Online Mental Health Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its mental health courses to be successful psychologists, therapists, psychiatrists, child psychologists, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 98,330 people employed as clinical, counseling, and school psychologists alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $72,310. Psychiatrists make on average $163,660 per year and there are about 22,210 of them employed today.

Mental Health Organizations Mental Health Common Job Tasks
  • providing treatment for suicidal patients
  • counseling families and individuals
  • working with individuals on building self-esteem
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Ranked by Excellence

Mental Health Courses at Walden University

Program Name: B.S. in Political Science and Public Administration
Interviewing and Observational Strategies
Course Number PSYC 6331
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.


Mental Health Law
Course Number PSYC 6912
Credits 5.0

This course examines several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues. Laws and court decisions that affect the practice of psychology—such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)—are addressed, as are the many areas of law that constitute forensic psychological practice, including civil matters (such as personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (such as competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death penalty issues).


Substance Abuse Therapies
Course Number PSYC 6728
Credits 5.0

This course examines psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. Current research in the field of dependency and addiction is explored. Topics include diagnosis, models of treatment, treatment planning, use of group and family treatment plans, and efficacy of treatment. Strategies to promote change, including the transtheoretical model of behavior change, are discussed.


Multicultural Counseling
Course Number PSYC 6723
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness and knowledge of, and skills related to, multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the therapeutic relationship. The application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups is addressed. Topics include race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, and age and ability.


Juvenile Justice, Delinquency, and Development
Course Number FPSY 6512
Credits 5.0

The focus of this course is on the various aspects of the juvenile justice system and the population that it serves. As such, a thorough understanding of normal juvenile development is provided as a backdrop in which to better apply current juvenile justice codes and case law. The changing landscape of the juvenile justice field based on current research with its population will be covered.


Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology
Course Number PSYC 6001
Credits 1.0

This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals; development of the program of study and Professional Development Plan; strategies for online success; introduction to the online library; and introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence.


Introduction to Forensic Psychology
Course Number FPSY 6101
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with an overview of the areas covered by a broad definition of forensic psychology. In doing so, this course introduces the basic tenets of forensic psychology and the criminal justice system. Topics of study include criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, correctional psychology, and others. Assignments focus on providing the student with a broad basic knowledge of the forensic psychology field.


Abnormal Behavior
Course Number FPSY 6720
Credits 5.0

This course is an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, what constitutes normalcy is considered from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders are considered using the scholar-practitioner model. Techniques are reviewed for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis are reviewed.


Understanding Forensic Psychology Research
Course Number FPSY 6115
Credits 5.0

This course aims to help the student better understand how to be an astute consumer of forensic psychology research. Basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity, are covered. However, this course places emphasis on teaching the student how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic clinical settings.


Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings
Course Number FPSY 6125
Credits 5.0

This course covers the varied assessment techniques and instruments used in the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, lie detection, custody evaluations, and many of the psychological tests and instruments that are used in these assessments. The course will provide a solid foundation of the knowledge of forensic psychology techniques and assessment rather than specific skills in administering and interpreting psychological tests.


Criminal Behavior
Course Number FPSY 6135
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that which comes from the sociological and anthropological perspectives, is discussed. Theories and application of criminal profiling will be discussed. Additionally, more specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators will be addressed.


Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology
Course Number FPSY 6145
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as a forensic psychologist. The American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered.


Treatment of Forensic Populations
Course Number FPSY 6511
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.


Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation
Course Number COUN 6785
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to prepare students for their roles as counselors in prevention, intervention, and consultation endeavors with specific populations in specific settings. Using an action research model, students will prepare a blueprint for a prevention, intervention, or consultation project for a community, agency, or organization.


