Online Visual Communications Courses at Accredited Schools

American Intercontinental University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its visual communications courses to be successful visual communications specialists, designers, telecommunications specialists, telecommunications professionals, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 1,745,670 people employed as arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media employees alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $51,720. Media and communication equipment workers make on average $59,880 per year and there are about 17,610 of them employed today.

Visual Communications Organizations Visual Communications Common Job Tasks
  • creating or reproducing handmade objects
  • designing concepts and reviewing material
  • creating pictures for books
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Visual Communications Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Associate's (AABA) - Visual Communication
English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.0

Prerequisite: None In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Introduction to Business
Course Number BUSN 105
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed, and controlled.



Principles of Accounting I
Course Number ACCT 205
Credits 4.5

"This course introduces students to financial accounting. Students can learn the fundamentals of the accounting cycle."


Microeconomics
Course Number ECON 220
Credits 4.5

"This course focuses on Economic theory of the firm, resource allocation and price determination, the free market supply/demand mechanism, and pure and imperfect competition models are analyzed."


Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON 224
Credits 4.5

"Presents basic economic concepts emphasizing the part the United States plays in a global economy. Foundations of economic theory are presented, using topics from television news and mass media. Topics introduced are GDP, National Income Accounting, United States fiscal policy and economic growth."


Business Management and Leadership
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

"Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix."


Principles of Marketing
Course Number MKTG 205
Credits 4.5

Students will study and apply the fundamentals of marketing within an organization and the contemporary market environment. The course will focus on marketing strategy and development of a marketing mix.


Lower Division Capstone
Course Number BUSN 300
Credits 4.5

This course requires students completing their AABA degree to demonstrate knowledge learned throughout the program and apply the theories to real world issues. Students are expected to synthesize and integrate learning experiences acquired throughout their program and to evaluate research and current topics relative to their area of concentration.


Design Principles
Course Number VCDD 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a foundation class in principles relating to all areas of visual design. In this course, students can develop an awareness of the basic elements of visual language, aesthetics sensitivity, and the ability to think and act as a designer. Students explore methods for evoking intuitive responses through color, shape, texture, rhythm, line, and other compositional elements. The class consists of both practical studio-based assignments and contextual studies areas.


Fundamentals of Color
Course Number VCDD102
Credits 4.5

This is a theoretical and practical course examining the visual forces of color and color relationships in traditional and electronic media. This foundation-level class is essential to all design students. Students can develop knowledge of color principles and the ability to manipulate hue, value and chroma as well as sensitivity to aesthetic and psychological qualities.


Computer Design I
Course Number VCDD 201
Credits 4.5

Utilizing digital media and traditional visualization techniques in the production of graphic art for print and screen, this course will develop skills accrued during Intro to Mac; examining closely the potential of the Macintosh or PC as a creative and communication tool. All assignments are related to professional practice. Adobe CS (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Flash, Acrobat) is the default software set for this class.


Drawing Concepts
Course Number VCDD 202
Credits 4.5

The techniques of drawing basic forms and shapes are developed through exercises that are designed to develop perceptual skills. The student studies volume, tone, texture, perspective, and composition. The exercises are presented in sequence and are designed to develop the individual student's basic drawing methods and techniques. Subject matter can vary from still life to figure drawing.


Program description: The AIU Online AABA degree with a concentration in Visual Communication combines the business skills from our University's AABA degree program with specific skills needed to pursue career opportunities in the creative, diverse field of visual communication. This career-focused curriculum is for students wishing to parlay their creative skills into fulfilling, interesting professions.

For students wishing to pursue their creative interests in Visual Communication, AIU Online's rich multimedia courses can be an excellent way to quickly acquire industry-current skills and real-world knowledge.

Visual Communications Courses at University of Phoenix

Program Name: Visual Communication Certificate
Image Editing
Course Number VCT300

This course is an introduction to image editing and its role in the disciplines of web design, electronic publishing and multimedia development. An overview is presented on file formats, composition, color, text design, retouching and manipulation of graphic and photographic images. Topics and Objectives Photo Manipulation * Explain photo manipulation. * Apply photo optimization techniques. Photo Retouching * Explain photo retouching. * Apply photo retouching. Non-destructive Editing * Explain non-destructive editing. * Apply non-destructive editing. Drawing and Painting * Identify drawing and painting tools. * Apply drawing and painting tools. Text Manipulation * Identify text manipulation techniques. * Apply text manipulation techniques.


Web Design
Course Number VCT310

This course focuses on the principles of good web design and the essential role of the web designer in today's business environment. Topics covered include layout, style, artistic quality, navigation, performance, communication, community, e-commerce and marketing. Topics and Objectives Plan a Web Site * Identify steps for developing a Web site. * Plan a Web site. Web Site Design * Identify critical elements of Web site design. * Analyze the design aspects of a Web site. Web Site Style * Identify elements of style in a Web site. * Critique the style (in contrast to the design) of a Web site. Graphics and Media Integration * Explain the effective use of graphics and media in Web site design. * Critique the use of graphics and media in a Web site. Usability of a Web Site * Identify attributes of usability. * Critique usability of a Web site.


Electronic Publishing
Course Number VCT320

This Course Presents The Essential Role Of Electronic Publishing In The Delivery Of Information To Today's Businesses And Consumers. Most Of The Course Is Concerned With Methods And Techniques Involved In The Electronic Publishing Of Business Presentations, Corporate Reports, Newsletters, Training Materials, Manuals And Electronic Books, But Other Information Formats Such As Wikis And Blogs Are Also Considered. Topics And Objectives Ebooks * Compare And Contrast Print And Electronic Books. Epublishing Production And Delivery * Identify Common Epublishing Formats. * Explain The Use Of Common Epublishing Formats. Content Management * Compare And Contrast Course, Learning And Content Management Systems. Digital Rights Management (drm) And Maintenance * Explain Drm. Trends In Epublishing * Identify Alternatives To Traditional Publishing.


