Online Small Business Courses at Accredited Schools

Penn Foster Career School, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its small business courses to be successful small business owners, businessmen, businesswomen, small business managers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 6,063,670 people employed as business and financial operations employees alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $65,900. Business operations specialists make on average $65,960 per year and there are about 1,036,450 of them employed today.

Small Business Organizations Small Business Common Job Tasks
  • finding suppliers
  • answering queries
  • advertising through various media
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Ranked by Excellence

Small Business Courses at Penn Foster Career School

Program Name: Small Business Management
Instruction Set 1

Learning Strategies The advantages of learning at home; types of study materials; types of examinations; accessing and using the features of our web site; determining what kind of learner you are; establishing a study schedule; using study tips; preparing for and taking examinations. Investigation as a Career Various job opportunities in private investigating; how to collect and use information; how to perform private investigations; the difference between the real world of private investigations and the fictional version described by writers and moviemakers; basic knowledge of related fields you might need to call on as an investigator; personal characteristics of a private investigator.


Instruction Set 2

Legal Principles and Requirements The principles of law related to private investigators; the basic legal system; Supreme Court cases and constitutional amendments related to private investigation; local, state, and federal laws that affect the work of a private investigator. Communication Skills and Investigation The importance of communication skills in private investigation; verbal and nonverbal communication; developing good communication skills; how having good communication skills helps the investigator gather information. Investigation Business Basics Running an investigation business; administrative procedures; record keeping; billing; writing reports; business forms; supplies; equipment


Instruction Set 3

Sources of Information Classifications of investigative information resources; role of the Internet in private investigation; differences between public and private records; computerized databases; field investigation. The Computer and the Investigator The role of the computer in investigation; personal computer technology; using online computer databases; field investigation. Reporting Basics of report writing; how to report to clients; appropriate use of intermediate reports and final reports; how to prepare a report; when to verbally advise a client.


Instruction Set 4

Locating People and Performing Background Investigations Shows the difference between routine and specific locates; power of the Uniform Commercial Code; methods of approaching clients; accessing public records, motor vehicle reports, and credit reports; employment verification; presenting gathered information to your clients. Observation and Description How the terms of observation and description are related to investigations; systematic approach to observing persons, objects, events, and places; systematic approach to asking others for their observations and descriptions in interviews; building a rapport with a witness; observing and interpreting body language. Surveillance How to plan, prepare, and conduct a surveillance; when to use foot and vehicular surveillance; how to detect and defend against counter-surveillance; the use of photographic equipment for surveillance; the techniques of covert photography; appropriate indoor and outdoor observation posts; recording in the surveillance log


Instruction Set 5

Equipment Usage The equipment used by private investigators, including operational equipment, surveillance equipment, evidence collection equipment, and safety equipment. Evidence Obtaining, recording, preserving, and analyzing evidence; processing an arson crime scene; getting evidence admitted into court; obtaining dental records and identifying what records are important. Court-Related Issues for Private Investigation Working with the court system; the operation and procedures of both civil and criminal trials; preparing to be a witness and providing testimony.


Instruction Set 6

Sub Rosa and Undercover Investigations The types of undercover investigators and the different kinds of undercover investigations; steps in conducting an undercover investigation; the personal characteristics of successful undercover investigators; the high stakes of drug investigations. Competitive Intelligence and Corporate Espionage Methods used to collect competitive intelligence; methods used to commit corporate espionage; counterintelligence measures; ethical issues associated with corporate intelligence gathering; how to implement counterintelligence measures for corporate clients. Homeland Security the historical and current developments in homeland security; the relationship of homeland security to private security; and private investigation; sources of valuable training material; business emergency recovery teams.


Program description: Learn Small Business Management skills - at home, at your own pace, with Penn Foster Career School.

There are certain skills you need to manage a small business. The Penn Foster Career School Small Business Management Program helps you learn them
quickly and conveniently.

You’ll get hands-on training in:

* Preparing for Business Success and Market Research
* Writing a Business Plan and Financing
Your Business
* Legal Requirements and Resources
* Putting Your Business Online and Preparing
a Budget

Small Business Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Undergraduate Certificate in Business Administration: Small Business Mgt. & Entrepreneurship Emphasis
Introduction to Business
Course Number BUS 100
Credits 4.0

Provides a foundation in business operations through a survey of major business functions (management, production, marketing, finance and accounting, human resource management, and various support functions). Offers an overview of business organizations and the business environment, strategic planning, international business, and quality assurance.


Fundamentals of E-Business
Course Number BUS 107
Credits 4.0

Examines the development of electronic commerce, the basic technologies used to conduct e-business, and the various forms of electronic business. Presents marketing models used in e-business strategy. Examines the processes for business-to-business and business-to-consumer transactions. Reviews the electronic commerce infrastructure, designing and managing online storefronts, payment options, security, privacy, and the legal and ethical challenges of electronic business.


Small Business Management
Course Number BUS 205
Credits 4.0

Provides the basic principles of operating and managing a small business. Topics include buying, merchandising, pricing, promotions, inventory management, customer service, location decisions, and planning. Reviews strategic planning considerations relative to operating a small business.


Contract and Purchasing Negotiation Techniques
Course Number BUS 340
Credits 4.0

Covers theory, strategies, techniques and tactics for negotiating contracts, and principles and practices of negotiations for corporate or institutional procurements. Includes preparation and conduct of negotiations and emphasizes interactions prior to/during negotiations and methods of dealing with situations under different types of negotiations. Utilizes role playing techniques and methodologies.


Principles of Finance
Course Number FIN 100
Credits 4.0

Serves as a foundation course in business finance. Provides a conceptual framework for the financial decision-making process and introduces tools and techniques of finance including financial mathematics, capital budgeting, sources of funds and financial analysis. Topics include acquisition and use of short-term and long-term capital; financial markets, institutions and instruments; financial control; time value of money; cash, operation and long-range budgeting; and cost of capital.


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKT 100
Credits 4.0

Introduces basic marketing principles and concepts. Emphasis is placed on the development of marketing strategy and the major components of the marketing mix, (product, price, promotion, and distribution). Reviews the critical environmental factors of markets, domestic and international, and customer behavior characteristics that affect marketing operations. Highlights the integration of marketing with other functions in a business organization.


Program description: Strayer University's Undergraduate Certificate in Business Administration with an Emphasis in Small Business Management & Entrepreneurship program provides students with an introduction to business. Other topics of study include e-business, small business management, finance, and marketing. The program also explores techniques for contract and purchasing negotiations.

