Online Training Courses at Accredited Schools

University of Phoenix, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its training courses to be successful training specialists, corporate trainers, leadership trainers, personal skills trainers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 205,020 people employed as training and development specialists alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $55,310. Human resources, training, and labor relations specialists make on average $59,070 per year and there are about 219,240 of them employed today.

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Training Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Master of Arts in Education/Adult Education and Training
Foundations of Adult Education and Training
Course Number AET505

This course focuses on the principles of adult learning and andragogical theory. It addresses the history of adult learning, the characteristics of adult learners, key adult learning theories, and learning processes and styles. Additionally, the course investigates factors that influence adult education and training environments such as motivation, critical thinking skills, and ethics. Topics and Objectives History of Adult Learning Explore the history of adult learning. Explain the impact of federal mandates on adult education and training. Compare and contrast andragogy and pedagogy. Examine adult learning in a contemporary society. Purposes and Principles of Adult Education and Training Analyze the purposes of adult education and training. Examine the fundamental principles of adult learning. Identify the providers of adult education and training. Explore subject-matter categories of adult learning. Adult Development and Learning Examine the biological and psychological development of adult learners. Analyze the influences of sociocultural and integrative perspectives on development. Explore cognitive development in adulthood. Examine the notion of intelligence in reference to adult learners. Learning Process Explain memory and cognition. Analyze the adult learning process and experience. Examine key theories of learning. Learning Transactions with Adults Identify characteristics of adult learners. Analyze the impact of learning styles on adult learning. Examine ways to utilize andragogical techniques. Compare and contrast traditional and non-traditional instructional models. Adult Learning Environment Describe the characteristics of formal and informal adult education and training settings. Apply ethics to adult learning environments. Explore the application of critical thinking in the adult learning environment. Examine the motivation of adults in the learning environment. Describe the most common challenges in an education or in a training environment.



Instructional Design
Course Number AET515

This course focuses on systematic approaches to instructional design. Learners create an instructional plan that outlines each of the five components of a systematic instructional design model (i.e., ADDIE: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation). The course identifies trends and issues in instructional design for adult learners. Topics and Objectives Instructional Design Models and Analysis Analyze systematic approaches to instructional design. Examine the components of a needs assessment. Identify performance gaps based on a needs assessment. Design Construct goals for an instructional plan. Create performance-based objectives that align with instructional goals. Describe a summative assessment to support learner outcomes. Analyze the impact of learner characteristics and learning context on instructional design. Development Determine delivery modality. Select instructional strategies. Implementation Create an implementation schedule for the instructional plan. Evaluate resources for instructional delivery. Analyze the purposes of formative evaluations. Evaluation Examine strategies for evaluating a systematic approach to instructional design. Identify criteria for determining that design goals, performance-based objectives, and learning outcomes were achieved. Analyze possible recommendations for future use. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design Describe issues and trends in various instructional settings. Analyze issues and trends in the use of various instructional modalities. Predict how current issues and trends will impact the future of instructional design.


Instructional Strategies in Adult Education and Training
Course Number AET520

This course builds upon the foundation provided in the instructional design course and focuses on development and implementation of instruction that facilitates adult learning. Learners examine and apply models, strategies, and methods for planning and for implementing instruction. Instructional approaches, engagement strategies, and management of the instructional environment are explored. Topics and Objectives Effective Communication and Instructional Techniques Describe effective communication for facilitators. Analyze the relationship between interpersonal skills and instruction. Examine information components of an instructional module/training plan. Instructional Planning Explain components in the development of an instructional module/training plan. Analyze components in the implementation of an instructional module/training plan. Examine planning and instructional variables. Engagement of Adult Learners Analyze methods of engaging the adult learner. Describe the essential components of collaborative learning. Describe compelling questioning techniques. Instructional Approaches Examine the roles of the facilitator and the learner in various instructional approaches. Examine teaching/training concepts. Explain the rationale for selected instructional approaches. Create an audience-appropriate instructional module/training plan. Critical Thinking and Problem-Based Learning for Adults Examine problem-based learning. Employ components of critical thinking to improve cognitive skills. Management of the Instructional Environment Identify elements of effective course syllabi/instructional agendas. Analyze proactive management strategies. Describe appropriate responses to challenging participant behavior.


Facilitating Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners
Course Number AET525

This course focuses on facilitation strategies for meeting the needs of diverse adult learners. It examines differences among adult learners in language, literacy skills, and learning styles. It also utilizes previous learning experiences and provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to provide differentiated instruction to address different needs. In addition, this course covers the challenges and the opportunities that diversity and multiculturalism present in facilitating adult education and training. Topics and Objectives Connecting with the Adult Learner Review characteristics of adult learners. Identify learning styles of diverse adult learners. Describe the diverse adult learner population. Analyze characteristics of effective facilitators for diverse learners. Challenges and Opportunities of Diversity and Multiculturalism in Adult Learning Examine demographic profiles influencing adult learning. Examine the psychographic factors influencing adult learning. Identify categories of special needs learners. Explore challenges and opportunities of diversity and multiculturalism in adult education and training. Implications for the Facilitation of Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners Analyze types of regulations and policies that impact facilitation of instruction for diverse adult learners. Examine the facilitation implications for multicultural adult learners. Examine the implications of multicultural facilitators on adult learners. Strategies for Effective Facilitation of Instruction for Diverse Adult Learners Examine how to establish a foundation for working with adult learners. Explore effective learning environments for diverse learners. Analyze differentiated instruction as an effective means of facilitating learning. Supportive Strategies for Diverse Adult Learners Examine strategies for engaging diverse adults in their learning. Examine classroom communication strategies that support diverse adult learners. Identify support services for diverse adult learners. Explore language and literacy challenges that impact facilitation of instruction for diverse adult learners. Effective Diverse Curriculum Explore continuous improvement techniques to monitor and to adjust facilitation methods. Examine best practices to monitor diverse adult learners’ achievement of outcomes. Demonstrate modification strategies for assignments, instruction, and assessments for diverse learners


Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Learning
Course Number AET535

This course focuses on developing the skills necessary to become effective assessors of adult learners in postsecondary and training environments. It provides the fundamentals of varied classroom assessments and training evaluation models, such as formative and summative tests and authentic assessments. Learners develop assessments and analyze how assessment data is used to improve instruction and learning. Additionally, the purposes, the methods, and the reporting of evaluation for trainers are explored. Topics and Objectives Overview of Assessment Identify what assessment is and how it is used in learning environments Differentiate between assessment, evaluation, measurement, and testing Compare and contrast formative and summative assessment Assessment in Adult Education Explore the purposes of assessment in adult education Analyze the types of summative assessment Analyze ethical standards for assessments Using Assessment to Improve Instruction Describe effective assessment techniques Analyze the use of assessment to improve instruction and learning Evaluation Principles and Purposes Examine the guiding principles of evaluation Explore the purposes of evaluation in training Examine decision-making in evaluation Describe effective evaluation models Evaluation for Trainers Identify data sources for evaluation Explore data analysis for evaluation Examine the purpose and process of evaluation reporting


Coaching and Mentoring
Course Number EDL531

This course provides an exploration into how mentoring and coaching improves teaching and learning. This course examines mentoring and coaching competencies, including ethical guidelines, creating collegial relationships, building learning communities, effective communication, problem-solving and conflict resolution, and facilitating learning and accountability. Candidates will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to integrate and apply these competencies in real life and instructional leadership situations. Topics and Objectives Foundations of Coaching and Mentoring Identify characteristics of coaching. Identify characteristics of mentoring. Compare and contrast coaching and mentoring. Identify the dispositions necessary to be an effective coach and mentor. Explore the International Coach Federation Code of Ethics. Collegial Relationships Identify the role and responsibilities of a coach and of a mentor. Examine the elements of cognitive coaching. Analyze the 16 Habits of Mind. Demonstrate effective collaboration skills. Effective Communications Describe factors that impact communication. Describe effective communication processes. Illustrate strategies for promoting dialogue, resolving conflict, and problem solving. Mentors as Instructional Coaches Examine topics for instructional coaching. Analyze opportunities to cultivate learning focused relationships. Facilitating Results Explain the stages of mentoring. Identify ways to create awareness. Establish realistic goals and objectives. Design an action plan. Analyze effective modeling and motivation strategies. Develop a process to monitor progress and accountability. Coaches as Leaders of Change Develop an understanding of the effects of change on school culture. Identify ways to create and communicate support. Examine ways to manage change effectively. Explore mentoring and coaching as elements of professional growth.