Elective (fpsy 6512 Or Fpsy 6530)
Credits 5.0

Fpsy 6512:(course Description) The Focus Of This Course Is On The Various Aspects Of The Juvenile Justice System And The Population That It Serves. As Such, A Thorough Understanding Of Normal Juvenile Development Is Provided As A Backdrop In Which To Better Apply Current Juvenile Justice Codes And Case Law. The Changing Landscape Of The Juvenile Justice Field Based On Current Research With Its Population Will Be Covered. Fpsy 6530:(course Description) This Course Is Directed At The Application Of Forensic Psychology To Various Community Settings. An Emphasis Is Placed On Working With Offenders Upon Re-entry To The Community And Offenders Who Receive Nonincarceration Community Placements. However, This Course Will Also Explore Less-common Applications Such As Restorative Justice And Community Crime Prevention.


Capstone Course or Field Experience
Course Number none
Credits 5.0

Capstone Course or Field Experience


Program description: Explore the foundations of government and its organization through Walden’s B.S. in Political Science and Public Administration. This online bachelor’s degree program combines political theory and application to examine how policy can effect positive change. Gain an understanding of how political and social organizations work together for the interest of the common good. Choose a concentration that meets your professional and personal goals.

Concentrations (in addition to the General Program)

  • Global Issues and Social Justice
  • Law and Legal Studies
  • Managing in the Public Environment
  • Public Service Through Civic Engagement
  • Social Entrepreneurship

Program Name: M.S. in Forensic Psychology
Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology
Course Number PSYC 6001
Credits 1.0

This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals; development of the program of study and Professional Development Plan; strategies for online success; introduction to the online library; and introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence.


Introduction to Forensic Psychology
Course Number FPSY 6101
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with an overview of the areas covered by a broad definition of forensic psychology. In doing so, this course introduces the basic tenets of forensic psychology and the criminal justice system. Topics of study include criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, correctional psychology, and others. Assignments focus on providing the student with a broad basic knowledge of the forensic psychology field.


Abnormal Behavior
Course Number FPSY 6720
Credits 5.0

This course is an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, what constitutes normalcy is considered from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders are considered using the scholar-practitioner model. Techniques are reviewed for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis are reviewed.


Understanding Forensic Psychology Research
Course Number FPSY 6115
Credits 5.0

This course aims to help the student better understand how to be an astute consumer of forensic psychology research. Basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity, are covered. However, this course places emphasis on teaching the student how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic clinical settings.


Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings
Course Number FPSY 6125
Credits 5.0

This course covers the varied assessment techniques and instruments used in the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, lie detection, custody evaluations, and many of the psychological tests and instruments that are used in these assessments. The course will provide a solid foundation of the knowledge of forensic psychology techniques and assessment rather than specific skills in administering and interpreting psychological tests.


Criminal Behavior
Course Number FPSY 6135
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that which comes from the sociological and anthropological perspectives, is discussed. Theories and application of criminal profiling will be discussed. Additionally, more specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators will be addressed.


Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology
Course Number FPSY 6145
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as a forensic psychologist. The American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered.


Treatment of Forensic Populations
Course Number FPSY 6511
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.


Psychology in the Courts
Course Number PSYC 6520
Credits 5.0

This course covers the major roles that a forensic psychologist could have within the court system. Issues such as expert testimony, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, and consultation with attorneys will be covered. Additionally, practical skills such as documentation and report writing will be addressed.


Police Psychology
Course Number COUN 6521
Credits 5.0

The focus of this course is directed at the various roles a psychologist might have when working within a police department. Issues such as officer selection and training, stress management, critical incident stress debriefing, and upper-management consultation are mainstays of the police psychologist and will be covered. Additionally, less-well-known roles such as training in hostage negotiations and the selection of special operations officers (S.W.A.T., snipers, tactical commanders) will be reviewed.


Elective (fpsy 6512 Or Fpsy 6530)
Credits 5.0

Fpsy 6512:(course Description) The Focus Of This Course Is On The Various Aspects Of The Juvenile Justice System And The Population That It Serves. As Such, A Thorough Understanding Of Normal Juvenile Development Is Provided As A Backdrop In Which To Better Apply Current Juvenile Justice Codes And Case Law. The Changing Landscape Of The Juvenile Justice Field Based On Current Research With Its Population Will Be Covered. Fpsy 6530:(course Description) This Course Is Directed At The Application Of Forensic Psychology To Various Community Settings. An Emphasis Is Placed On Working With Offenders Upon Re-entry To The Community And Offenders Who Receive Nonincarceration Community Placements. However, This Course Will Also Explore Less-common Applications Such As Restorative Justice And Community Crime Prevention.


