Procedures Processed Through The Career Center. Must Apply Semester Prior To Internship.


Cultural Anthropology
Course Number ICST 300
Credits 3.0

Contemporary Mission Problems and Issues
Course Number ICST 338
Credits 3.0

Contemporary problems in world missions are examined. Issues and trends are identified and evaluated with possible solutions or alternatives considered. Topics that may affect missions in the future are ecclesiastical, economic, cultural concerns, socio-political, and theological in nature.


World Religions
Course Number ICST 350
Credits 3.0

The basic principles and practices of the most significant world religions are discussed and evaluated in light of biblical truth. The course goes beyond descriptions and identifies points of contact and cultural opportunities for gaining a hearing for the propagation of the gospel.


History and Survey of Missions
Course Number ICST 355
Credits 3.0

A survey of world missions historically and geographically.Special attention is given toward trends and personalities impacted by the Gospel. Case studies are made of Christian converts from an assortment of religious backgrounds including their subsequent and successful evangelization of groups within their societies.


Missionary Relationships
Course Number ICST 373
Credits 3.0

An in-depth study of the special relationships of a missionary with his Lord, family, supporting churches, the mission agency, and nationals on the field. Special attention is given to deputation, mission policies and procedures as well as common areas of tension between missionaries and between missionaries and national church leaders.


Roman Catholicism
Course Number ICST 421
Credits 3.0

This is a study of the historical development and major doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. Special attention is given to the impact of the Vatican II Council and the “Evangelicals Catholics Together” document on evangelism. A biblical evaluation of this church’s doctrines and practices is thoroughly treated with guidelines on how to present biblical truths to Catholics.


Directed Research
Course Number ISYS 495
Credits 3.0

Individual study of advanced topics in management information systems. Includes periodic meetings with instructor.


Church and Missions
Course Number ICST 497
Credits 3.0

Assorted mission-related topics are addressed as requested. Outside experience personnel in missions share from their field of experience and expertise. Topics can range from world religions in general to finances, organization and administration.


Program description: The Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies program prepares students to confidently and compassionately serve in a variety of cultural and missions-oriented settings. Through this program, students will participate in intensive study of personal evangelism, doctrinal learning, and techniques for effective ministry in both local and international mission fields. Specialized courses provide students with in-depth, biblical training to supply the values, knowledge and skills needed to effectively serve the church in an evangelism-specific capacity.

Program Name: AA in General Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Course Number ENGL 101
Credits 3.0

Through the critical engagement of a variety of texts, including written, oral, and visual, this course prepares students to become careful readers, critical thinkers, and skilled writers. Drawing upon rhetorical theory, it emphasizes the practices of analytical reading, informed reasoning, effective writing, and sound argumentation. The course requires 4,000 words of writing in no fewer than five writing projects, three of which are argumentative essays incorporating external sources.


Old Testament Survey
Course Number BIBL 105
Credits 3.0

An introduction to the authorship and contents of the Old Testament books. Special attention will be given to important persons, places and events, as well as to key chapters in the Old Testament revelation.


New Testament Survey
Course Number BIBL 110
Credits 3.0

An introduction to the authorship and contents of the New Testament books. Special attention will be given to important persons, places, events, as well as to key chapters in the New Testament revelation.


Theology Survey I
Course Number THEO 201
Credits 3.0

This is a general survey of Bible doctrine designed to synthesize and outline each of ten major areas of systematic theology, including prolegomena, bibliology, theology proper, Christology, angelology, and pneumatology.


Theology Survey II
Course Number THEO 202
Credits 3.0

This is a continuation of general survey of Bible doctrine designed to synthesize and outline each of the ten major areas of systematic theology. Survey II includes anthropology, hamartiology, soteriology, ecclesiology and eschatology.


Evangelism and the Christian Life
Course Number EVAN 101
Credits 3.0

An in-depth study of how to lead people to Christ. Special attention will be given to the theology of all aspects of evangelism including the follow-up. Various methods of approach and presentation will be considered. Emphasis will be placed on evangelism and the local church for conservation of results.


Composition and Literature
Course Number ENGL 102
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or advanced standing on the placement test Continues the emphasis on writing. Two analytical papers— based upon studies of the short story, poetry and drama—and a literary research paper, sequentially developed, are required.


Speech Communication
Course Number COMS 101
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or advanced standing on the English placement test Study and practice in communicating ideas competently in public speaking. Students are also given a foundation for development of communication skills in other human communication contexts, including dyadic and small group communication


Contemporary Worldviews
Course Number PHIL 104
Credits 3.0

An Overview Of The Major Worldviews, Including Their History And Current Relations With Other Religions And Philosophies, Their Influence, When Applicable, On Historical Forces (cultural, Social, Political, And Economic), And The Effects Of Worldviews On Behavior. Common Critiques To Each Worldview Will Be Included And Analyzed From Various Schools Such As Historicism And Existentialism. The Issue Of Absolutes, The Existence Of God, And How People View Revelation From God Will Be Emphasized With Several Worldviews Note: Phil 201 Is A Prerequisite To All Phil Courses


Survey of Biblical Literature
Course Number BIBL 104
Credits 3.0

This survey course is designed to lay a foundational understanding of scripture via a historical survey of the Old and New Testaments. The student will engage a range of learning activates related to the issues interacting with biblical literature, basic hermeneutical principles, key themes and persons of the canon, and the redemptive theme of scripture.


Philosophy and Contemporary Ideas
Course Number PHIL 201
Credits 3.0

A survey of the major positions and figures in philosophy and the cultural worldviews and practical applications that derive from them, focusing specifically on theism, naturalism and humanism in contemporary thought.


Introduction to Christian Thought
Course Number THEO 104
Credits 3.0

This course is an introduction to the basic tenets of Christianity.


Program description: Liberty University's Associate of Arts in General Studies is designed to help you obtain your degree through a broad range of liberal arts study and skills. Through such courses, you will develop skills in university-level writing, speaking, reading, and computer literacy, with the ability to utilize analytical reasoning and library research. This is a great degree for those that have a variety of transfer credit. This degree will prepare you for jobs requiring a strong liberal arts background.

Liberty University is the most economical, quality Christian education available …
“Liberty University is the most economically cost sufficient, regionally-accredited university that offers the most superb quality Christian education available in the United States. Even though the cost of living is constantly increasing, Liberty University tuition is remaining stable. Enroll today, you won't regret it!

Liberal Arts Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Liberal Arts Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Total Programs 67
Number of Subjects 67
Rank in USA 12th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
California Institute of Technology
Total Programs 38
Number of Subjects 41
Rank in USA 21st
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Rice University
Total Programs 74
Number of Subjects 72
Rank in USA 28th
Emory University
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 30th