E-Learning Design Technologies
Course Number AET545

This Course Provides Adult Learners The Opportunity To Design A Web-based E-learning Tutorial. The Focus Is On The Importance Of Planning, Principles Of Good Web-page Design, Storyboarding, And Elements Of Multimedia. Web-based Design Standards, As Well As Appropriate Use Of Web Pages And Multimedia, Are Analyzed. It Reviews E-learning Software, Computer-mediated Delivery Platforms, And Learning Management Systems. Topics And Objectives Analysis Phase And Introduction To Multimedia Review The Addie Instructional Design Process. Perform A Needs Assessment To Address A Training Need That Will Be Solved By A Web-based Tutorial. Identify Performance Gaps Based On The Needs Assessment. Identify Different Types Of Multimedia That Can Be Integrated Into E-learning. Design Phase And Storyboarding Write Instructional Goals And Performance Objectives Based On The Needs Analysis (gap Analysis). Apply Storyboard Principles For Creating A Web-based Tutorial. Select Appropriate Web-based Platforms For E-learning. Identify Different Strategies That Increase Adult Learner Engagement. Development Phase And Introduction To Web Design Analyze Effective E-learning Instructional Strategies And Delivery Modalities. Examine Html Development Techniques For An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Review Effective Web Design Techniques. Creation Of A Web-based Tutorial Create An Effective Web-based Tutorial. Analyze Page Layout Techniques. Compare And Contrast Multimedia Elements. Determine A Summative Assessment For A Web-based Tutorial. Implementation Of E-learning Publish An E-learning Tutorial To The Web. Analyze The Preparedness Of Learners For E-learning. Review E-learning Standards. Evaluation Of A Web-based Tutorial Examine E-assessment Tools. Evaluate The Instructional Effectiveness Of A Web-based Tutorial.


Performance Improvement and Management
Course Number AET550

This Course Provides Learners With An Overview Of Performance Improvement Principles. Learners Identify And Analyze Organizational Performance Gaps, Create Learning Interventions To Diminish Those Gaps, And Evaluate Training Using Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels. Topics And Objectives Human Performance Technology Define Performance Improvement Describe The Human Performance Technology (hpt) Process Demonstrate That Performance Improvement Is Systems-based Compare And Contrast The Components Of Performance Improvement And Of Instructional Design Relate The Performance Improvement Process To The Addie Model Human Performance Management Define Performance Management Examine The Key Features Of Ideal Performance Management Analyze Learning Theories And Their Impact On The Performance Management Process Performance Gaps Determine The Nature Of A Performance Gap Based On Motivation (affective Domain), Declarative Knowledge (cognitive Domain), And Procedural Knowledge (psychomotor Domain) Examine The Role Of The Performance Model In Identifying Performance Gaps Inspect The Causes Of Performance Gaps Performance Interventions Define Performance Interventions And The Role They Play In The Hpt Process Examine The Types Of Performance Interventions Inspect The Factors That Influence The Selection Of Performance Interventions Determine The Risks In Selecting An Inappropriate Intervention Performance Evaluations Examine The Four Levels Of Kirkpatrick’s Evaluation Model Examine The Types Of Performance Evaluations To Measure Results Of An Intervention Analyze The Factors That Influence The Evaluation Of Performance Justify The Success Of The Performance Intervention Becoming A Practitioner In Performance Management Inspect Roles Of Successful Practitioners In The Field Of Performance Management Review Opportunities In Performance Management Outline A Career Development Plan That Includes Certification, Continuing Education, And Job Outlook Examine Ethical Standards In Performance Management


Overview of the Community College
Course Number AET555

This course provides an overview of the community college. It examines global, national, and local perspectives of the community college. The course also examines the history and development, mission and purpose, functions, governance and organization, and trends and issues of community colleges. Topics and Objectives Historical Perspectives, Philosophies, and Missions Examine the history of community colleges Describe the historical and current functions of community colleges Explore the general mission of community colleges Governance and Organizational Structure Compare community college governance models Explore national and local governance issues Investigate community college organizational structures and their effects Examine the purpose of accreditation Investigate measurements of accountability Funding and Finances Identify sources of community college funding Analyze the relationship among funding, services, course and program offerings, and local and national economic issues Student Populations and Student Services Describe community college student populations Explore admission, enrollment, and registration policies Examine services offered to community college students Evaluate essential and non-essential services Explore retention issues Examine the role of articulation and its relationship to community college students Curriculum Explore community college curricula Examine curriculum development processes Identify types of degrees and certificates awarded by community colleges Instruction Examine instructional methodologies and delivery modalities Explore developmental education and its role in student success Describe services that support student learning Identify methods and challenges of assessment Roles and Challenges for Faculty Identify faculty roles Analyze faculty challenges and their effects on the institutional environment Examine faculty qualification and certification processes Explore the role and challenges of technology in the educational environment The Future of Community Colleges Describe research in and about community colleges Analyze trends and challenges related to the community college Investigate how community colleges respond to local social, political, and economic influences


Action Research and Evaluation
Course Number EDD581

This course examines action research and its role in decision-making and in educational practices. Students are introduced to various types of action research and to the elements of the action research process, including identifying a problem, determining a problem statement and a purpose, conducting a literature review, planning for the collection and the analysis of data, and creating a plan of action. Methods for collecting, evaluating, and analyzing data are discussed. Students identify ethical issues related to research as well, including a professional code of ethics, confidentiality, and research using human subjects. In addition, they synthesize and apply the content of the course by writing a proposal for an action research study. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Action Research Define action research. Distinguish between types of action research. Identify the components of action research. Review examples of action research. Explain how action research can be utilized to effect school improvement and change. Examine opportunities to conduct action research collaboratively. Introduction to the Action Research Process Examine the role of reflection on practice in generating ideas for a research focus. Determine appropriate topics for an action research study. Identify the elements of an effective research question. Determine varied sources relevant to a research problem. Explain the importance of the literature review. Compare qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Collecting Data Explain processes for selecting research participants. Describe varied types of data that can be collected to answer research questions. Examine qualitative research designs, methods, and issues in collecting data. Initial Steps in Developing an Action Research Study Examine quantitative research designs and methods, and issues in collecting data. Explain ways of ensuring validity in action research. Develop a plan for collecting data. Analyzing and Interpreting Data Explain the purpose of interim data analysis and its importance in action research. Describe ways to analyze and report results for qualitative data. Describe ways to analyze and report results for quantitative data. Draw conclusions from data. Ethical Issues Related to Educational Research Outline guidelines for conducting research using human subjects. Analyze the impact of technology on the ethical issue of confidentiality in educational research. Discuss the ethical use of data in educational decision-making. Assess ethical considerations when publishing reports of a research study. Develop a process for following ethical guidelines throughout an action research study. Creating a Proposal for an Action Research Study Produce a proposal for an action research study. Prepare an overview of the proposal for presentation.


