Online Property Management Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashworth College, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its property management courses to be successful real estate managers, property managers, commercial property managers, retail property managers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 150,850 people employed as property, real estate, and community association managers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $58,660. Real estate brokers make on average $78,360 per year and there are about 48,380 of them employed today.

Property Management Organizations Property Management Common Job Tasks
  • cleaning properties
  • filing papers
  • renting properties
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Ranked by Excellence

Property Management Courses at Ashworth College

Program Name: Property Management Offline
Lesson 1: Overview of Property Management: Economic and Planning

Property management defined; types of properties involved; professional organizations; duties and job descriptions of property managers; applying principles of property management.


Lesson 2: Managing Owner Relations and Marketing

Business relationships between property managers and owners; preparation of the management contract; the manager's reporting obligations; mutual responsibilities.


Lesson 3: Managing Leases and Lease Negotiations

How to negotiate a lease to your advantage; understanding specific lease terms; concessions; rent schedules; rent rebates; length of the lease period; including options for tenant alterations and expansion; qualifying the prospective tenant financially.


Lesson 4: Managing Tenant Relations, Maintenance, and Construction

Building a good relationship with the tenant; inspection to verify conditions of the property; security deposits; renter's rules and regulations; scheduling rent payments; termination of tenancy.


Lesson 5: Managing Reports, Insurance, and the Office

Reporting procedures in the management of different kinds of properties; budgeting; preparing profit-and-loss statements; tax implications; tax records; cash flows; depreciation; investment tax credits; after-tax cash flow; risk management; how to obtain proper insurance.


Lesson 6: Managing Federal/State Laws and Residential Property

Types of multi-family and apartment complexes; creating and using an effective residential market analysis; how to market apartment space; price adjustments; the show list; advertising; rental offices; leasing; maintenance.


Lesson 7: Managing Specialized Housing and Office Property

Types of office buildings; determining a suitable rent schedule; marketing considerations for office buildings; advertising; public relations; how to get referrals; canvassing for tenants; preparing a solid rental sales plan; how to negotiate a lease; escalation clauses; maintenance.


Lesson 8: Managing Retail and Industrial Property

The nature of industrial real estate; types of properties; industrial markets; tenant qualification; marketing techniques; lease negotiation; maintenance; security.


Lesson 9: Managing Life Safety and Environmental Issues

Maintaining safety and security; emergency technology and equipment; the role of property management personnel in safety; managing environmental issues; controlling hazards.


Program description: Whether you’re a landlord or work for a property
management firm, you’ll learn how to improve real estate
and put it to its best use. The course will teach you to
evaluate and select investment properties, set up favorable
leasing terms, maximize tax advantages, minimize expenses,
and manage operations.

Program Name: Property Management Online
Lesson 1: Overview of Property Management: Economic and Planning

Property management defined; types of properties involved; professional organizations; duties and job descriptions of property managers; applying principles of property management.


Lesson 2: Managing Owner Relations and Marketing

Business relationships between property managers and owners; preparation of the management contract; the manager's reporting obligations; mutual responsibilities.


Lesson 3: Managing Leases and Lease Negotiations

How to negotiate a lease to your advantage; understanding specific lease terms; concessions; rent schedules; rent rebates; length of the lease period; including options for tenant alterations and expansion; qualifying the prospective tenant financially.


Lesson 4: Managing Tenant Relations, Maintenance, and Construction

Building a good relationship with the tenant; inspection to verify conditions of the property; security deposits; renter's rules and regulations; scheduling rent payments; termination of tenancy.


Lesson 5: Managing Reports, Insurance, and the Office

Reporting procedures in the management of different kinds of properties; budgeting; preparing profit-and-loss statements; tax implications; tax records; cash flows; depreciation; investment tax credits; after-tax cash flow; risk management; how to obtain proper insurance.


Lesson 6: Managing Federal/State Laws and Residential Property

Types of multi-family and apartment complexes; creating and using an effective residential market analysis; how to market apartment space; price adjustments; the show list; advertising; rental offices; leasing; maintenance.


Lesson 7: Managing Specialized Housing and Office Property

Types of office buildings; determining a suitable rent schedule; marketing considerations for office buildings; advertising; public relations; how to get referrals; canvassing for tenants; preparing a solid rental sales plan; how to negotiate a lease; escalation clauses; maintenance.


Lesson 8: Managing Retail and Industrial Property

The nature of industrial real estate; types of properties; industrial markets; tenant qualification; marketing techniques; lease negotiation; maintenance; security.


Lesson 9: Managing Life Safety and Environmental Issues

Maintaining safety and security; emergency technology and equipment; the role of property management personnel in safety; managing environmental issues; controlling hazards.