Multimedia Development
Course Number VCT420

This course introduces the fundamentals of developing interactive, multimedia enriched content for delivery across alternative platforms such as the Internet, CDs and handheld devices. The focus is on the integration of animation, audio and video content to maximize communication. Topics and Objectives Multimedia Concepts * Identify elements of multimedia. * Differentiate between multimedia technologies. Graphics * Identify graphic formats. * Compare and contrast graphic formats. * Apply effective use of graphics. Audio and Video * Identify audio formats. * Compare and contrast audio formats. * Apply audio formats. * Identify video formats. * Compare and contrast video formats. * Apply video formats. Interactive Multimedia * Explain characteristics of interactive multimedia. * Apply interactive multimedia. Advanced Multimedia * Identify trends in multimedia. * Apply storyboarding.


Computers and Information Processing
Course Number CIS319
Credits 3.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of computer systems and the role of information processing in today’s business environment. An overview is presented of information systems, systems development, operating systems and programming, database management, networking and telecommunications, and the Internet. (3 credits) Prerequisite: GEN 300.


Instructional Design
Course Number AET515

This course focuses on systematic approaches to instructional design. Learners create an instructional plan that outlines each of the five components of a systematic instructional design model (i.e., ADDIE: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation). The course identifies trends and issues in instructional design for adult learners. Topics and Objectives Instructional Design Models and Analysis Analyze systematic approaches to instructional design. Examine the components of a needs assessment. Identify performance gaps based on a needs assessment. Design Construct goals for an instructional plan. Create performance-based objectives that align with instructional goals. Describe a summative assessment to support learner outcomes. Analyze the impact of learner characteristics and learning context on instructional design. Development Determine delivery modality. Select instructional strategies. Implementation Create an implementation schedule for the instructional plan. Evaluate resources for instructional delivery. Analyze the purposes of formative evaluations. Evaluation Examine strategies for evaluating a systematic approach to instructional design. Identify criteria for determining that design goals, performance-based objectives, and learning outcomes were achieved. Analyze possible recommendations for future use. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design Describe issues and trends in various instructional settings. Analyze issues and trends in the use of various instructional modalities. Predict how current issues and trends will impact the future of instructional design.


Program description: The Visual Communication Certificate is available to undergraduate students not enrolled in the BSIT program who wish to expand their technical knowledge using software tools for Visual Communication. Students enrolling in the Visual Communication Certificate will learn the graphic design and technology tools to create visual communications that are relevant to organizations. Students in the Visual Communication Certificate will develop a diverse portfolio of rich media that can be used in Web sites, advertising, corporate reports, business presentations, instructional materials, animated movies and electronic publications that fulfill business and training needs.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Communication - Culture and Communication
Contemporary American Society
Course Number SOC262
Credits 3.0

Course Description Students in this course will explore the implications of ethnicity, culture, and diversity within the context of society. Students will be introduced to racial and ethnic relations, prejudice, stereotypes, discrimination, and adaptation and conflict in diverse cultures. Topics and Objectives Racial and Ethnic Groups and Their Relations * Differentiate between race and ethnicity. * Describe the impact of racial hierarchies. Prejudices, Stereotypes, and Discrimination * Distinguish among prejudices, stereotypes, and discrimination. * Identify types of discrimination. * Summarize types of inclusive communication. Adaptation, Assimilation, and Theories of Migration * Explain the relationship between migration and group contact. * Identify effects of migration on racial and ethnic relations. * Compare the order and power-conflict theories of adaptation. * Describe types of assimilation. Economic and Political Conditions of Major Racial and Ethnic Groups * Recognize benefits of cultural diversity. * Analyze the influence of economy on immigration. Racial and Ethnic Issues in the United States: Past and Present * Identify how racial and ethnic groups adapt to each other. * Project future impacts of multiculturalism as it relates to creating an egalitarian society. * Describe bias-free language.


Genders in Society
Course Number SOC333
Credits 3.0

Course Description The objective of this course is to explore gender differences and communication. This course introduces students to gender inclusiveness and sensitivity through the examination of the roles of genders in society. Students will focus on gender communication in business, organizations, family and the media. Additionally, students will explore communication traits of men and women and the impact of miscommunication between genders. Topics and Objectives Social and Historical Perspectives of Gender * Compare and contrast the biological and sociological perspectives towards gender identity development. * Describe the impact social movements have on gender. * Evaluate trait differences between genders. The Role of Gender in Society * Explain how education defines gender roles. * Identify the gender norms in government, law, and public policy. * Analyze the role of gender in the workplace. Gender, Media, and Stereotypes * Describe mass media portrayal of gender. * Analyze the interaction between mass media and gender. * Interpret common gender stereotypes in mass media. Gender and Communication * Compare and contrast how men and women use verbal and nonverbal communication. * Analyze common miscommunications between genders. * Determine strategies to foster effective communication between genders. Gender Communication in the Global Workplace * Identify different communication styles between genders in the workplace. * Evaluate the impact of culture on communication between genders. * Evaluate strategies to facilitate gender communication across cultures.


