Online Social Work Courses at Accredited Schools

Walden University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its social work courses to be successful social work case managers, social workers, social scientists, health and social service managers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 73,250 people employed as social workers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $50,470. Community and social services employees make on average $42,750 per year and there are about 1,891,320 of them employed today.

Social Work Organizations Social Work Common Job Tasks
  • creating a bond with the rural and urban poor
  • paying attention to those who need assistance
  • assisting medical personnels in field operations
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Ranked by Excellence

Social Work Courses at Walden University

Program Name: Ph.D. in Human Services
Foundations of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8000
Credits 1.0

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement.


Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Counseling and Human Services Professionals
Course Number HUMN 8660
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of counselor educators to foster social change, provide leadership and service to the counseling and human service professional, and advocate for their community, clients, students, and profession. Students will use current research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling and human services profession. Students also will understand the processes of advocacy and social change. In addition, students will continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.


History and Development of Human Services
Course Number HUMN 8150
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to provide a doctoral foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. It integrates information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students will review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments, students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. This course focuses on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.


Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8151
Credits 5.0

Understanding how theory, research, and practice are connected is a vital skill for the human services scholar-practitioner. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. The course culminates with the development of a conceptual framework to address a critical issue in human services practice.


Culture and Psychology
Course Number HUMN 8701
Credits 5.0

This course explores the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, this course focuses on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.


Human Services Administration
Course Number HUMN 8152
Credits 5.0

Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human service administrators need in order to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.


Advanced Social Work Theory and Practice
Course Number HUMN 8110
Credits 5.0

One of the primary focuses of social work is to promote social justice within a diverse society. This course focuses on an advanced exploration of traditional and contemporary clinical social work theories for providing culturally and contextually relevant services to individuals and families. Students examine social work theories in a way that informs clinical practice, and discuss the role of the social worker in social issues at the macro and micro levels. Students evaluate existing practices and policies with the goal of designing and implementing more effective practices and policies that positively impact the individual, the community, and society at large.


Theories and Techniques in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling
Course Number HUMN 8356
Credits 5.0

This course provides students with an advanced understanding of theories and techniques for working with couples, marriages, and families. The focus of this course is on empirically supported treatments and techniques for addressing prevention, intervention, development, and wellness of marriages, couples, and families. Systemic implications for conceptualization, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions will be addressed. Students will be exposed to procedures for critically evaluating relevant research and to methods for applying findings to their counseling with these groups. Methods of adapting models to meet the needs of a diverse society as well as legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area will be explored.


Psychology and Social Change
Course Number HUMN 8700
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on the theories of social and personal change. Topics include power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment and social change, issues related to gender and sexism, and homophobia. In addition, students are presented with impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. The concepts of change agent and change advocate are explored as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent.


Human Motivation
Course Number HUMN 8240
Credits 5.0

This course provides an overview of physiological, psychological, and social aspects in the study of motivation and includes an exploration of historical and contemporary theories and perspectives. The course emphasizes both conceptual understanding of theories associated with motivation and their applications to personal, professional, and social issues. Major topics include physiological, learned, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation. Themes of diversity are threaded throughout the course.


Organizational Management and Leadership
Course Number MMPA 6420
Credits 5.0

Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. This course examines the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.


Research Theory, Design, and Methods
Course Number RSCH 8100
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the doctoral level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the importance of theory in research, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research designs and methods are introduced. Ethical and social change implications of conducting research, producing knowledge, and engaging in scholarship are emphasized. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing elements of simple research plans.


Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8200C
Credits 4.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Ethics and Social Justice
Course Number NPMG 6405
Credits 5.0

Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social-justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.


Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8300
Credits 4.0

This research course provides students with core knowledge and skills for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding data analysis. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry; fieldwork strategies and the nature of observation; theoretical approaches to qualitative research; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical, legal, and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students use software to code data and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Writing a Quality Prospectus
Course Number COUN 8550
Credits 5.0

Study To Effectively Apply Consultation Skills To Improve Individual, Group, And Organizational Performance. Share Your Counseling Skills And Expertise As You Solve Problems And Make Recommendations In A Range Of Settings, Including Primary And Secondary Schools, Mental Health Agencies, Higher Education Institutions, Nonprofit Organizations, And Business And Industry. Completion Requirements For Students Who Are Licensed Professional Counselors Or Who Have Graduated From A Cacrep-accredited Or Cacrep-equivalent Master’s Program:* * 98 Total Quarter Credit Hours O Core Courses (46 Cr.) O Foundation Research Sequence (16 Cr.) O Specialization Courses (15 Cr.) O Practicum (3 Cr.) O Internship (6 Cr.) O Dissertation (12 Cr.) * Professional Development Plan And Program Of Study (included In Coun 8001) * Minimum 11 Quarters Enrollment * 20 Days Of Residency (one 4-day And Two 8-day Residencies)


Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8250C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis, and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding multivariate data analysis and applying more advanced statistical concepts. Students explore comprehensive quantitative research designs and suitable statistical tests, the importance of quality assurance, and ethical considerations and social social-change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. This course approaches statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting the appropriate research design and statistical tests for more complex research questions or problems. Students use statistical software to perform analyses and interpret and present results. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a quantitative research plan.


Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8350C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and provides experience applying them. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan.


Advanced Mixed Methods Reasoning and Analysis
Course Number RSCH 8450C
Credits 4.0

This research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200C: Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and 8300C: Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. It provides students with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. The course emphasizes integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practice in data analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a truly mixed mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements.


Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector
Course Number MMPA 6431
Credits 5.0

Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.


Dissertation
Course Number COUN 8560
Credits 12.0

This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with a dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation, for a minimum of four terms.


Techniques of Counseling
Course Number COUN 6316
Credits 5.0

This course focuses on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.


Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories
Course Number COUN 6722
Credits 5.0

This course summarizes the history and explores the primary concepts of the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use. The empirical foundations of each theory are examined, and examples are supplied showing how each method is applied to clients. Limitations of each approach are also explored.


Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation
Course Number COUN 6785
Credits 5.0

This course is designed to prepare students for their roles as counselors in prevention, intervention, and consultation endeavors with specific populations in specific settings. Using an action research model, students will prepare a blueprint for a prevention, intervention, or consultation project for a community, agency, or organization.


Substance Abuse Counseling
Course Number COUN 6728
Credits 5.0

This course examines psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. Current research in the field of dependency and addiction is explored. Topics include diagnosis, models of treatment, treatment planning, use of group and family treatment plans, and efficacy of treatment. Strategies to promote change, including the transtheoretical model of behavior change, are discussed.


Program description: Make a positive impact in your community and your organization as you explore strategies to help those struggling with illness, addiction, violence, and poverty. Walden University’s Ph.D. in Human Services offers a large number of specializations that are designed to meet your needs and interests. Learn how effective policy and practice can improve the quality of life for underserved populations. Through original research, you can explore the theories, concepts, and strategies that are influential in the field today.

Specializations (in addition to the General Program)

  • Clinical Social Work
  • Criminal Justice
  • Disaster, Crisis, and Intervention
  • Family Studies and Intervention Strategies
  • Human Services Administration
  • Public Health
  • Social Policy Analysis and Planning

Social Work Courses at Capella University

Program Name: M.S. in Social Work

Program description:

Social Work Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Addictions & Community Support Worker
Basic Psychology
Course Number BPYE
Credits 50.0

This subject provides the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of psychological concepts that can be applied in the subjects that follow.


Case File Management and Report Writing
Course Number CFME
Credits 25.0

This subject deals with preparing social work-related written reports to communicate the progress of a client. The student will be introduced to various methods of recording information, along with the requirements for various entries to a file within the parameters of legal and ethical requirements. Basic computer skills are further developed through a series of assignments.


Case Management and Assessment
Course Number CMAE
Credits 20.0

This subject will enable the student to become aware of the various testing procedures and the methods by which an appropriate and accurate assessment can be made. Subjects covered include laboratory testing, psychometric assessment, interviews, services, analysis of life situations, differential diagnosis and the matching hypothesis.


