Online Software Engineering Courses at Accredited Schools

Kaplan University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its software engineering courses to be successful software engineers, software developers, game software developers, computer software engineers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 385,200 people employed as computer software engineers, systems software alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $96,620. Computer programmers make on average $74,690 per year and there are about 367,880 of them employed today.

Software Engineering Organizations Software Engineering Common Job Tasks
  • maintaining general computer applications software or specialized utility programs
  • designing and implementation of system security and data assurance
  • evaluating the software applications and systems that make computers work
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Software Engineering Courses at Kaplan University

Program Name: BSIT/Application Development
Academic Strategies For The It Professional
Course Number CS 114
Credits 5.0

Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces students to the purposes and processes of university education. An emphasis is placed on study, communication, and thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation. Choose either CS114 or CS121.


Technology Infrastructure
Course Number IT 331
Credits 6.0

This course explores the concepts and purpose of information technology infrastructure. Emphasis is placed on expanding the student’s knowledge of computer networks and data transmissions and applying those concepts to an organization’s technology requirements.


Introduction To Website Development
Course Number IT 117
Credits 5.0

Learning The Value Of Self-promotion Equips Students To Demonstrate Their Skills To An Audience. This Course Investigates The World Wide Web And The Internet. Students Learn The Basic Concepts Of Web Development And E-commerce Along With Basic Web Page Design. By Creating An Individual Online Portfolio Or Biography Using Html, Xhtml, And Css (cascading Style Sheets), Students Will Develop Skills For Today And Tomorrow.


Database Concepts Using Microsoft Access
Course Number IT 163
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to relational database management systems. Students will use a relational database management system to create and maintain a database. Students will create filters, sorts, queries, forms, and reports. Emphasis will be placed on the skills needed to meet user requirements.


Data Modeling For Health Informatics
Course Number IT 238
Credits 5.0

This course covers data modeling for health care systems. Students will be introduced to the following topics: entity-relationship modeling, normal forms, database creation, and data manipulation using SQL. Students will complete hands-on assignments and case studies related to the health care industry.


Foundations In Information Technology
Course Number IT 190
Credits 5.0

Students will explore the basic concepts of information technology including hardware, software, and networks. The student will gain a practical understanding of how computer hardware and operating systems work. Topics include personal computer configuration and maintenance, along with the fundamentals of system software installation and administration.


Foundations Of Programming Using Visual Basic
Course Number IT 193
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of programming using Visual Basic. Basic concepts and syntax used to write programs, including variables, input, output, looping, and program flow, are introduced. Students will design and develop simple, graphical user interface-based applications using the Visual Studio development environment.


Foundations Of Programming Using Java
Course Number IT 258
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming in Java, where students learn analysis and design techniques of software engineering. Projects and assignments cover numerous aspects of program development. Students successfully completing the course will have the necessary background to analyze, design, and implement basic software solutions in Java.


Networking Concepts
Course Number IT 273
Credits 5.0

This course introduces the concepts behind today's networks. It outlines current network design, explaining the OSI Model and the methods of carrying data over wired and wireless media. Other topics include fundamental network design components such as topologies and access methods, basic administration of network operating systems, and troubleshooting methods for data transmission and recovery.


Introduction To Management
Course Number MT 140
Credits 5.0

This course will give students an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to real-world management problems and scenarios.


Mathematics Course
Course Number 200 level
Credits 5.0

Project Managment I
Course Number IT 301
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Human Computer Interaction
Course Number IT 302
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Internet Business Fundamentals
Course Number IT 337
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Structured Query language
Course Number IT 350
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Database Design
Course Number IT 354
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


IT Consulting Skills
Course Number IT 402
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Information Technology Externship
Course Number IT 489
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


System Analysis and Design
Course Number IT 460
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Bachelor's Capstone in Information Technology
Course Number IT 499
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Foundations Of Programming Using Java
Course Number IT 258
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming in Java, where students learn analysis and design techniques of software engineering. Projects and assignments cover numerous aspects of program development. Students successfully completing the course will have the necessary background to analyze, design, and implement basic software solutions in Java.


Visual Basics Fundamentals
Course Number IT 271
Credits 5.0

This is a fast paced Visual Basic programming course for students enrolled in the advanced start version of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology. Basic concepts and syntax used to write programs, including variables, input, output, looping and program flow are introduced. Students design and develop graphical user interface- based applications using the Visual Studio development environment. Topics include object oriented programming, using external data for input/output and software component development. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: Enrollment in the advanced start Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program


Data Structures and Algorithms
Course Number IT 310
Credits 6.0

This course teaches students how to create data structures and algorithms using proper programming techniques. The course uses an object- oriented programming language to apply concepts such as linked lists, recursion, searching and sorting, binary search, trees and graphs. The program design process and program implementation involving multiple modules, verification of program correctness and abstract data types are also stressed. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 258


Structured Query language
Course Number IT 350
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Web Programming Development
Course Number IT 355
Credits 6.0

Students will learn how to create and maintain interactive and dynamic web applicatios within a server based scripting environment. Topics include Web applications, object-oriented programming and Web databases. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 271 or IT 293


Advanced Visual Basic Programming
Course Number IT 461
Credits 6.0

This course teaches students advanced Visual Basic programming techniques. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to write, debug, compile and execute Visual Basic programs. During this course student’s focus on building well engineered and maintainable programs to meet business application and programming standards. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 271 or IT 293


Program description: Students enrolled in Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a career focus area in Application Development program have the chance to study the fundamentals of information technology, operating systems, systems analysis, and project management. Coursework in the application development emphasis area allows students the opportunity to develop advanced programming and application development skills, which could prepare them for careers in this field.* Students can study various programming languages, including C#, Java, and Visual Basic. Students can also learn about web programming and development. To earn the Bachelor of Science degree, students must meet all general education requirements; general education courses give students the chance to develop a wide range of skills and knowledge through courses in the arts and humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, and communications.