The Peoples and Cultures of Asia
Course Number SOC335
Credits 3.0

Course Description This course provides students with an overview of the cultural traditions and contemporary development of Asian countries. Course topics include the geography, history, politics, economic development, and social conditions of Asian countries. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Asia * Identify the geographic features of Asia. * Compare the major language groups of Asia. * Describe the roles of regional organizations. * Explain the regional and global influence of China and India, past and present. China * Identify the political and historical geography of China. * Describe important events in Chinese history. * Analyze the political and economic development of modern China. * Compare and contrast cultural traditions and current social conditions in China. Southeast Asia * Identify the political and historical geography of Southeast Asia. * Describe important events in Southeast Asian history. * Analyze the political and economic development of modern Southeast Asia. * Compare and contrast cultural traditions and current social conditions in Southeast Asia. India * Identify the political and historical geography of India. * Describe important events in Indian history. * Analyze the political and economic development of modern India. * Compare and contrast cultural traditions and current social conditions in India. Northeast Asia and Central Asia * Identify the political and historical Northeast and Central Asia. * Describe important events in Northeast and Central Asian history. * Analyze the political and economic development of modern Northeast and Central Asia. * Compare and contrast cultural traditions and current social conditions in Northeast and Central Asia.


Contemporary Latin American Society
Course Number SOC337
Credits 3.0

Course Description This course introduces the cultural perspectives of Latin America. Students will explore cultural geography, ethnicity, class and culture, gender, and challenges facing Latin America. Topics and Objectives Identity * Explain the challenge of defining Hispanic identity using traditional concepts of race and ethnicity. * Explain the importance of history to the definition of Hispanic identity. * Debate the use of terms to identify Hispanics. Society * Describe how colonial institutions created lasting class inequalities in Latin America. * Contrast traditional Western and popular Hispanic folk beliefs about health and illness. * Analyze the relationship between health challenges and economic class in contemporary Latin America. Religion * Identify attributes of contemporary Latin American Catholicism. * Describe African and indigenous religions’ influence on Latin American Catholicism. * Explain the spread of Protestantism in Latin America. Gender * Describe the relationship between gender constructs and state affairs in different periods of Latin American history. * Analyze the social implications of machismo and marianismo in contemporary Latin American society. * Predict how changing attitudes about gender and sexuality will affect Latin American society. Week Five Topic * Compare twentieth-century Latin American political movements. * Assess the effects of globalization on Latin America.


The African American Experience
Course Number SOC338
Credits 3.0

Course Description This course serves as an introduction to the African American experience. This course will explore the social construction of identity, culture, and the inequalities African Americans face in popular American culture. Race, class, and gender of the African American people will be explored from a historical to modern day perspective. Topics and Objectives The Construction of African American Identity * Describe pre-slavery African identity. * Analyze the effect of slavery on African American identity. * Identify significant events of the Civil War and Reconstruction for African Americans. * Evaluate the development of African American identity from Reconstruction, through the Civil Rights movement, to today. Inequality and Class Differences for African Americans * Describe the types of inequality faced by African Americans. * Examine inequality for African Americans in United States politics and justice. * Explain the relationship between assimilation and the perception of class for African Americans. * Distinguish between social status and economic status among African Americans. African Americans in Culture and Communications * Examine the treatment of African Americans in the news media. * Evaluate the importance of African American culture to popular culture. African American Families * Examine the role of the family in African American culture. * Identify the features of childhood development unique to African American families. * Identify current health issues for African Americans. Gender Issues for African Americans * Indicate the importance of contributions by African American women to the Women’s Movement. * Compare and contrast female and male identity among African Americans. * Theorize about future trends for African American culture in the United States.


Contemporary Communication in a Diverse Society
Course Number COM403
Credits 3.0

Course Description The objective of this course is to focus on the dynamics of human communication across cultures and genders in a multicultural society Topics and Objectives Communication and Cultures * Identify different ways of communicating. * Describe the stages of the communication process within a multicultural society. * Evaluate the impact of technology on human communication across cultures. Communication and Conflict * Explain solutions for conflict in communication. * Analyze how individuals create co-cultures within a multicultural society. * Describe how individuals identify with co-cultures within a multicultural society. Multicultural Communication and Genders * Compare communication styles between genders within a multicultural society. * Identify barriers to interpersonal communication between genders in a multicultural environment. * Analyze characteristics of effective multicultural communication between genders. Communication and Racial/Ethnic Groups * Explain the importance of multicultural communication. * Describe ways to promote effective multicultural communication. * Analyze strategies to overcome communication barriers between racial/ethnic groups. Cultural Norms in Communication * Evaluate how cultural norms affect communication within a multicultural society. * Analyze the effect of prejudice and stereotypes on societal communication.


Skills for Professional Development
Course Number GEN300
Credits 3.0

This Course Examines The Skills Necessary For Successful Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Research, And Communication. The Course Is Designed To Aid Adult Learners In Acquiring And Improving The Core Competencies That Are Necessary At University Of Phoenix. Students Examine Their Reasons For Returning To School And Develop Strategies For Achieving Educational Goals In School, Work, And Personal Settings. Students Are Also Introduced To The University Library And Learn How To Access Its Resources Successfully. (3 Credits) *for Flexibility In Scheduling, Campuses Are Permitted To Schedule Gen/200 To Satisfy Gen/300 Requirements.