Capstone Course or Field Experience
Course Number none
Credits 5.0

Capstone Course or Field Experience


Program description: One of the few programs of its kind available online, Walden University’s M.S. in Forensic Psychology explores research methods to evaluate and analyze programs focusing on incarcerated or recently released offenders. Apply psychological theories and concepts as you identify offenders, including juveniles, in a wide range of forensic settings. Through a range of specializations, you can focus your study on issues in the field that most interest you and best fit your career goals.

Specializations (in addition to the General Program)

  • Forensic Psychology in the Community
  • Mental Health Applications
  • Program Planning and Evaluation in Forensic Settings
  • Psychology and Legal Systems


Note on Licensure

The M.S. in Forensic Psychology is not a licensure program and does not prepare an individual to become a licensed psychology professional.

Mental Health Courses at Capella University

Program Name: MS - Mental Health Counseling
Mental Health Counseling Pre-Practicum Course I
Course Number COUN5930

This online course reinforces the clinical mental health counseling skills developed in COUN-R5930, including building therapeutic relationships, performing therapeutic assessments, and applying ethical and legal standards of practice. Learners continue to integrate mental health counseling theories and methods with clinical practice.


Mental Health Counseling Residential Colloquium I
Course Number COUN-R5930

The first residential colloquium includes a preparatory online courseroom and a residency experience. Learners engage in preparatory online courseroom activities to prepare themselves for the residency experience and focus on developing clinical mental health counseling skills, including building therapeutic relationships, performing therapeutic assessments, and applying ethical and legal standards of practice. Learners then engage in a face-to-face residency experience that guides them as they integrate mental health counseling theories and methods with clinical practice.


Mental Health Counseling Pre-Practicum Course II
Course Number COUN5931

This online course reinforces the advanced clinical mental health counseling skills developed in COUN-R5931, including building a range of therapeutic relationships, applying theory-based individual and group therapy techniques, and performing crisis assessments. Learners continue to integrate mental health counseling theories and methods with clinical practice.


Mental Health Counseling Residential Colloquium II
Course Number COUN-R5931

The second residential colloquium includes a preparatory online courseroom and a residency experience. Learners engage in preparatory online courseroom activities to prepare themselves for the residency experience and focus on developing advanced clinical mental health counseling skills, including building a range of therapeutic relationships, applying theory-based individual and group therapy techniques, and performing crisis assessments. Learners then engage in a face-to-face residency experience that guides them as they integrate mental health counseling theories and methods with clinical practice. This residential colloquium provides 10 hours of group therapy experience


Mental Health Counseling Clinical Practicum
Course Number COUN6302

The clinical practicum is an online-directed, supervised field experience during which learners practice specific clinical skills, including interviewing, assessment, intervention, documentation, and consultation in a mental health counseling field setting. Learners use fundamental communication and interviewing principles and perform initial assessments with individuals, couples, and families. This course requires 100 hours of clinical field experience, no less than 40 hours of direct client contact, and no less than 12 hours of face-to-face contact with field supervisors.


Mental Health Counseling Clinical Internship I
Course Number COUN6331

This is the first course in a sequence of two clinical internship courses during which learners fulfill 600 total required contact hours. Learners must complete 240 hours of direct client contact and 24 hours of fact-to-face contact with field supervisors. The internship provides learners with specific clinical skills in interviewing, assessment, intervention, documentation, and consultation in a field setting relevant to the learner’s chosen field of counseling or therapy.


Mental Health Counseling Clinical Internship II
Course Number COUN6332

This is the second course in a sequence of two clinical internship courses during which learners fulfill 600 total required contact hours. Learners must complete 240 hours of direct client contact and 24 hours of face-to-face contact with field supervisors. The internship provides learners with specific clinical skills in interviewing, assessment, intervention, documentation, and consultation in a field setting relevant to the learner’s chosen field of counseling or therapy.