Program Name: BSIT - Application Development
Project Managment I
Course Number IT 301
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Human Computer Interaction
Course Number IT 302
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Technology Infrastructure
Course Number IT 331
Credits 6.0

This course explores the concepts and purpose of information technology infrastructure. Emphasis is placed on expanding the student’s knowledge of computer networks and data transmissions and applying those concepts to an organization’s technology requirements.


Internet Business Fundamentals
Course Number IT 337
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Database Design
Course Number IT 354
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


IT Consulting Skills
Course Number IT 402
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


System Analysis and Design
Course Number IT 460
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Bachelor's Capstone in Information Technology
Course Number IT 499
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Visual Basics Fundamentals
Course Number IT 271
Credits 5.0

This is a fast paced Visual Basic programming course for students enrolled in the advanced start version of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology. Basic concepts and syntax used to write programs, including variables, input, output, looping and program flow are introduced. Students design and develop graphical user interface- based applications using the Visual Studio development environment. Topics include object oriented programming, using external data for input/output and software component development. 5 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: Enrollment in the advanced start Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program


Data Structures and Algorithms
Course Number IT 310
Credits 6.0

This course teaches students how to create data structures and algorithms using proper programming techniques. The course uses an object- oriented programming language to apply concepts such as linked lists, recursion, searching and sorting, binary search, trees and graphs. The program design process and program implementation involving multiple modules, verification of program correctness and abstract data types are also stressed. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 258


Web Programming Development
Course Number IT 355
Credits 6.0

Students will learn how to create and maintain interactive and dynamic web applicatios within a server based scripting environment. Topics include Web applications, object-oriented programming and Web databases. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 271 or IT 293


Advanced Visual Basic Programming
Course Number IT 461
Credits 6.0

This course teaches students advanced Visual Basic programming techniques. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to write, debug, compile and execute Visual Basic programs. During this course student’s focus on building well engineered and maintainable programs to meet business application and programming standards. 6 Quarter Credit Hours Prerequisite: IT 271 or IT 293


Foundations Of Programming Using Java
Course Number IT 258
Credits 5.0

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming in Java, where students learn analysis and design techniques of software engineering. Projects and assignments cover numerous aspects of program development. Students successfully completing the course will have the necessary background to analyze, design, and implement basic software solutions in Java.


Intermediate Visual Basic Programming
Course Number IT 293
Credits 5.0

Th is is an intermediate course in the design and implementation of programs using Visual Basic. Topics include object-oriented programming, database access, and soft ware component development.


Structured Query language
Course Number IT 350
Credits 6.0

An introduction to the preparation and analysis of financial statements, Specific topics include the accounting model, general purpose financial statements and accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity.


Program description: Students enrolled in Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a career focus area in Application Development program have the chance to study the fundamentals of information technology, operating systems, systems analysis, and project management. Coursework in the application development emphasis area allows students the opportunity to develop advanced programming and application development skills, which could prepare them for careers in this field.* Students can study various programming languages, including C#, Java, and Visual Basic. Students can also learn about web programming and development. To earn the Bachelor of Science degree, students must meet all general education requirements; general education courses give students the chance to develop a wide range of skills and knowledge through courses in the arts and humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, and communications.

Software Engineering Courses at Strayer University

Program Name: Executive Graduate Certificate in Information Systems: Software Engineering Emphasis
Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS510
Credits 4.0

This course provides an integrated approach to the study of systems analysis and design. It highlights CASE tools and analysis as means of solving problems


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number CIS512
Credits 4.0

This course covers the concepts of corporate data models and strategies for transforming the models into physical designs. It provides a foundation for implementing the physical designs onto various computer architectures


Advanced Software Engineering
Course Number CIS518
Credits 4.0

This course combines theory with practical applications in developing and managing software applications that support business functions. Key issues such as risk management, technology transfer, control, modeling and quality assurance are covered


Information Systems for Decision-Making
Course Number CIS500
Credits 4.0

This course examines the information requirements of an organization. It emphasizes the difference in the kinds of information needed at the operational, administrative, strategic, and organizational levels. It discusses planning and implementing a comprehensive information system and methods to measure its effectiveness.


IT Project Management
Course Number CIS517
Credits 4.0

This course provides a practical and theoretical foundation for applying project management activities to Information Technology projects. Emphasis is placed on how the systems development life cycle, prototyping, rapid application development, and acquiring and maintaining systems are managed and used in Enterprise System solutions. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Strategic Planning for Database Systems
Course Number CIS 515
Credits 4.0

This course covers strategies for developing and implementing an effective database system. Topics include database systems organization, creation, and maintenance; and evaluation criteria and standardization of database systems. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Program description: The Executive Graduate Certificate program is designed for mid and senior level managers, professional and technical specialists and individuals seeking career opportunities in the Information Systems field. The curriculum encompasses the knowledge and skills needed in pertinent professional areas. Persons interested should possess at least a bachelor’s degree in a related field.

The recipient of the executive graduate certificate may apply all credits earned toward a Master of Science degree with the same emphasis. Contact the academics department for more information.

Undergraduate prerequisites may be required for entry into the graduate certificate program; students who have not earned degrees from appropriate fields of study may be required to take additional coursework as a prerequisite for completing the program.

Program Name: Master of Science in Information Systems: Software Engineering Management Concentration
Financial Accounting
Course Number ACC 557
Credits 4.0

This course provides a framework for financial accounting concepts and practices used by internal and external users in businesses. Topics presented include the accounting cycle, financial reporting, financial statements analysis, ratio calculation and interpretation, and management decision making based on financial results.


Information Systems for Decision-Making
Course Number CIS500
Credits 4.0

This course examines the information requirements of an organization. It emphasizes the difference in the kinds of information needed at the operational, administrative, strategic, and organizational levels. It discusses planning and implementing a comprehensive information system and methods to measure its effectiveness.


Managerial Economics and Globalization
Course Number ECO 550
Credits 4.0

Applies relevant economic theory to develop a framework of analysis and techniques that business managers can use in deciding how to allocate a firm’s scarce resources to achieve its objectives. Uses economic analysis to support business strategy decisions that promote competitiveness in an environment of changing domestic and international market conditions, government regulations, trade policies, and resource availability. Systematically analyzes how global economic integration affects the production, input sourcing, and pricing decisions of firms operating in different market structures.