E-Learning
Course Number AET541

Course Description This course focuses on e-learning for adult learners. Students apply instructional design techniques, learning theory, and technical tools for e-learning activities. The course also addresses the challenges associated with the e-learning environment. Topics and Objectives Foundations of E-Learning Identify the characteristics of e-learning. Summarize the evolution of e-learning. Analyze the purposes, benefits, and challenges of e-learning. Describe the instructional methods of an e-learning environment. Designing E-Learning Summarize the principles for designing effective e-learning instruction. Analyze the effect of personalization on e-learning. Evaluate the benefits of segmentation and pretraining. Explain methods for incorporating worked examples in e-learning environments. Instructional Considerations: Text and Graphics Summarize the principles for effective use of text in e-learning. Summarize the principles for integrating graphics in e-learning. Evaluate the use of text and graphics in instruction. Integrate text and graphics for effective instruction. Instructional Considerations: Text and Audio Identify the various technologies for audio in e-learning. Determine appropriate uses of audio in e-learning. Integrate text and audio for effective instruction. Analyze the application of audio in e-learning environments. Effective E-Learning Practices Describe the principles behind the effective use of practice in e-learning. Determine the effectiveness of feedback in practice exercises. Apply multimedia principles in practice exercises. Justify collaboration in e-learning. Evaluate the level of learner control in e-learning. Applications of E-Learning Guidelines Summarize e-learning principles that promote thinking skills. Analyze the role of simulations and games in e-learning. Prioritize guidelines for developing e-learning courseware.


Technology for the Adult Learner
Course Number AET531

This course explores a variety of ways in which technology can support and facilitate instruction for adult learners, including the use of web resources and multimedia.It also addresses the facilitator’s role in researching, selecting, integrating, and managing technology in an adult learning and training environment. The course focuses on technologies, software applications, and the evaluation of technology. Additionally, the course analyzes the effects of 21st century technology tools on intellectual property and other legal matters. Topics and Objectives Transformation of Online Learning Analyze how the delivery of adult education has changed over the past 50 years. Analyze the effect of modern technologies on adult education. Identify technology skills required by instructors. Facilitating Online Instruction Compare technology-based learning tools that enhance student learning. Analyze the importance of collaboration for student learning. Identify assessment strategies for the online environment. Synchronous Learning Identify the advantages and disadvantages of synchronous learning. Explain how technology tools can enhance synchronous learning. Identify strategies for facilitating synchronous online learning. Synchronous Versus Asynchronous Learning Identify the advantages and disadvantages of asynchronous learning. Identify strategies for facilitating asynchronous online learning. Compare synchronous learning to asynchronous learning. Administration of Technologies Identify challenges associated with managing the use of technologies. Evaluate an organization’s capacity for integrating technology to aid instruction. Analyze the functionality and purpose of various communication tools. Legal Matters Analyze the effect of modern technology tools on legal and ethical issues. Identify the key components of an acceptable use policy.


Professional Communications
Course Number COM 516
Credits 1.0

This course provides new graduate students in University of Phoenix programs with an introduction to strategies for academic success within the University of Phoenix adult learning model. Topics include oral and written communication, methods for finding and evaluating course resources, critical thinking, the purpose and use of portfolios, program standards, stress and time management, and tools for collaborative learning, in preparation for team assignments in future classes.


Program description: Our Adult Education and Training degree program gives you the tools you need to enhance adult learning.

You'll focus on methods and techniques for engaging adult learners in a corporate training or community college setting, or any other academic or recreational instructional environment.

The course work emphasizes adult learning theory, the needs of diverse learners, critical issues and trends in adult education and training, instructional design and strategies, the use of technologies as well as assessment and learning. You'll also focus on coaching and mentoring, e-learning and instructional web design technologies.

Be a part of a lifetime of learning for today's adult learners. Enroll today in our Master of Arts in Education/Adult Education and Training degree program.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Training Courses at Capella University

Program Name: MS - Training and Performance Improvement
Foundations of Theory and Practice in Master’s Studies
Course Number ED5002
Credits 4.0

This is a foundational course for learners in higher education and training specializations. Learners are introduced to discipline-specific topics and begin to put into practice the academic developmental and behavioral competencies they are expected to master during their degree program. Learners engage in scholarly inquiry, research, critical thinking, and communication within the context of their specialization. ED5002 must be taken by master’s learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Survey of Research Methodology
Course Number COUN5006
Credits 4.0

This Course Provides An Overview Of Graduate-level Approaches To Research Methodology. Learners Study Major Research Methodologies And Quantitative And Qualitative Approaches To Needs Assessment, Program Evaluation, And Program Design. Learners May Only Earn Credit For Coun5006 Or Cst5006 Or Hs5006 Or Shb5006.


Introduction to Training and Performance Systems
Course Number ED7631
Credits 4.0

This course is an overview of the history of training and human performance improvement (HPI) and its associated theories, principles, and processes. Learners develop a systems view of developing people and organizations by completing a performance improvement project in which they perform business, performance, gap, and root cause analyses; select appropriate interventions; and develop implementation, change, and evaluation plans.


Needs Assessment: Models and Procedures
Course Number ED7641
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of the needs assessment models and procedures used to diagnose the causes of workplace performance problems. Learners design and develop needs assessment instruments and collect and diagnose data to differentiate workplace performance issues that require training solutions from those that require non-training interventions.


Designing Training and Performance Solutions
Course Number ED7662
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore various training and performance gaps and solutions associated with information, resources, incentives, knowledge, and capacity. Learners examine theoretical models used to match performance gaps with potential solutions and identify the factors needed to enhance the success of a performance improvement intervention. Learners then select a performance gap to address using an intervention selection tool.


Delivery Systems for Training and Performance Improvement
Course Number ED7672
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an in-depth, application-based overview of facilitation skills and e-learning initiatives for training and performance improvement and the tools and strategies used to address these critical issues.


Evaluating Training and Performance Improvement Systems
Course Number ED7652
Credits 4.0

Learners explore reasons that evaluation is essential: so that courses or performance solutions can be improved and so that it can be clearly shown how a particular training intervention can improve both personal and organizational performance. This course provides learners with an understanding of measurement and evaluation theory, principles, and procedures. Topics include quantitative and qualitative measures, performance objectives, Kirkpatrick’s five levels, and reporting strategies.


Return on Investment in Training and Performance Improvement
Course Number ED7675
Credits 4.0

This Course Prepares Learners To Apply Return On Investment (roi) Methodology That Has Been Developed In The Field To Their Own Organizations. Topics Include Planning For An Evaluation, Collecting Data, Analyzing Data, And Reporting Procedures. While Utilizing Statistics Is An Important Part Of Roi Evaluation, This Course Does Not Include Developing Competencies In Statistical Analysis. Upon Successful Completion Of The Final Deliverable For The Course, Learners Are Awarded The Roi Certificate From The Roi Institute. For Phd And Ms Training And Performance Improvement Learners Only. Must Be Taken During The Learner’s Final Quarter. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Training and Performance Improvement Capstone
Course Number ED5994
Credits 4.0

The capstone course is required for learners in the master’s Training and Performance Improvement specialization and is taken after completing all required and elective course work. Learners demonstrate proficiency in integrating learning from required and elective courses by completing a final project. For MS Training and Performance Improvement learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Survey of Human Resource Development Research
Course Number ED7679
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners explore the values, purposes, methods, and processes of human resource development research. In particular, learners focus on identifying the ways theory and research can be used as practical tools to solve human resource development challenges. For PhD and MS Training and Performance Improvement learners only.