Mental Health Counseling Integrative Project
Course Number COUN5935

In this course, learners demonstrate proficiency in mental health counseling by applying learning from required and elective courses to complete an analysis of a mental health counseling organization or system or to propose a new application in the professional mental health counseling field.


Counseling and Guidance with Children
Course Number COUN5240

Learners in this course review current theories, research, and methods of counseling and guidance of children. Topics include childhood abuse and trauma, the effect of family relationships on children, methods of parent education, school counseling issues, and specialized techniques for working with challenging children. COUN5241


Survey of Research in Human Development and Behavior
Course Number COUN5003
Credits 4.0

This Course Presents Theories Of Human Development And Behavior Throughout The Lifecycle. Learners Examine Approaches For Researching Human Development, Including Personality And Moral Development Theory. Learners Also Focus On The Developing Person Using The Theoretical Lenses Of Disciplines Such As Psychology, Anthropology, And Biology. Must Be Taken By Master’s Learners In Their First Quarter. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5003 Or Cst5003 Or Hs5002 Or Shb5003. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Survey of Research Methodology
Course Number COUN5006
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of Graduate-level Approaches To Research Methodology. Learners Study Major Research Methodologies And Quantitative And Qualitative Approaches To Needs Assessment, Program Evaluation, And Program Design. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5006 Or Cst5006 Or Hs5006 Or Shb5006.


Assessment, Tests, and Measures
Course Number COUN5106
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the assessment process and the use of tests and measures in counseling. Learners also explore the evolution of assessment methods, testing strategies and interpretation, and fundamental measurement constructs.


Principles of Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Treatment
Course Number COUN5107
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Examine Psychopathology Principles, Professional Literature, And Current Issues Associated With Assessing And Treating Mental Disorders. Learners Critically Evaluate Diagnostic Models, Methods, And Approaches Used In Diagnosing And Treating Individuals, Couples, And Families, Including The Dsm-iv-tr Multiaxial System. Learners Also Explore Diagnostic Issues Associated With Multicultural Populations. Prerequisite(s): Addiction Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5940 And Coun-r5940. Mental Health Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5930 And Coun-r5930.


Theories of Personality
Course Number COUN5214
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Examine The Main Constructs Of Personality By Analyzing Person-centered, Trait, Behavioral, Psychodynamic, And Social-cognitive Personality Theories. Learners Also Study Biological, Social, And Cultural Influences On Personality And The Development Of Personality Throughout The Lifecycle. Learners May Earn Credit For Either Coun5214 Or Cst5214, But Not Both.


Professional and Scientific Ethics for Counselors/Therapists
Course Number COUN5215
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the evolution of professional counselor/therapist ethics and analyze the effect of ethics on education, psychotherapy, law, and institutional guidelines protecting human subjects in research. Learners also identify current ethical issues in the addiction counseling field and explore methods used to effectively address them.


Introduction to Mental Health Counseling
Course Number COUN5223
Credits 4.0

This course is a review of the historical foundations and contextual dimensions of the mental health counseling profession. Learners analyze fundamental theories and models of mental health counseling and the ways the counselor’s values and biases influence counseling practice.


Theories of Psychotherapy
Course Number COUN5239
Credits 4.0

This course presents various theories of psychotherapy and their respective philosophical principles and assumptions. Learners evaluate the theoretical concepts and evidence-based practices of psychotherapy and examine appropriate application of theories and interventions to a diverse client population.


Group Counseling and Psychotherapy
Course Number COUN5241
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Examine The Theoretical Components And Developmental Aspects Of Groups. Topics Include Types Of Groups, Group Dynamics And Processes, Group Leadership And Membership Roles, Ethical Awareness In Relation To Groups, And Crisis Management Within Groups. Prerequisite(s): Addiction Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5940 And Coun-r5940. Career Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5950 And Coun-r5950. Marriage And Family Therapy Learners Must Have Completed Coun5920 And Coun-r5920. Mental Health Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5930 And Coun-r5930. School Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5910 And Coun-r5910.