Community Resources and Networking
Course Number CRNE
Credits 25.0

The goal of an Addictions Worker is to accurately assess the client’s needs and provide the most appropriate referral in an ethical manner. This subject establishes a framework to assess needs and explores the various services available in the community. This is accomplished by guiding the student through a series of assignments to enhance their evaluation skills and knowledge.


Fundamentals of Addiction
Course Number FADE
Credits 100.0

This subject provides the foundation for further in-depth subjects in the study of addiction. The basic pharmacological nature and effects of a range of psychoactive chemicals are presented, with an emphasis on challenging the myths of which chemicals cost society the most in terms of economic costs and social burden of human suffering. Specific target populations are explored, focusing on women, children, adolescents, ethnic minorities, elderly, the disabled and those suffering from mental illness. Assessment, intervention strategies, and treatment options are presented, along with the most common problems encountered during treatment.


Group Facilitation Concepts
Course Number GPCE
Credits 50.0

This subject will provide the student with an overview of the nature of group work in a social service setting and an opportunity to explore relevant techniques and exercises designed to enhance group work.


Introduction to Software Applications
Course Number ISAE
Credits 25.0

This subject educates the student about the software applications that are commonly used in document preparation, report writing and presentations. The student will learn how to use a computer’s operating system; perform basic file management tasks; use a Web browser to explore the Internet and perform searches for information; create, edit, and format documents; and prepare a slide show presentation.


Interviewing Techniques
Course Number ITSE
Credits 50.0

This subject will assist the student to define communication skills and demonstrate how to use them effectively in many types of situations. A group of core communication skills is essential to any interview, whether it takes place in counselling, nursing, social work, personnel work, or information gathering.


Pharmacology
Course Number PHAE
Credits 25.0

This subject provides basic drug information including the basic pharmacological nature and effects of a range of psychoactive chemicals. Students will build knowledge relating drug treatments/usage to various body systems and associated states of disease.


Preventive Health Promotion
Course Number PHPE
Credits 50.0

The student is introduced to various health and relationship concerns that are relevant in chemically dependent individuals. The student will learn to evaluate the effectiveness of program delivery and begin to create new ideas for promoting healthier lifestyle choices within a range of settings and diverse populations.


Practicum
Course Number PRAC
Credits 100.0

This program includes a practicum component consisting of a specified number of weeks of work at a job site. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the business organization does not pay for the services of the student during the practicum. The number of practicum hours varies between programs. To learn more about the specific practicum hours for a specific program, speak with an Admissions Representative.


Relapse Prevention and Intervention
Course Number RPIE
Credits 75.0

This Subject Will Provide The Student With An Understanding Of Relapse As A Natural Part Of The Recovery Process. The Student Will Study A Range Of Strategies And Techniques To Assist In Minimizing And Preventing The Effects Of Prolonged Periods Of Relapse During The Journey Of Recovery. Students Are Guided Through The Entire Relapse Process By Considering The Application Of Some Basic Principles Introduced In The Cenaps Model Of Treatment (cenaps Is An Acronym For Center For Applied Behavioral Research).


Selected Populations
Course Number SPOE
Credits 50.0

Selected Populations provides the foundation for further in-depth examination of the relationship between substance abuse and a specific population in society. The purpose of this course is to gain a realistic perspective of drug-related problems affecting different sub-populations in society. To understand the complex issues surrounding drugs in our society, we need to recognize the enormous diversity that exists within the general population. This course will provide the student with the basic knowledge around being a multicultural counsellor and working specifically with sub-populations that are regularly encountered.


Secondary Traumatic Stress
Course Number STSE
Credits 25.0

Secondary traumatic stress results from helping or wanting to help a traumatized or suffering person. Students will gain insight into their personal strengths and weaknesses and will explore methods to prevent/reduce secondary traumatic stress.