Coaching for High Performance
Course Number ED7830
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study theories and practices used to coach individuals to improved learning, decision making, and performance. Learners explore theoretical coaching approaches and models; client needs assessment; the coaching knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for supporting clients through personal and professional change; and the role of coaching in organizational performance systems. Learners focus on becoming confident and effective mediators of people seeking to improve the quality of their personal and professional lives.


The Delivery of Distance Education
Course Number ED5804
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners gain an understanding of current distance education delivery systems, including print, recorded audio and video, and Internet technologies. Learners also examine the ways delivery technologies inform and constrain design decisions.


Adult Development and Learning
Course Number ED5315
Credits 4.0

This course presents theories and research related to adult development. Learners examine the changes that occur during the early, middle, and advanced stages of adulthood and analyze their effects on adult learning. Learners also consider the impact of gender, culture, and personal experience on adult learning and evaluate their related instruction implications. This course emphasizes critically reflective, transformational teaching and learning.


Program description: Increase your career potential by earning the only master's Training and Performance Improvement specialization that includes valuable certification in ROI MethodologyTM from the ROI InstituteTM. Based on the American Society for Training and Development's (ASTD) Human Performance Improvement Model, this online program is designed to teach you how to apply human performance technology to improve organizational productivity. Course topics include analyzing systems performance; selecting, designing and implementing performance improvement solutions; and evaluating return on investment data to support training and performance improvement efforts in the workplace. People who choose this specialization are often pursuing advanced training, instructional design, or consulting positions in business, health care, government, or the military.

Program Name: PhD - Training and Performance Improvement
Foundations of Theory and Practice in Doctoral Studies
Course Number ED8002
Credits 4.0

This is a foundational course for learners in higher education and training specializations. Learners are introduced to discipline-specific topics and begin to put into practice the academic developmental and behavioral competencies they are expected to master during their degree program. Learners engage in scholarly inquiry, research, critical thinking, and communication within the context of their specialization. ED8002 must be taken by PhD learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


Educational Research Methods
Course Number ED8112
Credits 4.0

This course is an exploration of the quantitative and qualitative research methodologies often used in educational research. Learners analyze and evaluate the characteristics, strengths, and weaknesses of specific quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and designs and examine strategies for designing specific, appropriate, and feasible research questions.


Statistics for Educational Research I
Course Number ED8122
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course apply statistical analyses appropriate to different research contexts using SPSS, a statistical software package. Learners examine statistical concepts, including descriptive statistics, normal distribution, sampling probability, and sampling distribution and demonstrate different hypothesis testing techniques.


Introduction to Training and Performance Systems
Course Number ED7631
Credits 4.0

This course is an overview of the history of training and human performance improvement (HPI) and its associated theories, principles, and processes. Learners develop a systems view of developing people and organizations by completing a performance improvement project in which they perform business, performance, gap, and root cause analyses; select appropriate interventions; and develop implementation, change, and evaluation plans.


Needs Assessment: Models and Procedures
Course Number ED7641
Credits 4.0

This course is a survey of the needs assessment models and procedures used to diagnose the causes of workplace performance problems. Learners design and develop needs assessment instruments and collect and diagnose data to differentiate workplace performance issues that require training solutions from those that require non-training interventions.


Designing Training and Performance Solutions
Course Number ED7662
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course explore various training and performance gaps and solutions associated with information, resources, incentives, knowledge, and capacity. Learners examine theoretical models used to match performance gaps with potential solutions and identify the factors needed to enhance the success of a performance improvement intervention. Learners then select a performance gap to address using an intervention selection tool.


Delivery Systems for Training and Performance Improvement
Course Number ED7672
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with an in-depth, application-based overview of facilitation skills and e-learning initiatives for training and performance improvement and the tools and strategies used to address these critical issues.


Return on Investment in Training and Performance Improvement
Course Number ED7675
Credits 4.0

This Course Prepares Learners To Apply Return On Investment (roi) Methodology That Has Been Developed In The Field To Their Own Organizations. Topics Include Planning For An Evaluation, Collecting Data, Analyzing Data, And Reporting Procedures. While Utilizing Statistics Is An Important Part Of Roi Evaluation, This Course Does Not Include Developing Competencies In Statistical Analysis. Upon Successful Completion Of The Final Deliverable For The Course, Learners Are Awarded The Roi Certificate From The Roi Institute. For Phd And Ms Training And Performance Improvement Learners Only. Must Be Taken During The Learner’s Final Quarter. Cannot Be Fulfilled By Transfer.


Survey of Human Resource Development Research
Course Number ED7679
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners explore the values, purposes, methods, and processes of human resource development research. In particular, learners focus on identifying the ways theory and research can be used as practical tools to solve human resource development challenges. For PhD and MS Training and Performance Improvement learners only.


Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
Course Number ED9919
Credits 4.0

This course includes an overview of the comprehensive examination process, the university’s expectations of academic honesty and integrity, the three core themes of the examination, and the evaluation criteria. The courseroom mentor provides three questions addressing the core themes. Learners write answers to the comprehensive examination questions. Answers are evaluated by faculty readers using point-scale scoring rubrics. Upon passing the comprehensive examination, learners are eligible to enroll in the first dissertation course.


Dissertation Courseroom
Course Number EDD9920
Credits 0.0

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.


Dissertation Research 1
Course Number ED9921
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 2
Course Number ED9922
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 3
Course Number ED9923
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Dissertation Research 4
Course Number ED9924
Credits 5.0

Learners complete the required dissertation milestones and prepare their dissertation for publication.


Coaching for High Performance
Course Number ED7830
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study theories and practices used to coach individuals to improved learning, decision making, and performance. Learners explore theoretical coaching approaches and models; client needs assessment; the coaching knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for supporting clients through personal and professional change; and the role of coaching in organizational performance systems. Learners focus on becoming confident and effective mediators of people seeking to improve the quality of their personal and professional lives.


International Aspects of Adult Education
Course Number ED7391
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study adult education from an international perspective. In particular, learners analyze and compare various international adult educational systems in terms of philosophy, goals, and methods.


Principles of Instructional Design
Course Number ED5802
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners gain an understanding of the instructional design process and associated instructional design principles and strategies. Learners focus on the decisions that instructional designers make, the principles and concepts that drive those decisions, and the ways the decisions are interrelated. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.


The Delivery of Distance Education
Course Number ED5804
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners gain an understanding of current distance education delivery systems, including print, recorded audio and video, and Internet technologies. Learners also examine the ways delivery technologies inform and constrain design decisions.



The Historical and Social Foundations of Education
Course Number ED8111
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study the historical and social foundations of education to gain an awareness of and a context for its evolving practice. Learners explore the ways educational institutions have emerged and developed, particularly in relation to societal functions and expectations. Learners also develop the knowledge, skills, and points of view needed to understand the evolution of education as a whole and its contributing sociocultural forces


Program description: The doctoral Training and Performance Improvement specialization is designed for experienced career professionals who wish to advance to leadership roles such as chief learning officer, training director, professor, or manager of learning and performance improvement. Required courses broaden and deepen the learner’s understanding of both strategic and tactical issues that are important to the success of any performance improvement intervention. The entire doctoral experience is designed to help create reflective scholar-practitioners and innovative thinkers with advanced skills in critical thinking, research, and problem solving. The curriculum is based on American Society for Training & Development’s (ASTD) Human Performance Improvement model.