Introduction to Communication
Course Number XCOM100
Credits 0.0

This Course Is An Introduction To The Field Of Communication, With Emphasis On The History Of Communication Study, Theories Important To All Areas Of Communication, Contexts In Which Communication Occurs, And Issues That Students Of Communication Must Consider. The Course Serves As An Introduction To The Strands Of Communication: Interpersonal, Small Group And Team, Mass, Organizational, Intercultural, And Rhetoric. Topics And Objectives Overview Of Communication * Identify Historical Developments In Communication. * Describe Communication Models. * Analyze Importance Of Communication. * Identify Careers In Communication. Self-concept, Identity, And Communication * Explain How Self-awareness Impacts Communication Skills. * Identify The Relationship Between Communication And Self-esteem. * Describe How Perception Influences Communication. Verbal And Nonverbal Communication * Distinguish Between Verbal And Nonverbal Messages. * Describe How To Avoid Bias In Language. * Identify Listening Styles And Strategies. Interpersonal Communication * Recognize Types Of Interpersonal Communication. * Identify The Stages Of Relationship Development. * Analyze The Impact Of Technology On Interpersonal Communication. * Identify Interviewing Skills And Techniques. Small Group And Team Communication * Identify Elements Of Group Dynamics. * Describe Phases Of Group Development. * Recognize Characteristics Of Effective Teams. * Identify Problem-solving Steps. * Explain Technology's Impact On Small Groups And Team Communication. Communication And Conflict * Describe Types Of Conflict. * Differentiate Between Assertive And Aggressive Communication. * Identify Conflict Management Styles. * Explain Strategies For Improving Conflict Management Skills. Power Of Presentation * Identify Steps In Presentation Development And Organization. * Describe Elements Of An Effective Presentation. * Compare Informative And Persuasive Presentations. Mass Communication * Explain How Mass Communication Influences Society. * Explain The Importance Of Media Literacy. * Analyze The Role Of Advertising In Society. * Analyze Impact Of Technology On Mass Media. Special Issues In Communication * Explain How Diversity Affects Communication. * Describe The Role Of Ethics In Communication. Prerequisites: Hum111, Psy201


Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
Course Number XCOM200
Credits 0.0

This course includes the application of communication principles, theory, and research to the process of interpersonal communication; includes verbal, nonverbal, listening, conflict management, and communication skills most relevant to a broad range of interpersonal settings. Topics and Objectives Introduction to Interpersonal Communication * Define interpersonal communication. * Explain the importance of interpersonal communication. * Identify key principles of interpersonal communication. Listening * Identify listening barriers and their effects on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate listening strategies for interpersonal interaction. Word Use * Identify word barriers and their effects on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate word use for interpersonal communication situations. Diversity * Identify cultural barriers and their effects on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate intercultural communication strategies. Nonverbal Communication * Explain the effect of nonverbal communication codes on interpersonal communication. * Determine appropriate nonverbal communication strategies for interpersonal communication. Self and Perception * Explain how interpersonal perceptions are formed. * Identify barriers to accurate interpersonal perception. * Determine appropriate strategies for improving interpersonal perception and self-esteem. The Development of Interpersonal Relationships * Explain the importance of attraction and power in interpersonal relationships. * Explain how interpersonal relationships develop. Managing Interpersonal Relationships * Determine appropriate interpersonal relationship management skills. * Create a strategy for managing interpersonal relationships. Conflict Management * Compare conflict management styles. * Determine appropriate conflict management skills for specific interpersonal relationship challenges. * Create a plan to manage interpersonal relationship challenges. Prerequisites: XCOM100


Foundations of Mass Communication
Course Number XCOM225
Credits 0.0

This Course Is A Survey Of The Basic Theories Upon Which Our Understanding Of Mass Communication Is Based. Ethical And Related Problems Of Mass Communication Will Be Studied From Contemporary And Historical Viewpoints. The Course Will Encourage A Critical Analysis Of The Performance Of The Mass Media. Topics And Objectives Print Media * Describe The Historical And Contemporary Roles Of The Print Media Industry In Society. * Compare And Contrast Major Publications In The Print Media Industry. Technology And The Print Media * Describe Types Of New Technology That Affect The Print Media Industry. * Analyze The Influence Of New Technology On The Print Media Industry. Electronic Media * Describe The Historical And Contemporary Roles Of Electronic Media Industries In Society. * Explain How Technological Transitions Have Shaped Electronic Media Industries. Technology And The Electronic Media * Analyze The Influence Of Digital Technology On The Electronic Media Industry. * Describe The Interaction Between Mass Media, New Technology, And The Public. Mass Media Messages * Analyze The Influence Of New Technology On Advertising And News Reporting Techniques. * Identify The Role Of Mass Media In Distributing Public Relations Messages. Sex And Gaming As Media Content * Evaluate The Fcc’s Process Of Classifying Material As Indecent, Obscene, Or Profane. * Analyze The Effects Of Objectionable Material On Children And Adult’s Behavior. Government And The Media * Compare And Contrast Authoritarian And Libertarian Styles Of Mass Media. * Explain The Interaction Between Mass Media And Government. Law And Ethics In The Mass Media * Explain Laws That Apply To Mass Media Messages. * Analyze Ethical Issues In Mass Media. Effects Of Mass Media Messages * Analyze Effects Of Mass Media Messages In Society. Prerequisites: Xcom100