Introspective and Personal Growth Seminar
Course Number COUN5252

This course helps learners identify aspects o f their history and personality that are relevant to professional clinical work. Learners examine methods of introspective work that facilitate the self-assessment process, including journaling, personal psychotherapy, self-expressive artwork, dream work, and specialized readings. The course emphasizes identifying personal strengths and limitations and the ways they may influence clinical effectiveness.


Life Planning and Career Development
Course Number COUN5279
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners develop foundational career counseling knowledge and skills and engage in professional career counseling activities. Learners examine the major models of career development and the ways clients’ interests, aptitudes, lifestyle preferences, social interests, familial responsibilities, and life transitions may impact the career development process. Learners also discuss legal and ethical issues associated with career counseling practice.


Ethnic and Cultural Awareness
Course Number COUN5334
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Survey Of Theories, Research, And Concepts That Highlight The Importance Of Race, Culture, And Ethnicity In Individual And Group Experience. Learners Consider The Effects Of Gender, Social Class, Religion, And Disability On Experience And Evaluate The Role Of The Human Service And Educational Professional In Addressing The Multicultural Needs Of Clients And Colleagues In The Workforce. Learners Also Examine Cross-cultural Issues And Practice Applying A Variety Of Theoretical Approaches And Methodologies To Real-life Scenarios. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5334 Or Cst5334 Or Hs5334 Or Shb5334.


Foundations of Addictive and Compulsive Behavior
Course Number COUN5108
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Explore The Theories And Research That Guide The Treatment Of Addictive And Compulsive Behavior Disorders. Learners Analyze Traditional And Non-traditional Interventions As Applied To Inpatient, Outpatient, And Community-based Treatment For Individuals, Couples, Families, And Groups. Topics Include Assessment, Diagnosis, And Treatment Planning And Evaluation. Learners May Earn Credit For Either Coun5108 Or Cst5108, But Not Both. Prerequisite(s): Addiction Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5940 And Coun-r5940. Marriage And Family Therapy Learners Must Have Completed Coun5920 And Coun-r5920. Mental Health Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5930 And Coun-r5930.


Human Sexuality
Course Number COUN5225
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study sexuality within the broad context of human experience. Learners examine the sexual response cycle and psychosexual development and evaluate the functionality of sexual behavior in individuals, couples, and families. Learners also study health issues associated with sexuality, explore treatments for various sexual problems, and identify sexuality-related concerns of special and diverse populations.


Child and Adolescent Counseling
Course Number COUN5254
Credits 4.0

This Course Presents Major Theories And Research Of Adolescent And Child Development. Learners Examine Biological And Psychosocial Development Factors And Evaluate The Influence Of Family, Community, Society, And Trauma On Development. Prerequisite(s): Marriage And Family Therapy Learners Must Have Completed Coun5920 And Coun-r5920. Mental Health Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5930 And Coun-r5930.


Marriage and Family Systems
Course Number COUN5271
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study families as systems from theoretical, clinical, and research perspectives. The course emphasizes family development, transitions, assessment, and intervention. Learners also explore systems-oriented assessment models and strategies for initial interviews, hypothesis formulation, designing a strategy for intervention, and the process of termination.


Program description: The CACREP-accredited Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling degree program is designed to prepare learners to serve as mental health counselors for a diverse population of clients in various therapeutic settings. The program seeks to deliver its curriculum through a dynamic, interactive, and collaborative learning environment and provides learners with a strong theoretical foundation in the field of mental health counseling and knowledge and skills in associated areas of wellness theory and research, relationship building, assessment and treatment, cultural competence, and ethical practice.

Program Name: PhD - Counseling Studies
Advanced Research in Adult Human Development and Behavior
Course Number HS8002
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course critically analyze theory and research in adult development and behavior with an emphasis on contemporary research and application issues. In addition, learners study adult development from biological, psychological, social, and multicultural perspectives and apply principles of adult development to professional practice.