Small Business Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Business - Small Business Management & Entrepreneurship
Survey of Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship
Course Number MGT300

This course provides an overview of critical issues faced in small business and entrepreneurship. Emphasis is placed on what a small business entrepreneur should know when starting a business. This includes an overview of how marketing, cash management, strategic pricing, and business planning principles relate to small business and entrepreneurship management.


The Small Business: Structure, Planning, Funding
Course Number MGT401

This course provides an overview of the Small Business from concept through funding. Emphasis on designing a competitive business model, crafting the business plan, forms of ownership and exploring funding options.


Evaluating New Business Opportunities
Course Number MGT418

This course focuses on evaluating the benefits and risks associated with new business opportunities. This includes reviewing the projected return on investment, the role of risk, investor considerations, strategic planning, and modeling techniques to analyze possible business ventures.


Small Business and Entrepreneurial Planning
Course Number MGT465

This course focuses on the development of a strategic business plan applicable for the needs of a small business or entrepreneurial venture. This will include a strategic application of financial planning, capital management, marketing, people management, and leadership. Special emphasis is placed on adapting the business plan to the realistic needs of a small business owner and entrepreneur.


Skills for Professional Development
Course Number GEN300
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Skills Necessary For Successful Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Research, And Communication. The Course Is Designed To Aid Adult Learners In Acquiring And Improving The Core Competencies That Are Necessary At University Of Phoenix. Students Examine Their Reasons For Returning To School And Develop Strategies For Achieving Educational Goals In School, Work, And Personal Settings. Students Are Also Introduced To The University Library And Learn How To Access Its Resources Successfully. (3 Credits) *for Flexibility In Scheduling, Campuses Are Permitted To Schedule Gen/200 To Satisfy Gen/300 Requirements.


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECO 212
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the fundamental theories of microeconomics and macroeconomics. The economic principles studied in this course apply to everyday life as students research an industry, debate issues with trade agreements, discuss the effects of a shift in labor supply and demand, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Consumer Price Index calculation. In particular, students research an industry affected by the economy and perform an economic analysis of the chosen industry. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 300


Business Information Systems
Course Number XBIS219

This course provides an overview of Business Information Systems. This includes a broad foundation for both technical and non-technical business professionals. Special emphasis is placed on how information is used by different types of businesses across different industries. Topics and Objectives Overview of Information Systems Identify information systems used in organizational departments. Explain how information resources are managed. Describe roles of the information systems department. Data Gathering, Storage, and Uses Recognize data management issues. Identify components of a database. Describe the relationship between data, information, and knowledge. E-Business and E-Commerce Compare e-business and e-commerce. Differentiate among business-to-business (B2B), business-to-consumer (B2C), and government-to-citizen (G2C). Explain how online auctions work. How Businesses Use Information Describe organizational information systems. Explain how functional areas use information systems. Identify supply chain components. How Managers Use Information Explain how managers use information systems. Identify information tools for managers. Project Development Methodologies Explain information technology project development methodologies. Identify the phases of Systems Development Life Cycle. Ethical and Legal Issues Recognize ethical and legal issues in information technology. Identify threats to information security. Trends Identify communication technologies used in business. Explain the impact of Web 2.0 on business. Describe advantages and disadvantages of mobile commerce (m-commerce). Technology Solutions Identify technology solutions for business problems. Develop a proposal for technology solutions that address business problems.


Organizational Ethics and Social Responsibility
Course Number XMGT216

This course provides a foundational perspective for socially responsible management practices in business. Special emphasis is placed on the interrelated nature of ethics, moral, legal, and social issues in managing individuals, groups, and the organization within a business environment. Topics and Objectives Fundamentals of Business Ethics Describe business ethics. Identify moral issues within today’s business environment. Compare major ethical theories. Describe social responsibility. Moral Perspectives Describe the relationship among virtue, values, and moral concepts in an individual and business context. Explain ways in which external social pressures have influenced business ethics. Summarize how personal values influence ethical decision-making. Ethics and the Individual Explain how individuals respond to moral issues in business. Recommend solutions to individual moral dilemmas using ethical principles. Ethics in Business and Management Describe moral and ethical issues faced by managers. Explain the relationship between social issues and ethically responsible management practices. Managing for Ethical Conduct Explain management practices for creating and managing an ethical environment within an organization. Apply ethical principles to managerial issues. Ethics in Business and the Organization Describe current moral and ethical issues faced by organizations. Apply ethical principles to organizational issues. Ethical Culture and Leadership Describe ways to improve the ethical culture within an organization. Explain the relationship among ethics, morality, and social issues within the legal environment. Examine the effects of leader’s morals on an organization’s ethical culture. Business Ethics Across Cultures Describe ethical issues that arise as a result of globalization. Compare ethical perspectives across cultures. Determine the risks and consequences associated with global business. Business Ethics Reflection Apply ethical principles to ethical dilemmas in business. Explain ways individuals, managers, and organizations can improve business ethics.


Principles of Accounting
Course Number ACC 280
Credits 3.0

This Course Covers The Fundamentals Of Financial Accounting As Well As The Identification, Measurement, And Reporting Of The Financial Effects Of Economic Events On The Enterprise. Financial Information Is Examined From The Perspective Of Effective Management Decision Making With Special Emphasis On The Planning And Controlling Responsibilities Of Practicing Managers. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300 And Mth 209


Introduction to Business Communication
Course Number COM285
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to the foundations of communication in a business setting. Students are exposed to various topics related to interpersonal and group communication within the context of applications in an office or virtual office setting. Students will develop skills in the forms of written communication, including memos, emails, business letters, and reports. Communication ethics and cross-cultural communications are also explored. Upon completing the course, students will have an awareness of their personal communication style and be able to identify areas for further exploration of communication as a business skill. Topics and Objectives Business Communication Concepts Describe the managerial functions of communication. Identify various message types. Analyze the characteristics of effective messages. Explain the audience’s impact on communication. Interpersonal and Group Communication Identify ways to foster positive group communication. Identify strategies to increase positive cross cultural communication. Compare and contrast individual and group communication. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of using technology for communication. Business Writing Describe the steps in various business writing. Compare and contrast business and academic writing. Create documents in various business formats. Laws and Ethics in Communication Identify laws relating to employees and communication privacy. Analyze workplace communication policies regarding privacy and ethics. Apply appropriate email etiquette. Create documents to deliver difficult messages. Reports and Presentations Identify skills needed to deliver effective oral presentations. Create a written report.


