Online Vocational Courses at Accredited Schools

Ashford University, the school below with the highest overall ranking, is effective at equipping students via its vocational courses to be successful vocational educators, event planners, landscape architects, landscape designers, etc. and connect them to future employers. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, at present there are 114,420 people employed as vocational education teachers alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $52,030. Middle school teachers make on average $53,550 per year and there are about 665,420 of them employed today.

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Vocational Courses at American Intercontinental University

Program Name: Bachelor's (BIT) - Internet Security
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Discovering Information Technology
Course Number ITCO 101
Credits 4.5

From entry-level technicians to computer scientists to chief information officers, there are limitless career possibilities in today's Information Technology. In this course, students may explore hands-on projects such as building websites, databases, and wireless networks, as well as installing computer components and investigating digital evidence and discuss future trends in information technology. This course also introduces the student to the various career elements of IT.


Introduction to Computer and Network Hardware
Course Number ITCO 103
Credits 4.5

This course provides the student with the experience and knowledge necessary to properly install, configure, upgrade, and troubleshoot microcomputers and basic network hardware. Included will be a discussion of desktop and portable systems, printers, input devices, and fundamental networking components.


Introduction to Operating Systems
Course Number ITCO 211
Credits 4.5

In this introduction to operating systems, students will be exposed to contemporary operating systems; examples may include Windows and Linux. Topics may include supporting the operating system, network considerations for operating systems, the desktop interface, manual and automatic package installation and update, virtualization, and basic maintenance.


Fundamentals of Programming and Logic
Course Number ITCO 221
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will be introduced to topics such as variables and scope, data types, control structures, and development environments. Students will create algorithms using basic problem solving techniques.


Introduction to Databases
Course Number ITCO 231
Credits 4.5

In This Course Students Will Review The Fundamental Concepts Of Database Systems, Leading To The Rationale For Today's Dominance Of The Relational Model. Students Will Learn How To Enter Data And Query Them Using Simple Database Applications Including Microsoft Access And Mysql. Additional Topics For This Course Include Design- By-normalization, Thoughtful Declaration Of Indices, The Functionality Of Odbc And Other Apis, And The Difference Between Transactional And Analytic Systems.


Introduction to Programming Using Alice
Course Number ITCO 222
Credits 4.5

In this course students will examine programming concepts and apply constructs such as control structures, arrays, functions, and procedures, using the Alice programming environment.


Network Infrastructure Basics
Course Number ITCO 251
Credits 4.5

This Course Provides Students With A Conceptual Overview Of Network Infrastructure. Topics May Include Network Configurations, Networking Hardware, Network Operating Systems, Segmentation Through Subnetting, And Network Management Issues. Network Communication Is Presented At The Conceptual Level Via Osi Reference Model, And Then At A Practical Level With Tcp/ip.


Comprehensive IT Project
Course Number ITCO 299
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will explore the integration of information technology skills and knowledge from areas of information technology such as computer hardware, networking, database systems, and programming with emphasis on the forensics aspect of digital information systems.


Relational Database Management Systems
Course Number ITCO 331
Credits 4.5

This course discusses the installation and configuration of an enterprise-level relational database management system. Students will learn how to configure the system for multiple users, grant access privileges, distribute the database over the filesystem, and ensure the integrity of the data content captured by the database.


Computer Networks
Course Number ITCO 351
Credits 4.5

In This Course, Students Will Review The Design And Components Of Lan And Wan Systems And Demonstrate The Ability To Implement And Deploy Network Topologies Using The Necessary Network Hardware And Software Systems. Topics In This Course Include Network Configurations, Networking Hardware, Network Operating Systems, Segmentation Through Subnetting, And Network Management Issues. Network Communication Is Presented At The Conceptual Level Via Osi Reference Model, And Then At A Practical Level With Tcp/ip.


Data Structures and Implementation
Course Number ITCO 321
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with an intermediate approach to organizing and storing data for efficient use by computers. The course builds on students' existing knowledge of mathematics and programming to illustrate the data structure abstractions and their manifestation in computer applications.


IT Project and Team Management
Course Number ITCO 311
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with the opportunity to experience project and team management in a realistic setting. Students form groups that undertake specific projects, while learning about group dynamics, communications, project scoping, resource allocations, and timeline planning.


Data Modeling and Design
Course Number ITCO 333
Credits 4.5

This course examines relational database concepts and implementation of database systems. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual modeling and in particular the entity- relationship diagram. Students will learn to distinguish between conceptual and physical schemas, appreciate the role of the 1-m relationship, and will be able to translate a conceptual schema into a full-fledged database.


Human/Computer Interfaces and Interactions
Course Number ITCO 391
Credits 4.5

The course examines human factors and performance vis- à-vis technology applications, components of technology, and methods and techniques used in design and evaluation of system and application interfaces.


Planning and Implementing a Network
Course Number ITCO 451
Credits 4.5

This advanced course brings together a variety of critical topics including network configuration, management, and monitoring through various tools. Students will advance their understanding of networks by learning how to use various management protocols and how to resolve critical (but predictable) problems in scalable network topologies.


Data Mining and Warehousing
Course Number ITCO 435
Credits 4.5

In this course, students will focus on the concepts, methods and skills for developing and mining data warehouses for the best competitive business strategy. It also develops analytical thinking to identify such appropriate business strategies. The course will focus on the programmatic interface between databases and analytical tools, the statistical foundation of datamining, dimensional modeling, and the extraction-transformation- loading staging of a data warehouse.


Program Capstone
Course Number ITCO 499
Credits 4.5

An internship or senior project that satisfies the concentration outcomes and meets the approval of the University Program Committee.


Infrastructure Security
Course Number ITSC 262
Credits 4.5

This course covers network security principles and implementation techniques. Topics can include examples of attacks and countermeasures for securing e-mail, definitions and principles underpinning all IT security, security management, and security architectures.


Information Assurance Network Fundamentals
Course Number ITSC 263
Credits 4.5

This Course Reviews How Networks And The Related Protocols Like Tcp/ip Work To Allow Users To Analyze Network Traffic And Determine Hostile Traffic And To Protect Against These Attacks Using Devices Such As Routers And Firewalls. Topics May Include Network Topologies, Tcp/ip Concepts And Behavior, And Routing And Switching.


Security Policies and Secure Network Concepts
Course Number ITSC 265
Credits 4.5

This course covers the essential practices involved in developing a security policy. Topics may include IT security policies and procedures, security standards, security baseline analysis, guidelines for security policy development, the value of security templates, and policy implementation, revision, maintenance, and enforcement, threat detection and reaction, and technical and managerial responses.


Physical and Personnel Aspects of IT Security
Course Number ITSC 266
Credits 4.5

This course provides students with an overview of physical security along with issues relating to security of personnel. Physical security topics can include facility requirements, technical controls, environmental issues, personal safety, and physical security threats. Personnel security topics can include classification issues, clearances, and training.


Program description: The Bachelor of Information Technology (BIT) with a concentration in Internet Security degree program allows students to focus their studies on an area that is gaining more and more attention from an increasingly security-conscious business community. Students will learn about the types of information technology security used in business today as well as the practices that should be in place in any organization to ensure security. The courses offered in this program helps prepare students who are interested in developing and advancing their career opportunities in business environments.

Program Name: Bachelor's (BSCJ) - Law Enforcement
Art Appreciation
Course Number HUMA 205
Credits 4.5

This course introduces a variety of art forms within a cultural context, providing a basis of understanding of societal and cultural developments in historic and contemporary terms.


Topics in Cultural Studies
Course Number HUMA 215
Credits 4.5

This course explores a specific region or culture in depth, emphasizing its cultural, political, and economic characteristics.


Introduction to Computers
Course Number COMP 101
Credits 4.5

This course is a practical overview of desktop applications including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.


English Composition I
Course Number ENGL 106
Credits 4.5

In this course, students focus on developing writing skills through practice and revision of a variety of different types of essays. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation.


English Composition II
Course Number ENGL 107
Credits 4.5

"In this course, students focus on research and developing writing skills through writing the ""argument"" essay. Students are also given instruction in library and online research and methods of documentation."


College Algebra
Course Number MATH 133
Credits 4.5

"This course addresses topics in contemporary mathematics such as inequalities, radicals, quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic, and graphing polynomial functions."


Presentation Essentials
Course Number PRES 111
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on preparing and delivering effective presentations. In addition, students learn about presentation strategy and the creation of visual aids.


Aspects of Psychology
Course Number SSCI 206
Credits 4.5

This course examines the discipline of psychology, b cognitive and psycho-social, covering topics such as perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, attitudes, psychological aspects of huma sexuality, and psycho-behavioral pathology.