Communication: Theories and Practice
Course Number COM310

This Course Explores The Various Theories Of Communication That Create The Foundation For Study Of Communications In The Bachelor's Degree Program At The University Of Phoenix. Major Communication Areas Examined In This Course Include Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, Group And Teamwork, Organizational, Intercultural, And Mass Media. Each Area, Along With Others, Will Be Studied In Greater Depth In Subsequent Courses In The Degree Program. Topics And Objectives The Self And Communication Theories * Analyze The Symbolic Interaction Theory. * Explain Coordinated Management Of Meaning. * Evaluate The Cognitive Dissonance Theory. * Assess The Expectancy Violations Theory. Interpersonal Communication Theories * Summarize The Uncertainty Reduction Theory. * Analyze The Social Penetration Theory. * Explain The Social Exchange Theory. * Critique The Relational Dialectics Theory. * Evaluate The Communication Privacy Management Theory. Communication Theories For Groups, Teams, And Organization * Analyze Groupthink. * Explain The Adaptive Structuration Theory. * Evaluate The Organizational Culture Theory. * Assess The Organizational Information Theory. Communication Theories Regarding The Public And Media * Compare And Contrast Rhetoric, Dramatism, And The Narrative Paradigm. * Summarize Cultivation Analysis. * Illustrate The Use And Gratifications Theory. * Critique The Spiral Of Silence Theory. * Assess The Medium Theory. Communication Theories For Diversity And Intercultural Communication * Analyze The Face-negotiation Theory. * Explain The Standpoint Theory. * Evaluate The Muted Group Theory. * Assess The Communication Accommodation Theory. Prerequisites: Com285, Gen300, Gen101


Small Groups and Team Communication
Course Number COM330

This course explores the dynamics of group communication and effective team work. Both social and workplace scenarios will be examined. Analytical techniques will be included to provide effective strategies for communication in these contexts


Organizational Communication
Course Number COM350

This course examines various theoretical frameworks necessary for effective organizational communication. It analyzes the application of communication strategies within organizations in terms of their effectiveness. It provides the infrastructure necessary for the creation and maintenance of successful communication strategies in organizations.


Intercultural Communication
Course Number COM360

The purpose of this course is to assist you to understand and apply the principles of effective intercultural communication in a diverse society and in global commerce. Students will develop an understanding of why and how cultural issues influence effective communication. This course introduces techniques for improving written, oral, and interpersonal communication skills in response to intercultural settings.


Media and Society
Course Number COM400

The development and evolution of contemporary society have become inextricably intertwined with the development and use of electronic media within the past 100 years. This course explores the complex interactions involving society, information, communication, and the electronic media. Controversial topics that media have brought to the fore, and in some cases caused, will be highlighted.


Communication Law
Course Number COM440

This course focuses on the U.S. legal environment and its specific laws, court decisions, policies, and regulations that address the freedom and responsibilities that come with the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The personal, commercial, and political exercise of free speech, and its regulation, will be analyzed in this course.


Ethics and Communication
Course Number COM450

While ethical decision-making permeates every facet of personal and professional life, this course focuses specifically upon ethical issues that are inherent in personal and public forms of communication. Special emphases are placed on ethical issues in commercial communication. Ethical decision-making models will be discussed and applied to cases involving various contemporary and controversial communication topics.


Mediation and Conflict Resolution
Course Number COM470

Communication is the foundation upon which mediation and other forms of alternative dispute resolution are based. This course starts with an examination of the theoretical basis for ADR in light of communication theory. Then it focuses upon the effective application of theory and practice to achieve meaningful results and to managing conflict in the future.


Communication Capstone Course
Course Number COM480

This is the capstone course for students pursuing the bachelor's of science in communication. The course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their professional program of study in a comprehensive manner. Students will also assess the impact of their educational experiences on their ethical perspectives and critical thinking skills. Students will reflect on and evaluate their personal and professional growth in the study of communication, the benefits of lifelong learning, and the impact of these elements on their future.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Communication (BS/COM) degree program is designed to develop knowledge and skills for effective communication in a variety of public and private work environments. The program was created specifically to build upon personal and professional communication experiences. The BS/COM degree enhances the communication skills necessary for the development of professional competence and values; critical thinking and problem solving; information utilization; and collaboration.

The curriculum focuses on the development of core communication competencies. It emphasizes theory and application in the domains of interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass communication. Specific areas of focus include business communication, diversity, intercultural communication, conflict resolution, legal and ethical issues, media and culture, and future trends in communication technology.

The concentration in Culture Communication is designed to prepare students with a well-rounded view of diversity in American society. Students will focus on the experiences of people from different cultures and how communication differs by race and gender. In addition, students will gain a global perspective on race, ethnicity, and class in the United States. Students will compare cultural topics such as Asian American, African American, Hispanic American, gender, and their differences.

For program disclosure information, click here.

While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

Visual Communications Courses at Westwood College

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Graphic Design: Major in Visual Communications
Digital Photography
Course Number GD221
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd111 This Course Focuses On Traditional And Contemporary Photography, With An Emphasis On Digital Tools And Techniques. Topics Include The History Of Photography And Its Impact On Studio And On-location Photographic Techniques, Lighting, And Composition. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply The Technical And Mechanical Skills Necessary To Produce Relevant Photography For Effective Visual Communications.


Typography
Course Number GD306
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd131 This Course Explores The Parallels Between Typographic History And Contemporary Visual Communication, Leading Up To A Contemporary Skill Set Focusing On The Expressive Qualities Of Type And The Evolution Of Typographic Style. Topics Include Technical Aspects Of Typography, Output Options, The Anatomy And Expressive Qualities Of Type And Its Formal Applications, And Intuitive Design. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Creatively And Effectively Incorporate Typography Into Multi-faceted Design Projects.


Advanced Image Editing
Course Number GD308
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd111, Gd221 This Course Presents Advanced Image Manipulation, Color Management, And Editing Techniques For Print And Web Technologies. Topics Include Photographic Collage, Composition, Filters, Layers, Masking, And Effects. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Incorporate Advanced Image Editing Techniques Into Design Projects.