Program description: This program covers successful approaches to owning and managing private residential investments as well as corporate and commercial properties. By undertaking property management training, students will learn how to evaluate and select investment properties, set up favorable leasing terms and conditions, maximize tax advantages, minimize expenses and turnover, manage day-to-day operations, maintain and improve the real estate and put it to the highest and best use. The course comprises of 9 comprehensive lessons. They are easy to follow, yet challenging and stimulating at the same time. Each real estate management course lesson begins with a subject matter preview and objectives, an introductory note from the instructor and a vocabulary builder of new words and terms.

Property Management Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration - Property Management
Professional Communications
Course Number ENG210
Credits 4.0

This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process.


Real World Writing
Course Number ENGL125
Credits 4.0

This Is One Of The Most Important Courses You Can Take—it Will Lay The Foundation For Your Entire College And Professional Career As An Educated Person. In It, We Will Address How To Write And Speak To Make A Point; How To Use Good Grammar, Vocabulary And Logical Thinking; As Well As How To Find A Suitable Topic For Your Writing Assignments. We Will Start With The Basics: Reviewing Sentences And Paragraphs, And Then Move On To The Classic Five-part College Essay Or Theme. 321 Effective November 15, 2010 For Students Starting On Or After January 2, 2011 There Are Different Rules Of The Game For Writing Academically Than Writing For Business. We Want To Teach Students The “culture” Of Being Solid College-level Communicators And Successful Professionals. This Workshop Course Is Highly Experiential, Supportive, And Collaborative, As Students Read And Critique Each Others’ Work. This Is The First In A Sequence On Composition And Writing Skills. The Second Course, Engl126, In This Series Will Build Upon This One—addressing How To Research And Use Resources Without Plagiarizing, How To Utilize The Apa Formatting For Documentation And How To Make A Persuasive Argument. Our View Of The Required Composition Sequence Is That It Is Essential For All Who Want To Become Skilled Critical Thinkers And Educated People.


Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose
Course Number ENGL126
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Workshop That Builds Upon Engl125—real World Writing. It Is A Workshop Format—highly Experiential And Hands On. Students Practice Drafting Progressively Complex Papers, Demonstrating The Capacity To Do College Level Research And Write Essays That Convey Information, Make A Point Or Provide An Opinion. They Will Study The Apa Handbook, Learn To Do Research (beyond Wikipedia!) And Cite Resources Without Plagiarizing Them. In Addition, This Course Uses Readings To Demonstrate Excellence And Eloquence In Speaking And Writing, Emphasizing The Crucial Synergy Between Learning To Write And Developing The Practice Of Intelligent Reading Of Texts. This Will Be A Highly Collaborative Course, With Students Reading And Critiquing Others’ Work, As A Means To Create A Learning Community As Well As Develop Critical Capacities.


American Culture in Transition
Course Number HIS120
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural “isms,” and America’s relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society.


World Literature
Course Number LTR215
Credits 4.0

This literature course examines a wide range of stories, poems, and plays. Students learn how to interact with and respond to literature.


Real World Math
Course Number MATH105
Credits 4.0

In this course, students explore how to survive in a number-driven world, to increase their mathematical knowledge for making logical decisions, and to begin to develop connections with mathematics in their related field of study and daily lives.


Math for Professionals
Course Number MATH140
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with a background in the quantitative techniques necessary to better understand and appreciate the study of mathematics. Specifically, this course focuses on applied mathematical principles with a broad scope toward business applications.


Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

This course surveys major areas of psychological science, including human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, learning, memory, and biological influences.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Sociology
Course Number SOC205
Credits 4.0

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students will develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Building Your Success Strategy Plan
Course Number UNIV101
Credits 4.0

UNIV101 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students learn effective tools and skills necessary for academic success, integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.


Career Planning and Management
Course Number UNIV201
Credits 4.0

This course provides the framework for effective career management as students gain insight into themselves and potential career fields, acquiring knowledge and skills needed to successfully plan career transitions.


Accounting I
Course Number ACCT101
Credits 4.0

This course introduces fundamental accounting concepts and explores the accounting environment. It covers the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and introduces the concept of internal accounting controls.


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON202
Credits 4.0

An introductory course in the tools of economics as they apply to the operation of market economy. Includes supply and demand analysis, consumer behavior, economic nature of production and costs, behavior of firms in both competitive and


Introductory Human Resource Management
Course Number HRM210
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on acquiring, utilizing, and developing human resources. It is an overview of such common personnel management issues as recruitment, selection, compensation, productivity, and satisfaction. Additionally, employee diversity, ethical issues, and equal employment opportunity will be discussed.