Sociology
Course Number SSCI 210
Credits 4.5

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theory, and method of sociology. Students can develop a better understanding of society, culture, social institutions, social behavior, and other general social processes that operate in the social world.


Biology
Course Number SCIE 206
Credits 4.5

This survey course presents the fundamental concepts of biology. Special emphasis is given to current biological issues.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCIE 210
Credits 4.5

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explo the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature.


Comparative Criminal Justice System
Course Number CRJS 305
Credits 4.5

This course gives students a rationale for understanding and appreciating the different ways justice is conceived and administered internationally. This course serves as a basis for comparing various justice systems as they relate to the American justice system. Students will explore how various countries organize their law enforcement, judicial systems and corrections agencies, and compare them with the American criminal justice system.


Crime Victim Studies
Course Number CRJS 310
Credits 4.5

This course presents the scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to victims and their situations. It also looks at the different types of victimizations, how victimization rates are measured, and what attempts the government has made to increase the involvement of victims’ role in the criminal justice system.


Constitutional Law
Course Number CRJS 400
Credits 4.5

This course examines the United States Constitution, its history, evolution and influence on the criminal justice system, including the structure of government and our system of checks and balances. Additionally, students will analyze doctrinal shifts in the court’s decisions, and critique the role of individual jurisprudential viewpoints in judicial decision making.


Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 410
Credits 4.5

This course offers a social historical overview of issues of race, class, gender, crime, and justice. The impact of the criminal justice system on culturally diverse groups is the primary theme of all class activities.


Ethics and Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 420
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of ethical conduct in the administration of justice. This course explores moral choices associated with individuals in the criminal justice field, and examines consequences associated with various choice options.


Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Number CRJS 430
Credits 4.5

This course teaches students the theoretical aspects of conducting and investigating research problems in criminology and criminal justice. It explores the entire research process from beginning to end including the following techniques: problem identification, data collection, measurement, reliability, and validity issues. Students will also examine the ethical issues in the research process and how to analyze and document the research findings in a written assignment.


Applied Statistics
Course Number CRJS 440
Credits 4.5

This course is designed to teach students basic inferential statistical computations and analyses. The course focuses on practical applications rather than advanced statistical analysis. Students will develop skills in statistical application related to criminal justice policies and this course prepares students for the work place or those who are interested in pursuing graduate studies involving research.


Advanced Topics in Corrections
Course Number CRJS 450
Credits 4.5

This course examines the theories and practices involved in probation and parole processes and decision-making. Topics include pre-sentence and pre-parole investigations, probation and parole supervision, the administration of corrections services including treatment and release decision making processes. Finally this course examines juvenile corrections and the use of intermediate methods of treatment including electronic monitoring, community service, and the use of restitution.


Senior Capstone in Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 499
Credits 4.5

This course offers a comprehensive and systematic analysis of key contemporary criminal justice issues through a close review of the theories and policies guiding many crime fighting strategies. By applying critical thinking and analytical skills, oral and written communication skills, and information systems skills, students will learn of the complex nature of crime and society’s response to criminality. This course serves as the CJ capstone class and involves the student preparing a project agreed upon between the student and the instructor. Each project will require research, report writing, oral presentation, and interactive teamwork.


Administration of Criminal Justice
Course Number CRJS 345
Credits 4.5

This course focuses on the challenges administrators face in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will examine the various organizational frameworks in the criminal justice system and the concepts, organizational principles, and models associated with these criminal justice agencies.


Community Oriented Policing
Course Number CRJS 320
Credits 4.5

This course examines the relationship between police agencies and the communities they serve. Topics will include traditional relations and public policy as well as new programs designed to involve the community in resolving crimes in the community. Students will also examine issues involving police ethics and the public image of police agencies in the media.


Criminal Investigation
Course Number CRJS 455
Credits 4.5

This course explores the elements of investigation including crime scenes, witnesses and evidence, and includes such topics as investigative techniques, evidence documentation, interrogation and arrest. The course addresses the particulars of investigating major crimes.


Crime Mapping and Analysis
Course Number CRJS 465
Credits 4.5

This course introduces basic concepts in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications in criminal justice. The class provides an overview of the use of maps in policing. Emphasis is on learning how to properly design, construct, manipulate, and interpret maps.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice
provides students with a broad based education in criminal
justice studies. The curriculum is designed to give students
a professional education in the criminal justice field, with
particular emphases in policing, courts, criminology,
corrections, juvenile justice, and the field of forensic
science. The focus is to provide students with an
education that will help them master the skills and
expertise needed to work in the field of criminal justice.

Program Name: Master's (MIT) - Internet Security
Database Design and Implementation
Course Number ITD 640
Credits 6.0

In this course students will focus on the design and implementation of a relational database management system, including concepts such as data extraction and data manipulation.


Enterprise Network Design
Course Number ITN 620
Credits 6.0

In this course students examine computer networking concepts, which enable them to translate business objectives into a physical network design. Students will be expected to collect and analyze appropriate information to make context-appropriate network-related business decisions.


Object-oriented Application Development
Course Number ITP 630
Credits 6.0

During this course students analyze and apply the fundamentals of object-oriented application development.


Information Systems
Course Number ITS 610
Credits 6.0

In this course students examine management skills as they relate to the information technology industry, taking into account the relationship between networking, databases, and programming.


Strategic Information Management
Course Number ITS 685
Credits 6.0

This capstone course examines the role of information systems within the strategic management of an organization. Students will explore a number of issues such as intellectual property rights, information policy, information technology trends and opportunities, and the use of technology to generate a competitive advantage.


Introduction to Information Security
Course Number ITS 650
Credits 6.0

This course provides an overview of information security technologies as applied to operating systems, database management systems, and computer networks.


Cryptography Concepts
Course Number ITS 660
Credits 6.0

In this course, students can learn to use secure protocols over networked systems using cryptography.


Special Topics in Network Security
Course Number ITS 670
Credits 6.0

In this course, students will explore current issues in network security and apply security concepts. The class will focus on technical topics as well as privacy and policy issues.


Program description: This Master of Information Technology (MIT) degree program with a concentration in Internet Security gives students the opportunity to understand information security technologies as applied to operating systems, database management systems and computer networks. Coursework is structured to assist students in the development of their goals as they acquire the knowledge and skills common to professional Internet security professionals.

The goal of the MIT with a concentration in Internet Security is to prepare students with the industry-current knowledge and skills specific to the area of Internet security. In this industry-focused curriculum, students will have opportunities to learn how to use secure protocols over networked systems using cryptography. They will also explore current issues in network security and apply security concepts. Coursework focuses on technical topics as well as privacy and policy issues.

Vocational Courses at Capella University

Program Name: BS - Homeland Security
Homeland Security in the 21st Century
Course Number PS4310
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the responsibilities of the Department of Homeland Security. Learners examine the roles and jurisdictions of the 22 federal agencies within the Department of Homeland Security and their relationships with local, county, and state agencies. Learners also identify the economic challenges associated with ensuring homeland security.


Homeland Security and Multijurisdictional Coordination
Course Number PS4320
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Focus On Nationally Recognized And Accepted Multijurisdictional Emergency Operations Systems. Learners Examine The National Incident Management System (nims) And The Incident Command System (ics) As Foundations For Modeling And Coordinating Effective Crisis Command And Communication Management Systems. Learners Also Evaluate Proper Techniques For Managing Rumor Control And Disseminating Information During Times Of Crisis.


Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number PS4325
Credits 4.0

This course presents the fundamentals of risk and asset analysis in the field of homeland security and emergency management. Learners examine physical, operational, economic, legal, and asset security risks and establish appropriate levels of preparedness for an operational system. Learners also study gap analysis measures and develop corrective action plans for both political and Incident Command systems.


Leadership in Homeland Security
Course Number PS4330
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of homeland security leadership strategies, including best practices for achieving leadership success. Learners study the organizational structure of the homeland security field and gain an understanding of leadership constraints and leadership autonomy.


Technology and Homeland Security
Course Number PS4340
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study integrative technology systems and application techniques used in the homeland security field. Learners examine technological resources and their applications in securing mission-critical data. Other course topics include data networking, data mining, intelligence gathering, forecasting models, and planning for tabletop exercises using conventional and virtual simulations.


Government, Media, and Civil Liberties
Course Number PS4350
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Evaluate The Effects Laws Such As The Antiterrorism And Effective Death Penalty Act (aedpa) And The Usa Patriot Act Have On Individuals, Organizations, And Governments. Learners Evaluate Information Affecting Individual Civil Liberties, Constitutionally Protected Freedoms, And Ethnic Relations. Learners Also Examine The Consequences Of Detainment, Internment, Interrogation, And Torture.


Domestic and International Terrorism
Course Number PS4360
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is on the mission of protecting the United States from domestic or international threats. Learners identify and interpret social, cultural, and psychological threats and stressors that can result in terrorist acts. Other course topics include terrorist organizations, political threats, and regional conflicts.