Psychopathology: Assessment and Treatment
Course Number CST8731
Credits 4.0

This course is a forum for examining the various forms of psychopathology, current methods of psychological assessment, research on psychodynamics, and existing treatment methods. Learners explore the politics of mental disorders, emerging diagnoses, and other contemporary issues.


Theories of Psychotherapy
Course Number COUN5239
Credits 4.0

This course presents various theories of psychotherapy and their respective philosophical principles and assumptions. Learners evaluate the theoretical concepts and evidence-based practices of psychotherapy and examine appropriate application of theories and interventions to a diverse client population.


Life Planning and Career Development
Course Number COUN5279
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners develop foundational career counseling knowledge and skills and engage in professional career counseling activities. Learners examine the major models of career development and the ways clients’ interests, aptitudes, lifestyle preferences, social interests, familial responsibilities, and life transitions may impact the career development process. Learners also discuss legal and ethical issues associated with career counseling practice.


Epistemology of Practice Knowledge
Course Number HS8106
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine theories that guide the acquisition of knowledge within human services professions. Learners critically analyze and evaluate the methods used to develop social science theory as a precursor to examining and applying the scientific method. Learners also study theory derivation, the link between research methods and theory, and the ways scholar-practitioners apply the scientific method.


Fundamentals of Social Science Research
Course Number HS8100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to social science research, particularly in the context of human services. Learners focus on becoming educated consumers of research and examine major concepts and techniques of social science research, including problem formulation, identification of variables, literature review, research design, sampling, definition and measurement of study variables, instrument construction, and data collection and analysis. Learners also critically evaluate published research, apply research findings to professional practice, and practice designing research studies in their field of interest.


Quantitative Research Methods in the Human Services
Course Number HS8111
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the research methods and designs human service professionals use to solve specific social problems. Topics include human subjects protection, measurement, development of instruments, data collection and management, and initial phases of data analysis. Learners also consider methodological adaptations when conducting research with vulnerable and diverse populations.


Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Course Number HS8112
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate qualitative research methods and designs. Learners focus on developing the skills used to synthesize information related to qualitative research methodology and examine ethical issues associated with the qualitative research process


Advanced Study in Research Methods
Course Number HS8113
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the relevance and appropriateness of specific research methodologies in preparation for using them in the dissertation. The course emphasizes conceptualizing, planning, and designing a doctoral research proposal and includes topics such as planning and sampling; measurement; statistical and qualitative analytic models; results planning, analysis, and interpretation; and ethical considerations


The Family in Social Context
Course Number HS8478
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine families from a systems perspective and explore the dynamics and systems influencing family structures. Learners also identify the skills needed to work with diverse family groups and the challenges faced by human service professionals.


Contemporary Issues in Counseling Studies
Course Number CST8501
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners explore counseling professions and the increasing need to devise research-based methods of practice to better understand the role of the counselor in contemporary society. This course focuses on analysis and evaluation of contemporary issues that affect the counseling professions, such as ethical issues, compassion fatigue and burnout, the impaired professional, Internet counseling applications, and multiculturalism and diversity challenges.


Human Sexuality
Course Number COUN5225
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study sexuality within the broad context of human experience. Learners examine the sexual response cycle and psychosexual development and evaluate the functionality of sexual behavior in individuals, couples, and families. Learners also study health issues associated with sexuality, explore treatments for various sexual problems, and identify sexuality-related concerns of special and diverse populations.


Group Counseling and Psychotherapy
Course Number COUN5241
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Examine The Theoretical Components And Developmental Aspects Of Groups. Topics Include Types Of Groups, Group Dynamics And Processes, Group Leadership And Membership Roles, Ethical Awareness In Relation To Groups, And Crisis Management Within Groups. Prerequisite(s): Addiction Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5940 And Coun-r5940. Career Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5950 And Coun-r5950. Marriage And Family Therapy Learners Must Have Completed Coun5920 And Coun-r5920. Mental Health Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5930 And Coun-r5930. School Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5910 And Coun-r5910.