Management: Theory, Practice, and Application
Course Number MGT330
Credits 3.0

This course explores the rich field of management in theory and practice, and as both a science and an art. The course also addresses the role of managers in the current world of rapid change, increased competitive forces, and increased expectations for the successful performance of employees and organizations. The focus is on some of the ways and means of achieving desired goals. The student will leave this course with a solid background in the nature and work of management and managers. Applications of concepts to current workplace issues will be stressed. (3 credits)


Organizational Behavior and Group Dynamics
Course Number MGT 307
Credits 3.0

This course in organizational behavior encompasses the study of individual and group behavior in organizational settings. Emphasis is placed on strategic elements of organizational behavior, workforce diversity, managing change, effective communication, and performance systems. A comprehensive review of these processes, as well as others, will allow students to examine their role in organizations. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 300.


Critical Thinking: Strategies in Decision Making
Course Number MGT350
Credits 3.0

This course provides students opportunities for analysis, synthesis, prescription, and application of critical thinking and decision making within the organization. Emphasis is placed on preparing managers who can deal clearly, rationally, and creatively with a diverse workforce and dynamic workplace. This course equips students with concrete skills in critical thinking and decision making that will allow them to identify and solve organizational problems, as well as provide strategic direction. (3 credits)


Research and Evaluation I
Course Number RES 341
Credits 3.0

This Course Integrates Applied Business Research And Descriptive Statistics. Examination Of The Role Of Statistics In Research, Statistical Terminology, The Appropriate Use Of Statistical Techniques And Interpretation Of Statistical Findings In Business And Research Will Be The Primary Focus. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300 And Mth 209.


Research and Evaluation II
Course Number RES 342
Credits 3.0

This Course Integrates Applied Business Research And Descriptive Statistics. Examination Of The Role Of Statistics In Research, Statistical Terminology, The Appropriate Use Of Statistical Techniques And Interpretation Of Statistical Findings In Business And Research Will Be The Primary Focus. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Mth 209, And Res 341.


Finance for Business
Course Number FIN 370
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces The Student To The Essential Elements Of Finance For Business. Emphasis Is Placed On Financial Management, Financial Markets, And The Tools, Techniques, And Methodologies Used In Making Financial Decisions. Topics Include: Financial Planning, Working Capital Management, Capital Budgeting, Long Term Financing, And International Finance. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Mth 209, And Acc 280.


Business Law
Course Number LAW531

This course prepares students to evaluate the legal risks associated with business activity. Students will create proposals to manage an organization’s legal exposure. Other topics include the legal system, alternative dispute resolution, enterprise liability, product liability, international law, business risks, intellectual property, legal forms of business, and governance. Topics and Objectives Legal Systems of Business Explain traditional litigation and its application to business transactions. Create an alternative dispute resolution best suited to a common business issue. Describe how the legal system functions to resolve business problems. Tort and Regulatory Risk Propose actions a company can take to avoid tort liability and litigation. Propose actions a company can take to avoid product liability risk. Assess methods for managing legal risk arising out of domestic and international regulatory matters. Contract Risk and Opportunities Analyze legal risk issues arising out of contract formation, performance, and remedies. Evaluate measures business leaders can take to avoid risk in transactions. Explain transaction risk arising in unique environments. Risk in the Employment Relationship Analyze legal risk arising out of wrongful discharge. Evaluate legal risk associated with employment discrimination and harassment. Evaluate the regulatory and compliance requirements related to employment and benefits. Risk Arising in Tangible Property and Intellectual Property Propose methods for managing legal risk involving tangible property. Design plans for protecting business intellectual property. Propose methods to avoid liability arising from violating the property rights of others. Business Forms and Governance Compare and contrast the legal forms of business. Analyze who Sarbanes-Oxley applies to and how it applies. Design plans for managing the legal liability of officers and directors.


Marketing
Course Number MKT421
Credits 3.0

This course involves an integrated analysis of the role of marketing within the total organization. Specific attention is given to the analysis of factors affecting consumer behavior, the identification of marketing variables, the development and use of marketing strategies, and the discussion of international marketing issues. (3 credits) Prerequisite: COMM 215.


Integrated Business Topics
Course Number BUS 475
Credits 3.0

The Integrated Business Topics Course Examines Strategic Business Management While Integrating Topics From Previously Completed Business Foundation Coursework. This Allows Students To Demonstrate A Comprehensive Understanding Of The Undergraduate Business Curricula With A Significant Emphasis Placed On The Assessment Of Individual Outcomes To Determine Content Mastery. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Gen 300, Mth 209, Comm 215, Mgt 330, Mgt 350, Mgt 307, Res 341, Res 342, Fin 370, Mkt 421, Eco 212, Bis 219, Mgt 216, Com 285, Acc 280, And Bus 415.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Business (BSB) undergraduate degree program is designed to prepare graduates with the requisite knowledge, skills, and values to effectively apply various business principles and tools in an organizational setting. The BSB foundation is designed to bridge the gap between theory and practical application, while examining the areas of accounting, critical thinking and decision-making, finance, business law, management, marketing, organizational behavior, research and evaluation, and technology. Students are required to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the undergraduate business curricula through an integrated topics course.

The Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship concentration provides students with a course framework built around small business planning, financial management, and integrated business topics on entrepreneurship and small business management. Within the concentration, students can elect to study advanced concepts in small business marketing, leadership, family business management, operations management, and business law for entrepreneurs. They may also elect to explore in more depth either small business management or entrepreneurship studies as a function of their concentration electives. Students graduating with the Small Business/Entrepreneurship concentration will be prepared to address the challenges and opportunities specific to small business management and entrepreneurship.

In the Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship concentration, 18 credit hours are required. Students must successfully complete four required courses: MGT/300 Survey of Small Business and Entrepreneurship Management, MGT401 The Small Business: Structure, Planning, Funding, MGT/418 Evaluating New Business Opportunities, and MGT/465 Small Business and Entrepreneurial Planning. Students must also complete two additional business elective courses (6-credit hours) within the Small Business/Entrepreneurship concentration. Select courses have prerequisite requirements. In addition to the required course of study, students must satisfy General Education and Elective requirements to meet the 120 (124 for Kansas) semester-credit minimums required for completion of the degree.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Small Business Courses at South University

Program Name: Masters of Business Administration - Entrepreneurship and Small Business Specialization
Organization Behavior and Communication
Course Number MBA5001
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the issues of motivation, leadership, and communications. Included are negotiation, conflict resolution, and teambuilding. 4 quarter hours


Law and Ethics for Managers
Course Number MBA5005
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Quantitative Analysis and Decision Making
Course Number MBA5008
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Managerial Finance
Course Number MBA6010
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Strategic Marketing
Course Number MBA6011
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Operations and Supply Chain Management
Course Number MBA6012
Credits 4.0

The South University Master Of Business Administration (mba) Program Is Designed To Provide Students With A Process Based Curriculum Versus The Standard Functional Based Curriculum. The Foundation Provides A Firm Grounding In Economics, Decision-making, Behavioral Sciences, And Strategic Environment. The Core Presents A Functional Approach To The Long Run And Short Run Decisions That Must Be Made To Deliver Goods And Services To Constituents. Students May Choose One Of Eight Specializations Or Mix Courses For A General Mba.