World Conflict
Course Number PS4365
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners identify and evaluate the causes of world conflict. Learners examine and interpret social, cultural, and psychological threats and stressors that can result in global fear and world conflict. Other course topics include the historical evolution of terrorism; geopolitical threats; and past, current, and potential regional and world conflicts.


Diplomatic Approaches to National Security
Course Number PS4370
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the issues involved with maintaining national security while respecting citizens’ individual freedoms. Learners study the art of diplomacy and examine other nations’ approaches to democracy and their relationships with the U.S.


Intelligence Role in Homeland Security
Course Number PS4380
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course evaluate threats to homeland security and identify the intelligence-gathering methods used to address them. Learners also use the intelligence process model to assess and properly allocate the resources needed to maintain homeland security.


Multijurisdictional Approaches to Investigations
Course Number PS4390
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the intricacies of conducting successful multijurisdictional investigations. Learners study crime scene evaluation and preservation practices, crime-specific investigation strategies, and the different investigation standards of various federal agencies.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number PS3100
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system and its evolution in response to the continually changing forces that influence crime control. Learners gain an understanding of criminal justice theory and its relation to criminality, the criminal justice system, and the principles of the adjudication process.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number PS3200
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the growing field of emergency management. Learners study various hazard threats and examine strategies for determining and reducing vulnerability. Learners also analyze disaster response and recovery behaviors and activities. Course topics include local, state, and federal emergency management organizations and the impact of various stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, on the emergency management process.


Principles of Security Management
Course Number PS3300
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Course topics include security department management and operations, emergency and disaster management, the role of security in risk management, and integrating security with local law enforcement organizations and the role of security management in the business environment.


Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Number PS3400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the essential concepts of the emerging field of homeland security. Learners study a range of threats to U.S. security, including specialty weapons, cyber attacks, and smuggling. Learners also examine current issues related to large-scale refugee flow and civil liberties, and evaluate homeland security domains, including strategy, fear management, and crisis communications. This course helps learners build a foundational vernacular upon which to critically analyze homeland security.


Applied Public Safety Theory
Course Number PS3500
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major theoretical approaches to threats to public safety from the eighteenth century and the Enlightenment period through the present. Learners study the work of experts associated with the historical, international body of criminology knowledge. Learners explore a range of issues and apply public safety theory and research to analyze them, further developing their critical thinking and writing skills.


Principles of Public Safety Investigation
Course Number PS3600
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing breaches in physical, information, or personnel security. Learners examine the principles and procedures used for crime scene investigation and protection from security and law enforcement perspectives. Learners also study methods of collecting and preserving evidence; interviewing and interrogating complainants, witnesses, suspects, and victims; and employing scientific applications in criminal justice and private security investigations.


Justice, Crime, and Ethics
Course Number PS3700
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ethical dimension of law enforcement practice and acquire the critical knowledge and skills that support ethical, on-the-job decision making. Learners examine major ethical problems such as discrimination, corruption, deception, racial profiling, and excessive force using material drawn from commissions of inquiry, internal affairs investigations, published literature, human rights documentation, and observed police-community relations. Learners explore the bases for developing personal and professional ethics, guided by professional codes of practice and human rights standards.


Applied Public Safety Research Methods
Course Number PS3800
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners are introduced to the principles of social research in the field of public safety. Learners use the scientific method to collect data and analyze research questions specific to crime prevention, emergency planning, information security, and hazard assessment. Learners also explore the ethics of public safety research techniques and practical applications of research.


History of Violence in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS3900
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners review the history of violence in U.S. society, focusing on war, terrorism, hostility, and conquest. Course content emphasizes the roles of local, state, and federal public safety agencies in addressing violence issues in the post-9/11 era.


Introductory Public Safety Statistical Research
Course Number PS3950
Credits 6.0

This course introduces learners to basic statistical language and procedures related to crime phenomena data. Learners practice basic skills such as reading and calculating formulas and analyze the effects of measurement techniques, distribution shapes,and other factors of the statistic-selection process. Learners also examine two-variable relationships, including correlation and prediction measures. Prerequisite(s): MAT2050, PS3800.


Public Safety Capstone Project
Course Number PS4990
Credits 6.0

The capstone project is the culmination of the bachelor’s degree program in Public Safety and is intended to demonstrate the technical and applied public safety knowledge and the critical-thinking and communication skills learners gain during their program. Learners formulate ideas for a new public safety approach, create a vision, and develop a strategic plan that describes how to implement their concept. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Statistical Literacy
Course Number MAT2050
Credits 3.0

This course emphasizes the learner as a consumer of statistics rather than a producer of statistical calculations. Learners apply critical-thinking skills to arguments involving statistics and interpret and evaluate statistics used in real-world situations.


General Education Classes
Credits 45.0

General Education Requirements are 45 quarter credits with a minimum of 6 quarter credits from each category: Communications, Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, Social Science.


Elective Courses CJ
Credits 37.0

Choose 37 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


Program description: Undergraduate learners in the Homeland Security specialization examine the fundamentals of the homeland security profession and acquire knowledge and skills needed to manage public security in conjunction with federal resources. Specialization topics include world conflict and the geopolitical roots of terrorism, terroristic threat analysis, domestic and international terrorism, and the role of diplomacy and intelligence in homeland security. Successful graduates of this specialization are prepared to pursue careers as Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) program specialists, Department of Homeland Security policy analysts or criminal investigators, or U.S. Department of Transportation security screening analysts. Learn about completion rates, affordability, and more at www.capellaresults.com.

Program Name: BS - Information Assurance and Security
System Assurance Security
Course Number IT4803
Credits 6.0

This course is an introduction to information assurance and security. It is an overview for network administrators who must implement security strategies to protect their organization from exposure to the Internet and helps network designers incorporate security-conscious designs. The course presents strategies to guard against hackers and forms of viruses, describes firewalls and gateways, and helps learners explore authentication and encryption techniques. It also covers a list of the methods most often used for attacking a network system and how to defend against them. Upon successful completion of this course, learners are prepared to take the exam for the Security+ certification.


Cyber Defense and Countermeasures
Course Number IT4070
Credits 6.0

This course provides an in-depth coverage of the design, implementation, and troubleshooting of security infrastructure. Learners explore and apply the principles of cyber defense in-depth techniques utilizing cryptography, encryption, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), digital signatures, and perimeter security techniques.


Cyber Attacks and Ethical Hacking
Course Number IT4071
Credits 6.0

This course covers ways that computers and networks are attacked by hackers using techniques and common utilities. Learners explore security threats and ways that system vulnerabilities are exploited to attack systems. Topics include Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), ethical hacking techniques, sniffers, protocols, social engineering, vulnerability analysis, and penetration testing to ensure infrastructure security.


Operating Systems Security
Course Number IT4072
Credits 6.0

This course focuses on securing and hardening both Windows and Linux operating systems, as well as techniques for maintaining the confidentiality and integrity of systems. Topics include patch management, authentication, auditing and monitoring, and access control.


Organizational Security
Course Number IT4073
Credits 6.0

This Course Covers The People And Process Aspect Of Information Assurance And Security, Which Is The Most Widely Ignored Part Of The Information Technology Industry. Topics Include Security Life Cycle, Certification And Accreditation, Configuration Management, Employment Practices, And Security Awareness. The Course Covers Best Practices Of Policy Development Along With Industry-specific Standards. Industry-specific Laws And Regulations Such As Health Insurance Portability And Accountability Act (hipaa), Sarbanes-oxley (sarbox), And National Institute Of Standards And Technology (nist), Are Explored. Privacy Issues In Computing, Personnel, And Physical Security Are Discussed Along With Biometrics


Applications Security
Course Number IT4074
Credits 6.0

This course addresses securing applications, security vulnerabilities, services, and learning secure coding techniques. The course covers all classes of applications including mobile, email, databases, and Web applications


Computer Forensics
Course Number IT4075
Credits 6.0

Learners in this course examine computer forensics as a discipline that supports law enforcement professionals in investigating white collar crime. Learners explore computer forensics tools and techniques, crime investigations, incident response and handling, and legal issues


Security Management and Policies
Course Number IT4076
Credits 6.0

This course covers hands-on security management practices through the study of security policies and procedures, risk management, and business continuity planning. Topics include security and business need trade-offs, risk assessments, designing security policies and procedures and a business continuity plan, and enforcement of security policies and procedures.


Discrete Mathematics
Course Number MAT2051
Credits 6.0

This course presents an overview of mathematical analysis techniques. Learners apply number logic and set theory, functions and sequences, relations equivalence, partial order, digraphs, recurrence relations, counting techniques, logic and techniques of proof, graphs, and algorithms to the fields of business and information technology. Prerequisite(s): MAT1050.