Quantitative Methods
Course Number MAT540
Credits 4.0

Applies quantitative methods to systems management (Decision Theory), and/or methods of decision-making with respect to sampling, organizing, and analyzing empirical data.


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number CIS512
Credits 4.0

This course covers the concepts of corporate data models and strategies for transforming the models into physical designs. It provides a foundation for implementing the physical designs onto various computer architectures


IT Project Management
Course Number CIS517
Credits 4.0

This course provides a practical and theoretical foundation for applying project management activities to Information Technology projects. Emphasis is placed on how the systems development life cycle, prototyping, rapid application development, and acquiring and maintaining systems are managed and used in Enterprise System solutions. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Network Architecture and Analysis
Course Number CIS532
Credits 4.0

his course focuses on network architecture development concepts and components including architecture functions and use. It provides the student with the skills required developing, managing, and sizing architectures in large organizations. Topics include topologies, protocols, connectivity, transactions, and performance. Prerequisites CIS 175 Introduction to Networking


Directed Research Project
Course Number EDU 590
Credits 4.0

Enables student to complete a research project in the field of major concentration. The research project will be monitored by a supervising faculty member and must be defended by the student in an oral examination. The oral defense may be conducted in a conference-style meeting of student, instructor, and second reader or technical advisor. A second type of defense allows students to present a synopsis of their project during one of the last two scheduled class meetings. Students are encouraged to discuss the project with an instructor or academic officer early in their program. Students may not fulfill the directed research requirement by completing another course.


Research Methods
Course Number RES 531
Credits 4.0

This course covers research methodology and strategic communications in business and the professions. It discusses research planning and design including the research proposal, identification of appropriate measurement instruments, and evaluation of alternative methodologies and their validity. Students are required to complete a minimum of a 20-page research proposal consistent with standards of the University's Directed Research Project (DRP). Students also acquire oral and written communication skills necessary to perform effectively as managers. All phases of the communications process - interpersonal, group, and public speaking - are illuminated throughout the course as are current challenges presented by new technology, the global marketplace, and workforce diversity.


Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
Course Number CIS510
Credits 4.0

This course provides an integrated approach to the study of systems analysis and design. It highlights CASE tools and analysis as means of solving problems


Strategic Planning for Database Systems
Course Number CIS 515
Credits 4.0

This course covers strategies for developing and implementing an effective database system. Topics include database systems organization, creation, and maintenance; and evaluation criteria and standardization of database systems. Prerequisites CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development


Advanced Software Engineering
Course Number CIS518
Credits 4.0

This course combines theory with practical applications in developing and managing software applications that support business functions. Key issues such as risk management, technology transfer, control, modeling and quality assurance are covered


Program description: The Master of Science in Information Systems (MSIS) is a professional degree program that stresses the technical, managerial, and policy issues associated with building computer based systems that support modern organizations. The program addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of specifying, designing, implementing, and managing systems that possess qualities such as portability, scalability, and interoperability (open systems).

The Master of Science in Information Systems program treats information as an organizational resource that is subject to managerial planning and control. It focuses on integration of data and distribution of information in helping organizations to be more competitive. In addition, the program offers graduates most of the academic background necessary to pursue certification as a Certified Computer Professional (CCP).

Students who have not earned degrees from appropriate fields of study may be required to take additional coursework as a prerequisite for completing the program.

Software Engineering Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Software Engineering
Introduction to Software Engineering
Course Number BSA385
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the fundamental, logical, and design considerations addressed during system and application software development. It provides a background in applications software development and testing techniques through a combination of theory and application. (3 credits) Prerequisite: BSA 375.


Software Architecture
Course Number CSS422
Credits 3.0

This course is an integrating course in business application software engineering. Integration, migration, and maintenance of enterprise software systems, including legacy systems, are emphasized. (3 credits) Prerequisite: POS 355.


.NET I
Course Number POS408
Credits 3.0

This Course Introduces Object-oriented Programming In The Context Of Business Applications Development. It Develops The Skills And Knowledge Necessary To Produce Beginning Event-driven Programs With Graphical User Interfaces (gui). Topics Include Standard Windows Compatible Forms, Controls, And Procedures. The Course Uses Visual Basic�. (3 Credits) Prerequisites: Comm 215, Mth 209, And Prg 210.uisite


.NET II
Course Number POS409
Credits 3.0

This course extends the facilities and command sets of the Visual Basic programming system for Windows. Topics covered include designing Visual Basic applications, forms, event driven procedures, writing and debugging programs, databases, data files, and printing. (3 credits) Prerequisite: POS 408.A


Skills for Professional Development
Course Number GEN300
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Skills Necessary For Successful Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Research, And Communication. The Course Is Designed To Aid Adult Learners In Acquiring And Improving The Core Competencies That Are Necessary At University Of Phoenix. Students Examine Their Reasons For Returning To School And Develop Strategies For Achieving Educational Goals In School, Work, And Personal Settings. Students Are Also Introduced To The University Library And Learn How To Access Its Resources Successfully. (3 Credits) *for Flexibility In Scheduling, Campuses Are Permitted To Schedule Gen/200 To Satisfy Gen/300 Requirements.


Management Information Systems
Course Number CIS205

This course introduces the fundamentals of computer systems and the role of information processing in today's business environment. An overview is presented of information systems, systems development, operating systems and programming, database management, networking and telecommunications, and the Internet.