Packaging Design
Course Number GD332
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd121, Gd131 This Course Investigates Design Concepts As They Relate To 3d Forms And Current Packaging Trends. Topics Include Contemporary Package Design, Manufacturing And Printing Technologies, And Design Elements Related To Products And Promotional Materials. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze And Apply Contemporary Package Design Elements, Tools, And Techniques To Produce Effective Industry-standard 3d Designs.


Advanced Illustration
Course Number GD350
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd121 This Course Offers An Advanced Study Of Illustrative Techniques From The Classical To The Contemporary. Topics Include Hand And Digital Illustrative Techniques For Figure Construction, Perspective, And Design Composition. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Develop Contemporary Concepts And Illustrations Appropriate To A Variety Of Professional Applications Including Editorial Content And Media.


Advertising Campaign Concepts
Course Number GD355
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd131 This Course Focuses On Advertising Campaigns And Concepts Related To Graphic Design. Topics Include Concept Development And Creative Brief Writing That Incorporates Media Types, Media Mixing, Client Positioning, And Branding. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Design An Integrated Advertising Campaign Using Targeted Marketing Messages To Effectively Promote A Product Or Service.


Color Theory
Course Number GD375
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd111, Gd121 This Course Provides An In-depth Study Of The Principles Of Color As It Applies To Print And Digital Media. Topics Include Color Relationships, Color Composition, And Visual Color Mixing. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze The Impact And Psychology Of Color On The Development Of Design, And The Power Of Color To Create And Influence Effective Visual Marketing.


Motion Graphics
Course Number GD432
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Gd252 This Course Explores Digital Effects For Video. Topics Include Storyboarding, Effects Design, Motion Effects, Morphing, Titling, Blue Screen, And 3d Camera Matching. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Create Effective Visual Effects Using Current Mastering Technologies.


Visual Communications Portfolio Review
Course Number GD480
Credits 6.0

6.5 Credit Hours/30 Lecture Hours/70 Lab Hours Prerequisite(s): Upper-division Status This Course Focuses On The Development And Critique Of A Professional Design Portfolio. Topics Include Design Industry Business Practices, Industry Interviewing Techniques, Portfolio Refinement, And Self-marketing Skills. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Their Personal Traits And Present A Print, Digital, And Web Portfolio, And A Résumé That Highlight Their Individual Design Skills In A Professional Manner.


Fundamentals of Design
Course Number GD100
Credits 6.0

This course introduces basic design concepts using a hands-on approach to the development of design concepts and solutions to basic design problems. Topics include the design principles and process, drawing, color theory, typography, illustration and layout techniques and the vocabulary of design. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply visual problem-solving skills to create a concept development plan and a creative brief.


History of Graphic Design
Course Number GD102
Credits 3.0

This course explores the parallels between graphic design history and contemporary visual communications. Topics include major trends in design as well as the evolution of paper, type design, typography, image making, photography, and printing techniques. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify the relationships between fine art and political and social movements, and explain their influence on graphic design.


Fundamentals of Image Editing
Course Number GD111
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD100 This course covers the basics of digital image editing, manipulation, and creation of pixel-based imagery. Topics include digital photography, scanning techniques, photo retouching and manipulation, electronic color theory, special effects, print, and web graphics. Upon successful completion of this course,students will be able to utilize digital imaging software to digitally correct images, blend and composite images and create layered photographic compositions.


Fundamentals of Digital Illustration
Course Number GD121
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD100 This course introduces the basic concepts of illustration. Topics include traditional and digital methods of concept development,drawing, typography and design. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply illustration theory,tools, and techniques to create effective illustrations.


Digital Layout
Course Number GD131
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD111, GD121 This course presents the skills necessary to combine imagery and typography to produce effective layouts. Topics include grid theory, style sheets, master pages, pre-flight technologies, printing standards, resolution, and image placement. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to import images and format text to create multi-page layouts using industry-standard software.


Fundamentals of Web Design
Course Number GD241
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD111 This course introduces the basics of web site design and layout. Topics include foundational mark up languages including formatting, design theory, layout, utilization of typography, and web-appropriate imagery. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply the principles of web site design and use industry-standard software to create functional web sites.


Audio-Video
Course Number GD252
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD111 This course provides an overview of video editing, sound editing, and special effects. Topics covered include working with timelines to animate still clips, importing and editing digital video and audio clips, and creating special effects. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to use industry relevant non-linear digital editing software to produce a short video production.


Fundamentals of Interactive Design
Course Number GD261
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD241 This course provides an overview of multimedia graphics focusing on interactive design for 2D animation and the Internet. Topics include storyboarding, basic scripting, and utilizing key frames and timelines. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to design and create basic interactive presentations utilizing animations, video, and sound delivered through interactive media and web technologies.


Print Production
Course Number GD270
Credits 6.0

PREREQUISITE(S): GD131 This course presents the current software tools and techniques for print production of a wide variety of projects and materials. Topics covered include forming concepts that produce layouts with impact, designing with type, creating a visual hierarchy, and identifying current production and pre-press standards. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to use current industry software tools and techniques to conceptualize, create, and carry a project through the print production process.


Portfolio Review and Business Practices
Course Number GD280
Credits 6.0

Prerequisite(s): Program Chair’s Approval This Course Covers Business Practices In The Design Industry And Focuses On The Development And Critique Of A Professional Portfolio And Résumé. Topics Include Design Industry Business Practices, Portfolio Development Process For Traditional And Digital Portfolios, Industry Research, Peer Critiques, And Design Continuity. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Have Created And Presented Both A Print And Digital Portfolio And Résumé That Highlights Their Individual Design Skills.