Training Courses at University of Maryland University College

Program Name: Master of Distance Education and E-Learning (MDE): Distance Education Teaching and Training
Instructional Design and Course Development in Distance Education and E-Learning
Course Number DETT 607
Credits 3.0

(Formerly OMDE 607.) An examination of the instructional design process, its history and place in today’s course development efforts, and the use of instructional design components in practice. Emphasis is on the nature of learning and the requirements for effective instruction. The theoretical underpinnings of learning are explored and applied to the design of a prototype classroom. Management issues surrounding course and curriculum development efforts are discussed, and a comprehensive curriculum management plan is developed.


Training and Learning with Multimedia
Course Number DETC 620
Credits 3.0

(Formerly OMDE 620. Developed by Joachim Hasebrook of Germany.) An examination of the use of digital media in a variety of educational settings to identify properties, strengths, and weaknesses of multimedia in different learning contexts. Basic psychological processes of perception, understanding, and learning are introduced. Focus is on multimedia and instructional design for online learning systems, such as Web-based training. Hands-on experiences with several multimedia and online learning and information systems are provided. Topics also include groupware and collaborative learning technologies, intelligent systems, instructional simulations, and virtual reality systems.


Special Topics in Instructional Technology
Course Number EDTC 650
Credits 3.0

An exploration of current topics in instructional technology, which are offered on a rotating basis. Individual topics focus on advanced instructional multimedia for the K–12 classroom (including building interactive multimedia materials that meet the learning needs of diverse K–12 populations while developing skills using animation and other multimedia technologies) or on teaching and learning in the K–12 virtual school (including policies and structures of K–12 virtual schools, teaching and course development strategies appropriate for elementary and secondary school online courses, and emerging issues in the K–12 virtual enterprise).


Training at a Distance
Course Number DETT 621
Credits 3.0

(Formerly OMDE 621.) An examination of the role of distance training in business, nonprofit, and government organizations. A wide variety of issues, problems, and solutions in Web-based training are explored. Topics include the economics of distance training, distance technology in the business organization, synchronous versus asynchronous interactive tools, collaborative and problem-solving tools, authoring tools, insourcing versus outsourcing, and the role of multimedia in distance training. Emphasis is on the concept of the corporate virtual university and its design and operation.


Foundations of Distance Education and E-Learning
Course Number OMDE 601
Credits 3.0

(Developed by Ulrich Bernath of Germany and Eugene Rubin of the United States, in collaboration with Borje Holmberg of Sweden and Otto Peters of Germany.) An overview of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are required by a competent practitioner of distance education. Critical concepts and issues identified in the distance education literature are explored and the history and theories of the field are critically examined.


Technology in Distance Education and E-Learning
Course Number OMDE 603
Credits 3.0

A review of the history and the terminology of technology used in distance education. The basic technology building blocks of hardware, networks, and software are identified. Analysis covers the characteristics of asynchronous and synchronous technologies and tools used in the teaching and learning, as well as the administration of distance education. The relationship between technology and the goals of the educational/training organization are critically examined. The relationship between information technology (especially online technology) and distance education is explored. Topics include the criteria and guidelines for selecting technologies for distance education and the future directions of technology in distance education.


Teaching and Learning in Online Distance Education
Course Number OMDE 610
Credits 3.0

An exploration of the online teaching and learning dynamic, including its theoretical foundation and best practices. The themes that shape the online teaching/learning relationship are addressed through individual and collaborative projects. Topics include philosophical frameworks; instructional, social, and cognitive presence; interaction, collaboration, and participation; community and engagement; and administration and management.


Costs and Economics of Distance Education and E-Learning
Course Number OMDE 606
Credits 3.0

(Developed by Thomas Huelsmann of Germany.) A study of the economics of distance education in the larger context of the economics of education. A variety of methodological approaches (including cost/benefit and cost/effectiveness analysis) are applied to the distance education context. A variety of costing techniques and economic models are explored and applied to different institutional forms and levels of distance education.


Learner Support in Distance Education and Training
Course Number OMDE 608
Credits 3.0

An introduction to the theories and concepts of support for learners in distance education and training. The various types of learner support—including tutoring and teaching; advising and counseling; and library, registrar, and other administrative services—are examined. Discussion addresses management issues, such as planning, organizational models, staffing and staff development, designing services to meet learner needs, serving special groups, and evaluation and applied research. Assignments include designing a learner support model for a particular context (e.g., public or private educational institution or corporate or military training).


Portfolio and Project in Distance Education and E-Learning
Course Number OMDE 670
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 27 graduate credits. (Formerly OMDE 690.) A capstone study of distance education and training designed to demonstrate cumulative knowledge and skills through two major projects: an electronic portfolio and a case study. The personal e-portfolio documents credentials and accomplishments to date and also serves as an ongoing resource and record of continuing professional development. The case study, which focuses on a distance education/training program or organization, involves in-depth analysis of the setting and application of concepts and strategies to enhance practice and performance in distance education and training.


Library and Intellectual Property Issues in Distance Education and E-Learning
Course Number DETT 611
Credits 3.0

(formerly Omde 611.) An Overview Of The Development And Delivery Of Digital Resources For Distance Education. Discussion Covers The Intellectual Property Issues Affecting The Use Of Copyrighted Works In Distance Education, The Development And Delivery Of Library Resources Online To A Faculty And Student Population, And The Future Of Digital Information Delivery And The Impact Of Digital Rights Management (drm) Technologies And Social Networking.


Management and Leadership in Distance Education and E-Learning
Course Number DEPM 604
Credits 3.0

(Formerly OMDE 604.) An introduction to the organization, management, and administration of distance education systems. Topics include management theory, organizational behavior, leadership roles, human resource management, employee relations, the impact of information technology, faculty/staff development, interinstitutional collaboration, planning, policy, and change. Education and training environments, as well as the knowledge and skills necessary to function effectively in either type of organizational setting, are explored.


Program description: The objective of the teaching and training specialization in the Master of Distance Education and E-Learning (MDE) program is to educate managers to deal with the specific teaching-related aspects of modern distance education both in the traditional teaching setting as well as in the corporate training sector. While the specialization focuses on teaching and training, it also examines technology-related aspects (for example, instructional design), as well as specific management-related aspects (intellectual property, accreditation, and quality assurance).

Training Courses at Jones International University

Program Name: MEd in Corporate Training and Knowledge Management
Evaluating Education Technology
Course Number EDU550
Credits 3.0

This course explores the processes involved in determining specific needs in an educational environment that can be used to assist in the evaluation and selection of educational technology as the rationale for decisions, planning, and designing a strategic technology plan. The course examines available technology as related to curriculum, standards, and assessment in a variety of educational settings. In the course project, Technology Integration Strategic Plan: Creating a Shared Vision, students create a shared vision for the integration of technology through the development of a technology integration strategic plan that includes a needs assessment, timeline, and budget. For students in the MEd in Education Leadership and Administration (K-12) programs, the course project s a key assessment designed to demonstrate mastery of the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) professional standards.