Fundamentals of Programming with Algorithms and Logic
Course Number PRG210

This Course Provides Students With A Basic Understanding Of Programming Development Practices. Concepts Covered Include The Application Of Algorithms And Logic To The Design And Development Of Computer Programs To Address The Problem Solving Requirements Associated With Business Information Systems. This Course Will Cover Procedural Programming Concepts Including Data Types, Controls Structures, Functional Decomposition, Arrays, And Files. Topics And Objectives Programming Fundamentals * Identify How A Computer Processes And Stores Data. * Describe The Importance Of Using A Structured, Modular Approach When Creating Program Requirements, Design, And Code. Problem Solving And Algorithm Development * Describe The Process And Methods For Problem Recognition. * Examine The Development Of Problem Solutions. * Define The Process Of Algorithm Development. Programming Logic * Apply The Concepts Of Functional Decomposition To The Development Of Programming Logic. * Demonstrate The Sequential And Selection Processing Control Structure. * Demonstrate The Iteration Control Structure. Data Structures, Verification, And Validation * Explain The Need For Complex Data Structures. * Explain The Design And Application Of Arrays To Program Logic And Data Manipulation. * Describe How Requirements And Desk Review Design Are Used To Verify Algorithms. File And Database Processing * Determine When A Sequential Data File Is More Useful Than A Database. * Differentiate Between A Flat File And A Relational Database. * Differentiate Between A Text File And A Binary File. Prerequisites: Gen300, Gen101


Web Design I
Course Number WEB236

This course introduces effective web design principles and the essential role of the web designer in today's business environment. Topics covered include site architecture, page layout, navigation, content, functionality and usability. Students will evaluate existing web sites and apply best practices to prototype a unique design using a web authoring application. Topics and Objectives Website Planning * Identify purpose and target audience. * Illustrate a site architecture map. Web Design Concepts & Techniques * Define fundamental Web design terminology. * Explain design principles for effective site navigation. * Identify Web design tools and their applications. Website Content * Recognize common media formats and plug-ins. * Explain the effective use of graphics and media in Web site design. * Discuss copyright implications. * Explain how to optimize content for search engines. Website Effectiveness * Recognize design principles of basic website appearance and functionality. * Evaluate business and e-business Web page layouts, navigation, and performance. * Identify attributes of usability. * Critique usability of a website. * Recognize accessibility standards. Website Prototyping * Apply effective design concepts and techniques to prototype a homepage and secondary page. Prerequisites: CIS205,GEN300,GEN101


Web Design II
Course Number WEB237

This Course Introduces Development Tools And Techniques Used To Publish Web Pages On The World Wide Web. Students Use Basic Hypertext Markup Language, Scripting And Presentational Technologies To Create Web Sites Without The Aid Of A Software Authoring Application. Topics Include Xhtml, Css, Javascript, Server Hosting, Site Publication, Site Maintenance And Search Engine Optimization. Topics And Objectives Introduction To Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (xhtml) * Identify Basic Xhtml Tags And Attributes. * Explain Viewing And Testing Markup Code In Various Web Browsers. * Describe How Cascading Style Sheets (css) Are Applied For Formatting Web Content. Website Development * Develop Xhtml Code That Displays Content In A Web Browser. * Apply Styles And Style Sheets To Control Various Attributes Of A Web Page And Its Content. * Create Internal, External And Anchor Hyperlinks In A Web Page. * Distinguish The Development Environment From A Production Environment. Website Interaction * Create An Effective Navigation System. * Create A Basic Web Form. * Describe How To Integrate Multimedia Files Into A Web Page. * Apply Usability Best Practices. * Apply Principles Of Effective Technical Writing And Web Design. Introduction To Javascript * Explain The Basic Application For Javascript. * Explain Javascript Arrays, Loops And Conditional Statements. * Apply Javascript Effectively In Website. Website Publication & Maintenance * Identify The Importance Of Professional Standards In Web Development. * Explain How Meta Data Can Promote A Website. * Identify The Process To Publish A Website. * Identify The Need To Maintain And Redesign A Website. Prerequisites: Web236


Technical Writing Fundamentals
Course Number ENG221

This Course Covers The Fundamentals And Best Practices Of Using Written Communication In Business And In The Information Technologies. Topics Include Strategies, Techniques, And Nuances For Producing Emails, Memos, Reports, Proposals, Project Specifications, And User Manuals, As Well As Other Technical Documents. Topics And Objectives The Technical Writing Process * Identify Uses Of Technical Writing In The Corporate Environment. * Describe The Differences Between Technical Writing And Expository Writing. Technical Writing In The Corporate Environment * Identify Intellectual Property Issues In The Corporate Environment. * Create Letters And Memos With Appropriate Formatting For The Corporate Environment. Writing Reports & Proposals * Apply Effective Document Design And Graphics In Technical Writing. * Create A Request For Proposal. Writing Technical Instructions & User Manuals * Integrate Appropriate Visual Elements Into A User Manual. * Create Clear, Concise, Accurate, And Coherent Written Communication For A User Manual. * Identify The Criteria For Writing A User Manual. Preparing Presentations * Use Effective Layout And Design In Presentations. * Prepare A Presentation For A Management Audience. Prerequisites: Gen300, Gen101


Business Systems
Course Number BSA310

This Course Reviews Common Business Systems And Their Interrelationships. Business Systems Covered Include Finance, Accounting, Sales, Marketing, Human Resources, Legal And Operations. Emphasis Is Placed Upon The Inputs And Outputs Of Information Systems, The Potential For Integration Of The Systems, And Information Systems Security. Topics And Objectives Business Structure * Identify The Application Of Information Systems In Business. * Examine The Impact Of Information Systems On The Business Structure. Business Environment * Identify Economic, Government And Legal Influences On Business. * Describe The Ethical And Security Considerations For An Information System In Business. * Describe The Need For Security Measures In It Organizations And Information Systems. Finance And Accounting * Examine Accounting Information Systems. * Analyze Accounting Information Systems And Business Processes. Sales And Marketing * Examine Contemporary Marketing Practices. * Describe Marketing In The Electronic Commerce Environment. Information Systems * Identify Types Of Information Systems And Required Security. * Apply The Concepts Of Information Systems To Business Processes. Prerequisites: Cis205, Eng221, Gen300, Gen101


Fundamentals of Business Systems Development
Course Number BSA375

This Course Introduces The Fundamental, Logical, And Design Considerations Addressed During System And Application Software Development. It Provides A Solid Background In Information Systems Analysis And Design Techniques Through A Combination Of Theory And Application. The Systems Development Life Cycle Will Be Fundamental To The Course. Topics And Objectives Systems Development Life Cycle * Define The Systems Development Life Cycle. Systems Analysis * Explain Scope And Feasibility. * Define Systems Analysis And Systems Requirements. Systems Design * Define Design Specifications. Systems Development And Implementation * Analyze Development. * Analyze Implementation. Maintenance * Identify Types Of Maintenance. Prerequisites: Bsa310, Cis319, Gen300, Gen101, Comm215, Mth209


Project Planning & Implementation
Course Number CMGT410

This course provides the foundation for understanding the broad concepts of successful planning, organization, and implementation within the realm of information technology. This course uses real-world examples and identifies common mistakes and pitfalls in project management. Topics covered include project scoping, estimating, budgeting, scheduling, tracking and controlling.