Principles of Business
Course Number MGM110
Credits 4.0

This survey course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled.


Introduction to Business Law
Course Number MGM225
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the system of law in the United States and its relationship to the contemporary business environment. Students will gain an understanding of the basic structure of the U.S. legal system as it relates to business, finance and commerce.


Management Fundamentals
Course Number MGM225
Credits 4.0

Fundamentals of Marketing
Course Number MKT210
Credits 4.0

Students will start with a study of the fundamentals of marketing. Students will then progress to the application of those fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix.


Introduction to Project Management
Course Number MPM210
Credits 6.0

This Course Provides An Overview And Introduction To The Discipline Of Project Management, Coupled With An Examination Of The Techniques That Project Managers Use To Complete Their Projects On Schedule, Within Budgeted Cost, And According To Specified Scope. Using Materials Based On The Pmbok® (guide To Project Management Body Of Knowledge, Published By The Project Management Institute Or Pmi®), Students Learn The Operational Framework Of Project Management Relating To The Project Lifecycle Of Project Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling, And Closing. This Course Also Provides The Basis For The More Advanced Development Of Project Management Skills In Subsequent Project Management Courses.


Personal Finance Concepts
Course Number PFP110
Credits 4.0

Students will survey the management of personal and family finances. Topics will include financial goals, budgeting, income taxes, personal credit, savings and investment, home ownership, insurance and retirement.


Managerial Accounting Practices
Course Number ACC350
Credits 4.0

This course provides students with an understanding of the role of accounting information in support of decision-making and planning. Students learn accounting methods for planning and controlling operations through budgets, responsibility centers, and cost management.


Financial Management Principles
Course Number FIN310
Credits 4.0

This course examines the key components of financial decision-making: valuation and risk management. Students will examine the implications of forecasting, capital budgeting, working capital management, and project risk management.


Managing Human Resources
Course Number HRM315
Credits 4.0

This course discusses the principles, policies, and practices of human resource management. The role of managing and enhancing the productivity and potential of the human resources of the business organization is the primary focus of the course.


Organizational Change
Course Number HRM445
Credits 4.0

This course presents both conceptual and experiential approaches to the topic of organizational change and organization development. Special emphasis is placed on developing interpersonal skills in order to analyze situations. The process of change is a common occurrence in today's business organizations.


E-Business
Course Number MGM310
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the elements of e-Business such as strategy, technology, relationships, and related issues. Students will examine how to integrate suppliers, customers, and employees in order to achieve business success.


International Business Communications
Course Number MGM316
Credits 4.0

This course is designed to enhance students’ knowledge of cultures, traditions, and value systems as they apply in international, multinational, and global business settings. Students explore topics such as language and other forms of communication, traditions, values, norms, cultural diversity, cultural influences on communication and the negotiation process, and ways to improve communications with people whose first language is something other than English.


Business Decision-Making
Course Number MGM330
Credits 4.0

Critical thinking and problem solving are essential skills in management. In this course, students explore these concepts by learning the fundamentals of probability and statistics, and their applications in business decision-making.


Organizational Behavior Principles
Course Number MGM335
Credits 4.0

In this course students examine individual and group behavior within the context of the organizational design and culture. This course provides theoretical and practical knowledge for understanding topics such as motivation, leadership, managerial decision-making, group processes, and conflict resolution.


Operations Management Principles
Course Number MGM340
Credits 4.0

This course will examine the principles and techniques of managing operations processes in manufacturing and service industries. Students will explore the interrelationships between operations concepts, such as forecasting, planning products, technologies, facilities, demand, inventory, productivity, quality, and reliability.


International Business Practices
Course Number MGM355
Credits 4.0

In this course students examine the international business environment and how it influences management. It examines the issues and implications involved in the application of modern management practices and principles within the global business environment.



Business Strategy
Course Number MGM465
Credits 4.0

This capstone course examines business and strategic management from a holistic perspective. Students will analyze major strategic tasks, such as setting strategic vision and goals; and formulating, implementing, and evaluating strategy and tactics


Marketing and the Virtual Marketplace
Course Number MKT305
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on marketing strategies and their applications in business. Students will examine the marketing and planning process, and analyze the various implications for traditional and Internet marketing strategies.


Ethics
Course Number PHIL310
Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an understanding of ethical expectations and prepares the student to make decisions that are ethically correct and legal. The study of ethics includes the development of ethical standards, prima facie obligations, responsibilities, societal aims and professional codes of conduct. The course will follow the aims of normative ethics. The students should expect to participate and become involved in case studies, hypothetical situations and discussions to develop an attitude that is ethically acceptable, as well as to practice the concepts learned to aid in decision making.