Managerial Economics
Course Number MBA5004
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of microeconomic concepts and their application to common business problems. Topics include supply and demand analysis, cost analysis, economies of scale, basic market types and their characteristics, pricing, risk analysis, and the government's role in economic affairs.


New Venture Creation
Course Number MBA6720
Credits 4.0

n/a



Growing Entrepreneurial Organizations and Small Businesses
Course Number MBA6740
Credits 4.0

n/a


Marketing in Entrepreneurial Organizations and Small Businesses
Course Number MBA6210
Credits 4.0

n/a


Program description: The Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Entrepreneurship and Small Business is designed to prepare students for the practical application of theories, concepts, and practices needed to start and grow new business ventures. The curricula will allow students to explore the entrepreneurial mindset and explore best practices from a variety of functional areas to create a comprehensive business plan, navigate the waters of new venture start up, and continue the organization on its growth path. This specialization helps students from a variety of backgrounds and industries gain insights into the fundamental role of small businesses in the U.S. economy. Upon completion of Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, each student should be able to: * Understand entrepreneurship as a business model that exists within a variety of organizational contexts. * Understand and implement an entrepreneurial mindset on both personal and organizational levels. * Create and implement a new ventures comprehensive business plan. * Plan for the marketing resources and related functions to support new and growing entrepreneurial organizations. * Plan for the financial resources and related functions to support new and growing entrepreneurial organizations. Small business owner/manager either of an existing enterprise or a new one.

Small Business Courses at DeVry University

Program Name: Bachelor's in Business Administration - Small Business Management & Entrepreneurship
Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources.


Technical Writing
Course Number ENGL-216
Credits 4.0

Students apply composition principles to develop common report formats, including formal lab reports and common types of applied writing. Audience analysis, development of effective technical style, organization methods and graphic aids are emphasized. Classroom activities include planning, reviewing and revising writing.


Professional Communication
Course Number ENGL-230
Credits 3.0

This course enhances students’ writing and presentation skills for academic applications and professional communication in the workplace. Students analyze the needs of divergent audiences, and craft messages using technology tools and media appropriate for distance and group communication. An emphasis on collaborative work further prepares students for the contemporary work environment.


Dramatic Literature
Course Number HUMN-428
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the dramatic genre and enables students to analyze and evaluate both written plays and live performances. Through reading plays and critical texts from various historical periods and writing critical papers, students learn to assess formal elements of dramatic writing together with thematic content and historical context. Students watch live or filmed performances, extending their ability to develop critical understanding of theater as a social and artistic phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Comparative Religions
Course Number HUMN-448
Credits 3.0

Through study of the world’s major and minor religions, indigenous religions and cults, this course helps students understand the varieties and commonalities of human religious experience, with emphasis on both individual and group phenomena. Students compare the core elements of religion through analysis of religious belief in practice, and as they are depicted in philosophy, theology and the social sciences. Students also learn to formulate their own views on the role of religion in human affairs. Prerequisite: ENGL-135


Technology, Society, and Culture
Course Number HUMN-432
Credits 3.0

In this capstone course, the relationship between society and technology is investigated through reading, reflection, research and reports. The course identifies conditions that have promoted technological development and assesses the social, political, environmental, cultural and economic effects of current technology. Issues of control and ethical considerations in the use of technology are primary. Discussion and oral and written reports draw together students’ prior learning in specialty and general education courses. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisites: Senior status, and successful completion of all General Education requirements except courses with the prefix CARD


Social Psychology
Course Number PSYC-315
Credits 3.0

Students In This Course Explore Ways In Which Individuals Think About, Influence, Are Influenced By And Otherwise Relate To People. Individual Behavior In The Context Of Social Groups And Forces Is Emphasized. Coursework Provides A Basis For Scientifically Addressing Key Issues Of This Field. Prerequisite: Psyc-110, Socs-185, Socs-187 Or Socs-190



Statistics for Decision-Making
Course Number MATH-221
Credits 4.0

This course provides tools used for statistical analysis and decision-making in business. The course includes both descriptive statistics and inferential concepts used to draw conclusions about a population. Research techniques such as sampling and experiment design are included for both single and multiple sample groups. Prerequisite: MATH-114


Marketing
Course Number BUSN-319
Credits 3.0

In This Course Students Apply Principles And Strategies For Marketing Products And Services To Industrial, Commercial And Governmental Entities. Topics Include Ways In Which Market Information And Product Life Cycle Affect Product And Production Design; Forecasting Techniques; Interdependencies Between Marketing And Operations Functions; And Selling Skills. Prerequisites: Busn-115 And Math-114


Finance
Course Number BUSN-379
Credits 3.0

This course introduces corporate financial structure and covers basic capital budgeting techniques, including discounted cash flow analysis. Funds sources and financial resource allocation are analyzed. Spreadsheet software packages are used to analyze data and solve case-based problems. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Principles of Economics
Course Number ECON-312
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and issues in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade. Microeconomic concepts, such as supply and demand and the theory of the firm, serve as foundations for analyzing macroeconomic issues. Macroeconomic topics include gross domestic product (GDP), and fiscal and monetary policy, as well as international topics such as trade and exchange rates. The course stresses analyzing and applying economic variables of real-world issues.