Communication Strategies for the Information Technology Professional
Course Number IT3006
Credits 6.0

In this course, learners build and strengthen the skills needed to succeed in their program and the workplace. Learners engage in interactive activities that help them develop an information technology perspective and expand their organizational, research, critical-thinking, and problem-solving skills. Learners also participate in building a learning community, share talents and resources with courseroom peers, and prepare professional written communications. Other topics include teamwork, ethics, and project creation.


Fundamentals of Project Management
Course Number IT3120
Credits 6.0

This course emphasizes the critical activities associated with managing and leading information technology projects while maintaining the structure of a standardized enterprise architecture. Topics include vendor management, configuration management, project estimation, risk management, and management of cross-functional and multinational teams. Learners explore case studies of IT project successes and failures and are introduced to software management practices within the Software Engineering Institute’s Capability Maturity Model. Learners also build and apply a project plan during this course.


Ethical and Human Side of Information Technology
Course Number IT3160
Credits 6.0

This course introduces the inherent ethical issues in the information technology profession with regard to cultural and human interaction in global and domestic issues. Essays, case studies, research, and ethical codes are integral to the course.


Enterprise Architecture
Course Number IT3200
Credits 6.0

Learners in this course study how core business processes and information technology infrastructure merge to form enterprise architecture. Learners conduct an organizational requirements analysis as a first step in constructing an enterprise architecture. Learners also examine the stages of enterprise architecture maturity and develop core designs appropriate for each corresponding maturity level.


Human-Computer Interaction
Course Number IT3300
Credits 6.0

Learners in this course analyze the cognitive and affective dynamics of human-computer interaction. Learners also examine the impact of user-centric guidelines on the design cycle of technological products and evaluate the usability of device interfaces and computer applications.


Hardware and Operating Systems Architecture
Course Number IT3310
Credits 6.0

Learners in this course study the fundamentals of hardware and operating systems architecture. Topics include computer architecture, operating systems architecture, number systems, peripherals, file management, and programming tools. The course also includes a review of current computer architectures and modern operating systems such as Windows, Linux, and MacOS.


Fundamentals of Software Architecture
Course Number IT3340
Credits 6.0

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of software and database architecture. Topics include the role of the software and data architect, requirements and tools used to create software architecture, database management systems, and database architecture. Learners define a software and data architecture appropriate for organizational needs and gain an understanding of the role of design in software and data architecture.


Network and Security Architecture
Course Number IT3350
Credits 6.0

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of network and security architecture. Learners gain an understanding of how networks function to support the requirements needed to build a network and security architecture. Course topics include requirements analysis, network architecture, security architecture, network analysis, and systems methodology.


Integrated Action Learning Project
Course Number IT4990
Credits 6.0

This course allows learners to apply knowledge and skills from other courses as they develop a project that benefits an organization, community, or industry. Learners prepare a proposal that includes a project description, deliverables, completion dates, and associated learning. Upon approval from the instructor, learners execute the proposal, record their progress weekly using a project tracking Web site, and produce a final project report.


Elective Courses IS33
Credits 33.0

Choose 33 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


General Education Classes
Credits 45.0

General Education Requirements are 45 quarter credits with a minimum of 6 quarter credits from each category: Communications, Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, Social Science.


Program description: Information systems play an important role in the infrastructure that supports commerce, banking, telecommunications, health care, and national security, driving the need for qualified informational assurance and security specialists. New financial and health care regulations related to privacy and security, along with a growing move to more vulnerable wireless systems, have also increased the importance of these skills. This Information Assurance and Security bachelor’s specialization is designed to help you acquire and apply the latest tools, techniques, and methods of securing an enterprise, while building the business and communication skills you need to influence internal decision making and enhance organizational effectiveness.

Program Name: BS - Security Management
Homeland Security in the 21st Century
Course Number PS4310
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the responsibilities of the Department of Homeland Security. Learners examine the roles and jurisdictions of the 22 federal agencies within the Department of Homeland Security and their relationships with local, county, and state agencies. Learners also identify the economic challenges associated with ensuring homeland security.


Homeland Security and Multijurisdictional Coordination
Course Number PS4320
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Focus On Nationally Recognized And Accepted Multijurisdictional Emergency Operations Systems. Learners Examine The National Incident Management System (nims) And The Incident Command System (ics) As Foundations For Modeling And Coordinating Effective Crisis Command And Communication Management Systems. Learners Also Evaluate Proper Techniques For Managing Rumor Control And Disseminating Information During Times Of Crisis.


Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Course Number PS4325
Credits 4.0

This course presents the fundamentals of risk and asset analysis in the field of homeland security and emergency management. Learners examine physical, operational, economic, legal, and asset security risks and establish appropriate levels of preparedness for an operational system. Learners also study gap analysis measures and develop corrective action plans for both political and Incident Command systems.


Leadership in Homeland Security
Course Number PS4330
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of homeland security leadership strategies, including best practices for achieving leadership success. Learners study the organizational structure of the homeland security field and gain an understanding of leadership constraints and leadership autonomy.


Technology and Homeland Security
Course Number PS4340
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners study integrative technology systems and application techniques used in the homeland security field. Learners examine technological resources and their applications in securing mission-critical data. Other course topics include data networking, data mining, intelligence gathering, forecasting models, and planning for tabletop exercises using conventional and virtual simulations.


Government, Media, and Civil Liberties
Course Number PS4350
Credits 4.0

Learners In This Course Evaluate The Effects Laws Such As The Antiterrorism And Effective Death Penalty Act (aedpa) And The Usa Patriot Act Have On Individuals, Organizations, And Governments. Learners Evaluate Information Affecting Individual Civil Liberties, Constitutionally Protected Freedoms, And Ethnic Relations. Learners Also Examine The Consequences Of Detainment, Internment, Interrogation, And Torture.


Domestic and International Terrorism
Course Number PS4360
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is on the mission of protecting the United States from domestic or international threats. Learners identify and interpret social, cultural, and psychological threats and stressors that can result in terrorist acts. Other course topics include terrorist organizations, political threats, and regional conflicts.


World Conflict
Course Number PS4365
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners identify and evaluate the causes of world conflict. Learners examine and interpret social, cultural, and psychological threats and stressors that can result in global fear and world conflict. Other course topics include the historical evolution of terrorism; geopolitical threats; and past, current, and potential regional and world conflicts.


Diplomatic Approaches to National Security
Course Number PS4370
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the issues involved with maintaining national security while respecting citizens’ individual freedoms. Learners study the art of diplomacy and examine other nations’ approaches to democracy and their relationships with the U.S.


Intelligence Role in Homeland Security
Course Number PS4380
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course evaluate threats to homeland security and identify the intelligence-gathering methods used to address them. Learners also use the intelligence process model to assess and properly allocate the resources needed to maintain homeland security.


Multijurisdictional Approaches to Investigations
Course Number PS4390
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the intricacies of conducting successful multijurisdictional investigations. Learners study crime scene evaluation and preservation practices, crime-specific investigation strategies, and the different investigation standards of various federal agencies.


Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number PS3100
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system and its evolution in response to the continually changing forces that influence crime control. Learners gain an understanding of criminal justice theory and its relation to criminality, the criminal justice system, and the principles of the adjudication process.


Introduction to Emergency Management
Course Number PS3200
Credits 4.0

This course provides an introduction to the growing field of emergency management. Learners study various hazard threats and examine strategies for determining and reducing vulnerability. Learners also analyze disaster response and recovery behaviors and activities. Course topics include local, state, and federal emergency management organizations and the impact of various stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, on the emergency management process.


Principles of Security Management
Course Number PS3300
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Course topics include security department management and operations, emergency and disaster management, the role of security in risk management, and integrating security with local law enforcement organizations and the role of security management in the business environment.


Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Number PS3400
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the essential concepts of the emerging field of homeland security. Learners study a range of threats to U.S. security, including specialty weapons, cyber attacks, and smuggling. Learners also examine current issues related to large-scale refugee flow and civil liberties, and evaluate homeland security domains, including strategy, fear management, and crisis communications. This course helps learners build a foundational vernacular upon which to critically analyze homeland security.


Applied Public Safety Theory
Course Number PS3500
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the major theoretical approaches to threats to public safety from the eighteenth century and the Enlightenment period through the present. Learners study the work of experts associated with the historical, international body of criminology knowledge. Learners explore a range of issues and apply public safety theory and research to analyze them, further developing their critical thinking and writing skills.


Principles of Public Safety Investigation
Course Number PS3600
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on analyzing breaches in physical, information, or personnel security. Learners examine the principles and procedures used for crime scene investigation and protection from security and law enforcement perspectives. Learners also study methods of collecting and preserving evidence; interviewing and interrogating complainants, witnesses, suspects, and victims; and employing scientific applications in criminal justice and private security investigations.