Grief and Bereavement Counseling
Course Number CST8745
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course investigate research on death and dying. Topics include the psychological stages of bereavement, the symptomatology of grief, death trajectory, hospice model of treatment, and techniques for coping with losses of all types, including death in the family. Learners explore case consultations with dying children and their parents that use drawing therapy and storytelling as a means to elicit psychological material. Learners may earn credit for either CST8745 or HS8745, but not both.


Child and Adolescent Counseling
Course Number COUN5254
Credits 4.0

This Course Presents Major Theories And Research Of Adolescent And Child Development. Learners Examine Biological And Psychosocial Development Factors And Evaluate The Influence Of Family, Community, Society, And Trauma On Development. Prerequisite(s): Marriage And Family Therapy Learners Must Have Completed Coun5920 And Coun-r5920. Mental Health Counseling Learners Must Have Completed Coun5930 And Coun-r5930.


Mental Health and Aging
Course Number CST8758
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the dramatic increase in the population of older persons and the increase in attention to their mental and physical health. This course addresses mental health and aging as major psychosocial phenomena integrating biological, psychological, social, and environmental perspectives and factors. Learners explore research in these areas as a function of many aspects of modern society: family life, caregivers, community and institutional care, ethnic and sociocultural differences, and urbanization. Return to Table of Contents


Contemporary Issues in Compulsive and Addictive Behavior Treatment
Course Number CST8764
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Review Current Research And Trends Within The Compulsive And Addictive Behavior Treatment Field. Topics Include Developments In The Psychopharmacologic Treatment Of Compulsive And Addictive Behaviors; The Influences Of Ethics, Culture, And Managed Care On Treatment; The Use Of Internet Resources In The Field; And The Changing Role Of The Counselor. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Ces8764 Or Cst8764 Or Hs8764.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number ED9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number ED9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number ED9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number ED9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Program description: The Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling Studies degree program offers doctoral preparation for human services professionals seeking further advancement in counseling professions. Using the scholar-practitioner model to guide learners toward the acquisition and application of advanced theory, knowledge, and skills, the program emphasizes contemporary issues in counseling studies, wellness theory and research, and methods of counseling a diverse population of clients.

Program Name: PhD - Counselor Education and Supervision
Advanced Research in Adult Human Development and Behavior
Course Number HS8002
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course critically analyze theory and research in adult development and behavior with an emphasis on contemporary research and application issues. In addition, learners study adult development from biological, psychological, social, and multicultural perspectives and apply principles of adult development to professional practice.


Advanced Counseling Theories
Course Number CES8756
Credits 4.0

This course presents an overview of major counseling theories and the current professional literature and research supporting them. Learners analyze key concepts of counseling and evaluate various theories, approaches, and interventions that can be applied to a diverse population of clients, issues, and settings. Learners also consider the legal and ethical implications of applying theory to practice and examine methods of demonstrating counseling effectiveness.


Advanced Clinical Practice
Course Number CES8760
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners demonstrate advanced clinical practice skills that promote greater social skills and respect for diversity while expanding and refining the therapeutic skills they developed through prior course work and practice. Learners examine the strengths and limitations of various counseling techniques; apply therapeutic models to a variety of contemporary client populations and issues; and develop a personal theoretical orientation to counseling. Learners also conceptualize a clinical case and develop a treatment plan that is consistent with their theoretical preference and diverse client needs.


Contemporary Issues in Compulsive and Addictive Behavior Treatment
Course Number CST8764
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Learners Review Current Research And Trends Within The Compulsive And Addictive Behavior Treatment Field. Topics Include Developments In The Psychopharmacologic Treatment Of Compulsive And Addictive Behaviors; The Influences Of Ethics, Culture, And Managed Care On Treatment; The Use Of Internet Resources In The Field; And The Changing Role Of The Counselor. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Ces8764 Or Cst8764 Or Hs8764.


Counselor Education Teaching and Practice
Course Number CES8768
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of major roles, responsibilities, and activities of counselor educators. Learners study instructional theory and methods and evaluate ethical and legal issues associated with counselor preparation training. Learners develop a philosophy of teaching and learning and examine procedures for engaging students, assessing student needs, and effectively delivering the information needed to develop competent counselors.