Principles of Management
Course Number MGMT-303
Credits 3.0

This course examines fundamental management theories and traditional managerial responsibilities in formal and informal organizational structures. Planning, organizing, directing, controlling and staffing are explored. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-346
Credits 4.0

This course introduces how managers use accounting information in business decision-making. Topics include standard cost systems, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant cost issues, and the effect of state and federal taxes on decision-making. These principles apply to all types of businesses, including the service industry, manufacturing and merchandising. Students use spreadsheet applications to analyze and provide solutions to challenges faced by management in today’s business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT-212


Fundamentals of E-Commerce
Course Number ECOM-210
Credits 4.0

This course provides an in-depth overview of the issues, technology and environment of electronic commerce. Knowledge gained facilitates more comprehensive and contemporary exploration of future coursework in marketing, operations, finance, business law, and database and website management. Challenges and opportunities of electronic business are discussed. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Federal Tax Accounting II
Course Number ACCT-424
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the special tax issues of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, gift taxes, estates and trusts. Tax forms, tax software, the Internet, spreadsheets and word processing programs are used to research, solve and analyze tax problems relating to corporate and partnership income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT-324


Project Management
Course Number MGMT-404
Credits 4.0

This Course Enhances Students’ Ability To Function In A Project Leadership Role. While Exploring The Project Life Cycle, They Gain Experience In Budget And Timeline Management. Project Management Software Is Used To Design Project Schedules Using Methods Such As Bar Charts, Program Evaluation Review Technique (pert) And Critical Path Method (cpm) To Produce Project Plans To Apply To The Solution Of Case Studies. Prerequisites: Math-221 Or Math-233, And Upper-term Status


Creative Writing – Honors Option
Course Number ENGL-220H
Credits 4.0

This alternative to ENGL-112 is offered in a workshop setting. Students explore modes of written self-expression, including poetry, fiction and drama, to experience various literary genres and produce short creative works. They also learn to apply constructive feedback to the rewrite process. A student writing anthology is produced, and the course culminates in a study of the literary marketplace. Prerequisite: Permission from the academic administrator / 4-4


Advanced Composition
Course Number ENGL-135
Credits 4.0

This course builds on the conventions and techniques of composition through critical reading requirements and longer, more sophisticated reports, including a documented library research paper. Assignments require revising and editing for an intended audience. Students are also taught search strategies for accessing a variety of print and electronic resources. Prerequisite: ENGL-112 / 4-4


Culture and Society
Course Number SOCS-185
Credits 3.0

This course explores the role of culture in social organizations. Social institutions, and the issues of race and gender within social structures, are analyzed in the context of multicultural societies and increasing global interaction. Basic sociological principles and research findings are used to support analysis of cultural and social issues. / 3-3


Career Development
Course Number CARD-205
Credits 5.0

Career planning strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to maximize potential for advancement and long-term professional growth. Students perform self-assessment and goal-setting activities, and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career advancement strategies. Each student assembles a professional portfolio highlighting achievements, goals and concrete plans. This course must be taken at DeVry. Prerequisite: Upper-term status / 2-2


Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving
Course Number COLL-148
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on identifying and articulating skills needed for academic and professional success. Coursework provides instruction and practice in critical thinking and problem-solving through analysis of critical reading and reasoning, as well as through examination of problem-solving methodologies. Students learn to work in teams, to identify and resolve problems, and to use research effectively to gather and evaluate relevant and useful information. / 3-3


Algebra for College Students
Course Number MATH-114
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Systems Of Linear Equations; Radical And Rational Expressions; And Functions Where Linear, Quadratic, Exponential And Logarithmic Functions Are Emphasized Using Application Problems And Modeling. The Minimum Requirement To Pass This Course Is 80 Percent, And Grades Of C And D Are Not Assigned. Eligibility To Enroll In The Course Is Based On Placement Results, Or Successful Completion Of Math-092 Or Math-102. / 4-4


Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Number BIOS-105
Credits 4.0

This course provides a “road map” perspective of human body structure and function. Topics include cell structure and function, and a survey of all major systems of the human body. The connections and inter-working relationships among systems are introduced. Lab work includes computer exercises and simulation activities, as well as observation related to topics covered. / 5-4


Financial Accounting
Course Number ACCT-212
Credits 4.0

This Course Focuses On Ways In Which Financial Statements Reflect Business Operations And Emphasizes Use Of Financial Statements In The Decision-making Process. The Course Encompasses All Business Forms And Various Sectors Such As Merchandising, Manufacturing And Services. Students Make Extensive Use Of Spreadsheet Applications To Analyze Accounting Records And Financial Statements. Prerequisites: Comp-100 And Math-114 / 4-4


Data Analysis with Spreadsheets with Lab
Course Number BIS-155
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing business situations using current spreadsheet software. Using data derived from real-world business situations, students learn to use appropriate spreadsheet software features to organize, analyze and present data, as well as to make business decisions. Through personal database technology such as Access, the course also introduces basic database concepts. Prerequisite: COMP-100 / 4-3


Introduction to Business and Technology
Course Number BUSN-115
Credits 3.0

This course introduces business and the environments in which businesses operate. Students examine the roles of major functional areas of business and interrelationships among them. Organizational theories and techniques are examined, and economic, cultural, political and technological factors affecting business organizations are evaluated. / 3-3


Computer Applications for Business with Lab
Course Number COMP-100
Credits 3.0

This course introduces basic concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools widely used in business such as word processors, spreadsheets, email and web browsers. Students also learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in use of PCs and current personal productivity tools. / 3-2


Database Essentials for Business with Lab
Course Number BIS-245
Credits 5.0

Students in this course learn to design relational databases and to build database applications, including tables, queries, forms, reports and macros. Also addressed is implementation of basic database security, backup and recovery procedures. Generating reports and meeting business requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIS-155 / 5-4


Customer Relations
Course Number BUSN-258
Credits 4.0

This course examines components of a solid customer relations program and develops students’ ability to recognize and participate in such programs. Students develop interpersonal communication and listening skills as well as conflict resolution skills. They also explore customer relations as an effective sales technique. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship
Course Number SBE-310
Credits 4.0

This course introduces students to business functions, problem areas, decision-making techniques and management fundamentals required for effectively managing a small business. Prerequisite: BUSN-115


E-Commerce for Small Business
Course Number SBE-430
Credits 4.0

This course explores the potential of e-commerce and its impact on small business practices. Topics include opportunities, issues, alternatives and techniques to support the development of an Internet marketing plan and related website. Prerequisite: BUSN-319


Business Plan Writing for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs
Course Number SBE-440
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on creating a comprehensive business plan for a small business. Coursework addresses research sources; plan presentation; follow-up; and business plan components, including executive summary, company description, target market, competition, marketing and sales, operations, management structure, future development and financials. Prerequisite: BUSN-319


Budgeting and Forecasting
Course Number BUSN-278
Credits 4.0

In this course students design and implement a departmental budget encompassing the various processes that account for resource expenditures. Students develop a long-range budget forecast and then assess its impact on departmental planning. Prerequisite: ACCT-212 / 4-4


Human Resource Management
Course Number MGMT-410
Credits 4.0

Students in this course explore contemporary concepts and techniques essential to managing corporate human resources.Topics include resource planning, staffing and rewards, as well as developing and maintaining positions and people. Prerequisite:BUSN-115 / 4-4


Program description: The degree is designed to give a broad knowledge of the functional areas of a company, and their interconnection, while also allowing for specialization in a particular area. BBA programs thus expose students to a variety of "core subjects", and, as above, allow students to specialize in a specific academic area; see MBA program content. The degree also develops the student's practical managerial skills, communication skills and business decision-making capability. Many programs thus incorporate training and practical experience, in the form of case studies, projects, presentations, internships, industrial visits, and interaction with experts from the industry. For a comparison with other undergraduate degrees in business and management, see further under Bachelor's degree.

