Stress Facing Students in Higher Education

Attending college is with no doubt a major milestone in a young adult's life. The journey that most students will embark on and the decisions made during that time will help to shape a person's personality and outlook for the rest of their life. During this time college students will be faced with many challenges, both financially and socially. As competition in the world becomes more intense, modern college students are burdened with more work, and the constant need to keep up with the times. Meeting the high demands imposed by our ever progressing society, dealing with the pressure to perform well in college, and maintaining a healthy and exciting social life takes a toll on the average college student, leading to stress.

In fact, most people have their first brush with stress during their college years. Possibly the biggest change in a college student’s life is independence. It’s almost like being given the key to ultimate freedom and there are countless doors to be opened. Imagine the euphoria of a freshman, tasting the forbidden fruit of adulthood. When college life starts to kick in, some students may begin to feel homesick because it’s the first time that they are away from their family. Homesickness may cause some level of stress and discomfort as adjusting to change can be difficult for students.

It’s also true that many people form lifelong friendships with their college friends. College represents a great training ground to enhance your socializing skills, which would serve you well when you enter the real world. Tempted with peer pressure, college friendships can also lead to other problems if you are not careful. Many people develop unwholesome habits like smoking, drinking, taking drugs, and gambling while they are in college. As young adults, college students would naturally be highly interested in sexual experimentation. When young people gather together, they tend to feel a certain rush of invincibility, especially when they are drunk and high often acting on impulses, only to regret their decisions later. This can cause serious accidents, accidental pregnancies, or other unwanted outcomes, all contributing to an already stressed college student's worries.

It’s not to be forgotten that the main goal of a college student is to earn that college degree. Other than countless tests and exams, the modern college student also has to be informed about technological developments because most fields are tied to these advances. Indeed, college life is very demanding. To be successful, the college student has to learn how to manage stress. If stress is left unchecked, it can affect their mental and physical health. Here are some comprehensive links to help college students control stress.

Common Problems

  • Note Taking Skills: Learn the skills to take good notes in lectures and readings.
  • Cornell System: Possibly the most efficient note taking systems in the world.
  • Study Skills: A series of instructions to help college students with case studies, reading, report writing, numeracy, and more.
  • Test Taking Tips: Excellent tips to help college students with tests.
  • Time Management: The secret to a fruitful college life.

Out of Control

  • College Gambling: The policies of the NCRG to curb college gambling.
  • Smoking: Be motivated to quit smoking before it is too late.
  • CESAR: Official site of the Center for Substance Abuse Research.
  • College Drinking: A great place to learn how to control drinking.
  • College Alcohol Study: Detailed study on the problems of college drinking.
  • Money Management: Find out why some college students always have enough and some college students always have not enough.

Depression and Anxiety

Loneliness

Abuse

Health

Additional Info

  • Help Guide: Offers useful advice on relieving stress.
  • Stress Management: Shows college students how to manage stress.
  • Culture Shock: Explores the stress of international students in a foreign environment.
  • Education USA: Excellent resource center for international students by the U.S. Department of State.