Managing e-Learning
Course Number EDU621
Credits 3.0

This course addresses competencies for training managers, evaluators, and instructional designers. It encompasses all facets of managing e-learning in an organization and incorporates the International Board of Standards for Training, Performance, and Instruction (IBSTPI). The course is designed as an ongoing simulation with the student playing the role of the Chief Learning Officer. In this role, strategies for moving the organization to an e-learning environment are explored, to include: Analysis of training needs and existing e-learning/training infrastructure Human resources, tools, and technology requirements Budgeting, scheduling, and preparing for the change Evaluating how e-learning meets the organizational mission In the course project, Strategy for e-Learning: Managing the e-Learning Change Process, the student prepares a detailed plan for using e-learning within a multinational corporation. Conducting research and considering a range of issues related to managing e-learning, while dealing with routine duties and crises, provides a backdrop for developing the strategy that moves the organization toward e-learning


Knowledge Management and Workplace Learning
Course Number EDU623
Credits 3.0

This course provides a foundation in the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to integrate knowledge management with workplace learning. Topics designed to help the educator shift the role of workplace learning beyond mastering processes to supporting the creation of new knowledge and improved processes are considered, including: Combining technology, organizational structures, and cognitive-based strategies to help organizations foster knowledge sharing and employee development Using the principles of adult learning and embedding them within the workplace learning context The course project, Workplace Learning Plan: Using Organizational Assessment to Inform Knowledge Management, integrates an understanding of knowledge management philosophy and approaches with their impact on workplace learning. Through identification of workplace competencies and the respective instructional development needed, the prospective workplace educator outlines how an organization reaches optimal effectiveness and its respective strategic goals


Orientation - Successful Online Learning
Course Number JIU101

Every business begins with a dream. But what separates those that fail from those that flourish is someone who has the vision, strategy, and discipline to nourish and grow that dream. If you possess the entrepreneurial spirit but need the practical skills to run a successful business in the field of professional communication, this program is for you! In this specialization, you will study key principles and practices critical to establish a communications-oriented small business and position it for growth. This bachelor degree specialization uses 4 specialization courses from the MABC program, giving the student a head-start on their master’s degree.


Research Methods: Improving Learning Organizations
Course Number EDU522
Credits 3.0

This course teaches students how to apply fundamental research skills in developing and delivering adult education programs, with an emphasis on short term, applied research applications as opposed to theoretical research. In adult education, the educator is often called upon to justify the development or continuation of an educational program based on research into the usefulness of that program to achieve desired results. This course provides a means to that end. The course project, Applied Research Report: Designing, Implementing, and Publishing Research in a Learning Organization, prepares adult educators to evaluate the results of a program in order to justify curricula and/or instructional practices. The student works with a sponsor within an organization to develop and evaluate an applied research project. Prerequisites: Admission or application for admission to the degree program is required to enroll in this course.


Strategic Planning for Educators
Course Number EDU542
Credits 3.0

This course establishes the requisite knowledge and skills needed to assist an educational organization in planning more effectively for a constantly changing internal and external environment. The course covers basic components of strategic planning processes that can be adapted to specific educational environments. In the course project, students develop a strategic plan that incorporates/facilitates the development of a vision and mission, and a positive school or organizational culture. For students in the MEd in Adult Education programs, the course project is called Strategic Plan: Improving Organizations and Culture. For students in the MEd in Education Leadership and Administration (K-12) programs, the course project is called Strategic Plan: Improving School Programs and Culture; it is a key assessment designed to demonstrate mastery of the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) professional standards. In addition, students in the K-12 programs will be assessed on their ability to develop a strategic plan that incorporates/facilitates evidence-based practices when implementing effective instructional programs and: (1) respond to the diverse needs of families and communities, and (2) mobilize community resources.


EDU544 Business Management for Learning Organizations
Course Number EDU544
Credits 3.0

This course establishes a working knowledge of business planning to achieve organizational objectives by introducing considerations related to: Finance Principles of management Applications of information technology and systems Human resource management Operational management In the course project, Business Proposal: Integrating Business Decision Making into Educational Organizations, students develop either a business case or a grant proposal for a real-world organization of their choosing. The purpose of the proposal is to convince a person (or persons) in authority to commit money, people, and/or resources (existing assets) to the proposal.


Needs Assessment for Learning Environments
Course Number EDU630
Credits 3.0

This course introduces approaches and techniques for planning a training needs assessment so that the needs of an organization are not only met, but also anticipated. Assessment is a decision-making tool that helps an organization measure where it is, compared to where it wants to be. The course project, Needs Assessment: Planning for Learning Environments, demonstrates how analysis and assessment grow in importance as organizations become more concerned with competitive advantage and employee expertise. Applying analysis, theory, and skills to real problems, students create instruments, gather data, and consider how to counter objections and influence decision makers.


Assessment Strategies to Improve Adult Learning
Course Number EDU653
Credits 3.0

This course provides adult educators with the necessary knowledge and skills to develop valid, reliable, and fair evaluation plans, tests, and assessments for adult education and organizational learning. The course is intended for adult educators who will develop and implement adult education programs. Many of the principles and practices, however, can also be applied to workplace performance assessment and program evaluation. In the course project, Assessment Plan: Evaluation in Adult Education, students will design valid, reliable, and fair tests and scoring rubrics as well as provide evaluation and reporting results and cost-benefit analysis. Additionally, they will write clear, concise, and complete learning objectives and employ them in formative and summative assessment elements


Adult Learning Theory
Course Number EDU681
Credits 3.0

This course introduces students to adult education theories and practices. Teaching and learning strategies for adult learners, including case studies, problem-solving strategies, collaborative learning, and distance learning techniques are discussed and modeled throughout the course. The course project, Adult Learning Program: Applying Theories and Strategies to a Real-world Adult Learning Environment, focuses students on developing a unit of instruction or program for adult learners. By analyzing the adult learning environment and selecting strategies for instruction and assessment, this project moves the student from studying educational theories into creating personally useful and insightful applications.


Capstone: The Professional Adult Educator
Course Number EDU669
Credits 3.0

This course represents the culmination of the master’s program. It is designed to give students a chance to synthesize their learning by producing a capstone project that exemplifies their newly acquired knowledge and expertise. Working alone or with a partner or team, they will select something from their educational portfolio and develop it further as proof of readiness to receive a master’s degree. In the course project, Capstone: Designing the Professional Portfolio, candidates apply knowledge and skills they have acquired during their tenure at JIU to a real educational issue or opportunity. The project may take any form, as long as it meets the specific educational objectives defined for the course. Project examples include: A grant proposal An environmental research scan A program development and/or implementation An appraisal of an existing program An internship A website Prerequisites: Academic advisor permission required for registration.


Program description: The modern-day explosion of information and knowledge management tools has made accessing and creating information anytime, from anywhere, a new reality. Corporate trainers and those who lead adult learning organizations must keep pace with changing education and training methods to infuse e-Learning into national and international teaching and learning models.

Training Courses at CDI College

Program Name: Expanded Training in Orthodontics/Scaling
Clinical Dentistry
Course Number CDYE
Credits 125.0

Students will be introduced to a wide variety of instruments and procedures used in dentistry. This component will assist students in developing the skills and recognizing the importance of smooth interaction with the dentist providing quality care while working chairside for various procedures. Students will learn the theory and practical elements of restorative dentistry. Emphasis is placed on the dental assistant’s role in operative procedures. It includes chairside assisting, as well as the implementation of the dental materials used in dentistry.


Dental Materials / Environmental Health & Safety WHMIS
Course Number D07E
Credits 75.0

A number of materials and products are used in the dental field. In this course, students will learn about the various types of dental products, as well as their properties and uses.


Diagnostic Records
Course Number DRSE
Credits 25.0

This section will provide students with a level of knowledge and skill to acquire patient information, obtain vital signs, and assist the dentist in the diagnostic stages of the dental care provided.


Dental Radiography
Course Number DRYE
Credits 80.0

This course prepares students to take and process intra-oral and extra-oral dental radiographs according to HARP standards. Students are introduced to basic physics and principles of radiography, safety precautions and the operation of the dental x-ray unit. They will expose dental radiographs using bisecting angle and paralleling techniques. Instruction will be provided on recognizing dental errors and solving problem situations, along with client education and management.


Dental Specialties
Course Number DSSE
Credits 130.0

This segment is designed to give students an overview of the various dental specialties. Students will learn the theory and practical skills relating to the various disciplines. The roles of the dental assistant will be examined in relation to these specialties.