The core topics usually comprise: accounting, business law and ethics, economics, finance, management information systems, marketing, operations management, organizational behavior, quantitative techniques (business statistics, financial mathematics, operations research) and strategic management

Small Business Courses at LA College International

Program Name: AA BM concentration in Small Business Management Online
Data Base Management Systems
Course Number BC113a
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: BC116a This course introduces Microsoft Access 2007 database management software. Students develop the skills required to use a database files and reports. Related topics include navigating the Access interface, structuring tables, designing queries, creating forms, and mitigating database design issues. Students will complete a comprehensive database project in which they apply the concepts learned in the class.


Business Communications
Course Number BC214
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course covers communication concepts and practices within the business community. Topics include the goals of effective business communication, memos and letters, report generation, career, oral communications, cross–cultural communications, global and multi–cultural issues, legal and ethical situations, and technology in communications.


Introduction to Business Management
Course Number BM207
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to the objectives of business, the dynamics of operating a business, and the social responsibilities of business management. Topics include forms of business ownership, marketing, economics, human resources, and finance management.


Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
Course Number BM208
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course focuses on the skills and knowledge useful for developing and operating a small business. Topics include information gathering strategies, basic sales and marketing principles, an overview of how to interpret and manage different types of cost, typical legal issues, and franchising alternatives. Students analyze a variety of business scenarios throughout the course


Principles of Accounting I
Course Number BM233
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to the fundamentals of accounting and the accounting cycle, including journalizing, posting, preparing worksheets, using financial statements, and executing banking practices.


Financial Planning & Management
Course Number BM237
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to the fundamental goals and practices of financial planning, budgeting, and forecasting. Topics include capital budgeting, financial markets, the agency problem, cash flow, financial ratios, time value of money, and interest. Students evaluate the effects of time and risk.


Business Law
Course Number BM240
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course explores basic legal aspects of operating a business. Emphasis is placed on legal terms, ethical responsibilities and considerations, forms of business organization, and the legal requirements and strengths of contractual transactions. Topics include the legal nature of employer-employee relations, parameters that support recovery for work-related claims, and federal statutes pertaining to employment discrimination.


Introduction to Taxation
Course Number BM242
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course familiarizes students with the application of federal and state income tax laws and regulations. Students use a variety of tax forms for preparation of tax returns.


Fundamentals of Marketing
Course Number BM244
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course covers fundamentals of marketing for business. Topics include exploring the meaning of marketing, consumer behavior, market segmentation, marketing ethics, and environmental influences that impact marketing.


Creating Your Business Plan
Course Number SB229
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None The course forwards the successful planning of business endeavors. Students formulate, draft, and edit a viable business plan that can be used toward starting their own business.


Mathematics
Course Number GE201
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course focuses on whole numbers, fractions, ratios, proportions, the decimal system, and percents. Special emphasis is placed on the application of basic math skills to common workplace problems and real=life situations.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number GE210
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course introduces self-awareness, heredity and environment, motivation, development and learning, perception, information processing, communication, and interpersonal relations. Important applications are made to situations people face in their work lives, including change management, stress management, goal-setting, and interpersonal relationships at work.


College Algebra I
Course Number GE215
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: GE201 The fundamentals of college mathematics are developed through the structure of algebra. Topics covered include linear equations and inequalities; functions; graphing linear equations; solving systems of linear equations; operations on polynomials; and factoring.


College English
Course Number GE218
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course reviews basic skills required for successful college essay writing, focusing on strategies to achieve effective content, organization and research support. Topics include stags of the writing process, topic adjustment, writing for precision, argumentation, and identifying effective information sources. May be substituted for GE221.


American Culture, Government and Politics
Course Number GE219
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course offers students insight into the foundations of the U.S. Constitution, and distribution of powers between federal and state governments, Students examine sp


Public Speaking
Course Number GE220
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course helps students develop confidence in both personal and professional verbal presentation skills. Topics include audience evaluation, critical thinking, organization, effective listening, audience message retention, and the use of visual aids.


Critical Thinking
Course Number GE230
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to basic principles of informal logic and standards of intellectual reasoning. Topics include the stages of critical thinking, points of view, assumptions and inferences, self-deception, bias and egocentrism, fallacies, and inductive strengths and weaknesses. Students use critical thinking skills to analyze and solve problems.


Introduction to Ecology
Course Number GE231
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to the scientific understanding of the environment. Topics include matter, energy, ecosystems, populations, environmental change, evolution and adaptation, pollution, waste, hazards and risk analysis, preservation, bio-diversity, and sustainability.


Introduction to Computers & Computer Applications
Course Number BC 116a
Credits 3.0

This class introduces students to basic computer terms and concepts. It also provides the hands-on experience and skills development necessary to perform tasks in word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software programs.


Marketing for Small Business
Course Number SB249
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course presents entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial thinking. Students investigate customer driven philosophy, entry and growth strategies, and marketing a business including product, price, promotion and placement. Topics also include ales styles and techniques, traits of successful salespeople, and sales and marketing interaction.



Import-Export Management
Course Number SB251
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: None This course provides an overview of import and export concepts including creating a business model, identifying the logistics involved in international sales, marketing and distribution in a global economy, understanding pertinent laws, rules and regulations, managing risk, identifying finance options, and managing accounts receivables in a global arena. Students examine international e-commerce, including legal and logistical considerations and marketing strategies, NAFTA, and other trading issues.


Case Studies in Small Business
Course Number SB252a
Credits 2.0

Prerequisite: None This lab course familiarizes students with strategies to launch specific industry small businesses. Topics include the use of business pro-software.


Program description: The Associate of Arts degree in Business Management is a comprehensive 27-month program, offered both on-ground as well as online, that teaches business fundamentals and offers students a general introduction to a wide array of business disciplines. The curriculum includes basic computer operations emphasizing software applications in word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and database concepts. Students may choose one of several concentrations, including Accounting, E-Commerce, or Small Business Management. Students can also decide to complete their program of study with general electives of their choosing. This degree program also includes a general education component. Some classes may only be available online.
The program is designed to prepare students for employment in a full range of positions available in today's global economy, including accounting, payroll, bookkeeping, small business management, e-commerce, and entrepreneurship.
The program is also designed to provide a foundation in basic business fundamentals for those students who choose to further their education by continuing for the Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management.