Art History
Course Number ART300
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Hum250 This Course Provides A Brief Overview Of Historical Ideas And Events In The Development Of The Arts. Topics Include A Review Of The Styles And Schools Of Art As Well As The Functions Of Art In Varying Cultures. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Describe Major Characteristics Of Art And Architecture, Analyze Visual Images, And Identify Historically Significant Artistic Styles, Individual Artists, And Works Of Art.


Communication Skills
Course Number COM112
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Foundational Course(s) If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Presents An Overview Of The Various Theories And Methods Of Personal And Professional Communications. Topics Include Written And Oral Communication Techniques, Presentation Skills, Intercultural Communication Skills,and Negotiation Skills.upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Communicate Effectively In Personal And Professional Environments And Be Able To Manage Personal And Professional Conflicts.


Public Speaking
Course Number COM305
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Com112 This Course Presents Public Speaking Concepts And Applications. Topics Include Assessing Audience And Environments, Incorporating Subject Matter Research, Verbal And Nonverbal Communications, Use Of Visual Aids, Outlining, And Developing Speeches For A Variety Of Purposes. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Create And Present Speeches And Presentations With Appropriate Visual Aids, Research, And Organizational Plans.


College Writing I
Course Number ENG121
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Foundational Course(s) If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Introduces Productive Writing Techniques With An Emphasis On The Writing Process. Topics Include Brainstorming,critical Reading And Thinking, Analyzing Audience And Purpose, Developing Clear Thesis Statements, Developing Effective Sentences And Paragraphs, Drafting, Revising, And Editing. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Use The Writing Process To Produce Effective Essays.


College Writing II
Course Number ENG221
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 This Course Builds On The Skills Taught In College Writing I, With Increased Emphasis On The Writing Process, Argumentation, Research, And Documentation. Topics Include Brainstorming, Analyzing Audience And Purpose, Developing Clear Thesis Statements, Evaluating Sources, Performing Research, And Presenting Correctly Documented Research Results. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Adequately Support A Position, Perform And Correctly Document Research, And Report The Results Of A Research Project.


Creative Writing
Course Number ENG421
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Lit301 This Course Emphasizes The Interdependence Of Writing And Literary Studies, Knowledge Of Literature And Literary Theory, Literary Creativity, Innovation, And The Creative Process. Topics Include Fiction, Non-fiction, Poetry, Drama, Screenplays, And The Study Of Literary Works That Urge Students To Think Outside The Box. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Works Of Fiction, Expand Their Powers Of Observation And Imagination, Develop A Unique Voice In Creative Writing, And Cultivate Good Writing Habits.


Ethical and Critical Thinking
Course Number HUM180
Credits 3.0

This course covers the principles and applications of ethical and critical thinking. Topics include argument construction and analysis, inductive and deductive reasoning, logical fallacies, perception, moral approaches, and social responsibility. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze ethical issues, evaluate and clarify their own thinking,create sound and valid arguments, and effectively weigh the arguments of others.


Humanities
Course Number HUM250
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng221 This Course Explores The Foundations And Development Of Western Culture From Its Origins In The Ancient Near East To Modern Western Civilization. Topics Include Cultural History,philosophy, Religion, Literature, Art, And Music. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Influential Figures And Events, Appreciate And Discuss Well-known Works Of Art And Thought, And Recognize And Analyze Significant Movements And Genres In Western Culture.


Introduction to Literature
Course Number LIT301
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng221 This Course Introduces Students To The Literary Genres Of Fiction, Poetry, And Drama. Topics Include Literary Terminology, Criticism, Forms, Elements, Themes, And Major Works And Authors Within These Genres. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Actively Read, Appreciate, Analyze, And Respond To Works Of Literature.


Science Fiction and Fantasy
Course Number LIT415
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Lit301 This Course Covers The Genres Of Science Fiction And Fantasy. Topics Include The Use Of Language, Composition, And Characterization Within Different Forms Of Science Fiction And Fantasy. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Major Authors And Analyze Significant Works Of Science Fiction And Fantasy.


Literature and Film
Course Number LIT417
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Lit301 This Course Explores The Relationship Between Film And Literature. Topics Include Narrative Techniques And The Differences Between The Media. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify The Narrative Techniques Used In Film And Literature, And Compare And Analyze The Two Formats.


American Government
Course Number POL107
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to present an overview of American government. Topics include the federal system; political parties; nominations and elections; the legislative, executive and judicial branches; and civil liberties and civil rights. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to trace the development of the U.S. Constitution, understand and analyze issues in American government, and discuss the policy-making process.


Political Science
Course Number POL423
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng221, Pol107 This Course Explores Some Of The Most Pressing Political Issues Facing The United States And Other Nations. Topics Include Problems And Issues Inherent In Different Governmental Styles And The Political Process Of Democracies And Other Forms Of Government. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course Students Will Be Able To Research, Analyze, And Discuss Issues Related To The Function Of Political Institutions, Issues Relating To A Variety Of Social Changes, Public Policy Matters, And America’s Role As A Global Leader In Foreign Affairs.


Introduction to Psychology
Course Number PSY101
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 This Course Is Designed To Present A General Overview Of Psychology As A Social Science. Topics Include Historical Perspectives, Research Methods, Therapies, Applied Psychology,and Other Current Issues. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Identify Psychological Concepts And Methods As Used Commonly To Address Real-world Situations.