Intra-Oral Dental Assisting
Course Number IODE
Credits 240.0

This course will provide students with the theory required by an Intra-Oral Dental Assistant to perform direct patient care. An ethical decision-making framework will enable students to utilize problem-solving skills to plan for and manage direct patient care and to respond to patient-specific needs as they relate to the clinical practice of an Intra-Oral Dental Assistant. In-house clinical and outside practicum experience will provide an environment for students to apply and adapt the knowledge and skills obtained.


Mandatory Outside Practical Phase I
Course Number MOP1
Credits 80.0

This program consists of a practical component consisting of 80 hours working in private practice with a dentist during Phase I of the program. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the dentist does not pay for the services of the services of the student during the practicum.


Mandatory Outside Practical Phase II
Course Number MOP2
Credits 60.0

This program consists of a practical component consisting of 60 hours working in private practice with a dentist during Phase II of the program. This practicum work experience is a mandatory diploma requirement and the dentist does not pay for the services of the services of the student during the practicum.


Orientation to Dentistry
Course Number ODYE
Credits 5.0

This section will discuss the professionalism and legalities of all members of the dental team. It will enable students to understand the expectations of the profession and the workplace. Students will consider their role on the dental team, identify other members of the team, develop an appreciation for being affiliated with a profession and learn how to use a problem-solving approach to deal with conflicts that may arise within the dental team.


Oral Facial Science
Course Number OFSE
Credits 35.0

Students are provided with an understanding of normal anatomy and physiology beginning with an introduction to the human body and its functions. Students will learn detailed anatomy of the head, neck, and will examine the normal development of the oral cavity and facial complex, teeth, and the attachment unit.


Orientation to Intra-Oral Dental Assistant Program
Course Number OIOE
Credits 25.0

This course provides an overview and introduction to the Intra-Oral Dental Assistant program. Emphasis will be placed on the required safety precautions required for the dental assistant. It also addresses the concept of standard precautions, dental health care worker safety and relevant clinical procedures including barrier techniques, surface cleaners and disinfectants, and proper heat sterilization. Radiation hygiene and safety procedures will be emphasized.


Preventive Dentistry and Nutrition
Course Number PDNE
Credits 20.0

This segment provides an opportunity for students to obtain the knowledge and acquire techniques and skills required to assist clients in the prevention and control of disease and injury to the oral tissues. Importance is placed on communication skills and methods of assessing, implementing, and evaluating individualized hygiene


Prevention of Disease Transmission
Course Number PDTE
Credits 30.0

Students will study the common microorganisms and pathogens with emphasis placed on those found in the oral cavity. This course will provide students with the prerequisite knowledge required to practice effective infection control procedures in the dental environment and to prevent cross-contamination


Practice Management
Course Number PMTE
Credits 100.0

This segment will cover the key competencies related to office practices and administrative responsibilities of the dental assistant. This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills related to basic dental reception procedures. Topics will include the organization and management of patient records, appointment control, dental claims, financial procedures, and the utilization of dental management computer software.


Career and Employment Strategies
Course Number CESE
Credits 25.0

This course looks at the planning, preparation, execution, and follow-up stages of an interview.


Medical Emergencies / CPR / First Aid
Course Number MECE
Credits 25.0

This component provides students with the knowledge and skills that are required to recognize and prevent medical and dental emergencies within the dental office. It will prepare students to assist the dentist in administering immediate care for the client in the dental office environment. Students also participate in CPR/First Aid training


Pharmacology
Course Number PHAE
Credits 25.0

This subject provides basic drug information including the basic pharmacological nature and effects of a range of psychoactive chemicals. Students will build knowledge relating drug treatments/usage to various body systems and associated states of disease.


Professional Skills
Course Number PSKE
Credits 25.0

This course is designed to equip students with interpersonal skills identified by employers as essential for success in the professional world. Using a variety of instructional methods including case studies, group exercises, and discussion, students learn and practice key communication skills.


Student Success Strategies
Course Number SSSE
Credits 25.0

This course will introduce students to skills and concepts that will help them achieve personal, academic, and career success.


Program description: Looking to take your career as a dental assistant to the next level? CDI College's Expanded Training in Orthodontics program trains practicing Certified Dental Assistants and Registered Dental Hygienists in specialized orthodontic treatments and procedures. Students will learn to use the instruments, equipment and accessories used in orthodontics, as well as the various categories of orthodontic treatment.

They will also learn about orthodontic treatments, including orthodontic appliances. In addition, students will also learn to organize, prepare, and perform orthodontic duties such as taking health histories, documentation of procedures and fitting and removal of various appliances.

Once this module has been successfully completed, the student must apply to the College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia (CDSBC) to have this designation added to their certificate.

This training module is 50 hours in length.

*For those who do not have their dental certification, CDI College also offers an Intra Oral Dental Assistant program that trains you to enter the field of dentistry.

Training Courses at Ashworth College

Program Name: Electrician Training Offline
Electrical Energy Theory
Course Number Lesson 1

Types and sources of electric current; circuits; loads; electromagnetic induction; generators; alternators; power transmission; motors; measuring electricity and energy; electrical codes; safety standards; resistance; converting fractions to decimals and percentages; formulas; basic trigonometry: circles, rectangles, squares, and calculating circumference and perimeter.


Circuits, Safety and Tools
Course Number Lesson 2

Wire sizes; conductor markings; insulation; protective devices; controllers; striking, cutting, sawing, fastening, drilling, soldering and measuring; cutting tools; temporary wiring; shock prevention; grounding; ground fault circuit interrupters; bonding; troubleshooting tools; diagnosing problems; overloaded neutrals and unbalanced currents; fuses; breakers; understanding other problems.


Wiring Systems, Boxes and Conductors
Course Number Lesson 3

Raceways; conduit fill; box construction and location; knockouts; pryouts; box gangs; box mounting, covers and accessories; non-metallic boxes and cable; fittings; fill allotment; roughing-in; installing conduit runs; boring; notching; cutting and bending conduit; installing flexible metal conduit; making conduit connections.


Device Wiring and Branch Circuits
Course Number Lesson 4

Equipment acceptability; wiring methods and materials; attaching conductors to device terminals; splicing; wiring and mounting fixtures; branch circuit design; determining proper electrical loads; lighting fixture installation rules; balancing circuit loads.


Reading Blueprints: Service Entrance
Course Number Lesson 5

Standard symbols; wiring circuits; outdoor wiring procedures; fluorescent lighting; pole transformer; service entrance components and location; power company wires; sizing service entrance conductors; service drop mast and insulator; grounding; clearances; supplies and fittings; overcurrent protection; multi-phase systems


Appliance, Light Commercial and Mobile Home Wiring
Course Number Lesson 6

Heater circuits; air conditioning units; garbage disposals; dishwashers; refrigerators; freezers; cook-tops; ovens; electric motors; small multi-family dwellings; building categories and service schemes; mobile home devices and outlets; hooking up the distribution panel.


Low-Voltage Circuits: Remodeling Procedures
Course Number Lesson 7

Installing remote-control systems; types of low-voltage circuits, cables and devices; wiring advantages and considerations; low-voltage code rules; safety considerations; special tools and materials for remodeling jobs; box installation; installing surface wiring.


Advanced Blueprints, Wiring Methods, Boxes and Conduits
Course Number Lesson 8

Types of electrical drawings; symbols; building codes; the National Electrical Code; certification labs; commercial installations; calculating wireway sizes to meet code requirements; hardware; box types; grounding, mounting and supporting boxes to meet code; box fill; computing box sizes for straight and angular pulls.