Database Concepts
Course Number DBM381

This course covers database concepts. Topics include data analysis, the principal data models with emphasis on the relational model, entity-relationship diagrams, database design, normalization, and database administration.


SQL for Business
Course Number POS410

This Course Covers Structured Query Language (sql) That Provides A Unified Language That Lets You Query, Manipulate, Or Control Data In A Business Applications Environment. Topics And Objectives Sql Table * Create Tables Using Sql. Table Queries * Apply Single-table Queries. * Apply Multiple-table Queries. Data Changes * Apply Changes To Data. * Apply Changes To Tables. Reports * Apply Reporting In Sql. Embedded Sql * Explain Embedded Sql. * Apply Sql To A Business Application. Prerequisites: Comm215, Dbm380, Gen300, Mth209, Gen101, Mth212, Mth233


Network and Telecommunications Concepts
Course Number NTC360

This course provides an overview of telecommunication systems in a business environment. Topics covered include voice communications, standards, transmission, networks, and internetworking.


Java Programming I
Course Number PRG420

This Course Introduces Object-oriented Programming In The Context Of Business Applications Development. The Basics Of The Java Programming Language Are Covered. Topics And Objectives Java Basics * Explain The Java Virtual Machine. * Explain The Terminology Of Object-oriented Terminology. * Explain Documenting, Coding, Compiling, Executing, Testing, And Debugging Java Programs. Data Types * Define Data Types. * Explain Classes And Methods. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Selection And Repetition * Explain Selection. * Explain Repetition. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Arrays * Explain Arrays. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Objects * Explain Objects. * Apply Simple Java Programming. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Pos370, Gen101, Mth212, Prg210, Mth233


Java Programming II
Course Number PRG421

This Course Continues The Subject In Prg/420, Java Programming I. Topics Include Designing Complex Applications And The Use Of Data Files. Topics And Objectives User Interface * Explain Java User Interfaces. Applets * Explain Applets. * Apply Java Programming. Threads * Explain Error Handling. * Explain Threads. * Apply Java Programming. Files * Explain File Read And Write. * Apply Java Programming. Multimedia * Explain Graphics, Sound, And Animation. * Apply Java Programming. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Prg420, Gen101, Mth212, Mth233


Introduction to Operating Systems
Course Number POS355

This Course Provides An Introduction To Operating Systems. Topics Covered Include Operating System Concepts, Program Execution, And Operating System Internals Such As Memory, Processor, Device, And File Management. A Variety Of Operating Systems Are Compared And Contrasted. Topics And Objectives Computer System * Identify And Define Components Of A Computer System. Operating Systems * Identify And Define Components Of An Operating System (os). * Explain Memory Management. * Explain Processor Management. Windows Server * Explain The Basics Of The Windows Server Operating System. Unix * Explain The Basics Of The Unix Operating System. * Compare And Contrast Windows Xp, Windows 2003, And Linux. Prerequisites: Comm215, Gen300, Mth209, Ntc360, Gen101, Cis205, Mth212, Mth233


Application Implementation
Course Number CMGT445

This Course Will Cover The Process And Issues Associated With The Implementation Of A Computer Application Information System. Topics Will Include The Processes Associated Sponsor And Stakeholder Approvals, End User Training, Technical Staff Training, Conversion From Existing Application(s) And Integration Into The Information System Production Environment. This Course Will Also Examine The Use Of Development And Testing Environments And The Testing Procedures Related To The Implementation Of A Computer Application Information System. Topics And Objectives Implementation Planning * Identify Implementation Milestones And Resources. * Explain Phases Of Application Implementation. * Explain The Implementation Plan. * Identify Implementation Stakeholders. * Explain The Implementation Plan Approval Process. Software Acquisition * Explain The Request For Proposal Process. * Compare Methods Of Software Evaluation And Selection. * Explain The Vendor Selection Process. Change Control And Project Risk Management * Explain The Change Control Process. * Explain Software Versioning. * Evaluate Methods For Identifying Areas Of Project Risk. * Explore Project Risk Mitigation Strategies. Application Documentation * Describe The Content And Purpose Of Application Documentation. * Compare Technical, User And System Training Documentation. Technical Environment Preparation * Compare Development, Test, And Production Technical Environments. * Explain The System Turnover Process. Application Testing * Compare Application Testing Objectives And Methods. * Explain Test Data Preparation. * Organization Preparation * Explain Organizational Change Strategies. * Explain Process Business Procedures. Training * Compare Technical Training And End User Training. * Explain Methods And Timing Considerations For Training Personnel. Data Conversion * Explain Data Transformation And Migration. * Explain Conversion Programs And Procedures. * Explain Sample Data Extraction For Testing. * Describe The Conversion Schedule. System Launch * Compare System Startup Alternatives. * Identify Implementation Roles. * Explain Timeline For Key Activities. * Describe Startup Activities. System Support And Maintenance * Explain System Support Roles And Functions. * Explain The Process Of Enhancing System Functionality. Prerequisites: Bsa310, Bsa375, Bsa400, Bsa411, Bsa412, Cis205, Cmgt410, Cmgt411, Dbm380, Eng221, Gen300, Ntc360, Pos355, Pos410, Prg210, Prg420, Prg421, Web236, Web237, Gen101