The Counselling Relationship
Course Number TCRE
Credits 40.0

This subject is designed to provide the student with a framework in which to view helping functions and related skills in a systematic manner. The subject concentrates on the helper’s task of becoming a more aware and effective person. The emphasis is on empowering others to help themselves through the development of communication and coping skills.


Working with Families
Course Number WWFE
Credits 50.0

This subject will provide students with an overview of how addiction can impact the family unit. Understanding the family reaction is critical to providing caring support to the recovering addict and their loved ones. A recovery program that does not address issues of co-dependency may increase the likelihood of persistent patterns of relapse for both the addict and their family.


Career and Employment Strategies
Course Number CESE
Credits 25.0

his course looks at the planning, preparation, execution, and follow-up stages of an interview.


Professional Skills
Course Number PSKE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to equip students with interpersonal skills identified by employers as essential for success in the professional world. Using a variety of instructional methods including case studies, group exercises, and discussion, students learn and practice key communication skills.


Program description: CDI's instructors are industry professionals who introduce students to a wide range of subjects including assessment and treatment planning, writing and file management, and counselling training. Since addictions and community service workers are required to interact with clients and healthcare professionals, such as social workers, they need a broad understanding of the healthcare and addictions care industry. In addition, students will learn about human psychology, addiction prevention and intervention, pharmacology, and other medical areas. Each student must put their knowledge to the test as part of a 320 hour (eight week) mandatory clinical placement.

Program Name: Addictions and Community Services Worker
Basic Psychology
Course Number BPYE
Credits 50.0

This subject provides the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of psychological concepts that can be applied in the subjects that follow.


Career and Employment Strategies
Course Number CESE
Credits 25.0

his course looks at the planning, preparation, execution, and follow-up stages of an interview.


Case File Management and Report Writing
Course Number CFME
Credits 25.0

This subject deals with preparing social work-related written reports to communicate the progress of a client. The student will be introduced to various methods of recording information, along with the requirements for various entries to a file within the parameters of legal and ethical requirements. Basic computer skills are further developed through a series of assignments.


Case Management and Assessment
Course Number CMAE
Credits 20.0

This subject will enable the student to become aware of the various testing procedures and the methods by which an appropriate and accurate assessment can be made. Subjects covered include laboratory testing, psychometric assessment, interviews, services, analysis of life situations, differential diagnosis and the matching hypothesis.


Community Resources and Networking
Course Number CRNE
Credits 25.0

The goal of an Addictions Worker is to accurately assess the client’s needs and provide the most appropriate referral in an ethical manner. This subject establishes a framework to assess needs and explores the various services available in the community. This is accomplished by guiding the student through a series of assignments to enhance their evaluation skills and knowledge.


Fundamentals of Addiction
Course Number FADE
Credits 100.0

This subject provides the foundation for further in-depth subjects in the study of addiction. The basic pharmacological nature and effects of a range of psychoactive chemicals are presented, with an emphasis on challenging the myths of which chemicals cost society the most in terms of economic costs and social burden of human suffering. Specific target populations are explored, focusing on women, children, adolescents, ethnic minorities, elderly, the disabled and those suffering from mental illness. Assessment, intervention strategies, and treatment options are presented, along with the most common problems encountered during treatment.


Group Facilitation Concepts
Course Number GPCE
Credits 50.0

This subject will provide the student with an overview of the nature of group work in a social service setting and an opportunity to explore relevant techniques and exercises designed to enhance group work.


Introduction to Software Applications
Course Number ISAE
Credits 25.0

This subject educates the student about the software applications that are commonly used in document preparation, report writing and presentations. The student will learn how to use a computer’s operating system; perform basic file management tasks; use a Web browser to explore the Internet and perform searches for information; create, edit, and format documents; and prepare a slide show presentation.


Interviewing Techniques
Course Number ITSE
Credits 50.0

This subject will assist the student to define communication skills and demonstrate how to use them effectively in many types of situations. A group of core communication skills is essential to any interview, whether it takes place in counselling, nursing, social work, personnel work, or information gathering.