Advanced Conductors and Overcurrent Protection
Course Number Lesson 9

The types and functions of conductors; conductor ampacity rating; voltage drop; sizing conductors; adjusting conductor ampacity based on ambient temperature and number of conductors; sizing electrical conduits based on permissible percentage fill of conduit; electrical protective devices and fuses; recognizing overloads and short circuits; circuit breakers.


Advanced Branch Circuits, Feeders, Service and Distribution
Course Number Lesson 10

Functions, types and terminology of feeders and branch circuits; figuring loads for lighting and receptacles; sizing branch circuits and feeders; branch circuit overcurrent protection; the two basic types of electrical service; service drop clearance; the arrangement of service drops and service laterals; supply voltages and their common applications.


Transformers, Special Systems and PLCs
Course Number Lesson 11

Purposes and uses of transformers; transformer construction and components; how transformers work; transformer types; sizing overcurrent protective devices for transformer primaries and secondaries; special calculations for transformers; solving practical problems.


Motors and Motor Controls
Course Number Lesson 12

Motor components and types; calculating motor starting currents; code requirements for design of motor branch circuits, motor controls and motor control circuits; computing true power, apparent power and power factor; manual and magnetic starts; pilot device types; reading control circuit diagrams; reversing motor direction by switching connections; basic motor control center setup.


Resonance and IC Filters
Course Number Lesson 13:

Inductive and capacitive reactance; reflected impedance; resonance; passive filters; integrator and differentiator circuits; waves; harmonics.


Diagnosing Analog and Audio Circuits
Course Number Lesson 14:

Troubleshooting digital and analog equipment and audio-amplifier consumer chips; narrowing the problem; block diagrams; using a bench power supply; signal tracing; output devices; troubleshooting basic low-frequency amplifier circuits; audio distortion problems.


Program description: Train for a high-voltage career and watch electricity
“come alive” through diagrams, photos, tables and fascinating
hands-on activities. First you’ll gain a strong foundation in
essential power concepts. Then you’ll learn specific wiring
techniques, installation, circuitry, measuring current, safety,
repair and more.

Program Name: Electrician Training Online
Electrical Energy Theory
Course Number Lesson 1

Types and sources of electric current; circuits; loads; electromagnetic induction; generators; alternators; power transmission; motors; measuring electricity and energy; electrical codes; safety standards; resistance; converting fractions to decimals and percentages; formulas; basic trigonometry: circles, rectangles, squares, and calculating circumference and perimeter.


Circuits, Safety and Tools
Course Number Lesson 2

Wire sizes; conductor markings; insulation; protective devices; controllers; striking, cutting, sawing, fastening, drilling, soldering and measuring; cutting tools; temporary wiring; shock prevention; grounding; ground fault circuit interrupters; bonding; troubleshooting tools; diagnosing problems; overloaded neutrals and unbalanced currents; fuses; breakers; understanding other problems.


Wiring Systems, Boxes and Conductors
Course Number Lesson 3

Raceways; conduit fill; box construction and location; knockouts; pryouts; box gangs; box mounting, covers and accessories; non-metallic boxes and cable; fittings; fill allotment; roughing-in; installing conduit runs; boring; notching; cutting and bending conduit; installing flexible metal conduit; making conduit connections.


Device Wiring and Branch Circuits
Course Number Lesson 4

Equipment acceptability; wiring methods and materials; attaching conductors to device terminals; splicing; wiring and mounting fixtures; branch circuit design; determining proper electrical loads; lighting fixture installation rules; balancing circuit loads.


Reading Blueprints: Service Entrance
Course Number Lesson 5

Standard symbols; wiring circuits; outdoor wiring procedures; fluorescent lighting; pole transformer; service entrance components and location; power company wires; sizing service entrance conductors; service drop mast and insulator; grounding; clearances; supplies and fittings; overcurrent protection; multi-phase systems


Appliance, Light Commercial and Mobile Home Wiring
Course Number Lesson 6

Heater circuits; air conditioning units; garbage disposals; dishwashers; refrigerators; freezers; cook-tops; ovens; electric motors; small multi-family dwellings; building categories and service schemes; mobile home devices and outlets; hooking up the distribution panel.


Low-Voltage Circuits: Remodeling Procedures
Course Number Lesson 7

Installing remote-control systems; types of low-voltage circuits, cables and devices; wiring advantages and considerations; low-voltage code rules; safety considerations; special tools and materials for remodeling jobs; box installation; installing surface wiring.


Advanced Blueprints, Wiring Methods, Boxes and Conduits
Course Number Lesson 8

Types of electrical drawings; symbols; building codes; the National Electrical Code; certification labs; commercial installations; calculating wireway sizes to meet code requirements; hardware; box types; grounding, mounting and supporting boxes to meet code; box fill; computing box sizes for straight and angular pulls.


Advanced Conductors and Overcurrent Protection
Course Number Lesson 9

The types and functions of conductors; conductor ampacity rating; voltage drop; sizing conductors; adjusting conductor ampacity based on ambient temperature and number of conductors; sizing electrical conduits based on permissible percentage fill of conduit; electrical protective devices and fuses; recognizing overloads and short circuits; circuit breakers.


Advanced Branch Circuits, Feeders, Service and Distribution
Course Number Lesson 10

Functions, types and terminology of feeders and branch circuits; figuring loads for lighting and receptacles; sizing branch circuits and feeders; branch circuit overcurrent protection; the two basic types of electrical service; service drop clearance; the arrangement of service drops and service laterals; supply voltages and their common applications.


Transformers, Special Systems and PLCs
Course Number Lesson 11

Purposes and uses of transformers; transformer construction and components; how transformers work; transformer types; sizing overcurrent protective devices for transformer primaries and secondaries; special calculations for transformers; solving practical problems.


Motors and Motor Controls
Course Number Lesson 12

Motor components and types; calculating motor starting currents; code requirements for design of motor branch circuits, motor controls and motor control circuits; computing true power, apparent power and power factor; manual and magnetic starts; pilot device types; reading control circuit diagrams; reversing motor direction by switching connections; basic motor control center setup.


Resonance and IC Filters
Course Number Lesson 13:

Inductive and capacitive reactance; reflected impedance; resonance; passive filters; integrator and differentiator circuits; waves; harmonics.


Diagnosing Analog and Audio Circuits
Course Number Lesson 14:

Troubleshooting digital and analog equipment and audio-amplifier consumer chips; narrowing the problem; block diagrams; using a bench power supply; signal tracing; output devices; troubleshooting basic low-frequency amplifier circuits; audio distortion problems.


Program description: This program trains students for a high-voltage career. Electricity will ‘come alive’ through diagrams, photos, tables and fascinating hands-on activities. After gaining a strong foundation in essential power concepts, students will proceed to specific wiring techniques. Fascinating lessons focus on electrical power systems, installation techniques, circuitry, measuring current, wiring, safety and repair.

Training Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Training Schools (campus and online)

Columbia University in the City of New York
Total Programs 192
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 4th
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of Southern California
Total Programs 251
Number of Subjects 166
Rank in USA 10th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Vanderbilt University
Total Programs 144
Number of Subjects 81
Rank in USA 17th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
Johns Hopkins University
Total Programs 178
Number of Subjects 136
Rank in USA 19th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Total Programs 148
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 20th
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Boston College
Total Programs 112
Number of Subjects 94
Rank in USA 29th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
Texas A & M University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 135
Rank in USA 36th
University of Georgia
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 156
Rank in USA 38th
Carnegie Mellon University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 115
Rank in USA 44th
Michigan State University
Total Programs 220
Number of Subjects 164
Rank in USA 45th
George Washington University
Total Programs 194
Number of Subjects 171
Rank in USA 52nd
Rutgers University-New Brunswick
Total Programs 152
Number of Subjects 117
Rank in USA 55th