Human Relations
Course Number SOC121
Credits 3.0

This course explores the nature and importance of human relations. Topics include the communication process, working in diverse environments, teambuilding skills, controlling emotions,and managing conflict. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate essential transferable skills to function effectively in society.


Research Methodologies
Course Number SOC401
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng221, Mth340 This Course Covers Research Methods To Gather, Organize, Analyze, And Convert Data Into Information For The Purposes Of Presentation And Decision Making. Topics Include Primary And Secondary Research, Documentation And Interpretation Of Data, And Presentation To Multicultural Populations. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Conduct Independent Research, Analyze The Data Collected, And Present The Information In Written And Oral Forms.


College Mathematics
Course Number MTH107
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Mth097 If Indicated By Placement Scores This Course Develops Problem-solving And Decision-making Strategies Using Mathematical Tools From Arithmetic, Algebra,geometry, And Statistics. Topics Include Consumer Mathematics,key Concepts In Statistics And Probability, Sets Of Numbers, And Geometry. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Apply Mathematical Tools And Methods To Solve Real-world Problems.


Introduction to Statistics
Course Number MTH340
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Mth107 Or Mth170 This Course Introduces Basic Concepts In Statistics With Emphasis On Quantitative Analysis. Topics Include Measures Of Center And Variation, Applications Of Normal Distribution, Interpretations Of Correlation Coefficients, Analyzing And Graphing Linear Regression Models And Fundamentals Of Probability. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze Realworld Data, Interpret Graphs, Create Simple Linear Regression Models, And Form Valid Conclusions On The Basis Of Such Analysis.


Introduction to Physical Science
Course Number SCI121
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Eng121 And Either Mth107 Or Mth170 This Course Is Designed As An Introduction To Physical Science.topics Include Motion, Conservation Laws, Gravity, Waves, And Thermodynamics. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course,students Will Be Able To Describe The Scientific Method, Explain And Define The Principles And Terminology Of Physical Science,and Use Formulas To Solve Related Problems.


Earth Science
Course Number SCI311
Credits 3.0

3.5 Credit Hours/35 Lecture Hours Prerequisite(s): Eng121 This Course Integrates The Various Fields Of Earth Science And Explores How These Fields Interact. Topics Include Meteorology, Geology, Astronomy, And Oceanography. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course, Students Will Be Able To Analyze The Interactions Of Geological Events, The Weather, The Oceans, And Astronomy.


Computer Applications
Course Number CA101
Credits 3.0

This course is designed to increase proficiency in the use of common word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation application software. Topics include the production of business documents and reports. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to prepare documents using word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.


Success Strategies
Course Number PDC111
Credits 3.0

This course focuses on providing the skills and strategies to achieve personal and educational goals. Topics include learning styles, accountability, self-directed learning, managing resources,goal setting, self-esteem, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate self-reliance and apply the tools for success.


Career Management
Course Number PDC200
Credits 3.0

Prerequisite(s): Student Must Have Completed 50% Of Degree Requirements This Course Provides The Foundation For Developing Long-term Career Management Skills. Topics Include Tips For Producing Quality Résumés And Cover Letters And Interactive Techniques For Interviewing Success. Upon Successful Completion Of This Course,students Will Be Able To Research Job Leads, Write A Résumé,prepare For A Job Interview, Follow Up On A Job Interview, And Apply Strategies To Keep A Job And Advance In A Career.


Program description: The Visual Communications Bachelor’s program is designed to
prepare students with the design and technical skills necessary to
advance in the field of visual communications. Students take a
combination of design theory, web design, imaging, print design,
and multimedia courses. In addition, the general education
courses in the program help students apply skills in critical
thinking, communication, and problem solving to workplace
challenges.

Visual Communications Courses by State & City

Top 20 US Visual Communications Schools (campus and online)

Harvard University
Total Programs 113
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 1st
University of Pennsylvania
Total Programs 188
Number of Subjects 140
Rank in USA 5th
University of California-Los Angeles
Total Programs 168
Number of Subjects 111
Rank in USA 7th
Northwestern University
Total Programs 197
Number of Subjects 139
Rank in USA 11th
New York University
Total Programs 204
Number of Subjects 146
Rank in USA 13th
Duke University
Total Programs 77
Number of Subjects 76
Rank in USA 15th
The University of Texas at Austin
Total Programs 169
Number of Subjects 141
Rank in USA 18th
University of California-San Diego
Total Programs 121
Number of Subjects 89
Rank in USA 22nd
University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Total Programs 243
Number of Subjects 168
Rank in USA 26th
Rice University
Total Programs 74
Number of Subjects 72
Rank in USA 28th
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Total Programs 279
Number of Subjects 183
Rank in USA 31st
Boston University
Total Programs 6
Number of Subjects 124
Rank in USA 32nd
Ohio State University-Main Campus
Total Programs 202
Number of Subjects 150
Rank in USA 33rd
University of California-Davis
Total Programs 160
Number of Subjects 114
Rank in USA 41st
Carnegie Mellon University
Total Programs 167
Number of Subjects 115
Rank in USA 44th
George Washington University
Total Programs 194
Number of Subjects 171
Rank in USA 52nd
Haverford College
Total Programs 48
Number of Subjects 49
Rank in USA 54th
Northeastern University
Total Programs 10
Number of Subjects 126
Rank in USA 56th
Barnard College
Total Programs 76
Number of Subjects 52
Rank in USA 57th
University of Miami
Total Programs 177
Number of Subjects 151
Rank in USA 69th