Counselor Supervision
Course Number CES8772
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine critical literature in counselor education, including history, standards, multicultural concerns, and legal and ethical issues. Learners analyze theories, techniques, and models of counselor supervision and develop a personal supervision model. Learners also study the major dimensions of supervisions and the roles and relationships associated with them


Leadership and Advocacy in Counseling
Course Number CES8776
Credits 4.0

This course presents the historical and philosophical foundations of counselor education and supervision practice, including professional identity and values, leadership styles, client diversity issues, ethical issues, and social advocacy processes. Learners evaluate leadership theories and their applications and examine the roles of counselor educators and leaders in public and private policy processes, including professional advocacy.


Fundamentals of Social Science Research
Course Number HS8100
Credits 4.0

This course introduces learners to social science research, particularly in the context of human services. Learners focus on becoming educated consumers of research and examine major concepts and techniques of social science research, including problem formulation, identification of variables, literature review, research design, sampling, definition and measurement of study variables, instrument construction, and data collection and analysis. Learners also critically evaluate published research, apply research findings to professional practice, and practice designing research studies in their field of interest.


Epistemology of Practice Knowledge
Course Number HS8106
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine theories that guide the acquisition of knowledge within human services professions. Learners critically analyze and evaluate the methods used to develop social science theory as a precursor to examining and applying the scientific method. Learners also study theory derivation, the link between research methods and theory, and the ways scholar-practitioners apply the scientific method.


Quantitative Research Methods in the Human Services
Course Number HS8111
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course examine the research methods and designs human service professionals use to solve specific social problems. Topics include human subjects protection, measurement, development of instruments, data collection and management, and initial phases of data analysis. Learners also consider methodological adaptations when conducting research with vulnerable and diverse populations.


Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Course Number HS8112
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners evaluate qualitative research methods and designs. Learners focus on developing the skills used to synthesize information related to qualitative research methodology and examine ethical issues associated with the qualitative research process


Advanced Study in Research Methods
Course Number HS8113
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the relevance and appropriateness of specific research methodologies in preparation for using them in the dissertation. The course emphasizes conceptualizing, planning, and designing a doctoral research proposal and includes topics such as planning and sampling; measurement; statistical and qualitative analytic models; results planning, analysis, and interpretation; and ethical considerations


Counselor Education and Supervision Practicum
Course Number CES8780
Credits 4.0

This course provides a structure of supervised experiences in advanced counseling practice during which learners articulate, synthesize, and demonstrate a range of counseling skills and knowledge bases. Learners apply major counseling theories and their associated approaches to working with individuals, groups, systems, and developmental and consultation services. Learners also apply effective case conceptualization, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment skills; demonstrate the ability to develop ethical therapeutic relationships with a diverse population of clients; and establish long- and short-term goals. This course helps learners synthesize a comprehensive theoretical basis for the practice of counseling that is informed by evidence-informed practice, professional practice skills, and personal meaning. It requires 100 hours of field experience and no less than 40 hours of direct client contact.


Counselor Education and Supervision Internship I
Course Number CES8784
Credits 4.0

This is the first course in a sequence of two internship courses during which learners fulfill 300 required contact hours. Learners apply skills in counseling teaching, supervision, and research in a field setting relevant to their chosen field and engage in co-teaching sessions during a master’s-level residency


Counselor Education and Supervision Internship II
Course Number CES8785
Credits 4.0

This is the second course in a sequence of two internship courses during which learners fulfill 300 required contact hours. Learners refine the skills they developed in CES8784.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number CES9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number CES9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number CES9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number CES9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Program description: The Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education and Supervision degree program offers doctoral preparation for counseling/therapy professionals seeking career advancement within the counseling profession or leadership positions in academic, clinical, and consultative settings. Learners in this degree program develop expertise in graduate-level instruction, clinical supervision, and advanced clinical practice. Successful graduates of this degree program are prepared to pursue positions as counselor educators, supervisors, researchers, and advanced practitioners in academic and clinical settings.

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