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) program is focused on the acquisition of theory and application of technical competencies associated with the information technology profession. The courses prepare students with fundamental knowledge in core technologies, such as systems analysis and design, programming, database design, network architecture and administration, Web technologies and application development, implementation and maintenance.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Software Engineering Courses at University of Maryland University College

Program Name: MS in Information Technology: Software Engineering
Software Design and Implementation
Course Number SWEN 646
Credits 3.0

(formerly Mswe 646.) A Guide For The Transition From Programming-in-the-small To Programming-in-the-large. Software Development Processes And The Role Of Design As Applied In Those Processes Are Discussed. Review Covers Major Design Methods And Available Computer-aided Software Engineering (case) Tools, The Proper Application Of Design Methods And Techniques For Estimating The Magnitude Of The Development Effort. Strengths And Weaknesses Of The Development Methods Are Covered, And Traceability To Requirements And Code Are Examined


Software Verification and Validation
Course Number SWEN 647
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 647.) A study of the evaluation of software for correctness, efficiency, performance and reliability. Skills covered include program proving, code inspection, unit-level testing and system-level analysis. The difficulty and cost of some types of analysis and the need for automation of tedious tasks are examined. Problem-solving skills are stressed, especially in the analysis of code. The textbook world is contrasted with the real world using case studies and personal experiences. Industry attitudes toward reliability and performance are also discussed


Software Maintenance
Course Number SWEN 648
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 648.) A guide for the transition from programming for the short term to programming for the long term. Review covers the role of creation and maintenance in the software development process, as well as analysis and implementation of a software design. Topics also include the need for software maintenance and evolution, software maintenance process and performance issues, planning for extended software life and effective mechanisms to control software change


Usability Engineering
Course Number SWEN 651
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: SWEN 645. A study of the theory and practice of designing user interfaces for interactive systems. Topics include the principles of usability engineering and basic rules for usable design. User interfaces are evaluated using techniques such as contextual inquiry, task analysis, and usability testing. Discussion also covers when these techniques are most appropriate


Software Engineering Project
Course Number SWEN 670
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 617.) A comprehensive examination of the tools, skills and techniques of software engineering and their application. Completion of a major team project is designed to integrate knowledge and skills gained through previous study and provide experience of the constraints commonly experienced in industry (such as scheduling and vagueness of clients). Project requires forming teams (organization) and scheduling work to meet the deadlines imposed by the contract (syllabus)


Information Technology Foundations
Course Number ITEC 610
Credits 3.0

A fundamental study of technology and its applications, as well as the economic and social issues they have raised. Topics include computers, peripherals, databases, and networks; operations (of business, government, and other enterprises), decision support systems, and acquisition of information technology resources; and information security, productivity, equitable access by users, intellectual property rights, and global reach. Discussion also covers current and future developments in the field and their implications.


Information Technology Infrastructure
Course Number ITEC 620
Credits 3.0

An introduction to the broad variety in information technology infrastructures from the perspectives of systems architecture, data communications, and networks. Topics include enterprise information infrastructure, multinational enterprise, servers and Web services, layered network architecture, convergence and Internet protocols, global WAN services, enterprise network design, wireless technologies, network security, network management, server architectures, storage management and networks, and content management networks.


Information Systems Analysis, Modeling, and Design
Course Number ITEC 630
Credits 3.0

(Formerly CSMN 635.) A study of systems analysis and design, using selected engineering and management science techniques and practices. Topics include requirements determination, modeling, decision making, and proposal development. The System Development Life Cycle Model, including system implementation and post implementation activities, is examined. Emphasis is on the specification of the information system�s logical and physical analysis and design from a management perspective. Research and project assignments related to information systems analysis, design, implementation, and/or project planning and control, require individual and group work.


Information Technology Project Management
Course Number ITEC 640
Credits 3.0

An examination of the fundamental principles and practice of managing programs and projects in an information processing and high-tech environment. The dynamic nature of IT and the effect of life cycles are explored. The fundamental building blocks of high-tech management styles (including project planning, organizational structure, team building, and effective control mechanisms) are addressed. Discussion covers the effect of product and project life cycles in delivering a successful IT project, considering the obsolescence factors in procurement/ stakeholder contracts. The goal is to gain a solid foundation to successfully manage each phase of the project life cycle, work within organizational and cost constraints, set goals linked directly to stakeholder needs, and utilize proven management tools to execute a dynamic project on time and within budget. Emphasis is on how to apply the essential concepts, processes, and techniques in the management of large-scale governmental or commercial programs.


Systems Engineering
Course Number SWEN 603
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 603.) An examination of the systems engineering process, with special emphasis on software engineering as a discipline within systems engineering. Topics include an overview of system theory and structures, elements of the system life cycle (including systems design and development), risk and trade-off analyses, modeling and simulation, and the tools needed to analyze and support the systems process.


System and Software Standards and Requirements
Course Number SWEN 645
Credits 3.0

(Formerly MSWE 645.) An examination of major models of software requirements and specifications (sequential and concurrent systems), existing software standards and practices, and formal methods of software development. A comparative survey of various languages and methods serves to emphasize similarities and significant differences. Topics also include writing system and software requirements, formal specification analysis, formal description reasoning, models of “standard” paradigms, and translations of such models into formal notations.


Program description: The Software Engineering specialization provides a foundation in technical concepts and design techniques, as well as management and teamwork approaches, for building software systems. The emphasis of this specialization is on implementing software engineering projects within cost and schedule by applying proven and innovative practices that overcome the shortcomings of an undisciplined approach.