Pharmacology
Course Number PHAE
Credits 25.0

This subject provides basic drug information including the basic pharmacological nature and effects of a range of psychoactive chemicals. Students will build knowledge relating drug treatments/usage to various body systems and associated states of disease.


Preventive Health Promotion
Course Number PHPE
Credits 50.0

The student is introduced to various health and relationship concerns that are relevant in chemically dependent individuals. The student will learn to evaluate the effectiveness of program delivery and begin to create new ideas for promoting healthier lifestyle choices within a range of settings and diverse populations.


Practicum
Course Number PRAC
Credits 100.0

This program includes a practicum component consisting of a specified number of weeks of work at a job site. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the business organization does not pay for the services of the student during the practicum. The number of practicum hours varies between programs. To learn more about the specific practicum hours for a specific program, speak with an Admissions Representative.


Professional Skills
Course Number PSKE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to equip students with interpersonal skills identified by employers as essential for success in the professional world. Using a variety of instructional methods including case studies, group exercises, and discussion, students learn and practice key communication skills.


Relapse Prevention and Intervention
Course Number RPIE
Credits 75.0

This Subject Will Provide The Student With An Understanding Of Relapse As A Natural Part Of The Recovery Process. The Student Will Study A Range Of Strategies And Techniques To Assist In Minimizing And Preventing The Effects Of Prolonged Periods Of Relapse During The Journey Of Recovery. Students Are Guided Through The Entire Relapse Process By Considering The Application Of Some Basic Principles Introduced In The Cenaps Model Of Treatment (cenaps Is An Acronym For Center For Applied Behavioral Research).


Selected Populations
Course Number SPOE
Credits 50.0

Selected Populations provides the foundation for further in-depth examination of the relationship between substance abuse and a specific population in society. The purpose of this course is to gain a realistic perspective of drug-related problems affecting different sub-populations in society. To understand the complex issues surrounding drugs in our society, we need to recognize the enormous diversity that exists within the general population. This course will provide the student with the basic knowledge around being a multicultural counsellor and working specifically with sub-populations that are regularly encountered.


Secondary Traumatic Stress
Course Number STSE
Credits 25.0

Secondary traumatic stress results from helping or wanting to help a traumatized or suffering person. Students will gain insight into their personal strengths and weaknesses and will explore methods to prevent/reduce secondary traumatic stress.


The Counselling Relationship
Course Number TCRE
Credits 40.0

This subject is designed to provide the student with a framework in which to view helping functions and related skills in a systematic manner. The subject concentrates on the helper’s task of becoming a more aware and effective person. The emphasis is on empowering others to help themselves through the development of communication and coping skills.


Working with Families
Course Number WWFE
Credits 50.0

This subject will provide students with an overview of how addiction can impact the family unit. Understanding the family reaction is critical to providing caring support to the recovering addict and their loved ones. A recovery program that does not address issues of co-dependency may increase the likelihood of persistent patterns of relapse for both the addict and their family.


Program description: CDI's instructors are industry professionals who introduce students to a wide range of subjects including assessment and treatment planning, writing and file management, and counselling training. Since addictions and community service workers are required to interact with clients and healthcare professionals, such as social workers, they need a broad understanding of the healthcare and addictions care industry. In addition, students will learn about human psychology, addiction prevention and intervention, pharmacology, and other medical areas. Each student must put their knowledge to the test as part of a 320 hour (eight week) mandatory clinical placement.

Social Work Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Social Work Schools (campus and online)

Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Berkeley
Total Programs 145
Number of Subjects 105
Rank in USA 6th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
California Institute of Technology
Total Programs 38
Number of Subjects 41
Rank in USA 21st
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Total Programs 215
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 23rd
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Boston College
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 94
Rank in USA 29th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
Swarthmore College
Total Programs 88
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 37th
University of Georgia
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 156
Rank in USA 38th
Vassar College
Total Programs 65
Number of Subjects 57
Rank in USA 43rd
Michigan State University
Total Programs 220
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 45th
Carleton College
Total Programs 60
Number of Subjects 53
Rank in USA 48th