Justice, Crime, and Ethics
Course Number PS3700
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ethical dimension of law enforcement practice and acquire the critical knowledge and skills that support ethical, on-the-job decision making. Learners examine major ethical problems such as discrimination, corruption, deception, racial profiling, and excessive force using material drawn from commissions of inquiry, internal affairs investigations, published literature, human rights documentation, and observed police-community relations. Learners explore the bases for developing personal and professional ethics, guided by professional codes of practice and human rights standards.


Applied Public Safety Research Methods
Course Number PS3800
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners are introduced to the principles of social research in the field of public safety. Learners use the scientific method to collect data and analyze research questions specific to crime prevention, emergency planning, information security, and hazard assessment. Learners also explore the ethics of public safety research techniques and practical applications of research.


History of Violence in the U.S. Society
Course Number PS3900
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners review the history of violence in U.S. society, focusing on war, terrorism, hostility, and conquest. Course content emphasizes the roles of local, state, and federal public safety agencies in addressing violence issues in the post-9/11 era.


Introductory Public Safety Statistical Research
Course Number PS3950
Credits 6.0

This course introduces learners to basic statistical language and procedures related to crime phenomena data. Learners practice basic skills such as reading and calculating formulas and analyze the effects of measurement techniques, distribution shapes,and other factors of the statistic-selection process. Learners also examine two-variable relationships, including correlation and prediction measures. Prerequisite(s): MAT2050, PS3800.


Public Safety Capstone Project
Course Number PS4990
Credits 6.0

The capstone project is the culmination of the bachelor’s degree program in Public Safety and is intended to demonstrate the technical and applied public safety knowledge and the critical-thinking and communication skills learners gain during their program. Learners formulate ideas for a new public safety approach, create a vision, and develop a strategic plan that describes how to implement their concept. For BS in Public Safety learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s final quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Statistical Literacy
Course Number MAT2050
Credits 3.0

This course emphasizes the learner as a consumer of statistics rather than a producer of statistical calculations. Learners apply critical-thinking skills to arguments involving statistics and interpret and evaluate statistics used in real-world situations.


General Education Classes
Credits 45.0

General Education Requirements are 45 quarter credits with a minimum of 6 quarter credits from each category: Communications, Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, Social Science.


Elective Courses CJ
Credits 37.0

Choose 37 quarter credits of additional undergraduate courses.


Introduction to Security Management
Course Number PS4410
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Topics include emergency and disaster management, security department management and operations, integration of security with law enforcement organizations, and the role of security in risk management.


Ethics in Security Management
Course Number PS4420
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course analyze the ethical codes of conduct required of security industry professionals and use them as a foundation for developing their own personal codes of conduct. Learners also examine the importance of respecting diversity in the professional security management environment.


Leadership Principles in Security Management
Course Number PS4431
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners examine various leadership theories and personnel management styles used in the security management field and form personal leadership strategies to employ in future security operations. Learners analyze the daily operation of a security management organization and develop the skills needed to evaluate and retain employees and institute strategic problem-solving methods in a corporate setting. Learners also gain an understanding of working under the constraints of a corporate budget.


Technology and Systems in Security Management
Course Number PS4440
Credits 4.0

Learners in this course study access control, access deterrent systems, and biometric security measures. Learners gain the skills necessary to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of security management technologies. Learners also analyze and perform technology cost analyses and explore the legal implications of using security management technologies.


Operational Security
Course Number PS4460
Credits 4.0

In this course, learners develop the skills needed to evaluate threats and develop security procedures for public and private events. Learners survey, analyze, and target areas susceptible to security breach; assess infrastructure needs; and develop and apply action plans for securing assets.


Program description: In this course, learners examine the private security industry from a business perspective. Topics include emergency and disaster management, security department management and operations, integration of security with law enforcement organizations, and the role of security in risk management.

Program Name: MS - Information Assurance and Security
Technical Communications
Course Number TS5004
Credits 4.0

This course provides learners with the necessary skills for communicating technical information to various stakeholders in organizations. The focus of the course is on the fundamentals of technical communication in the electronic workplace while emphasizing clarity and organization. Learners study technical writing, editing, and online communication and engage in a broad range of activities, including preparing an effective résumé, writing proposals and technical reports, and creating professional development plans. This course helps learners develop an understanding of format and content and prepares them for project documentation requirements throughout their program and their professional careers. TS5004 must be taken by master’s learners in their first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer or petition.


Introduction to Enterprise Application Architecture
Course Number TS5010
Credits 4.0

This course presents the interrelated architectural, business, and technical solution perspectives essential to the design and development of enterprise-caliber information technology solutions. Learners consider each perspective as they develop a Web site for an enterprise. Learners explore the business context supporting the Web application and the ways it drives the requirements and functionality of the Web site; the technical resources and the environment in which the application is being used; and the role of the enterprise architect in selecting the processes, components, and technologies used to develop and maintain the application.


Managing People and Technology
Course Number TS5011
Credits 4.0

This course provides information technology learners with skills needed to manage technology and people. Learners assess and control the risks associated with information assets, apply concepts and principles to manage projects and project quality, and develop collaboration and leadership skills to use in a globally distributed team environment.


System Development Theory and Practice
Course Number TS5130
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on the software engineering fundamentals that can be applied to enterprise-wide software application development. Topics include portability, reusability, prototyping, and performance management. Learners examine advanced requirements analysis techniques; functional specifications; and system design, implementation, testing, and maintenance. Learners also compare theory with practice and assess, evaluate, and apply software development principles and processes to a professional environment. Prior to enrolling in this course, learners should have a working knowledge of the software development process.


Business Foundations
Course Number TS5160
Credits 4.0

This course provides information technology learners with a foundation of business concepts. Learners analyze organizational structures, operational processes, financial measures, and key business communication concepts and techniques. Through the analysis and application of fundamental business processes, theories, and techniques, learners gain a better understanding of how IT integrates with the enterprise as a whole.



Enterprise Security
Course Number TS5311
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of enterprise security and presents the tools, techniques, and strategies used to counteract threats organizations experience on a daily basis. Learners develop a working knowledge of organization security risk assessment and gain an understanding of appropriate security planning by analyzing cyber terrorism and enterprise system weaknesses and creating an enterprise system security plan.


Security Management Practices
Course Number TS5531
Credits 4.0

The focus of this course is on identifying, developing, and implementing security policies for an information system and its environment. Learners assess the need for network and physical security and analyze the importance of planning and developing incident reporting procedures. This course covers proactive security management practices, including business continuity planning and disaster recovery planning. Other topics include networking, database management, and project management.


Computer Forensics and Investigations
Course Number TS5534
Credits 4.0

This course provides an overview of the skills necessary in computer forensics. Learners explore ways data can be hidden on a computer and evaluate computer forensics investigation tools, methods of handling and transporting data once it is uncovered, and procedures for handling and safely storing electronic data.



Program description: The need to protect enterprises against threats to information system availability, integrity, and confidentiality has made information assurance and security expertise a valuable skill within businesses, government agencies, and military organizations. This online master's specialization in Information Assurance and Security is designed around the domains of knowledge in the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP®) certification. The curriculum addresses core information assurance and security topics, including enterprise security and security risk management, as well as such emerging areas as wireless security and computer forensics. It combines technical and policy-focused course work that will strengthen your ability to protect information system security while supporting organizational goals. You will also have access to Capella’s Virtual Lab Environment, which allows you to test open vulnerabilities and simulate and protect against attacks on system design. People who choose this specialization are often pursuing information security management or consulting positions in business, health care, government, and the military.

Vocational Courses at Colorado Technical University

Program Name: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Security
Macroeconomics
Course Number ECON201
Credits 4.0

The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy.


Professional Communications
Course Number ENG210
Credits 4.0

This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process.


Real World Writing
Course Number ENGL125
Credits 4.0

This Is One Of The Most Important Courses You Can Take—it Will Lay The Foundation For Your Entire College And Professional Career As An Educated Person. In It, We Will Address How To Write And Speak To Make A Point; How To Use Good Grammar, Vocabulary And Logical Thinking; As Well As How To Find A Suitable Topic For Your Writing Assignments. We Will Start With The Basics: Reviewing Sentences And Paragraphs, And Then Move On To The Classic Five-part College Essay Or Theme. 321 Effective November 15, 2010 For Students Starting On Or After January 2, 2011 There Are Different Rules Of The Game For Writing Academically Than Writing For Business. We Want To Teach Students The “culture” Of Being Solid College-level Communicators And Successful Professionals. This Workshop Course Is Highly Experiential, Supportive, And Collaborative, As Students Read And Critique Each Others’ Work. This Is The First In A Sequence On Composition And Writing Skills. The Second Course, Engl126, In This Series Will Build Upon This One—addressing How To Research And Use Resources Without Plagiarizing, How To Utilize The Apa Formatting For Documentation And How To Make A Persuasive Argument. Our View Of The Required Composition Sequence Is That It Is Essential For All Who Want To Become Skilled Critical Thinkers And Educated People.


Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose
Course Number ENGL126
Credits 4.0

This Course Is A Workshop That Builds Upon Engl125—real World Writing. It Is A Workshop Format—highly Experiential And Hands On. Students Practice Drafting Progressively Complex Papers, Demonstrating The Capacity To Do College Level Research And Write Essays That Convey Information, Make A Point Or Provide An Opinion. They Will Study The Apa Handbook, Learn To Do Research (beyond Wikipedia!) And Cite Resources Without Plagiarizing Them. In Addition, This Course Uses Readings To Demonstrate Excellence And Eloquence In Speaking And Writing, Emphasizing The Crucial Synergy Between Learning To Write And Developing The Practice Of Intelligent Reading Of Texts. This Will Be A Highly Collaborative Course, With Students Reading And Critiquing Others’ Work, As A Means To Create A Learning Community As Well As Develop Critical Capacities.


American Culture in Transition
Course Number HIS120
Credits 4.0

This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural “isms,” and America’s relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society.


World Literature
Course Number LTR215
Credits 4.0

This literature course examines a wide range of stories, poems, and plays. Students learn how to interact with and respond to literature.


Computer Assisted Statistics
Course Number MATH306
Credits 4.0

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of a computer program for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters.


Principles of Business
Course Number MGM110
Credits 4.0

This survey course provides students with a general introduction to business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Students will explore how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled.


Psychology
Course Number PSY105
Credits 4.0

This course surveys major areas of psychological science, including human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, learning, memory, and biological influences.


Environmental Science
Course Number SCI205
Credits 4.0

This course introduces environmental issues that are directly related to global populations. Students will explore the identification and classification of environmental problems, and how they relate to the laws of nature


Building Your Success Strategy Plan
Course Number UNIV101
Credits 4.0

UNIV101 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students learn effective tools and skills necessary for academic success, integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.


Career Planning and Management
Course Number UNIV201
Credits 4.0

This course provides the framework for effective career management as students gain insight into themselves and potential career fields, acquiring knowledge and skills needed to successfully plan career transitions.


Unix Fundamentals
Course Number CS126
Credits 4.0

In This Course, Students Explore End User Interaction With The Unix Operating System. This Course Examines The Basic Features Of The Unix Operating System, Unix Commands, The Unix File System, The Unix Shells, And Shell Programming. It Also Draws Comparisons Between Unix And Linux. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: It106 Or Cs106 Or Cs123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Fundamentals of Database Systems
Course Number CS251
Credits 4.0

This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems. Topics covered in this course include conceptual and logical database designs for several businesses, implementing these designs using a database management system and developing business applications that access these databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT106 Availability: Virtual Campus


Structured Query Language for Data Management
Course Number CS362
Credits 4.0

This course gives complete coverage of SQL, with an emphasis on storage, retrieval and the manipulation of data. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS250 or CS251 or IT235 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Computer Security
Course Number CSS150
Credits 4.0

This course provides the foundation for the study of computer system security. The course centers around the ten domains comprising the Information Security Common Body of Knowledge. Topics include access control systems, telecommunications and network security, cryptography, operations security and business continuity and disaster recovery planning. Students will be exposed to security management practices as well as security architecture and models security laws, investigations and ethics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus


Web Development I
Course Number EM208
Credits 4.0

The Fundamentals Of Web Servers, Web Sites, Html, Xhtml And Web Authoring Are Presented In The Context Of Using The Technology To Craft A Message For An Audience. Also Includes Fundamentals Of Linking, Graphics, And Other Media. The Creation Of A Web Site Project Is Required.


Introduction to Programming Logic
Course Number IT106
Credits 4.0

This course is the study of programming logic and the application of this logic to problem solving. In the course we will discuss and apply many approaches to problem solving such as step algorithms, flow charts, truth tables, and pseudo-code. Students will learn techniques to translate real life problems into forms that will enable computer programs to solve them. Students will learn and apply programming language constructs (i.e. linear, branching, iteration, subroutines, etc.) using a visual tool. These techniques and tools should allow students to create and design programming logic that will become a foundational skill for future programming courses. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Programming
Course Number IT110
Credits 4.0

The course is an introduction to Java programming and object-oriented techniques. This is designed for students just starting out in programming. Fundamental programming concepts such as string manipulation, file input and output, and error handling are incorporated in lab assignments. These concepts provide the framework for the development of a very basic Graphical User Interface (GUI) application. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments
Course Number IT140
Credits 4.0

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of operating systems and specialized networking operating system models. The fundamentals of common operating systems, client/server environments, network infrastructure, theoretic models and system architecture are discussed, including legacy operating system platforms and security processes utilized in today's enterprises. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Network Management
Course Number IT245
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Network Management Explores The Management Concepts And Processes Of Planning, Improving, Creating, Updating, And Revising The Processes Of Monitoring And Adjusting Performance Of The Network. Network Management Has A Tactical And Operational Process As Well As Strategic Implications. Additional Topics Covered In This Class Include: Network Models, Managed Objects, Configuration, Managing Agents, Network Management Software, Protocol Suites Such As Tcp/ip And Osi Seven-layer Model. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None


Information Technology Architectures
Course Number IT401
Credits 4.0

The major objective of this course is to introduce the concepts, methodology and terminology of Enterprise Architecture and integrate this knowledge with previous courses in operating systems, database management systems, networking, and programming. The course primarily focuses on the overall planning process of enterprise architecture. Issues and options involved in implementing an enterprise architecture incorporating a distributed IT system are examined from a Macro Level. An ongoing discussion is conducted on how the emergent profession of enterprise architecture fits into the duties and responsibilities of today's IT manager. Other resources and references relating to the field of enterprise architecture are introduced. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT245 or IT200 or IT242; IT110 or IT115 or IT171; CS251 or CS250 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Systems Analysis and Design
Course Number IT422
Credits 4.0

Introduction To Systems Analysis And Design Provides Instruction On The System Development Life Cycle (sdlc) Phases. This Course Looks At The Sdlc As A Structured Approach For Developing Requirements, Performing Analysis, Producing The Design, Coding Or Installation Of The Solution, Testing The Application And Installing The Final Product. The System As Defined In This Course Could Include A Network, Telecommunications, New Software Development Or Other Information Systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Availability: Virtual Campus


Systems Acquisition and Sourcing
Course Number IT424
Credits 4.0

Systems Acquisition and Sourcing explores the business and technical decision making process for “buy versus build,” in-sourcing versus outsourcing, evaluation and benchmarking and testing. In addition topics such as contracts and Request for Proposals (RFP) are explored and analyzed. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT422 Availability: Virtual Campus


System Integration and Organization Deployment
Course Number IT426
Credits 4.0

System Integration and Organization Deployment focuses on the technical and cultural integration of a system into an organization. This course explains and expands upon system support strategies, user support plans, enterprise integration approaches, standards, and best practices. Discussion of organizational culture and change management is also explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT424 Availability: Virtual Campus


Introduction to Project Management
Course Number MPM210
Credits 6.0

This Course Provides An Overview And Introduction To The Discipline Of Project Management, Coupled With An Examination Of The Techniques That Project Managers Use To Complete Their Projects On Schedule, Within Budgeted Cost, And According To Specified Scope. Using Materials Based On The Pmbok® (guide To Project Management Body Of Knowledge, Published By The Project Management Institute Or Pmi®), Students Learn The Operational Framework Of Project Management Relating To The Project Lifecycle Of Project Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling, And Closing. This Course Also Provides The Basis For The More Advanced Development Of Project Management Skills In Subsequent Project Management Courses.


Principles of Network Security
Course Number CSS200
Credits 4.0

This course identifies and explains technical issues involved in network security. It also covers the fundamentals of wireless networking protocols, their security issues and threats. Covered topics include cryptography applications; access control; firewalls; key management network security issues; application, e-mail and middleware security; wireless local area network technologies.


Security Risk Management
Course Number CSS250
Credits 4.0

This course addresses the concepts of risk management. The course explores general methodologies used to assess and manage risks to information security. The course also identifies the activities involved in the process of information security risk management for a business organization. Activities such as detection, recovery and damage control methods will be explored.


Ethical Hacking
Course Number CSS280
Credits 4.0

This course covers ways that computers and networks are attached by hackers using techniques and common utilities. Learners explore security threats and ways that system vulnerabilities are exploited to attack systems. Topics include Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), ethical hacking techniques, sniffers, protocols, social engineering, vulnerability analysis, and penetration testing to ensure infrastructure security.