Software Engineering Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Master of Science in Computer Science - Software Engineering
Computer Systems Architecture
Course Number CS644
Credits 4.0

Computer Systems Architecture reviews the architectural paradigms for various types of software systems, including distributed and heterogeneous systems. The course includes an in-depth examination of how software quality is supported in the system architecture. It examines several architectural evaluation methods to analyze the merits of candidate architectures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Software Systems Engineering Process
Course Number CS671
Credits 4.0

This course presents the current research and application of the principles of the software process and process improvement. The in-depth analysis of the basic principles behind software process improvement provides a framework for further investigation. The concepts of software development, configuration management, quality assurance, metrics and risk management are explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Computer Science Capstone
Course Number CS698
Credits 4.0

Computer Science Capstone
Course Number CS698
Credits 4.0

or any 600 level course
Course Number ELE
Credits 4.0

Computer Networking
Course Number CS635
Credits 4.0

This Course Surveys Both The Foundational Concepts And Current State Of The Practice In Computer Networking. The Lower Four Layers Of The Osi Reference Model Are Investigated Along With A Comprehensive Treatment Of The Tcp/ip Protocol Suite. Network Issues, Such As Addressing And Routing, And Transport Issues, And Connections And Reliability Are Discussed. Major Network Applications Are Also Surveyed, Including Examination Of Their Use In Current Practice.


Software Project Management
Course Number SWE440
Credits 4.0

Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.


Database Systems
Course Number CS660
Credits 4.0

This course explores the current state of the practice in database systems and provides a foundation for future study. Topics include the database life cycle, database models, relational algebra, SQL and an overview of the analysis, design, and implementation of relational databases. Concepts and issues in transaction processing, concurrency, security, data warehouses and data marts, distributed databases and web-based database systems are discussed.


Systems Engineering Methods
Course Number CS672
Credits 4.0

Software Engineering Methods provides an overview of the techniques and approaches used in systems engineering. The topics include the models, evaluation methods, decision-making processes, system quality, system design, integration, logistics, maintenance, and system disposal.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Software Requirements Engineering
Course Number CS455
Credits 4.0

Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, identification, definition, and documentation. Students will explore and practice elicitation techniques, define functional and non-functional requirements, write use-case scenarios, explore user interface alternatives, learn how to analyze and model requirements, and develop a requirements traceability matrix that spans the software development lifecycle.


Software Design
Course Number CS457
Credits 4.0

Software Design defines and describes the behavior of the software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course.


Program description: If you are a computer science engineer, then earning a Master of Science in Computer Science with a concentration in Software Engineering (MSCS-SE) can help you gain a competitive edge in pursuing increasing levels of responsibility in your career. Employment of computer software engineers is expected to grow at the national level by up to 38 percent through the year 2016 as organizations design and develop new computer software systems, and incorporate new technologies in a rapidly growing range of applications in order to maximize the efficiency of their computer systems.

The MSCS-SE degree program can give you the skills necessary for the organization and control of software development efforts using industry-current software engineering techniques to successfully deliver software systems requiring multi-person effort. You can learn to apply the principles and techniques of computer science, engineering and mathematical analysis to the design, development, testing and evaluation of the software and systems that can optimize the performance of computers in their many applications.

Program Name: Doctor of Computer Science
Research and Writing I
Course Number CS801
Credits 3.0

This course is one of a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses) is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Current Topics in the Discipline
Course Number CS803
Credits 5.0

This course provides an overview of current topics in the disciplines of computer science, software engineering, and sub-disciplines such as security. A high-level view of where topics fit helps students to better understand how the disciplines relate to one another. Students also discuss the state of the practice for selected disciplines and sub-disciplines and narrow their area of specialization for the remainder of the degree program. Prerequisite: None


Research Methods
Course Number CS804
Credits 5.0

This course introduces experimental design and analysis of data. Topics include independent and dependent variables, how to collect data, hypothesis testing and other forms of data analysis. You will be expected to design and conduct an experiment, collect and analyze data, and then write a technical report on your effort. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing II
Course Number CS806
Credits 3.0

This course is the second in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Project Management and Process Engineering
Course Number CS807
Credits 5.0

This Course Provides An Understanding Of The Technical And Managerial Processes Involved In Planning And Conducting Projects To Develop And Maintain Complex, Software-intensive Systems. Students Prepare Project Plans And Critically Evaluate Process Models Such As The Sei Capability Maturity Models, Iso/ieee Standard 12207, And The Pmi Body Of Knowledge. Emphasis Is Placed On Project Management, System Development, Information Security, And Other Process Areas. In Addition, Trends In Software Development Methods, Tools, And Techniques That Support These Processes Are Covered. We Also Discuss How The Software Lifecycle Relates To Business Process Improvement And Why Many Process Improvement Initiatives Fail. Students Perform Research Into Current Best Practices, Prepare A Project Plan For A Realistic Software Project, Conduct An Assessment Of Selected Processes In Their Organizations, And Recommend Improvements For The Software Processes They Have Selected. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing III
Course Number CS811
Credits 3.0

This course is the third in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IV
Course Number CS816
Credits 3.0

This course is the fourth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing V
Course Number CS821
Credits 3.0

This course is the fifth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VI
Course Number CS826
Credits 3.0

This course is the sixth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VII
Course Number CS831
Credits 3.0

This course is the seventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VIII
Course Number CS836
Credits 3.0

This course is the eighth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Requirements Engineering
Course Number CS837
Credits 5.0

This course presents the state of the practice in requirements engineering for software-intensive systems, emphasizing distributed systems and information security. Topics covered include requirements elicitation, feasibility analysis; cost-benefit analysis; the operational concept document; the requirements specification; verification; preparation for validation; requirements management; reconciling requirements with development constraints; and trends in requirements methods, tools, and techniques. Students will discuss the role of requirements engineering in the system lifecycle, with emphasis on quality considerations such as security, reliability, and scalability. Students perform research into current best practices and conduct a term project that incorporates requirements for a realistic system. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing IX
Course Number CS841
Credits 3.0

This course is the ninth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing X
Course Number CS846
Credits 3.0

This course is the tenth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XI
Course Number CS851
Credits 3.0

This course is the eleventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Software Architecture and Design
Course Number CS854
Credits 5.0