Small Business Courses at Concord Law School

Program Name: Small Business Practice LLM
Employee Management And Benefits I
Course Number CL 9115
Credits 2.0

This course is the fi rst in a set of courses covering issues of employee management and benefits. Th ese courses address the most common source of litigation for small business:disputes about the management of employees. In addition, the courses address matters affecting employee benefi ts, which are integrally related to these issues of management. These interconnected issues are typically handled conjunctively by small business owners and their lawyers. For this reason, the two courses organize employee management and employee benefits around common dimensions and themes of the small business workplace, rather than artifi cially segregating the topics in two,independent courses.


Leasing Commercial Real Estate
Course Number CL 9110
Credits 2.0

This course covers the law of commercial real estate leasing from the perspectives of tenant,landlord, and lender, and is largely organized around common, fundamental pieces of the typical commercial real estate lease. A chronological focus on the core legal issues of each part of the lease provides opportunities to explore transactional practice generally, as well as study the meaning and impact of each provision in the documents that embody the deal. Other subjects of special interest and importance to small business are also covered including bankruptcy of the landlord or tenant, shopping center leases,percentage leases, and leasehold financing.


Employee Management And Benefits Ii
Course Number CL 9125
Credits 2.0

This course is the second in a set of courses covering issues of employee management and benefi ts. Th ese courses address the most common source of litigation for small business: disputes about the management of employees.In addition, the courses address matters affecting employee benefi ts, which are integrally related to these issues of management. Th ese interconnected issues are typically handled conjunctively by small business owners and their lawyers. For this reason, the two courses organize employee management and employee benefits around common dimensions and themes of the small business workplace, rather than artificially segregating the topics in two, independent courses.


Structure And Governance Of Small Firms And Other Closely Held Business Organizations
Course Number CL 9120
Credits 2.0

The course focuses on the operation of closely held businesses and the problems that such businesses commonly encounter in their typical organizational forms. Th oroughly covered, too, are basic agency principles that are the building blocks for many of the legal doctrines associated with these business forms. Students study the problems and solutions inherent to closely held enterprises, where owners oft en expect to run their businesses in ways that diff er dramatically from the operation of publicly held enterprises.


Electronic Contracting, Business On The Web, And E-commerce
Course Number CL 9130
Credits 2.0

This course explores the law governing electronic contracting, other business technology, and e-commerce, including related issues of security and privacy. Students cover the growing bodies of domestic and international law that govern Internet selling, electronic data exchange,electronic payments, digital signatures, and Internet sales, which define the future of contracting and commerce for all small business.


Protecting And Selling Intellectual Property
Course Number CL 9135
Credits 2.0

This course explores various aspects of intellectual property rights and technology transfer as they apply to small business. Th e course provides students with the background necessary to effectively advise clients on technology transfer issues and with a more sophisticated understanding of intellectual property licensing issues,strategies, and customary business practices in commercializing technology.


Regulation And Finance In Starting And Growing A Small Business
Course Number CL 9145
Credits 2.0

This course examines traditional and creative approaches to capital formation and start-up financing, as well as life-cycle fi nancing that ties sources of equity and other funding to the stages of small business development, including personal equity, individual retirement assets, equity and debt investment by friends and relatives, and commercial loans, as well as venture capital and other more complex funding sources. Also covered are government programs, including the SBA, tax breaks, and other public subsidies, aimed at encouraging the growth and development of small businesses.


Taxation And Succession Planning
Course Number CL 9165
Credits 2.0

This course covers the tax consequences of forming, operating, and transitioning small business, with a focus on the legal forms most often used including partnerships and LLCs.Topics include organization and operation of small business, distribution of assets, and succession. Students explore the eff ect tax law has on business and economic decisions such as choice of legal entity, forms of compensation, and modes of distributing assets to enterprise owners. Signifi cant time is devoted to everyday small business issues concerning hardware depreciation, excess inventory, and writing off business-related debt; personal tax issues of small business owners and their families;the mechanics of documentation and record keeping; and tax issues aff ecting home-based businesses and their owners.


Creditor And Bankruptcy Rights Of Sole Proprietors And Small Firms
Course Number CL 9155
Credits 2.0

This course examines the special rights of small businesses as creditors under state law and their rights as debtors under provisions of the Bankruptcy Code dealing specially with small business.


Law Practice Management
Course Number CL 9150
Credits 2.0

The course explores the ways and means of managing a law offi ce practice to provide services to small business clients consistent with best practices and professional ethics. Special attention will be given to the use of emerging technologies for the solo and small fi rm practitioner in compliance with ethical obligations.


Business Torts
Course Number CL 9140
Credits 2.0

This course focuses on torts arising out of competition between businesses. Also covered are high-risk areas of liability, including important bases of tort and tort-like business liability to consumers such as premises and products liability claims and consumer liability for false and deceptive trade practices under state and “baby” FTC laws that give individual consumers the right to sue. Finally, students examine criminal liability imposed on business owners and managers for tort-like, business-related conduct.


Franchise, Distributorship, And Relationship Law
Course Number CL 9160
Credits 2.0

This course covers the two primary forms of franchising (product/trade name franchising and business format franchising) and two categories of governing laws: (1) statutory regulation of the franchise relationship and sales of franchises; and (2) statutory and common law frequently applied to the franchise relationship including areas of trademark, anti-trust, consumer protection, and contract law. Also covered are various laws governing the relationship between franchisors and franchisees; federal and state disclosure and registration requirements involved with the sale of franchise units; federal and state laws that focus on franchise relationships in specific industries; and the application of anti-trust and vicarious liability laws on franchise businesses.


Program description: The Concord Small Business Practice LLM, the first LLM in the country focused solely on small business, is designed for practicing attorneys and recent law school graduates who want an in-depth, practical knowledge of the legal issues unique to small business, an increasingly important segment of the economy.

Students take courses developed and taught by both practitioners and academics, which emphasize issues that are unique or especially important to start-up enterprises and small firms. With the practical, focused knowledge they receive and the credential they earn, graduates may have the opportunity to become more competitive in providing legal services and could greatly expand the reach and quality of their legal services to small businesses, which make up more than 90 percent of the business firms in the United States.