Vulnerability Assessment and Management
Course Number CSS300
Credits 4.0

This course surveys tools and techniques designed to detect intrusion into an organization's computer systems. In the hands-on lab component of the course, students will use a number of public domain and commercially available security tools. The course examines common attack methods, general inadequacies in various systems to include commercial intrusion detection systems. Utilization of the risk assessment process for determining cost effective vulnerability solutions is emphasized.


Software Assurance
Course Number CSS321
Credits 4.0

Software is essential to the operation of the commercial, government and military sectors of our nation. It is estimated that 90 percent of reported security incidents result from exploits against defects in the design or code of software. Therefore, ensuring the integrity of software is imperative to protecting the infrastructure of these sectors from threats and vulnerabilities. This course uses the Security Development Model to identify and implement security activities that must be applied during each phase of a software development lifecycle model. Static analysis tools, testing strategies, and auditing processes used for verification of secure code are applied in a test environment. Management’s role in the development of techniques for the enforcement of software assurance processes is explored.


Database Security
Course Number CSS330
Credits 4.0

This course is the study of security issues related to databases. The student will learn to identify security issues in a database environment, design and implement techniques to protect the database and the user, design a database with security in mind, and resolve database security issues. Students will demonstrate their competencies by developing real world projects.


Computer Forensics I
Course Number CSS350
Credits 4.0

This course introduces the student to the field of computer forensics. It covers the history of computer forensics and how the use of electronic evidence can support criminal investigation. The course examines procedures for investigating computer and cyber crime and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering and preserving forensic evidence.


Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security
Course Number CSS410
Credits 4.0

This course examines cloud computing: risk management; compliance and legal responsibilities of remotely stored, processed and maintained data; life cycle management; and disaster recovery planning from the perspective of the user and the cloud provider. The course also addresses handling of incidents and remediation, application security, encryption issues, storage, virtualization mechanisms and vulnerabilities, and access control in the cloud environment.


Advanced Research in IAS and IT Management
Course Number CSS430
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on research in system and software planning, delivery, management, and security. It also reviews research focused on the infrastructure components – hardware, software, data, communications technology, and specific applications – and the economics of IT. In particular, topics are chosen that reflect the current or future concerns of technology.


Security Compliance
Course Number CSS441
Credits 4.0

This Course Covers The Identification, Interpretation And Application Of Federal And State Government Regulations, Directives And Acts As They Apply To The Security Of Digital Systems. The Course Also Examines The Application Of Hardware And Software Tools In The Monitoring And Auditing Of Employee Behavior To Enforce Compliance Of An Organization’s Policies, Procedures And Guidelines. Applicable Certification And Accreditation Processes Are Researched Including Commercial Certifications, Iso 27002 And Diacap.


Security Capstone
Course Number CSS450
Credits 4.0

The capstone applies and integrates the contents of classes taken throughout the program. Projects will simulate a professional work environment.


Network Infrastructure Administration
Course Number IT326
Credits 4.0

Provides Instruction In Installing, Managing, Monitoring, Configuring And Troubleshooting, Dns, Dhcp, Remote Access, Network Protocols, Ip Routing, And Wins In A Windows Network Infrastructure. In Addition, This Course Provides Instruction In Managing, Monitoring, And Troubleshooting Network Address Translation And Certification Services.


Security Management
Course Number IT454
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on various practices that need to be established within an organization for an effective and efficient management of security. Topics such as security policies, design and implementation, risk assessment and management, and security procedures will be covered


Security Architecture
Course Number IT456
Credits 4.0

This course is an in-depth study of network security architecture. Students will examine both Internet security architectural models and web security protocols. Encryption, digital signatures, firewalls, proxy services, and virtual private networks (VPNs) will be covered. Additionally, students will examine cryptography protocols and standards.


Disaster Recovery
Course Number IT458
Credits 4.0

In this course, students learn the importance of recovery planning and the strategies for disaster recovery. This course covers the fundamental elements of disaster recovery planning, such as risk analysis, strategies for recovery and backup, plan maintenance, and testing.


Project Performance and Quality Assurance
Course Number MPM357
Credits 4.0

In this course, students will explore quality assurance concepts and principles within the total project quality management framework in manufacturing or service organizations. Students will also study benchmarking, the contractual aspects of quality, quality tools and techniques that utilize statistical process control, process improvement, yield management, quality issues of incoming material control and quality audits.


Program description: The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Concentration in Security degree program can help you build your credentials in the field of computer security. Along with knowledge essential to the field, it offers meaningful perspectives that you can apply to your own career objectives. The emphasis will be on analyzing security policies and evaluating risk assessment techniques. As you begin to understand security principles, concepts and techniques, you will have the opportunity to develop, implement and analyze disaster recovery plans.

Program Name: Doctorate of Management in Homeland Security (Executive Format)
Contemporary Issues in Homeland Security
Course Number HLS820
Credits 5.0

Using Large Scale Systems Thinking This Course Will Explore The Current Reality Of Hls Challenges That Embraces Tribal, State, Municipal, National, And Private Efforts. This Team-taught Class Uses A Diverse Cohort Across Representative Organizations, Enabling Knowledge Sharing And Complex Problem Solving. The Role Is To Create Practitioners Who Not Only Create Theory In Hls But Understand The Immediate Application Of Large Scale Change Techniques To Complex Crises That Have No Clear Solutions And Span Numerous Organizations.


Network Organizations and Other Large Scale Interventions
Course Number HLS825
Credits 5.0

Network Organizations are developing quickly throughout the world and are becoming increasingly important in how work gets accomplished. Network organizations have been growing in the modern world because traditional organizations cannot respond to the complexity and speed of change facing today’s organization. In the case of Homeland Security, where many interagency and inter-organizations must work together to respond to crisis, understanding Network Organizations and how to work between and with them is no longer a nicety but is absolutely essential. The problems of working with diverse organizational cultures, communicating across organizations, communities, and social groups including rural versus urban and metropolitan cultures will be addressed. Unique planning, intervention, and communication problems involving case studies and simulations will be used to create an active learning involvement. Students will be expected to build and develop their leadership skills necessary for working within and between Network Organizations while examining various methods used for operating within a parent organization as well as cooperatively with outside Homeland Security partners.


Policy & Governance in Trans-Organizational Collaboration
Course Number HLS830
Credits 5.0

The purpose of this course is to understand field operations and integrating trans-organizational operations planning and execution. The primary focus of the course is on communication and the importance of a detailed trans-organizational operations plan that has been shared and collaboratively developed before the crisis happens. A good operations plan and subsequent training is critical for timely response during an actual crisis. The course will also address how to: effectively respond to a crisis as it erupts; manage the initial response; organize at the point of crisis for the short run; and establish critical on-the-spot contingencies as the crisis unfolds.


Crisis Planning & Operations Management
Course Number HLS835
Credits 5.0

The course will explore how trans-organizational policy is formed and created. Using the case study method, students will analyze multiple cases from diverse perspectives. The course utilizes an intentional interdisciplinary focus (sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, and political science) and requires students to do a project with a client organization engaged in Homeland Security.


Strategic Thinking for HLS
Course Number HLS850
Credits 5.0

Develops and expands students’ ability to think strategically within the discipline of HLS. This will involve various typologies and methods of exploration and an examination of heuristics and biases. Students will develop the capacity for concurrent action and ‘birds-eye’ perspectives of ongoing organizational activity.


Futuring and Innovation in HLS
Course Number HLS855
Credits 5.0

This course develops skills in futuring via Delphi, Future Search, scenario building and other techniques. Students will talk with futurists and futures organizations, becoming involved in the World Futures Society and tech trending with leading electronics and aerospace companies. They will develop a socio-technology plan for the future of their division of HLS and will also look at formal models of innovation and diffusion of innovation.


Fundamentals of Management
Course Number MGMT800
Credits 5.0

The purpose of this course is to prepare new doctoral candidates for doctoral studies in management. The course design focuses on four critical aspects of a successful manger-leader – personal identity as a manager-leader, ability to embrace ambiguity, problem identification, and problem solving. Besides developing essential habits and skills necessary for success at the doctoral level the course will utilize readings in Organizational Behavior and Management Theory developing critical thinking and reflection in the context of action. Building on historical foundations in the field of organizational studies, students will enter into examination and conversations with a wide variety of contemporary management thinkers and researchers.


Research and Writing I
Course Number CS801
Credits 3.0

This course is one of a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses) is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research Methods and Design
Course Number MGMT805
Credits 5.0

This course is an examination of ‘full cycle research’ starting with a qualitative examination of an organizational phenomenon and then addressing how to measure it via survey, experiments, or other designs. It concludes with issues of verification and implementation based on the outcome of the quantitative phase. Also focuses on scale development skills involving reliability and validity measures, as well as confirmatory factor analysis, and issues of survey development and implementation.