Architectural frameworks and patterns are often used in the design of software systems. This course teaches students to understand commonly used frameworks and patterns and how to tailor framework and combine patterns in software design. Students will also study the role of software architects in the development of software systems and the advantages of systematic development processes that include an architectural design phase. Prerequisite: None


Futuring and Innovation
Course Number CS855
Credits 5.0

Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Introduces formal methods of innovation and diffusion of innovation. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XII
Course Number CS856
Credits 3.0

This course is the final one in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members, and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Simulation and Modeling
Course Number CS810
Credits 5.0

Complex Computing Applications Are Launched System Wide Only After Simulation, Modeling And Testing Have Been Conducted And The Results Analyzed. This Course Addresses Fundamental Issues In Developing Those Processes And Prepares Students For Their Own Project Simulation Or Model. Students Will Be Able To Describe Differences In Various Methods Of Central Tendency, Effectively Use Anova And Glm For Data Analysis And Demonstrate How Different Testing Variables Can Affect Simulations Or Models. Prerequisite: None


Usability and Interaction
Course Number CS820
Credits 5.0

This course investigates what qualities of a software product make it usable. Emphasis is placed on how one includes usability concerns throughout the software life cycle, how one designs for usability, how to determine experimentally the usability of a product, and the importance of early usability testing on a simple prototype. Students will be expected to design and conduct usability experiments and then analyze the data in order to refine product design. Prerequisite: None


Advanced Topics in Database Systems
Course Number CS825
Credits 5.0

Computer Science is dynamic; Moore’s Law tells us that today’s standard could very well be obsolete in 18 months. This course addresses the top three issues of current database theory and practice, identifying current trends and near future changes in the field. As such, the course content will vary according to the evolution of the discipline. Students will research major literature sources that address issues and trends, compare and contrast centralized database systems with distributed databases and identify principles behind database warehousing and data mining. Prerequisite: None


Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Course Number CS838
Credits 5.0

This course covers the fundamentals of concurrent and distributed systems including threading, synchronization and deadlock prevention as well as logical clocks, group communication and distributed transactions. It also covers current topics such as web services and software for multiprocessors and multicore processors. Prerequisite: None


System Metrics and Risk Analysis
Course Number CS840
Credits 5.0

Software development has risks – time, resources, and change. Measuring and managing risk is essential to successful software development. In this course, students will investigate and analyze current and emerging best practices for managing risk and learn how a good metrics program can be developed. Students will also use metric data to support risk exposure, while developing a risk mitigation plan for their organization. Prerequisite: None


Networking and Security
Course Number CS850
Credits 5.0

A generation ago, business referred to the shop owner down the street. Today’s business is global; companies have offices around the world, processing data twenty-four hours a day. Keeping software synchronized, online and secure is the ongoing challenge of computer professionals. In this course, students will assess the impact on security concerns when an organization moves from a centralized system to a distributed system. This includes describing emerging security issues and risk factors and designing a secure information system. Prerequisite: None


Program description: If you are a computer science professional interested in taking your career development to the highest level and making key leadership contributions in your area of expertise, you may want to consider enrolling in the Doctor of Computer Science (DCS) degree program offered through Colorado Technical University.

The Doctor of Computer Science degree program encourages you to think and act strategically and facilitates in developing your ability to predict future trends and make positive contributions in your area of technical expertise through mentoring, action research and practical projects. You can also perform research that advances the field of computer science and perfect your ability to effectively communicate technical material to non-technical decision makers. This Doctor of Computer Science degree program is designed by computer science professionals and academics to help you:

Develop a software process improvement plan for an organization.
Design, test and implement an experiment, reporting on the results.
Evaluate established and emerging security systems.
Predict future trends and developments based on data and research.
All three years of the Doctor of Computer Science degree program are designed to provide computer science professionals with the theoretical, research and application capabilities necessary to pursue a successful career and research in their chosen field.

Year one of this executive format Computer Science degree program focuses on research in the software engineering process: analysis, design, simulation and modeling, which should result in a broad overview of computer science and enable the use of simulation and modeling skills to produce an experimental design. Year two is designed to help you form a personal understanding of the advanced research and methods used in the specialized area of study. The focus of research is database systems, software usability, and new developments in computer science. Projects include the preparation of an industry white paper and a proposal for research to be carried out in the third year. The final year of the program involves developing metrics and risk analysis programs, exploration of high level design issues, evaluation of methods of maintaining security in distributed systems, and anticipating and planning for the future. The deliverable in year three is an applied research project to be submitted to an academic journal.

Software Engineering Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Software Engineering Schools (campus and online)

University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Carnegie Mellon University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 115
Rank in USA 44th
Drexel University
Total Programs 125
Number of Subjects 123
Rank in USA 108th
Marist College
Total Programs 81
Number of Subjects 95
Rank in USA 120th
Fairfield University
Total Programs 75
Number of Subjects 92
Rank in USA 133rd
Rochester Institute of Technology
Total Programs 1
Number of Subjects 108
Rank in USA 137th
Towson University
Total Programs 114
Number of Subjects 109
Rank in USA 141st
Loyola University Chicago
Total Programs 160
Number of Subjects 125
Rank in USA 144th
University of Denver
Total Programs 136
Number of Subjects 121
Rank in USA 148th
Texas Tech University
Total Programs 183
Number of Subjects 154
Rank in USA 150th
The University of Texas at Dallas
Total Programs 71
Number of Subjects 69
Rank in USA 153rd
Michigan Technological University
Total Programs 104
Number of Subjects 97
Rank in USA 158th
Duquesne University
Total Programs 152
Number of Subjects 127
Rank in USA 166th
Seattle University
Total Programs 106
Number of Subjects 118
Rank in USA 169th
Allegheny College
Total Programs 48
Number of Subjects 47
Rank in USA 183rd
East Carolina University
Total Programs 164
Number of Subjects 142
Rank in USA 214th
Clarkson University
Total Programs 52
Number of Subjects 61
Rank in USA 238th
Mercer University
Total Programs 97
Number of Subjects 99
Rank in USA 246th
Baldwin-Wallace College
Total Programs 86
Number of Subjects 86
Rank in USA 253rd