The online Small Business Practice LLM is a 24-unit, part-time program that generally will be completed in two years. The core set of required courses blend practice with theory and emphasize skills to enhance professional competence. The courses are familiar in name to every lawyer but, as structured for the LLM, are very different in focus and content, and carefully tuned to small business:

* Leasing Commercial Real Estate
* Employee Management and Benefits I
* Employee Management and Benefits II
* Structure and Governance of Small Firms and Other Closely Held Business Organizations
* Protecting and Selling Intellectual Property
* Electronic Contracting, Business on the Web and E-Commerce
* Business Torts
* Franchise, Distributorship, and Relationship Law
* Regulation and Finance in Starting and Growing a Small Business
* Taxation and Succession Planning
* Creditor and Bankruptcy Rights of Sole Proprietors and Small Firms
* Law Practice Management

Small Business Courses at Ashworth College

Program Name: Small Business Management Offline
Lesson 1: Starting Your Small Business

The planning process; our 16-step formula for preparing a business plan; the secrets of market research: a vital first step; operating plans; financial plans; the vitality of home-based businesses.


Lesson 2: Family-Owned Businesses

Developing an understanding of family owned businesses; operating a family-owned business; explain how family relationships can affect business; preparing for the next generation; tax and estate planning.


Lesson 3: Forms of Small Business Ownership

Explore the differences between proprietorships, partnerships, corporations and other forms of business by examining case studies.


Lesson 4: Becoming the Owner of a Small Business

Choosing a product or service; how to evaluate an existing business; new ventures versus buyouts; intellectual property; patents, copyrights, and trademarks.


Lesson 5: Planning, Organizing & Managing a Small Business

Finding the right accountant, lawyer, banker, insurance agent, and computer consultant; building a staff; the organization chart; the essence of TQM; sources of outside help.


Lesson 6: Obtaining Financing for Your Business

Antitrust laws; Fair Housing Act, equal housing, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and others; obtaining credit reports; provisions of Megan's Law.


Lesson 7: Marketing Strategies

How co-ops and condos work; differences between co-ops and condos; managing multi-owner communities; government regulations on subsidized housing; office property; marketing office space; building standards; intelligent buildings.


Lesson 8: Promotion & Distribution

Methods of setting prices; using advertising, publicity, personal selling, and sales promotion to build your business; the marketing mix; entering the global marketplace.


Lesson 9: Managing Human Resources & Employee Relations

Putting employees first; motivating employees; "musts" for managers; setting wage, salary, and benefits policies.


Lesson 10: Obtaining & Laying Out Operating Facilities

Market research in site selection; ideal sites for retail, service, and manufacturing companies; best cities for a small business.


Lesson 11: Purchasing, Inventory & Quality Control

Purchasing and inventory management; the purchasing cycle; measuring inventory-control performance.


Lesson 12: Basic Financial Planning & Control

How financial analysis fits into planning and control; tests of profitability and financial health; earning a satisfactory return; evaluating investment opportunities; deciding when to extend credit; setting credit and collection policies.


Lesson 13: Using Computer Technology

How to select the right computer hardware for your business; useful software programs and their applications; installing a computer system; using the Internet.


Lesson 14: Business Security

Developing a risk management program; risk transfer; kinds of insurance coverage; selecting an insurance agent.


Program description: It takes more than desire to start a new business or make a
success of an existing one. So let us help you succeed. From
finding the right location and hiring employees to organizing
for expansion, we’ll provide the skills you need. We’ll even
help you write a business plan and critique it for you.

Program Name: Small Business Management Online
Lesson 1: Starting Your Small Business

The planning process; our 16-step formula for preparing a business plan; the secrets of market research: a vital first step; operating plans; financial plans; the vitality of home-based businesses.


Lesson 2: Family-Owned Businesses

Developing an understanding of family owned businesses; operating a family-owned business; explain how family relationships can affect business; preparing for the next generation; tax and estate planning.


Lesson 3: Forms of Small Business Ownership

Explore the differences between proprietorships, partnerships, corporations and other forms of business by examining case studies.


Lesson 4: Becoming the Owner of a Small Business

Choosing a product or service; how to evaluate an existing business; new ventures versus buyouts; intellectual property; patents, copyrights, and trademarks.


Lesson 5: Planning, Organizing & Managing a Small Business

Finding the right accountant, lawyer, banker, insurance agent, and computer consultant; building a staff; the organization chart; the essence of TQM; sources of outside help.


Lesson 6: Obtaining Financing for Your Business

Antitrust laws; Fair Housing Act, equal housing, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and others; obtaining credit reports; provisions of Megan's Law.


Lesson 7: Marketing Strategies

How co-ops and condos work; differences between co-ops and condos; managing multi-owner communities; government regulations on subsidized housing; office property; marketing office space; building standards; intelligent buildings.


Lesson 8: Promotion & Distribution

Methods of setting prices; using advertising, publicity, personal selling, and sales promotion to build your business; the marketing mix; entering the global marketplace.


Lesson 9: Managing Human Resources & Employee Relations

Putting employees first; motivating employees; "musts" for managers; setting wage, salary, and benefits policies.


Lesson 10: Obtaining & Laying Out Operating Facilities

Market research in site selection; ideal sites for retail, service, and manufacturing companies; best cities for a small business.


Lesson 11: Purchasing, Inventory & Quality Control

Purchasing and inventory management; the purchasing cycle; measuring inventory-control performance.


Lesson 12: Basic Financial Planning & Control

How financial analysis fits into planning and control; tests of profitability and financial health; earning a satisfactory return; evaluating investment opportunities; deciding when to extend credit; setting credit and collection policies.


Lesson 13: Using Computer Technology

How to select the right computer hardware for your business; useful software programs and their applications; installing a computer system; using the Internet.


Lesson 14: Business Security

Developing a risk management program; risk transfer; kinds of insurance coverage; selecting an insurance agent.


Program description: This comprehensive program covers how to find the right location, hire and motivate employees, prepare advertising, manage cash flow and more. You'll learn the latest small business management techniques from knowledgeable instructors with years of experience in their field.
Comprehensive small business management textbook & study guides
Career search & time management guides
Office supply kit (Graduation Gift)
Open-book, online exams
Instructor guidance and unlimited tutoring
Invitations to live events with career experts
Networking with Ashworth's active student and alumni social community

Small Business Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Small Business Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
Yale University
Total Programs 132
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 2nd
Stanford University
Total Programs 126
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 3rd
Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Dartmouth College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 68
Rank in USA 14th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
University of Virginia-Main Campus
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 103
Rank in USA 16th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of California-San Diego
Total Programs 121
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 22nd
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th