Research and Writing II
Course Number CS806
Credits 3.0

This course is the second in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Qualitative and Ethnographic Methods
Course Number MGMT810
Credits 3.0

Instills and examines the fundamental principles of inquiry through active experimentation with ethnographic and quasi-ethnographic methods. Analysis of ethnographic descriptions and data via live, large datasets using automated methods


R&W III: Action Research Theory
Course Number MGMT811
Credits 3.0

Action Research explores various methods and contexts for all fields of research. Students will examine their historical experience with research in a wide variety of forms, understanding their personal biases and values in the process. Drawing on readings and conversations with contemporary practitioner researchers, students will explore and understand the use of this methodology for solving complex problems in their own field.


Quantitative Methods
Course Number MGMT815
Credits 5.0

Students Will Learn Fundamental Concepts Of Parametric And Non-parametric Statistics And Develop A Thorough Understanding Of The Primary Theorems Of Statistics. The Course Covers Measures Of Central Tendency, Various Forms Of Probability, Anova, And Glm. Exploration Of Multivariate Statistics Will Be Practiced Via Large Datasets In Live Research Projects. Particular Attention Is Given To Scale & Survey Development.


R&W IV: The Practice of Action Research
Course Number MGMT816
Credits 3.0

This Class Will Lead The Student Through The Implementation Of The Action Research Proposal That Was Developed And Irb Approved In R&w Iii. Data Will Be Collected, Analyzed And A Report For The Organization Prepared.


R&W V: Process Consulting & Intervention Theory
Course Number MGMT821
Credits 3.0

Starting with readings from classic authors, students will develop the models and thinking behind process interventions and tacit skill development of self-as-instrument. They will also explore various methods and techniques of consulting through active conversations with practicing consultants. The course covers the use of quantitative and qualitative methods to provide feedback and guidance in the management and leadership within their field.


R&W VI: The Practice of Process Consulting & Intervention
Course Number MGMT826
Credits 3.0

Students will be involved in live interventions in an organization within their field from entry and planning through delivery and follow-up based on the approved proposal developed in R&W V. These will start with basic interventions such as interview and feedback/action planning to Future Search, Appreciative Inquiry and related techniques.


Research and Writing VII
Course Number CS831
Credits 3.0

This course is the seventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing VIII
Course Number CS836
Credits 3.0

This course is the eighth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Philosophy of Science, Values, and Ethics
Course Number MGMT840
Credits 5.0

Starting with classic readings, and supplemented by contemporary readings in socio-technical systems from the global perspectives including; Eastern, Western, and indigenous approaches to appropriate technology, students will also look at moral dilemmas and choices in organizational life and professional careers. Examines how one can build or contribute to the development of the good, true and beautiful in organizations and careers.


Research and Writing IX
Course Number CS841
Credits 3.0

This course is the ninth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Leadership
Course Number MGMT845
Credits 5.0

This is an active course in leadership, building on critical and creative thinking. Students will be expected to build and develop their leadership with new doctoral students via cooperative research projects and programs of research.


Research and Writing X
Course Number CS846
Credits 3.0

This course is the tenth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XI
Course Number CS851
Credits 3.0

This course is the eleventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Research and Writing XII
Course Number CS856
Credits 3.0

This course is the final one in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members, and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of “satisfactory” certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Prerequisite: None


Program description: The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Homeland Security (HLS) degree program is designed to provide candidates with the theoretical, research and application capabilities necessary to pursue a rewarding career in their chosen field, with specific applications in Homeland Security. The first year focuses on research and studying classic and current management literature. In the second year, the student begins to form a personal understanding of the management research and methods used in Homeland Security. The final year is reserved for the development of leadership skills, resulting in the production of four publishable papers or a dissertation that must be approved by a three-member committee.

Course content is geared towards teaching students how to assess trans-organizational structures for the management of Homeland Security. Students are also challenged to develop a plan for coordinating networked Homeland Security organizations, analyze how crises unfold and evaluate contingencies for dealing with complications as they arise. Instruction is provided in framing policy agendas for creating inter-organizational collaboration among businesses, government and advocacy organizations.

The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Homeland Security includes twelve 5-credit classes and twelve 3-credit research and writing courses. One research and writing course is taken each quarter in conjunction with one formal course over a three year period. Courses are taught using Colorado Technical University's Professional Learning Model™ in an executive format: each course combines an active online component with an intensive residential session lasting four and a half days. Students are required to attend two of the quarterly residential sessions held throughout the year based on their start date.

Program Name: Master of Business Administration - Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Logistics/SCM Inventory and Distribution
Course Number SCM610
Credits 4.0

This Course Presents Systems Approach To The Supply Chain From Raw Materials Through Delivery To The End Customers. Emphasis Is On Achieving Efficient Customer Response (ecr) While Minimizing Inventory Costs And Improving Cash Flow. Supply Chain Management (scm) In Today’s Global E-business Environment Is Covered In Detail.


Impact on Design & Production
Course Number SCM620
Credits 4.0

Presents study of aspects of the production process that impact the total logistics system. This course covers the concepts total quality management, production planning and control, concurrent engineering and the strategic approach to total manufacturing management.


Supply Chain/Logistics Cost Analysis
Course Number SCM630
Credits 4.0

This course presents an in-depth analysis of costs relative to system and product life cycle phases, including concept definition, design, production, modification, support and retirement. Topics include a study of cost in relation to risk, time value of money, cost breakdown structure and total elements of cost analysis. It addresses the use of logistics cost analysis in making strategic and operational decisions, including product and supply chain design.


Applied Managerial Accounting
Course Number ACCT614
Credits 4.0

This course focuses on using available accounting information to help managers of the firm make relevant decisions. Examines how the financial information developed for external users forms the basis for the managerial accounting system. Explores costing systems, cost behavior analysis, responsibility accounting and volume-profit relationships.


Applied Managerial Economics
Course Number ECON616
Credits 4.0

During this course the student will study the practical aspects of both micro- and macroeconomics and how they are applied to the managerial environment. The students investigate the role of economic principles in management analysis and decision making: the study of demand, cost, and supply concepts from a business viewpoint; and the application of national income measures to strategic planning and the future.


Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments
Course Number EMBA690
Credits 4.0

Students will master analytical and integrative tools to perform in-depth analyses of industries, firms, and competitors. Course material includes methods to predict competitive behavior and develop and implement strategic plans to achieve and sustain a competitive profile in the emerging global marketplace.


Applied Managerial Finance
Course Number FINC615
Credits 4.0

Emphasizes management decision making utilizing accounting and finance concepts. The following subjects are addressed in the course: financial reports and metrics, financial analysis and planning, financial forecasting, financial markets, financial leverage, working capital management, capital budgeting processes, cost of capital and long term financing. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a financial strategy report and accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of financial analysis from either the academic or professional literature.


Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Course Number INTD670
Credits 4.0

Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in an organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes and differentiate among decision problems and address issues within a decision-making process. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of an organization. Additionally, students will explore the ‘Code of Conduct’ at work, issues related to managing conflicts of interest within a decision making process, and differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision making.


Applied Managerial Decision-Making
Course Number MGMT600
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the practical application of descriptive and inferential statistics to decisions made in a managerial role. The following subjects are addressed in the course: data summarization and presentation, data analysis, test of hypotheses, discrete and continuous distributions, estimation theory, simple and multiple correlation and regression, analysis of variance, multivariate statistics and non parametric methods. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a data aggregation and reduction exercise report and by accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of applied statistics from either the academic or professional literature.


Graduate Research Methods
Course Number MGMT605
Credits 4.0

This course will provide a working knowledge of quantitative, qualitative, mixed, and action research approaches. It covers the entire research process for each of these methods to include: formulating research questions; developing research proposals; performing a literature search and analysis; sampling and measurement; research design; data analysis; and writing and presenting the research report will be analyzed.


Applied Managerial Marketing
Course Number MKTG630
Credits 4.0

This course emphasizes the application of marketing concepts, tools and decision-making processes middle managers use in developing marketing plans, programs and strategies. Within the marketing strategy framework, it also examines market analysis and measurement, profitability and productivity analysis, product development, promotion and pricing strategies, the logistics systems approach and the marketing plan. The student will apply the knowledge learned by structuring and presenting to the class a practical strategic marketing plan.


Program description: Students enrolled in Colorado Technical University's Master of Science in Business Administration program with a concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management have the opportunity to learn about how to run a global supply chain that is cost effective and efficient. Some specific topics covered in the curriculum include procurement, supplier management, inventory control, and the quantitative and qualitative aspects of distribution management.

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