Elective Credits
Course Number ELE
Credits 8.0

Select a minimum of 8 credit hours


Facility and Property Management Technologies
Course Number FPM300
Credits 4.0

This Course Will Address The Profession Of Facility And Property Management, Including Space Regulations, Finance, Project Management, And Other Current Practices. Current Trends And Practices Of Computer-aided Facility Management (cafm), Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (cmms), And Integrated Computer-aided Design (cadd) Applications And Databases


Property Manager Responsibilities
Course Number FPM310
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to basic property manager responsibilities and duties. It provides information on the impact of the legal system, maintenance, operation, and marketing responsibilities of the manager, maintaining satisfactory tenant relations and other managerial techniques for the real estate professional. The role and process of property management rights, responsibilities of managers and tenants, competencies necessary for managing properties, and social services are examined.


Capital Planning and Asset Management
Course Number FPM320
Credits 4.0

The course will examine the operational and financial aspects of commercial and residential property management, including budgeting and purchasing decisions, maintenance management, optimizing rents, and property evaluation.


Property Management Operations
Course Number FPM330
Credits 4.0

This course in property management will examine current issues affecting the property manager, marketing trends, demographics, legal issues and economic factors. The course culminates in the analysis of a property and development of a comprehensive operational, marketing and cash flow plan. The course will review and address the fundamentals of commercial real estate investment, market influences, contracts and, property portfolio management. It will also address the concept of useful life of building and infrastructure systems and the process of managing their life cycles. There is an emphasis on justifying and funding capital projects


Personal Selling and Customer Focus
Course Number MKT430
Credits 6.0

In a world of increasing customer demands and expectations, this course emphasizes a hands-on approach to using customer service to improve business results. This course broadly defines the customer as any entity or person whose cooperation is essential for an organization’s success. As such, a customer may be external or internal to an organization. This course also examines the role of the sales function and techniques necessary for the successful selling of both tangibles and intangibles. Emphasis is placed on communication skills necessary to manage relationships for personal influence.


Project Scheduling and Cost
Course Number MPM434
Credits 6.0

This Course Exposes Students To Approaches, Methods, And Systems To Ensure Management Success Under Demanding Cost, Schedule, And Performance Requirements. Conflict And Risk Management Initiatives Along With Gantt, Pert, And Cpm Scheduling Methods Are Included.


Program description: This Property Management degree program concentration is designed to emphasize communication skills, develop facility leadership and understand finance in the facility and property management environment. Amongst the career-relevant skills taught in the program are how to maintain satisfactory tenant relations and other managerial techniques for the real estate professional.
With this Property Management degree program concentration you can pursue career opportunities such as:

* Residential Facilities Manager
* Residential Property Manager
* Commercial Facilities Manager
* Commercial Property Manager

Property Management Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Property Management Schools (campus and online)

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
Skidmore College
Total Programs 61
Number of Subjects 61
Rank in USA 102nd
Texas Tech University
Total Programs 183
Number of Subjects 154
Rank in USA 150th
Texas State University-San Marcos
Total Programs 164
Number of Subjects 152
Rank in USA 204th
University of Idaho
Total Programs 150
Number of Subjects 127
Rank in USA 243rd
Maine Maritime Academy
Total Programs 14
Number of Subjects 18
Rank in USA 322nd
Covenant College
Total Programs 47
Number of Subjects 48
Rank in USA 330th
The University of Montana
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 125
Rank in USA 331st
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Total Programs 30
Number of Subjects 30
Rank in USA 398th
Paul Smiths College of Arts and Science
Total Programs 35
Number of Subjects 41
Rank in USA 571st
American Jewish University
Total Programs 21
Number of Subjects 17
Rank in USA 653rd
University of Maryland-College Park
Total Programs 182
Number of Subjects 133
Rank in USA 665th
Purdue University-North Central Campus
Total Programs 33
Number of Subjects 49
Rank in USA 676th
Arizona State University
Total Programs 8
Number of Subjects 108
Rank in USA 730th
TCTC Adult Training Center
Total Programs 14
Number of Subjects 30
Rank in USA 737th
Kaw Area Technical School
Total Programs 42
Number of Subjects 45
Rank in USA 781st
Alaska Vocational Technical Center
Total Programs 22
Number of Subjects 35
Rank in USA 871st
Kansas State University
Total Programs 141
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 875th
Vanguard Career Center
Total Programs 9
Number of Subjects 11
Rank in USA 877th
Auburn Career Center
Total Programs 22
Number of Subjects 32
Rank in USA 923rd